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Ahmed Doudar jailed for disposing Mick Hawi getaway car

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ahmed doudar jailed for disposing mick hawi getaway car

A furniture removalist has been jailed for four-and-a-half years for moving a getaway car used in the execution of former bikie kingpin Mick Hawi. 

But in a quirk of fate, the friend that Ahmad Doudar, 40, accepted had shot Hawi dead as part of his guilty plea – Yusuf Nazlioglu – has been found not guilty of murder.

Father-of-one Doudar was sentenced on Thursday after admitting to being an accessory after the fact to Hawi’s murder.

Hawi was climbing into his Mercedes AMG 4WD outside Fitness First Rockdale on February 15, 2018 when he was shot several times in the head and torso. 

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33287714 8742183 image m 18 1600321760846

Former Comanchero Mahmoud ‘Mick’ Hawi was gunned down in broad daylight outside a south Sydney gym on February 15, 2018

NOT GUILTY: A jury found Yusuf Nazlioglu (above) not guilty of Hawi's murder a week ago

NOT GUILTY: A jury found Yusuf Nazlioglu (above) not guilty of Hawi's murder a week ago

GUILTY: Ahmad Doudar pleaded guilty to being an accessory after the fact to Hawi's murder by aa ssisting in the disposal of getaway car

GUILTY: Ahmad Doudar pleaded guilty to being an accessory after the fact to Hawi's murder by aa ssisting in the disposal of getaway car

A jury found Yusuf Nazlioglu (left, shirtless) not guilty of Hawi’s murder a week ago. Ahmad Doudar (right) pleaded guilty to being an accessory after the fact to Hawi’s murder

This is the moment an man with his face covered by a balaclava shot Hawi dead in a brazen daylight attack outside Fitness First Rockdale more than two years ago

This is the moment an man with his face covered by a balaclava shot Hawi dead in a brazen daylight attack outside Fitness First Rockdale more than two years ago

This is the moment an man with his face covered by a balaclava shot Hawi dead in a brazen daylight attack outside Fitness First Rockdale more than two years ago

The brazen executioners, faces obscured by balaclavas, escaped while Hawi died of a brain injury in hospital. 

Doudar’s role in the crime involved him picking up a hidden silver Aurion with a tow truck and intending to dispose of it, alongside others, the court heard. 

Justice Robert Allan Hulme said on sentencing today: ‘(Mr Doudar) intended to assist in disposing of the vehicle in order to assist’ in the murder.

A week ago, accused shooter Nazlioglu, 39, and alleged getaway driver Jamal El-Jaidi, 32, were both found not guilty of murder by a jury, following a week of deliberations. 

Doudar was not called to give evidence at their trial. 

In handing down his sentence today, Justice Robert Allan Hulme said Doudar’s plea of guilty and the facts he had agreed to indicated he knew ‘the brazen and brutal executioner.’

‘The murder itself was horrifying. It was a dangerous and violent public execution. Mr Doudar knew this.’ 

Hawi's wife Carolina Gonzalez gave a 'very moving account' of the grief she and her family have suffered during Doudar's sentencing

Hawi's wife Carolina Gonzalez gave a 'very moving account' of the grief she and her family have suffered during Doudar's sentencing

Hawi’s wife Carolina Gonzalez gave a ‘very moving account’ of the grief she and her family have suffered during Doudar’s sentencing

Getaway car driver Jamal El-Jaidi (centre, in black) walks free after a NSW Supreme Court jury found him not guilty

Getaway car driver Jamal El-Jaidi (centre, in black) walks free after a NSW Supreme Court jury found him not guilty

Getaway car driver Jamal El-Jaidi (centre, in black) walks free after a NSW Supreme Court jury found him not guilty 

The bullet-riddled Mercedes that Mick Hawi was gunned down in is above in a court exhibit

The bullet-riddled Mercedes that Mick Hawi was gunned down in is above in a court exhibit

The bullet-riddled Mercedes that Mick Hawi was gunned down in is above in a court exhibit

The judge said murders like this ‘do not happen by chance… they require the involvement of multiple people.’  

Doudar’s motive remains unknown. ‘For all I know, Mr Doudar may have been motivated by one or more other purposes,’ the judge said.

Hawi’s wife, Carolina Gonzalez, sister Zeinab and parents Ahmad and Nahdi read statements at his sentencing hearing.

They gave ‘very moving accounts of the loss and grief that has resulted from the taking of their loved one in the most horrendous of circumstances.’

