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ALDI is forced to respond to mum’s trolley hack

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aldi is forced to respond to mums trolley hack

ALDI has warned shoppers against a trick to unlock supermarket trolleys without using a token or gold coin, saying it could cost them a lot more than $1.

Australian customer Fiona posted to a popular Facebook group on Monday showing how she puts a house key into the coin slot and unlocks the trolley from the train.

But a spokeswoman for the budget supermarket chain warned shoppers against trying it, saying their keys could be damaged or stuck.

Australian customer Fiona posted to a popular Facebook group on Monday showing how she puts a house key into the coin slot and unlocks the trolley from the train

Australian customer Fiona posted to a popular Facebook group on Monday showing how she puts a house key into the coin slot and unlocks the trolley from the train

Australian customer Fiona posted to a popular Facebook group on Monday showing how she puts a house key into the coin slot and unlocks the trolley from the train 

‘We recommend that our shoppers continue using gold coins or an ALDI token to unlock their ALDI trolleys,’ the spokeswoman told Daily Mail Australia on Tuesday.

‘Other objects may become stuck or damaged.’

She also explained that tokens with key ring attachments can be purchased for 99c at the checkout.

Fiona’s post went viral and generated thousands of responses, with some thankful and others concerned.

She revealed the simple way to unlock a supermarket trolley without using a coin or token

She revealed the simple way to unlock a supermarket trolley without using a coin or token

She revealed the simple way to unlock a supermarket trolley without using a coin or token

While some claimed it was the ‘best life hack ever’, others expressed reservations about the technique.

‘I’d be too freaked out that my key wouldn’t come out,’ one woman said.

”With my luck the key would break,’ said another. 

‘When you can’t get it back out, you need to pay x100 the amount of a token to get your doors locks replaced,’ someone else pointed out. 

ALDI introduced the unlocking system in 2001 to encourage shoppers to return trolleys instead of dumping them.

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Four-year-old Melbourne boy gets stuck inside a Chupa Chup tin

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four year old melbourne boy gets stuck inside a chupa chup tin

A mother was forced to call emergency crews to her home to help rescue her has four-year-old son after he became stuck in a Chupachup tin. 

Alessio Caruso had been playing in the large lollie tin at his home in Melbourne on Wednesday when he became wedged in the small space. 

His mother Sheree Caruso tried for 20 minutes to pull the boy from the tin but he would not budge.  

She then made the desperate triple-zero call for help.

A mother has shared a hilarious image of her four-year-old son stuck in a Chupachup tin

A mother has shared a hilarious image of her four-year-old son stuck in a Chupachup tin

A mother has shared a hilarious image of her four-year-old son stuck in a Chupachup tin

Alessio Caruso had been playing in the large lollie tin at his home in Melbourne on Wednesday when he became wedged in the small space

Alessio Caruso had been playing in the large lollie tin at his home in Melbourne on Wednesday when he became wedged in the small space

Alessio Caruso had been playing in the large lollie tin at his home in Melbourne on Wednesday when he became wedged in the small space

Fire fighters, paramedics and even police officers showed up at the home to help the trapped little boy. 

After 15 minutes fire fighters managed to free little Alessio.

‘They squashed the tin as much as they could and then used a belt to slowly move his legs up so he was eventually able to move them,’ Ms Caruso wrote. 

Images shared on Facebook  by Ms Caruso show a tearful Alessio standing in the Chupachup tin. 

‘How’s everyone’s Wednesday? Mines great.. I had to call emergency services and tell them my son is stuck in a Chupachup tin. Never. A. Dull. Moment,’ she captioned the post.

She later wrote that little Alessio was doing just fine after being freed from the tin.

Many people were left entertained by the post, writing how the pictures had made their day. 

Ms Caruso told the Herald Sun her son probably climbed into the tin due ‘lockdown boredom’.

‘I think because we’ve been home so much that’s why he’s been using his imagination and playing with everything available to him. But this is certainly the first time this has happened. ‘

Fire fighters, paramedics and even police officers showed up at the home to help the trapped little boy

Fire fighters, paramedics and even police officers showed up at the home to help the trapped little boy

Fire fighters, paramedics and even police officers showed up at the home to help the trapped little boy

'They squashed the tin as much as they could and then used a belt to slowly move his legs up so he was eventually able to move them,' Ms Caruso wrote

'They squashed the tin as much as they could and then used a belt to slowly move his legs up so he was eventually able to move them,' Ms Caruso wrote

‘They squashed the tin as much as they could and then used a belt to slowly move his legs up so he was eventually able to move them,’ Ms Caruso wrote

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Kentucky AG says ‘law is not meant to react to tragedy’ after Breonna Taylor grand jury decision

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kentucky ag says law is not meant to react to tragedy after breonna taylor grand jury decision
Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron (pictured) defended a grand jury's decision to clear three officers of charges in Breonna Taylor's killing by saying that 'law is not meant to react to tragedy'

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron (pictured) defended a grand jury's decision to clear three officers of charges in Breonna Taylor's killing by saying that 'law is not meant to react to tragedy'

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron (pictured) defended a grand jury’s decision to clear three officers of charges in Breonna Taylor’s killing by saying that ‘law is not meant to react to tragedy’

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron defended a grand jury’s decision to clear three officers of charges in Breonna Taylor’s killing by saying that ‘law is not meant to react to tragedy’. 

Cameron discussed the outcome of his four-month investigation into Taylor’s death on Wednesday, after the grand jury chose to indict just one of the officers, Brett Hankison, on three counts of wanton endangerment in connection with the police raid where the 26-year-old EMT was shot and killed on the night of March 13. 

The first-degree charge, a Class D felony which carries a penalty of up to five years in prison, relates to Hankinson shooting into the neighboring apartments during the incident, not Taylor’s death.

Sgt Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove, who were also present at the time of the fatal operation, were not charged.  

Cameron, who is the state’s first black attorney general, said that the officers were not charged for Taylor’s death because they acted in self-defense after her boyfriend fired at them.   

He said he understood why people were outraged by the incident, but said that had no bearing on the outcome of his investigation.  

‘I certainly understand the pain that has been brought about by the tragic loss of Miss Taylor. I understand that as an attorney general … I understand that as a black man,’ Cameron said. 

‘This team, myself, and the representatives of the Attorney General’s office have taken a lot of criticism and scrutiny. But that scrutiny in many ways was misplaced because there was not a day that people in this office didn’t go to sleep thinking about this case.   

‘Criminal law is not meant to respond to every sorrow and grief, but my heart breaks for the loss of Ms Taylor and I’ve said that repeatedly. My mother, if something was to happen to me, would find it very hard,’ he added while appearing to choke up.  

At another point in his news conference Cameron cautioned against retaliation over the decision, which had already sparked unrest in downtown Louisville. 

‘If we simply act on emotion or outrage, there is no justice,’ he said. ‘Mob justice is not justice. Justice sought by violence is not justice. It just becomes revenge.’