Doudar was jailed with a non parole period of three years and four months.  With time served, he will be eligible for parole at the end of 2021. 

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Aldi set to launch a spectacular range of home furniture – including chic sofa bed and side table

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aldi set to launch a spectacular range of home furniture including chic sofa bed and side table

A chic sofa bed, a $79.99 ‘lift up’ coffee table with a secret storage and a $59.99 side table with a built-in USB charger are among the new homewares range set to drop at Aldi.

Australian shoppers can head into stores on Saturday, October 3 for the new furniture and home decor collection that’s part of the retailer’s Special Buys sale.

The deal includes a modern $299 sofa bed complete with a simple ‘click-clack’ mechanism that transforms the piece from a sofa to a bed in just seconds.

A $299 sofa bed and a $79.99 'lift up' coffee table are among a new range set to drop at Aldi

A $299 sofa bed and a $79.99 'lift up' coffee table are among a new range set to drop at Aldi

A $299 sofa bed and a $79.99 ‘lift up’ coffee table are among a new range set to drop at Aldi

Store everyday essentials in a $59.99 side table with two internal USB 'fast' charging ports and lower-shelf for additional storage

Store everyday essentials in a $59.99 side table with two internal USB 'fast' charging ports and lower-shelf for additional storage

Store everyday essentials in a $59.99 side table with two internal USB ‘fast’ charging ports and lower-shelf for additional storage

Give a new look to your sofa or recliner with a $59.99 stretch slipcover, which has a four-way fabric stretch that allows cover to fit perfectly over most sized sofas with minimal effort

Give a new look to your sofa or recliner with a $59.99 stretch slipcover, which has a four-way fabric stretch that allows cover to fit perfectly over most sized sofas with minimal effort

Give a new look to your sofa or recliner with a $59.99 stretch slipcover, which has a four-way fabric stretch that allows cover to fit perfectly over most sized sofas with minimal effort

Store everyday essentials in a $59.99 side table with two internal USB ‘fast’ charging ports and lower-shelf for additional storage.

The versatile side table is great addition to a living space or bedroom and it features a hinged tabletop, offering extra storage.

Add a modern $79.99 coffee table to the living room, featuring a tabletop ‘lift up’, with an additional storage beneath the table surface.

Perfect for the corner of your house, the $129 modular entertainment unit comes with an extendable and swivel top, allowing shoppers to assemble into multiple formats to suit the shape of your space.

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33555008 8761883 image a 84 1600917595401

Perfect for the corner of your house, the $129 modular entertainment unit comes with an extendable and swivel top, allowing shoppers to assemble into multiple formats to suit the shape of your space

Perfect for the corner of your house, the $129 modular entertainment unit comes with an extendable and swivel top, allowing shoppers to assemble into multiple formats to suit the shape of your space

Perfect for the corner of your house, the $129 modular entertainment unit comes with an extendable and swivel top, allowing shoppers to assemble into multiple formats to suit the shape of your space

Other items include a $39.99 kids cube bookshelf (pictured) and a $19.99 wall organiser

Other items include a $39.99 kids cube bookshelf (pictured) and a $19.99 wall organiser

Other items include a $39.99 kids cube bookshelf (pictured) and a $19.99 wall organiser

Give a new look to your sofa or recliner with a $59.99 stretch slipcover, which has a four-way fabric stretch that allows cover to fit perfectly over most sized sofas with minimal effort

Give a new look to your sofa or recliner with a $59.99 stretch slipcover, which has a four-way fabric stretch that allows cover to fit perfectly over most sized sofas with minimal effort

Give a new look to your sofa or recliner with a $59.99 stretch slipcover, which has a four-way fabric stretch that allows cover to fit perfectly over most sized sofas with minimal effort

Keep your home tidy with a $19.99 footstool that doubles as a ‘hidden’ storage, and it features pine wood legs and collapsible design.

Those looking for a storage solution can find a $79.99 storage bench, which features a ‘lift up’ bench seat to reveal the internal storage space that’s perfect for hiding knick knacks.

Give a new look to your sofa or recliner with a $59.99 stretch slipcover, which has a ‘unique’ four-way fabric stretch that allows cover to fit perfectly over most sized sofas with minimal effort.

Other items on sale include a $39.99 children’s cube bookshelf, a $19.99 metal wall organiser and a $49.99 two-pack eyelet curtains with blockout lining to keep home warm in winter and cool in summer.

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American expat baffled after noticing VERY different terms used for the same objects

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american expat baffled after noticing very different terms used for the same objects

An American expat living in Australia has started a ‘war’ between the country’s states after noticing that people in different areas have varying slang terms for the same items.

Lara Fourie, 18, moved to Melbourne three years ago from Houston, Texas, settling in Victoria with her family to attend school, and she soon learned that life is very different Down Under. 

The young brunette noted that different states and territories in Australia call food products, school canteens and even water fountains different things, so she decided to ask her Aussie followers which phrase they used on TikTok

The result were thousands of comments with people disagreeing on which terms were correct. 

Scroll down for video 

Lara Fourie (pictured) moved Down Under three years ago, settling in Melbourne with her family to attend school and learning pretty quickly that life is very different in Oz

Lara Fourie (pictured) moved Down Under three years ago, settling in Melbourne with her family to attend school and learning pretty quickly that life is very different in Oz

Lara Fourie (pictured) moved Down Under three years ago, settling in Melbourne with her family to attend school and learning pretty quickly that life is very different in Oz

'Do you call a chicken parmigiana a parma or parmy? Is it a drink tap or bubbler? An icey pole or ice block? Canteen or tuck shop? Wagging or jigging school? Four square or downball?' She asked in the video

'Do you call a chicken parmigiana a parma or parmy? Is it a drink tap or bubbler? An icey pole or ice block? Canteen or tuck shop? Wagging or jigging school? Four square or downball?' She asked in the video

One man from Victoria said he used parma, drink tap, icey pole, canteen, wagging and four square for each of the objects and places

One man from Victoria said he used parma, drink tap, icey pole, canteen, wagging and four square for each of the objects and places

‘Do you call a chicken parmigiana a parma or parmy? Is it a drink tap or bubbler? An icey pole or ice block? Canteen or tuck shop? Wagging or jigging school? Four square or downball?’ She asked in the video

‘Do you call a chicken parmigiana a parma or parmy? Is it a drink tap or bubbler? An icey pole or ice block? Canteen or tuck shop? Wagging or jigging school? Four square or downball?’ She asked in the video.

One man from Victoria said he used parma, drink tap, icey pole, canteen, wagging and four square for each of the objects and places.

While someone from New South Wales said parmi, bubbler, ice block, canteen, jigging and handball. A Queenslander said the same except they exchanged canteen for tuck shop.

Someone from Western Australia piped up by calling them a parmi, water fountain, icey pole, canteen, wagging and four square.

A canteen or tuck shop is the place students visit at school for a sandwich or treat

A canteen or tuck shop is the place students visit at school for a sandwich or treat

Parma and parmi are short for chicken parmigana, a meal with crumbed chicken, cheese and tomato paste on top

Parma and parmi are short for chicken parmigana, a meal with crumbed chicken, cheese and tomato paste on top

Someone from New South Wales commented and said parmi (right), bubbler, ice block, canteen (left), jigging and handball.

What terms mean the same thing in Australia?

* Icey pole and ice block

* Canteen and tuck shop

* Chicken parma and parmi

* Drink tap, water fountain and bubbler 

* Devon, pork fritz, German sausage

* Bathers, cossies, togs

* Wagging and jigging 

* Downball, four square and handball 

 

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A drink tap and bubbler is the same as a water fountaion

A drink tap and bubbler is the same as a water fountaion

Wagging and jigging are used to say someone is skipping school or class

Wagging and jigging are used to say someone is skipping school or class

Lara compared the use of the word ‘drink tap’ and ‘bubbler’ (left) as well as ‘wagging’ and ‘jigging’ (right), which is used when someone skips school or class

And a South Australian said parmi, drink tap, ice block, canteen, wagging and four square.

No one from the Northern Territory, ACT or Tasmania have commented on the thread. 

What else has Lara noticed differs from America? 

No one from the Northern Territory, ACT or Tasmania have commented on the thread

No one from the Northern Territory, ACT or Tasmania have commented on the thread

 No one from the Northern Territory, ACT or Tasmania have commented on the thread

Takeaway food is different in Australia

‘KFC is in both America and Australia but surprisingly it’s way more popular in Australia. But in America they sell mac and cheese there which is really good,’ she said.

In Australia Burger King is called Hungry Jacks and they don’t have Chick-fil-A, one of Lara’s personal favourites when it comes to takeout food.