Fired Louisville detective Brett Hankison was charged with three counts of wanton endangerment in connection to the police raid on the night of March 13

Fired Louisville detective Brett Hankison was charged with three counts of wanton endangerment in connection to the police raid on the night of March 13

Louisville police have declared a state of emergency ahead of Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's announcement about whether he will charge officers involved in the shooting death of Breonna Taylor (pictured)

Louisville police have declared a state of emergency ahead of Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's announcement about whether he will charge officers involved in the shooting death of Breonna Taylor (pictured)

Fired Louisville detective Brett Hankison (left) was charged with three counts of wanton endangerment in connection to the police raid that killed Breonna Taylor (right) on the night of March 13 

Myles Cosgrove

Myles Cosgrove

John Mattingly

John Mattingly

Officers Myles Cosgrove (left) and John Mattingly (right) who were present during the police raid on March 13, were not charged on Wednesday. Hankison was fired from the LMPD while the other two officers were placed on administrative assignment 

A person reacts after a decision in the criminal case against police officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor, who was shot dead by police in her apartment, in Louisville, Kentucky in March

A person reacts after a decision in the criminal case against police officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor, who was shot dead by police in her apartment, in Louisville, Kentucky in March

A person reacts after a decision in the criminal case against police officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor, who was shot dead by police in her apartment, in Louisville, Kentucky in March

People react in Kentucky following the grand jury's decision in the criminal case against police officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor

People react in Kentucky following the grand jury's decision in the criminal case against police officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor

People react in Kentucky following the grand jury’s decision in the criminal case against police officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor

WHAT IS WANTON ENDANGERMENT?

What is the charge?

Charges of wanton endangerment are brought when a person is found to have recklessly engaged in conduct, without concern for human life, that puts a person at risk of death or serious injury. 

‘A person is guilty of wanton endangerment in the first degree when, under circumstances manifesting extreme indifference to the value of human life, he wantonly engages in conduct which creates a substantial danger of death or serious physical injury to another person,’ state law says. 

What is the penalty?

Wanton endangerment in Kentucky is a class D felony.

It can bring a sentence of up to five years in prison.

How are the charges related to the Breonna Taylor case?

The three counts of wanton endangerment were brought against Officer Brett Hankison after the bullets he fired inside Taylor’s apartment traveled into a neighboring apartment. 

Crime scene photos show the walls of Taylor’s apartment riddled with bullet holes.  

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Hankinson was fired by the Louisville Metro Police Department in June after officials said he violated policy by ‘wantonly and blindly’ firing his gun during the raid. 

The FBI is still investigating potential violations of federal law in the case. 

Cameron gave a detailed account of the months-long investigation into the events leading up to deadly shooting, which he said had been pieced together by ballistics reports, 911 calls, and witness interviews, due to the lack of bodycam footage.  

The findings included: 

  • Sergeant Mattingly and detectives Cosgrove and Hankison had no known involvement in the obtainment of the search warrant executed on March 13.  
  • Mattingly was the first and the only officer to enter the residence, where he saw Taylor’s boyfriend Kenneth Walker open fire. 
  • There is no evidence to support that sergeant Mattingly was hit by friendly fire from other officers.  
  • Mattingly returned fire with six shots. Almost simultaneously, detective Cosgrove also in the doorway, shot 16 times. 
  • In total, six bullets struck Taylor, but only one was determined to be fatal.    
  • Detective Hankison fired his weapon ten times, firing bullets into apartment 4 and apartment 3.
  • At the time, three residents of apartment 3 were at home including a male, pregnant female, and a child. 
  • There is no conclusive evidence that any bullets fired from detective Hankison’s weapon struck Taylor. 
  • The ballistics analysis did not identify which of the three officers fired the fatal shot. 
  • The FBI investigation later concluded the fatal shot was fired by detective Cosgrove.  
  • Investigation found Mattingly and Cosgrove were justified in the use of force after Walker opened fire.

Investigators believe Cosgrove was responsible for firing the bullet that took Taylor’s life. Taylor was shot six times after officers barged into her apartment while acting on a search warrant for a drug investigation. 

Her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, opened fire when police burst in, hitting Mattingly. Walker was charged with attempted murder of a police officer, but prosecutors later dropped the charge.

Walker had told police he heard knocking but didn’t know who was coming into the home and fired in self-defense. 

Cameron said Cosgrove and Mattingly were not charged after investigators determined their actions were justified because Walker opened fire.

‘According to Kentucky law, the use of force by (Officers Jonathan) Mattingly and (Myles) Cosgrove was justified to protect themselves,’ he said. ‘This justification bars us from pursuing criminal charges in Miss Breonna Taylor’s death.’

The three officers did not take part in the obtaining of the warrant, he said. 

The raid had been widely reported by the media as a ‘no-knock’ warrant however, further investigations later proved the cops had knocked before entering.  

Walker had also told investigators he did hear knocking, but maintained the cops had not identify themselves as police. 

They knocked on Taylor’s apartment door and announced their presence outside, which Cameron said was corroborated by a neighbor who witnessed the arrival.  

Getting no answer, Cameron said police officers ‘breached the door’ and gained entry into the apartment. 

Mattingly entered first, and at the end of a corridor saw Taylor and with Walker who was pointing a gun.

Walker fired, injuring Mattingly in the thigh. Mattingly returned fire, and his colleagues began shooting soon after, Cameron said. Hankison fired 10 bullets, Cameron said.

Six bullets hit Taylor, though there is no ‘conclusive’ evidence that any came from Hankinson’s gun, Cameron said. Bullets fired by Hankison traveled into a neighboring apartment. 

The charges drew immediate sadness, frustration and anger among the community over the grand jury decision not to go further

The charges drew immediate sadness, frustration and anger among the community over the grand jury decision not to go further

 The charges drew immediate sadness, frustration and anger among the community over the grand jury decision not to go further

Protesters began marching through the streets of Louisville, where Taylor was killed, after the announcement, shouting 'No justice, no peace'

Protesters began marching through the streets of Louisville, where Taylor was killed, after the announcement, shouting 'No justice, no peace'

Protesters began marching through the streets of Louisville, where Taylor was killed, after the announcement, shouting ‘No justice, no peace’ 

Some members of the community were seen chanting as they reacted. While others sat quietly and cried

Some members of the community were seen chanting as they reacted. While others sat quietly and cried

Some members of the community were seen chanting as they reacted. While others sat quietly and cried

Just one hour before the decision was announced, the National Guard was deployed to downtown Louisville amid fears of unrest and protests

Just one hour before the decision was announced, the National Guard was deployed to downtown Louisville amid fears of unrest and protests

Just one hour before the decision was announced, the National Guard was deployed to downtown Louisville amid fears of unrest and protests 

Attorney Ben Crump, who is representing Taylor's family, called the grand jury's decision 'outrageous and offensive'

Attorney Ben Crump, who is representing Taylor's family, called the grand jury's decision 'outrageous and offensive'

Attorney Ben Crump, who is representing Taylor’s family, called the grand jury’s decision ‘outrageous and offensive’

TIMELINE OF EVENTS LEADING UP TO BREONNA TAYLOR’S DEATH, ACCORDING TO AG’S FINDINGS 

In the early morning hours of March 13, officers from LMPD executed a search warrant at 3003 Springfield Drive, apartment 4. This was Ms Breonna Taylor’s residence. 

The officers were advised by superiors to knock and announce their presence in serving this specific search warrant. Scope of the investigation did not include the attainment of the warrant by the LMPD criminal interdiction division. Federal law enforcement partners are conducting that investigation. 

Sergeant Mattingly and detectives Cosgrove and Hankison had no known involvement in the proceeding investigation or obtainment of the search warrant. They were called in to duty as the extra personnel to effectuate the service of the search warrant. They only had information conveyed to them in their prior briefing. They knock and announced the presence at the apart.

Their statement are corroborated by an independent witness near to the proximity of apartment 4. In other words, the warrant was not served as a no-knock warrant. When the officers were unable to get anyone to answer, or open the door to apartment 4, the decision was made to breach the door. 

After breaching the door, Sergeant Mattingly was the first and the only officer to enter the residence. Sergeant Mattingly identified two individuals, standing beside one another at the end of the hall. Male and a female. In his statement he says that the male was holding a gun. Arms extended. In a shooting stance. 

Sergeant Mattingly saw the man’s gun fire, heard a boom. Immediately knew he was shot as a result of feeling heat in his upper thigh. Kenneth walker fired the shot that hit sergeant Mattingly.

There is no evidence to support that sergeant Mattingly was hit by friendly fire from other officers. Mr Walker admitted that he fired one shot and was the first one to shoot. In addition to all the testimony, the ballistics report shows the round that struck sergeant Mattingly was fired from a .9-millimeter handgun. 

The LMPD officers fired .40-caliber handguns. Sergeant Mattingly returned fire down the hallway. Mattingly fired six shots. Almost simultaneously, detective Cosgrove also in the doorway, shot 16 times. This all took place in a matter of seconds. In total, six bullets struck Ms Taylor. Medical evidence obtained by the team indicates that only one shot was fatal. Further medical evidence shows Ms Taylor would have died from the fatal shot within a few seconds to two minutes after being struck. 

Detective Hankison fired his weapon ten times including from an outside sliding glass door and through a bedroom window. Some bullets traveled through apartment four and in to apartment three before some exited that apartment. 

At the time, three residents of apartment three were at home. Including a male, pregnant female, and a child. There is no conclusive evidence that any bullets fired from detective Hankison’s weapon struck Ms Taylor. 

The ballistics analysis did not identify which of the three officers fired the fatal shot. After receiving that information, I asked the FBI Crime lab to conduct its own analysis to see if they reach the same results. 

The FBI Ballistics analysis concluded the fatal shot was fired by Detective Cosgrove. Our officers looked at both reports to determine if there were major differences in the procedures used by each lab that would have led the FBI to identify who fired the fatal shot. Both law enforcement agencies used similar equipment and analysis. Each lab is highly respected for their work. 

There was nothing our investigators could point to nor anything provided by the respective agencies that directly explains why one lab made the call while another did not. 

I think it is worth repeating again that our investigation found Mattingly and Cosgrove were justified in their use of force after having been fired upon by Kenneth Walker. Secondary to this justification, the KSP and the FBI ballistics analysis reached different conclusions creating a reasonable doubt in the evidence about who fired the fatal shot. 

I certainly understand the public’s desires for answers and many have questioned the length of the investigation. Simply put, we had to try every means necessary to determine who fired the fatal shot before the investigation could be completed. 

With a thorough and complete knowledge of evidence collected in this case, lawyers of special prosecutions presented the findings of the independent investigation before a grand jury comprised of Jefferson County residents beginning on Monday and concluding today.

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Along with the killing of George Floyd in Minnesota, Taylor’s case became a major touchstone for the nationwide protests that have gripped the nation since May – drawing attention to entrenched racism and demanding police reform. 

Her image has been painted on streets, emblazoned on protest signs and silk-screened on T-shirts worn by celebrities.

The case exposed the wide gulf between public opinion on justice for those who kill black Americans, and the laws under which those officers are charged, which regularly favor working police and do not often result in steep criminal accusations.

Wednesday’s announcement drew immediate sadness, frustration and anger that the grand jury did not go further.

The wanton endangerment charges each carry a sentence of up to five years. Protesters began marching through the streets of Louisville, where Taylor was killed, after the announcement, shouting ‘No justice, no peace.’ Some sat quietly and cried.

Attorney Ben Crump, who is representing Taylor’s family, called the grand jury’s decision ‘outrageous and offensive!’

‘Justice has NOT been served,’ tweeted Linda Sarsour of Until Freedom, a group that has pushed for charges in the case.

In the lead up to Wednesday’s announcement, protesters have consistently pressured Cameron to act, and celebrities and pro athletes had joined them in calling on the attorney general to charge the police who shot Taylor. 

Hankison had previously been placed on administrative reassignment, as were Mattingly, Cosgrove and the detective who sought the warrant, Joshua Jaynes. 

At one point, demonstrators converged on Cameron’s house and were charged with felonies for trying to intimidate the prosecutor. 

The AG had previously refused to set a deadline for his decision on the investigation – which comes six months after Taylor’s death.  

Earlier, as the verdict loomed, Kentucky State Police were out in force outside the historic museum, with squad cars and orange cones blocking the building as the verdict loomed. 

Meanwhile in Louisville, officials had been bracing for more protests and possible unrest as the public nervously awaits the decision.  

In a midday press conference, Mayor Greg Fischer announced he will impose a 72-hour curfew in the city, from 9pm to 6.30am. 

‘No matter what Attorney General Cameron announces, I urge everyone to commit, once again, to a peaceful, lawful response,’ the mayor told reporters. 

While emphasizing he does not know the grand jury’s finding, the mayor has declared a state of emergency in the city, and Louisville Metro Police Department has closed off much of downtown to vehicles. 

A memorial to Breonna Taylor was set up in Jefferson Square Park in Louisville, as the city anxiously awaits the results of a grand jury inquiry into her death

A memorial to Breonna Taylor was set up in Jefferson Square Park in Louisville, as the city anxiously awaits the results of a grand jury inquiry into her death

A memorial to Breonna Taylor was set up in Jefferson Square Park in Louisville, as the city anxiously awaits the results of a grand jury inquiry into her death 

Officials and local businesses in downtown Louisville braced for potential unrest on Tuesday, after Mayor Greg Fischer declared a state of emergency

Officials and local businesses in downtown Louisville braced for potential unrest on Tuesday, after Mayor Greg Fischer declared a state of emergency

Officials and local businesses in downtown Louisville braced for potential unrest on Tuesday, after Mayor Greg Fischer declared a state of emergency

Plywood covers the windows of downtown businesses as the city prepares for the grand jury findings in the case of Breonna Taylor

Plywood covers the windows of downtown businesses as the city prepares for the grand jury findings in the case of Breonna Taylor

Plywood covers the windows of downtown businesses as the city prepares for the grand jury findings in the case of Breonna Taylor

The mayor and police said they were trying to plan ahead of time to protect both demonstrators and the people who live and work there.

Courthouses, offices and restaurants were already boarded up on Tuesday in the mostly deserted blocks around the city’s Jefferson Square Park, the site of regular demonstrations against police brutality that have spread across the nation.

Concrete barriers ringed the area, with a handful of checkpoints manned by police who would only allow people with essential business to drive downtown.

‘Our goal with these steps is ensuring space and opportunity for potential protesters to gather and express their First Amendment rights,’ Mayor Greg Fischer, a white Democrat, said in a statement. 

‘At the same time, we are preparing for any eventuality to keep everyone safe.’ He emphasized he did not know when any decision might come.

Taylor, 26, was killed shortly after midnight on March 13 when three plainclothes officers used a battering ram to force their way in to her Louisville home with a so-called no knock warrant. 

Fearing intruders, her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, fired a gun. The three officers fired their guns, striking Taylor five times.