In America you can visit a ‘freestyle soda machine’ in the restaurants to mix and match the soft drinks you want, with free refills after you purchase your cup.

At McDonald’s restaurants the sizes and proportions of both food and drinks is ‘way bigger’ than in Australia and Americans have both a ‘dollar menu’ and sweet tea, which is like iced tea.

Whereas in Australia there are more dessert options in the McCafe, Frozen Coke and they sell a burger called the 'chicken and cheese' (pictured)

Whereas in Australia there are more dessert options in the McCafe, Frozen Coke and they sell a burger called the 'chicken and cheese' (pictured)

Australians also have chicken salt on their hot chips

Australians also have chicken salt on their hot chips

Whereas in Australia there are more dessert options in the McCafe, Frozen Coke and they sell a burger called the ‘chicken and cheese’ (left), which Lara enjoys

Whereas in Australia there are more dessert options in the McCafe, Frozen Coke and they sell a burger called the ‘chicken and cheese’, which Lara enjoys.

In general Lara is thoroughly enjoying ‘chicken salt’ – a seasoning of spices Aussies put on their hot chips – and Kangaroo meat, something she ‘never knew existed’ before travelling to the southern hemisphere. 

In separate videos Lara outlined some of the things she wished she’d known before landing in the sunburnt country, like that avocados are very expensive and plenty of men enjoy having long locks.  

Magpies are the most dangerous animal

Poll

What’s something you wish you knew about Australia before coming to the country?

  • Magpies are dangerous creatures 67 votes
  • Groceries are expensive 159 votes
  • There are different phrases for common terms 62 votes
  • Netball is a sport 17 votes
  • Men have long hair 28 votes

Now share your opinion

In spring the dreaded male magpie is known for ‘swooping’ on innocent Australians.

Late August to late October is mating season for the breed and they experience a huge increase in the hormone testosterone that encourages them to protect their young.  

‘In Australia we have these hellbound creatures called magpies, and there has always been an ongoing joke that the animals here will attack you but these will literally swoop down from trees and peck at your head,’ Lara said in a video.

With the country now entering the spring season, Lara is terrified of coming across them while she lives in the country.

In spring the dreaded male magpie bird is known for 'swooping' on innocent Australians (stock image)

In spring the dreaded male magpie bird is known for 'swooping' on innocent Australians (stock image)

In spring the dreaded male magpie bird is known for ‘swooping’ on innocent Australians (stock image)

Men have long hair

Australian men prefer to grow their hair to shoulder length, Lara has noticed since moving to Melbourne.

‘One thing I first noticed is that a lot of the guys have long hair. In America you don’t see that,’ the 18-year-old said.

‘You very rarely see a guy with hair past his chin but it’s very common here.’ 

While there are no statistics for how many men choose to grow their hair in Australia, surfers can be known to sport ‘man buns’.

Australian men prefer to grow their hair to shoulder length, Lara has noticed since moving to Melbourne (stock image)

Australian men prefer to grow their hair to shoulder length, Lara has noticed since moving to Melbourne (stock image)

Australian men prefer to grow their hair to shoulder length, Lara has noticed since moving to Melbourne (stock image)

There are different phrases used for common things

Lara said that in America an ice block is called a ‘popsicle’, whereas some Australians refer to them as ‘icy poles’.  

‘In America we say swimsuits whereas they say cossies, togs or bathers. And we have four square whereas in Australia it’s called hand ball,’ she said.

Before she moved Lara had never heard or used the word ‘bogan’ before; something that was embarrassing to note when it came up in conversation.

‘The equivalent in America would probably be a redneck,’ she said.

Also, in the United States students get into college with a GPA whereas in Australia it’s called an ATAR. 

‘Everyone in your state is ranked against each other and that’s how you get into university,’ she said.

Lara said that in America an ice block is called a 'popsicle', whereas some Australians refer to them as 'icey poles'

Lara said that in America an ice block is called a 'popsicle', whereas some Australians refer to them as 'icey poles'

Lara said that in America an ice block is called a ‘popsicle’, whereas some Australians refer to them as ‘icey poles’

Avocados are really expensive

While the food options – like takeaway sushi – were remarkably ‘better’ Down Under, Lara acknowledged that groceries were extremely expensive.

‘Avocados are cheaper in the States, like in Texas they are 60c, whereas in Australia they can be $2 or $3 each,’ she said. 

Eating out for most is a ‘special treat’ because of how much money can be spent on a single outing. 