At least 10 bullets went into Taylor's apartment through a sliding glass door located in the living room and also through a bedroom window

At least 10 bullets went into Taylor's apartment through a sliding glass door located in the living room and also through a bedroom window

At least 10 bullets went into Taylor’s apartment through a sliding glass door located in the living room and also through a bedroom window

Bullet holes and blood smeared on the walls could be seen in one evidence photo taken inside the apartment in the hours after Taylor was gunned down

Bullet holes and blood smeared on the walls could be seen in one evidence photo taken inside the apartment in the hours after Taylor was gunned down

Bullet holes and blood smeared on the walls could be seen in one evidence photo taken inside the apartment in the hours after Taylor was gunned down

Taylor and her boyfriend Kenneth Walker (pictured together) were sleeping in bed when the officers served the warrant at around 1am on March 13

Taylor and her boyfriend Kenneth Walker (pictured together) were sleeping in bed when the officers served the warrant at around 1am on March 13

Taylor and her boyfriend Kenneth Walker (pictured together) were sleeping in bed when the officers served the warrant at around 1am on March 13

A timeline of events related to the shooting death of Breonna Taylor

– March 13: Officers serving a narcotics warrant fatally shoot Taylor in her home in Louisville, Kentucky.

– March 13, hours later: Police announce the arrest of Kenneth Walker in the wounding of an officer during an exchange of gunfire; Taylor is left unidentified at the news conference, described as ‘an unresponsive woman who was later pronounced dead.’

– March, April: The shooting stays out of the headlines as the COVID-19 pandemic spreads in the U.S.

– April 27, Taylor’s family files wrongful death lawsuit against police department and city, challenging the police narrative.

– May 13: Top Louisville prosecutor Tom Wine recuses himself from reviewing police investigation, Attorney General Daniel Cameron named as special prosecutor.  

– May 22: Prosecutors announce they will drop attempted murder charges against Walker, who shot at officers in his girlfriend’s home.

– May 28: Walker’s anguished 911 call is released, three days after the death of George Floyd at the hands of police in Minnesota, sparking large protests in Louisville.

– May 29: Mayor Greg Fischer suspends use of no-knock warrants by Louisville police.

– June 1: Fischer fires Police Chief Steve Conrad after officers failed to turn on body cameras in shooting of barbecue cook David McAtee during protests in Louisville.

– June 11: Louisville Metro Council unanimously passes ‘Breonna´s Law’ which bans use of no knock warrants.

– June 14: Pop star Beyoncé writes Attorney General Daniel Cameron, urging him to charge police officers.

– June 23: Officer Brett Hankison, one of 3 officers who fired shots the night of Taylor’s death, is fired for ‘blindly’ firing into Taylor´s apartment.

– June 25: Celebrities join hundreds of demonstrators outside state Capitol calling on Cameron to charge officers.

– June 28: Photographer Tyler Gerth is fatally shot at site of ongoing protests in downtown Louisville.

– July 14: Protesters are arrested for demonstrating on Cameron´s front lawn.

– August 12: Taylor´s mother, Tamika Palmer, meets with Cameron.

– September  5: Hundreds peacefully protest outside Kentucky Derby, urging Cameron to criminally charge the officers.

– September 7: Fischer names Yvette Gentry, first Black woman to lead Louisville Police department, as interim chief beginning Oct. 1.

– September 9: Cameron is included on President Donald Trump’s shortlist of Supreme Court candidates.

– September 15: City announces civil settlement providing Taylor´s family with $12 million and promising police reforms.

– September 22: Louisville police set up blockades downtown in anticipation of Cameron’s announcement.

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Cameron, a Black Republican, has said his investigation into Taylor’s death is ongoing, but has declined to confirm media reports that he is convening a grand jury to vote on whether to bring criminal charges against the officers.

The city’s main federal courthouse has also been closed all week in an order by Chief Judge Greg Stivers of the Western District of Kentucky.

Last week, the city of Louisville agreed to pay Taylor’s family a record-breaking $12million in a wrongful death lawsuit that her mother Tamika Palmer filed against the city and its police department back in April.  

At a September 15 press conference announcing the settlement, Palmer repeated her plea for charges to be brought against the officers involved in her daughter’s death. 

‘As significant as today is, it is only the beginning,’ Palmer said. ‘We must not lose focus on what the real job is, and with that being said, it’s time to move forward with the criminal charges, because she deserves that and much more.’ 

In addition to the $12million, the settlement will also include a series of police reforms for Louisville. 

Among the reforms is a requirement that police commanders must approve all search warrants before they are sent to a judge. 

Mayor Greg Fischer stated that the settlement had nothing to do with Cameron’s criminal investigation and said the city would be enacting reforms regardless of the outcome.  

‘I’m deeply, deeply sorry for Breonna’s death,’ Fischer said. ‘My administration is not waiting to move ahead with needed reforms to prevent a tragedy like this from ever happening again.’ 

As part of the settlement, the mayor said Louisville police officers will be offered housing credits to move to some of the poorest parts of the city in the hopes of improving community ties. 

They will also be encouraged to regularly volunteer for community organizations and will face increased random testing for drug use. 

Ben Crump, an attorney for Taylor’s family, noted that the settlement was not only the largest ever paid by the city of Louisville, but also the largest ever for a black woman killed by police.  

‘We won’t let Breonna Taylor’s life be swept under the rug,’ Crump said. 

The attorney also called for charges against the officers and urged people to ‘say her name’ – a phrase that has become a refrain for those outraged by the shooting but dejected by the lack of attention Black women have been getting.  

The lawsuit filed by Taylor’s mother alleged that police used flawed information when they obtained the no-knock warrant to enter her apartment. 

Police descended on her apartment after securing a court-approved warrant as part of a drug investigation involving her ex-boyfriend that allowed officers to enter her home without any warning. 

Taylor and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, had been sleeping in bed when the officers served the warrant at around 1am.

Walker fired his gun when officers stormed into the apartment and has since said he thought he was defending against a home invasion.  

At the time, Walker told police that he could hear knocking on the night of the shooting but did not hear police announce themselves.  

Walker said he was ‘scared to death’ so he grabbed his gun and when the door was knocked down, he fired a shot that ended up striking an officer in the leg.    

Investigators said police were returning fire when they shot Taylor eight times. 

No drugs were found at her home. 

The city has already taken some reform measures, including passing a law named for Taylor that bans the use of the no-knock warrants. Police typically use them in drug cases over concern that evidence could be destroyed if they announce their arrival.

Fischer fired former police chief Steve Conrad in June and last week named Yvette Gentry, a former deputy chief, as the new interim police chief. Gentry would be the first Black woman to lead the force of about 1,200 sworn officers. 

The department has also fired Officer Hankison, who is appealing the dismissal. 

How the one Louisville police officer charged in the Breonna Taylor case could face five years in prison after being charged with wanton endangerment for firing into a neighbor’s apartment

Officer Brett Hankison, who was fired in the aftermath of Taylor’s shooting, was charged with three counts of wanton endangerment, Attorney General Daniel Cameron said at a news conference.

The charges stem from Hankison’s bullets travelling into a neighboring apartment when he and two other officers opened fire.

They do not relate to the shooting death of Taylor. 

Charges of wanton endangerment are brought when a person is found to have recklessly engaged in conduct, without concern for human life, that puts a person at risk of death or serious injury.

‘A person is guilty of wanton endangerment in the first degree when, under circumstances manifesting extreme indifference to the value of human life, he wantonly engages in conduct which creates a substantial danger of death or serious physical injury to another person,’ state law says. 

Wanton endangerment in Kentucky is a class D felony and can bring up to five years in prison. 

Hankison, who was indicted on three counts, could potentially face up to 15 years.

Before charges were brought, Hankison was fired from the city’s police department on June 23. 

Taylor's living room was left riddled with bullets after the March 13 shooting by police

Taylor's living room was left riddled with bullets after the March 13 shooting by police

Taylor’s living room was left riddled with bullets after the March 13 shooting by police

The charges stem from Hankison's bullets travelling into a neighboring apartment when he and two other officers opened fire. Pictured above are the bullet holes found in Taylor's apartment

The charges stem from Hankison's bullets travelling into a neighboring apartment when he and two other officers opened fire. Pictured above are the bullet holes found in Taylor's apartment

The charges stem from Hankison’s bullets travelling into a neighboring apartment when he and two other officers opened fire. Pictured above are the bullet holes found in Taylor’s apartment 

Crime scene photos from the investigation show a number of shell casings in and near the EMT's apartment after she was shot dead by police on March 13

Crime scene photos from the investigation show a number of shell casings in and near the EMT's apartment after she was shot dead by police on March 13

Crime scene photos from the investigation show a number of shell casings in and near the EMT’s apartment after she was shot dead by police on March 13

A termination letter sent to him by interim Louisville Police Chief Robert Schroeder said the white officer had violated procedures by showing ‘extreme indifference to the value of human life’ when he ‘wantonly and blindly’ shot 10 rounds of gunfire into Taylor’s apartment. 

He is the only officer to be fired and charged in relation to the Taylor case.

Hankison’s two colleagues, Sergeant Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove, were not charged because the investigation found their actions were justified, the attorney general said. 

Those two other officers were reassigned to administrative duties in the aftermath of the shooting. 

In creating his account of Taylor’s death, the attorney general said his investigators had no video footage from the shooting.

‘Therefore, the sequence of events had to be pieced together through ballistics evidence, 911 calls, police radio traffic and interviews,’ Cameron said.

Cop who was shot by Breonna Taylor’s boyfriend emails colleagues to say ‘the good guys are demonized, and the criminals are canonized’ as Louisville braces for AG’s decision on whether to charge him and other officers over her death

Sgt Jonathan Mattingly (pictured) who was wounded during the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor in March told more than 1,000 officers that he's proof that city officials don no't care about them

Sgt Jonathan Mattingly (pictured) who was wounded during the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor in March told more than 1,000 officers that he's proof that city officials don no't care about them

Sgt Jonathan Mattingly (pictured) who was wounded during the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor in March told more than 1,000 officers that he’s proof that city officials don no’t care about them

An officer who was shot by Breonna Taylor‘s boyfriend when he entered her apartment in March, told his more than 1,000 colleagues in an email on Tuesday that ‘the good guys are demonized, and the criminals are canonized’ as Louisville braces for the attorney general’s decision on whether to charge him and two other officers in connection to her death. 

Sgt Jonathan Mattingly, who was one of three cops involved in the shooting, voiced his support for the officers and defended his actions the night Taylor, a 26-year-old EMT, was killed. 

Kentucky Attorney General, Daniel Cameron, said he will soon decide whether the charges will be brought against Mattingly and two other officers involved in the shooting.  

In the email, obtained by the Courier-Journal, Mattingly said that Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and top police officials had ‘failed all of us in epic proportions’.

‘Regardless of the outcome today or Wednesday, I know we did the legal, moral and ethical thing that night. It’s sad how the good guys are demonized, and the criminals are canonized.

‘I wish I were there with you leading the charge. I’ll be praying for your safety. Remember you are just a pawn in the Mayors political game. I’m proof they do not care about you or your family, and you are replaceable.’

Referring to protesters, Mattingly, who was shot in the leg by Taylor’s boyfriend the night police entered her apartment, explained to the officers that they ‘DO NOT DESERVE to be in this position’.

‘The position that allows thugs to get in your face and yell, curse and degrade you. Throw bricks bottles and urine on you and expect you to do nothing,’ he added. 

Mattingly claimed that the officers’ ‘civil rights mean nothing’ to city officials, but ‘the criminal has total autonomy’.

Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, told police he fired one round after Taylor’s door was broken down and Mattingly entered. Walker said he did not know police were at the door.

Mattingly’s attorney, Kent Wicker, said that Mattingly’s email was ‘expressing his support for (fellow officers) and their work during these difficult times’.

The email came the same day that Louisville officials prepared for more protests and possible unrest ahead of the attorney general’s announcement.

George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery: The black men and women killed by police in 2020

The police killing of black man George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on May 25 sparked outrage that has seen protests across the world denouncing police brutality, demanding change, and the end of systemic racism. 

Floyd’s death, unfortunately, is just one of a slew of police killings upon black men and women, including those who were unarmed and just going about their daily lives.  

In some cases body cameras were turned off, police departments have refused to share footage, and officers have yet to be criminally charged. 

Below are some of the black men and women who have died by the hands of police in 2020: 

Rayshard Brooks

27 years old, June 12, Atlanta, Georgia

Rayshard Brooks (pictured), 27, was killed by police in the parking lot of a Wendy's restaurant in Atlanta on Friday

Rayshard Brooks (pictured), 27, was killed by police in the parking lot of a Wendy's restaurant in Atlanta on Friday

Rayshard Brooks (pictured), 27, was killed by police in the parking lot of a Wendy’s restaurant in Atlanta on Friday

On June 12 Rayshard Brooks, a black man, was shot dead in a confrontation with Atlanta police officers Garrett Rolfe and Devin Bronsan.

Officers were called to the scene following reports of a man sleeping in his vehicle at a Wendy’s parking lot. Cops awoke him and had him complete a sobriety test, which he failed.

When trying to handcuff him Brooks grabbed one of the officera’s Taser and ran from the officers and pointed the stun gun at one of them. Officer Rolfe then shot Brooks twice in the back and he died at a hospital. His death has been ruled a homicide 

On June 17 the Fulton County District Attorney’s Office announced Rolfe has been charged with 11 counts, including felony murder and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, in the killing of Rayshard Brooks. 

Felony murder that carries a possible sentence of life without parole or the death penalty. 

Brosnan has been charged on three counts, one of aggravated assault a charge that carries up to 20 years in prison and two violations of oath, including a failure to administer timely medical assistance. 

Rolfe has been fired and Brosnan placed on administrative leave. Police Chief Erika Shields resigned from her post less than 24 hours after the shooting.   

Atlanta police officers Garrett Rolfe and Devin Bronsan were the cops involved in Brooks' killing. Rolfe, above, has been fired

Atlanta police officers Garrett Rolfe and Devin Bronsan were the cops involved in Brooks' killing. Rolfe, above, has been fired

Atlanta police officers Garrett Rolfe and Devin Bronsan were the cops involved in Brooks’ killing. Rolfe, above, has been fired

David McAtee

53 years old, June 1, Louisville, Kentucky 

David McAtee ran a popular BBQ joint in Louisville called Yaya’s BBQ Shack. He was fatally shot by police and the Kentucky National Guard as they dispersed a large crowd on June 1 following reports of a group of demonstrators in the area – though it wasn’t confirmed if that group was a part of protests.

Witnesses said McAtee and his friends and family were separate from the group of protesters and were at a weekly neighborhood party where McAtee served food.

According to officials, the police and soldiers were fired upon and two Louisville cops and two National Guardsmen returned fire. McAtee was killed by a shot fired from a guardsmen. 