While the food options - like takeaway sushi - were remarkably 'better' Down Under, Lara acknowledged, that groceries were extremely expensive (stock image)

While the food options - like takeaway sushi - were remarkably 'better' Down Under, Lara acknowledged, that groceries were extremely expensive (stock image)

While the food options – like takeaway sushi – were remarkably ‘better’ Down Under, Lara acknowledged, that groceries were extremely expensive (stock image)

Netball is a sport       

Lara didn’t know netball even ‘existed’ before she moved to Australia. 

‘It’s a sport they play here in Australia and it’s kind of like basketball… although I don’t really know the rules,’ she said.

While she did say it was made for women, mixed netball teams are extremely popular in the country, particularly as an extra-curricular activity at university.  

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Urgent warning against buying food on Facebook Marketplace over fears of food poisoning

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urgent warning against buying food on facebook marketplace over fears of food poisoning

Australians have been warned not to indulge in any takeaway meals offered on Facebook Marketplace with fears the cheap food could lead to food poisoning.

Curries, noodles, cooked meat, desserts, rice dishes and even raw sausages are just some of the items on offer on the advertising platform with some starting at $8.

But the Food Safety Information Council has warned it’s highly likely the home chefs aren’t meeting food safety requirements.

Curries, noodles, cooked meat, desserts, rice dishes and even raw sausages are just some of the items on offer on Facebook Marketplace

Curries, noodles, cooked meat, desserts, rice dishes and even raw sausages are just some of the items on offer on Facebook Marketplace

Curries, noodles, cooked meat, desserts, rice dishes and even raw sausages are just some of the items on offer on Facebook Marketplace

Cathy Moir, chair of the health promotion charity said they became aware of the ‘illegal’ practice in May after noticing a string of ‘high-risk’ foods were being sold online.

‘These unregulated food sales are a considerable food safety risk. There is a real risk of food poisoning, which, in its worst form can have severe health consequences,’ Ms Moir said. 

‘Not only that, it is illegal. Government and local council enforcement agencies are clamping down on these unregistered food businesses, as and when they become aware of them.

‘However, new sellers keep popping up and this is putting a considerable strain on our health services.’

Advertising food does not go against any rules of Facebook Marketplace which is commonly used to buy and sell clothes or furniture.

The Food Safety Information Council has warned it's highly likely the home chefs aren't meeting the required food safety requirements

The Food Safety Information Council has warned it's highly likely the home chefs aren't meeting the required food safety requirements

The Food Safety Information Council has warned it’s highly likely the home chefs aren’t meeting the required food safety requirements

Thai and Indian dishes were popular on the site along with cakes and other desserts

Thai and Indian dishes were popular on the site along with cakes and other desserts

Thai and Indian dishes were popular on the site along with cakes and other desserts

But Ms Moir said cooking at home couldn’t ensure the same level of health and safety as registered businesses would have. 

‘It is unlikely that food prepared in a home kitchen or backyard BBQ would meet these standards,’ she said.

‘Another reason to be extremely wary of these illegal sellers is a risk of allergic reactions. Licensed sellers must also be aware of any labelling requirements, including the allergens in their food, so they can inform consumers.’

There are simple ways to spot if the food is being sold from an unlicensed seller.

Ms Moir said to always check whether or not they had a website or social media page for their business.

She also said if the food was listed at a home address and much cheaper than usual it was likely to be unregulated. 

Another seller is seen using Facebook Marketplace to advertise their homemade fish for $40

Another seller is seen using Facebook Marketplace to advertise their homemade fish for $40

Another seller is seen using Facebook Marketplace to advertise their homemade fish for $40 

Another rice dish believed to be cooked at home is available on the platform for $12

Another rice dish believed to be cooked at home is available on the platform for $12

Another rice dish believed to be cooked at home is available on the platform for $12 

Most of the unlicensed vendors offered their meals for ‘pick-up only’ with prices ranging from around $8 to $35.

Indian and Thai dishes were extremely popular along with cakes and other desserts.

Some were even offering kangaroo meat for dog food while one was offering salted fish.

‘If in doubt, don’t take the risk of buying unsafe food. Support your local food businesses instead, either in store or by ordering online,’ Ms Moir said.

Daily Mail Australia has contacted Facebook for comment. 

A platter of sandwiches was also spotted on sale for just $1 in Sydney

A platter of sandwiches was also spotted on sale for just $1 in Sydney

A platter of sandwiches was also spotted on sale for just $1 in Sydney 

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