Louisville police chief Steve Conrad was fired after it was revealed that the body cams of the police involved in the shooting had been deactivated.

Officer Katie Crews, a white woman, was involved in the shooting and had mocked a different protester on Facebook earlier the day of the shooting, was placed on administrative assignment following the shooting. The other officer in the shooting was Austin Allen. 

Kentucky State Police, the U.S. Attorney’s Office and the FBI are investigating the shooting. Lawyers for the McAtee family intend to file a lawsuit. 

David McAtee was shot dead on June 1 after Louisville officers and the National Guard 'returned fire' into a group gather in a parking lot, next to where McAtee's business is located

David McAtee was shot dead on June 1 after Louisville officers and the National Guard 'returned fire' into a group gather in a parking lot, next to where McAtee's business is located

David McAtee was shot dead on June 1 after Louisville officers and the National Guard ‘returned fire’ into a group gather in a parking lot, next to where McAtee’s business is located

Crews

Crews

Austin Allen

Austin Allen

Two cops were involved in that shooting. Officer Katie Crews (left) and Officer Austin Allen (right), neither of whom had their body cameras switched on during the incident

Tony McDade

38 years old, May 27, Tallahassee Florida

Tony McDade, a black trans man, was shot dead in Florida just two days after the killing of George Floyd. 

Though the details surrounding Tony McDade's (pictured) death are murky, he was killed on May 27, two days after George Floyd died under the knee of Derek Chauvin

Though the details surrounding Tony McDade's (pictured) death are murky, he was killed on May 27, two days after George Floyd died under the knee of Derek Chauvin

Though the details surrounding Tony McDade’s (pictured) death are murky, he was killed on May 27, two days after George Floyd died under the knee of Derek Chauvin

He was killed after being approached by police as a suspect in a stabbing. 

According to the Tallahassee Police Department, McDade was in possession of a handgun and a bloody knife that was found at the scene. 

But videos shared on social media by witnesses appear to tell another story.

According to Rolling Stone, one witness said on Facebook: ‘They said “Stop moving, n****r,” and then they shot him after he stopped moving.’

Witness, Clifford Butler, told WFSU: ‘I never heard, “Get down, freeze, I’m an officer.” I never heard nothing. I just heard gunshots.’

The identity of the officer who shot McDade has not been released due to Marsy’s Law. The officer has been placed on administrative leave.  

Marsy’s Law classifies anyone who’s allegedly had their life threatened as victims — including police officers — and ensures their right to privacy. Yet witnesses have said the officer in question was white. A press release from the TPD states that he has been placed on administrative leave.

The Tallahassee Police Department still hasn’t released body camera footage. 

George Floyd 

46 years old, May 25, Minneapolis, Minnesota 

On Memorial Day George Floyd was arrested by a group of officers for allegedly using a fake $20 bill at a deli. 

George Floyd (pictured) died on May 25 under then knee of Officer Derek Chauvin

George Floyd (pictured) died on May 25 under then knee of Officer Derek Chauvin

George Floyd (pictured) died on May 25 under then knee of Officer Derek Chauvin 

He was pinned to the ground by white police officer Derek Chauvin, who dug his knee into the back of Floyd’s neck for an excruciating eight minutes and 46 minutes in a horrific act caught on camera. 

In the video Floyd is heard gasping ‘I Can’t Breathe’ – words that would be echoed across the globe to decry his violent death.  

All the while, cops Thomas Lane and J. Alexander Kueng helped restrain Floyd as Tou Thao stood nearby.

The video sent shockwaves across the country and sparked massive protests denouncing police brutality against black people and demanded justice. 

All four officers were fired after the incident. 

Chauvin was charged with a new, more serious count of second-degree murder on June 3. He had previously been charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

He was arrested on May 29 and is being held at Minnesota Department of Corrections. His bail sits at $1million.

He was the subject of at least 18 prior complaints and only two were ‘closed with discipline’.

From left to right: Derek Chauvin, Tou Thao, J. Alexander Kueng and Thomas Lane

From left to right: Derek Chauvin, Tou Thao, J. Alexander Kueng and Thomas Lane

From left to right: Derek Chauvin, Tou Thao, J. Alexander Kueng and Thomas Lane

On Wednesday June 3 the three other officers involved were charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.

On Wednesday June 10 Thomas Lane was released from Hennepin County Jail after posting bail. The bail for him and the other officers was set at $1million unconditional or $750,000 with conditions.

He had been on the police force for four days when Floyd died.

On Friday June 19 J. Alexander Kueng was released on $750,000 bail bond.

Dion Johnson

28 years old, May 25, Phoenix, Arizona 

On May 25 a Phoenix police trooper approached a vehicle and found Dion Johnson, 28, sleeping behind the wheel with beer and a gun visible in the car. Following a struggle, the trooper shot Johnson and killed  him

On May 25 a Phoenix police trooper approached a vehicle and found Dion Johnson, 28, sleeping behind the wheel with beer and a gun visible in the car. Following a struggle, the trooper shot Johnson and killed  him

On May 25 a Phoenix police trooper approached a vehicle and found Dion Johnson, 28, sleeping behind the wheel with beer and a gun visible in the car. Following a struggle, the trooper shot Johnson and killed  him

On May 25 a Phoenix police trooper approached a vehicle and found Dion Johnson, 28, sleeping behind the wheel with beer and a gun visible in the car.

The details of the circumstances around Johnson’s death are murky as troopers at the scene were not equipped with body cameras or dash cameras.

Cops said that the trooper approached Johnson and a struggle between the two ensued. The trooper then fired their weapon and struck Johnson, claiming they feared they’d be pushed into oncoming traffic, as per 12News.

Johnson was taken to the hospital and pronounced dead.

The trooper involved is on paid administrative leave.

Officials with the FBI will review evidence in Dion Johnson’s case alongside the Arizona U.S. Attorney’s Office, and the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division.

Maurice Gordon Jr

28 years old, May 23, New Jersey 

Maurice Gordon, 28, was fatally shot by a white officer following a traffic stop on the Garden State Parkway in New Jersey.

Maurice Gordon, 28, was fatally shot by a white officer following a traffic stop on the Garden State Parkway in New Jersey on May 28

Maurice Gordon, 28, was fatally shot by a white officer following a traffic stop on the Garden State Parkway in New Jersey on May 28

Maurice Gordon, 28, was fatally shot by a white officer following a traffic stop on the Garden State Parkway in New Jersey on May 28

Gordon was shot by a New Jersey State Police trooper four times following a struggle with the officer, just two days before the death of George Floyd.

His car was pulled over for driving 101mph and while sitting in the back of a police cruiser, he tried to flee.

Gordon then allegedly tried to get in the driver’s seat of the patrol car and in the confrontation with police was shot multiple times. Damcam video of the traffic stop shows him being shot and killed by the trooper. 

The trooper involved in the case was Sgt. Randall Wetzel. Wetzel remains on administrative leave with pay. 

An investigation is underway. New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said that a grand jury would review the case to consider possible criminal charges.

Gordon had moved to the US from Jamaica to attend college and work. 

His friend had called 911 in Dutchess County, New York in the early morning of May 22 hoping police would check on Gordon, who had been talking about being possessed and having paranormal experiences.

But New Jersey police did not know about Gordon’s mental health history.

The trooper involved in the case was Sgt. Randall Wetzel. He is seen above on dashcam before shooting Gordon dead

The trooper involved in the case was Sgt. Randall Wetzel. He is seen above on dashcam before shooting Gordon dead

The trooper involved in the case was Sgt. Randall Wetzel. He is seen above on dashcam before shooting Gordon dead

Robert Johnson Jr

29 years old, May 16, Essex, Maryland 

Robert Johnson Jr was fatally shot on May 16 while celebrating his cousin’s 15th birthday party in Essex. 

Robert Johnson Jr was fatally shot on May 16 in Essex, Maryland after getting into an argument with a neighbor after he bumped into their car. An officer was called to the scene who shot Johnson.

Robert Johnson Jr was fatally shot on May 16 in Essex, Maryland after getting into an argument with a neighbor after he bumped into their car. An officer was called to the scene who shot Johnson.

Robert Johnson Jr was fatally shot on May 16 in Essex, Maryland after getting into an argument with a neighbor after he bumped into their car. An officer was called to the scene who shot Johnson. 

He dented a neighbor’s vehicle while trying to park and told the man who owned the car that he’d pay for repairs, but the discussion escalated into an argument. The neighbor called police reporting that Johnson was armed.

The department’s initial release on the incident stated ‘the first arriving officer was confronted with an armed suspect and discharged his weapon.’

Johnson died after he was taken to the hospital.

The department later said that when the officer approached Johnson’s car he exited his vehicle and his ‘gun fell to the ground in plain view of the officer’.

Baltimore County Police say they recovered a gun from the scene and have body camera footage of the confrontation, which the department has declined to release. 

‘He wasn’t even a threat, he dropped the gun. Y’all didn’t go by the protocol and the right procedures. They just got out of their car and started shooting,’ Johnson’s brother said following his death.  

The officer in the shooting was identified solely by his surname as Police Officer First Class Knight, a 24-year-old veteran of the force with no prior offenses. He was initially placed on adminstrative leave and has resumed patrol duties. 

On Wednesday June 24 prosecutors released bodycamera footage and said they wouldn’t press charges against officer. They said the shooting ‘justified’ because Johnson was seen grabbing the gun off the ground and running with it, though he did not shoot or aim it at the officer.  

Dreasjon ‘Sean’ Reed

21 years old, May 6, Indianapolis, Indiana 

Dreasjon ‘Sean’ Reed was shot and killed by officers on May 6 during a high speed chase with police that was streamed on his Facebook live in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Dreasjon Reed also known as Sean Reed was fatally shot by Indianapolis Metropolitan Police on May 6, 2020 following a police pursuit on the city's northwest side. The incident was recorded on Facebook Live by Reed

Dreasjon Reed also known as Sean Reed was fatally shot by Indianapolis Metropolitan Police on May 6, 2020 following a police pursuit on the city's northwest side. The incident was recorded on Facebook Live by Reed

Dreasjon Reed also known as Sean Reed was fatally shot by Indianapolis Metropolitan Police on May 6, 2020 following a police pursuit on the city’s northwest side. The incident was recorded on Facebook Live by Reed

Officers saw someone driving recklessly on Interstate 65 speeding at nearly 90mph. Police pursued but lost sight of the vehicle. The car was later spotted in a city street and officers chased Reed on foot before cops said Reed and the officer exchanged gunfire.   

According to police, there was an exchange of gunfire between Reed and an officer after the officer’s use of a stun gun was ‘ineffective’. However, Reed’s family and their attorneys maintain that Reed did not fire a gun. 

The officer who shot Reed was identified on June 10 as Dejoure Mercer, who had been with the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police for four years.

A special prosecutor is investigating Reed’s death. 

The officer who shot Reed was identified on June 10 as Dejoure Mercer, who had been with the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police for four years

The officer who shot Reed was identified on June 10 as Dejoure Mercer, who had been with the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police for four years

The officer who shot Reed was identified on June 10 as Dejoure Mercer, who had been with the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police for four years

Shaun Fuhr

24 years old, April 29, Seattle, Washington

Shaun Fuhr was fatally shot by police on April 29, suffering a gunshot wound to the head.

Shaun Fuhr was fatally shot by police on April 29, suffering a gunshot wound to the head following a domestic violence report

Shaun Fuhr was fatally shot by police on April 29, suffering a gunshot wound to the head following a domestic violence report

Shaun Fuhr was fatally shot by police on April 29, suffering a gunshot wound to the head following a domestic violence report

Police responded to a call by a woman who reported that her boyfriend, who is the father of her one-year-old daughter, had beat her, fired a gun at her, and taken their daughter at gunpoint and fled.

Seattle police body camera footage showed several officers chasing a man on foot as he ran through a small parking lot and confront him. He was holding the child when he was shot and an officer ran to pick up the child.

NAACP officials in Seattle argued that deadly force was not necessary in the confrontation and from the video Fuhr did not appear to display a weapon.

Fuhr with his infant daughter above

Fuhr with his infant daughter above

Fuhr with his infant daughter above

Seattle police SWAT Office Noah Zech, 35, was placed on paid administrative leave following the shooting.

The shooting is being investigated by its own force investigation team and the King County Sheriff’s office. 

Breonna Taylor

26 years old, March 13, Louisville, Kentucky

Taylor was a 26-year-old EMT who was fatally shot by Louisville Metro Police inside her home in the early hours of March 13 by officers conducting a ‘no-knock- warrant.

Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old black EMT, was shot eight times in her bed on March 13 by Louisville police officers who stormed into her home on a 'no-knock- warrant searching for a drug suspect who wasn't there

Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old black EMT, was shot eight times in her bed on March 13 by Louisville police officers who stormed into her home on a 'no-knock- warrant searching for a drug suspect who wasn't there

Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old black EMT, was shot eight times in her bed on March 13 by Louisville police officers who stormed into her home on a ‘no-knock- warrant searching for a drug suspect who wasn’t there

The warrant was a part of a drug probe, but the suspect had already been in custody.

Officers entered the apartment and were fired upon by Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, who believed a robbery was in progress. Police returned fire, striking Taylor eight times, who had been sleeping in bed moments before.  

On June 11 no-knock search warrants were banned in Louisville following a unanimous vote of the Metro Council. 

Following the council’s vote, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer vowed to sign Breonna’s law ‘as soon as ‘it hits his desk’.

Det. Joshua Jaynes, the officer who applied for the ‘no-knock’ search warrant that led to Breonna Taylor’s death, is now on administrative reassignment. 

The three officers in the case – Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Officers Brett Hankinson and Myles Cosgrove – have not been charged in the shooting and have been placed on administrative leave. 

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer fired embattled Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad on June 1 after learning that officers behind fatal shooting of popular barbecue restaurant David McAtee did not have their body cameras on, even though they were mandated to following Taylor’s death 

On Friday June 19 Mayor Greg Fischer announced Friday that Louisville Metro Police is moving to fire Brett Hankison for ‘blindly’ firing 10 rounds into Taylor’s apartment. 

The three officers in the case - Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Officers Brett Hankinson and Myles Cosgrove - have not been charged in the shooting and have been placed on administrative leave. From left to right Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, Det. Brett Hankison, Det. Myles Cosgrove

The three officers in the case - Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Officers Brett Hankinson and Myles Cosgrove - have not been charged in the shooting and have been placed on administrative leave. From left to right Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, Det. Brett Hankison, Det. Myles Cosgrove

The three officers in the case – Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Officers Brett Hankinson and Myles Cosgrove – have not been charged in the shooting and have been placed on administrative leave. From left to right Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, Det. Brett Hankison, Det. Myles Cosgrove

Manuel Ellis

33 years old, March 3, Tacoma, Washington

Manuel Ellis is a black man who died while being restrained by Tacoma police officers for allegedly ‘trying to open car doors of occupied vehicles’. 

Manuel Ellis, 33, died as he was restrained by Tacoma, Washington police officers on March 3, stopped for allegedly trying to open car doors of occupied vehicles

Manuel Ellis, 33, died as he was restrained by Tacoma, Washington police officers on March 3, stopped for allegedly trying to open car doors of occupied vehicles

Manuel Ellis, 33, died as he was restrained by Tacoma, Washington police officers on March 3, stopped for allegedly trying to open car doors of occupied vehicles

Cops said they approached Ellis and an ‘altercation ensued’ and Ellis had to be physically restrained.

Officers said they called for medical aid when they said Ellis needed help but he died at the seen.

In jarring audio from the 911 call Ellis is heard exclaiming, ‘I can’t breathe’ as an officer is heard asking for hobbles to strap down Ellis’ legs.

Video of his arrest shows Tacoma officers striking down a black man and pinning him to the ground.

An autopsy shows he died of respiratory arrest due to hypoxia caused by physical restraint. Hypoxia is a condition in which the body is deprived of adequate oxygen supply.

Officers Christopher Burbank, Matthew Collins, Masyih Ford and Timothy Rankine, who are now on administrative leave following the incident. Tacoma Mayor Victoria Woodards has called for them to be fired. The officers involved were also not wearing their bodycams, by Tacoma Police Department. 

Masyih Ford is one of the cops involved

Masyih Ford is one of the cops involved

Timothy Rankine is one of the cops who were not wearing body cameras

Timothy Rankine is one of the cops who were not wearing body cameras

Masyih Ford (left) and Timothy Rankine (right), are two of the four officers involved. They were not wearing body cameras but there is footage of the incident that has been submitted. The four officers involved are on administrative leave

Ahmaud Arbery

25 years old, February 23, Atlanta 

Ahmaud Arbery (pictured), 25, was killed on February 23 while jogging on a residential street just outside the port city of Brunswick

Ahmaud Arbery (pictured), 25, was killed on February 23 while jogging on a residential street just outside the port city of Brunswick

Ahmaud Arbery (pictured), 25, was killed on February 23 while jogging on a residential street just outside the port city of Brunswick

Arbery was fatally shot on February 23 while jogging on a residential street just outside the port city of Brunswick. 

He was shot dead by father and son Greg McMichael and Travis McMichael who armed themselves and chased him down when they saw him running in their neighborhood.

Gregory McMichael had worked as an investigator in the Glynn County District Attorney’s office for 24 years until he retired in May 2019.

But it wasn’t until May 7 that the McMichaels were arrested and charged with murder, more than two months after Arbery’s death. 

The elder McMichael told police he suspected Arbery was responsible for recent break-ins in the neighborhood. 

Video that showed Arbery collapse on the pavement after being shot three times fueled a national outcry not just over the killing but also that more than two months passed before arrests were made.   

Gregory McMichael

Gregory McMichael

Travis McMichael

Travis McMichael

Arbery was killed February 23 after Gregory McMichael (left), and his son Travis McMichael (right) pursued him when he jogged past their yard just outside the port city of Brunswick

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Women are obsessed with a $30 bikini from Glassons that perfectly frames your curves

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An Australian fashion retailer is selling out of an underwire bikini top and matching bottoms after thousands of shoppers noticed how well it hugged their natural curves.

Glassons sold out of its $30 ‘tropical’ coloured bikini after women started posting about it on Instagram but customers can still get the cut out bra-style top for the same price in white, pink and black shades.

Former Love Island star Cassidy McGill managed to pick up the tropical option and debuted it at Sydney’s Shark Beach on Wednesday.

Former Love Island star Cassidy McGill managed to pick up the tropical option and debuted it at Sydney's Shark Beach on Wednesday

Former Love Island star Cassidy McGill managed to pick up the tropical option and debuted it at Sydney's Shark Beach on Wednesday

Former Love Island star Cassidy McGill managed to pick up the tropical option and debuted it at Sydney’s Shark Beach on Wednesday

Other ocean lovers have been rocking the sell-out tropical bikini on the sand in Queensland and even on their balconies in locked down Melbourne

Other ocean lovers have been rocking the sell-out tropical bikini on the sand in Queensland and even on their balconies in locked down Melbourne

But for those who weren't fast enough to snap up the must-have print, Glassons has offered three other tones that are proving just as popular

But for those who weren't fast enough to snap up the must-have print, Glassons has offered three other tones that are proving just as popular

Other ocean lovers have been rocking the sell-out tropical bikini on the sand in Queensland and even on their balconies in locked down Melbourne (right)

Her followers gave her ample compliments on the brightly coloured two-piece, calling it the ‘cutest set’ they’d seen in the lead up to summer.

‘I love this bikini. It frames your body so well,’ said one person.

Other ocean lovers have been rocking the sell-out tropical bikini on the sand in Queensland and even on their balconies in locked down Melbourne.

But for those who weren’t fast enough to snap up the must-have print, Glassons has offered three other tones that are proving just as popular.

'I love this bikini. It frames your body so well,' said one person

'I love this bikini. It frames your body so well,' said one person

‘I love this bikini. It frames your body so well,’ said one person

The bikini is flattering on all body shapes and features a lovely floral print

The bikini is flattering on all body shapes and features a lovely floral print

The bikini is flattering on all body shapes and features a lovely floral print

The textured version still includes an underwire bra for support and a back clasp to easily keep it in place, but it’s made from a ribbed nylon and elastane fabric.

It’s perfect for those swimmers with larger bust sizes and can be paired with a ‘cheeky’ cut bikini bottom in the same material.

In July Glassons launched a ‘dream bikini’ designed by Jade Tuncdoruk which became a bestseller on the website.

It sold out within a month and is no longer on the website, but it did go a long way in putting Glassons on the swimwear map.  

The textured version still includes an underwire bra for support and a back clasp to easily keep it in place, but it's made from a ribbed nylon and elastane fabric

The textured version still includes an underwire bra for support and a back clasp to easily keep it in place, but it's made from a ribbed nylon and elastane fabric

It's perfect for those swimmers with larger bust sizes and can be paired with a 'cheeky' cut bikini bottom in the same material

It's perfect for those swimmers with larger bust sizes and can be paired with a 'cheeky' cut bikini bottom in the same material

The textured version still includes an underwire bra for support and a back clasp to easily keep it in place, but it’s made from a ribbed nylon and elastane fabric

The little ruched number also comes in a black colourway, perfect for those who love a monochrome look

The little ruched number also comes in a black colourway, perfect for those who love a monochrome look

The little ruched number also comes in a black colourway, perfect for those who love a monochrome look

‘I can’t tell you how many times I’ve found the almost perfect bikini, only to find that it hurts my neck or digs into my hips or doesn’t cover my boobs properly,’ Jade said at the time.

‘This bikini is made for women of all different shapes and sizes who want to feel comfortable and cute when they’re walking down the beach.

‘I also love the fact that the adjustable bottoms are a little bit cheeky and that you can wear the side ties as high on your waist or as low as you like. 

‘My dream bikini literally is my dream bikini. I couldn’t be happier with how it turned out.’

All of the Glassons styles are $19.99 for the top and bottom, sold separately, or $30 if you buy the set. 

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