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Amputee, 30, shares graphic pictures of her blackened fingers to raise awareness for meningitis 

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amputee 30 shares graphic pictures of her blackened fingers to raise awareness for meningitis

An Australian amputee has shared graphic photos of her fingers and toes turning black in a bid to raise awareness for meningococcal disease.

Juttima Chinnasri, 30, began suffering from flu-like symptoms like a high fever, nausea and general tiredness while at work in October 2018, but assumed it was the common cold.

The next morning she was rushed to hospital after purple spots appeared on her face, and after a week in intensive care on life support she woke up to see her fingers and feet had turned black from blood poisoning – a side effect of meningococcal meningitis.

‘The photos I have shared are quite graphic but it shows the reality of meningitis and blood poisoning,’ she said.

Juttima Chinnasri, 30, began suffering from flu-like symptoms like a high fever, nausea and weakness while at work in October 2018, but assumed it was the common cold

Juttima Chinnasri, 30, began suffering from flu-like symptoms like a high fever, nausea and weakness while at work in October 2018, but assumed it was the common cold

Juttima Chinnasri, 30, began suffering from flu-like symptoms like a high fever, nausea and weakness while at work in October 2018, but assumed it was the common cold

'The photos I have shared are quite graphic but it shows the reality of meningitis and blood poisoning,' she said

'The photos I have shared are quite graphic but it shows the reality of meningitis and blood poisoning,' she said

‘The photos I have shared are quite graphic but it shows the reality of meningitis and blood poisoning,’ she said

‘When I woke up and saw my black fingers and feet – I was shocked. It was terrifying and I refused to accept that I had to have them amputated for days but eventually I realised that they couldn’t be saved.’ 

Doctors had to remove her legs and fingers in order to save her life, but it was still tough to accept. 

Juttima spent three months in hospital learning to walk again and waiting for her prosthetic legs to arrive, before she was allowed to return home in January 2019.  

‘Life has changed drastically since this happened – I had to learn to do everything again from walking to picking things up to simple things like going to the bathroom by myself,’ she said.

‘I couldn’t do what I did before, you’re in the same environment but you can’t just walk anywhere. I started getting depressed, but I caught it early and started working on my mental health and it got better.’  

WHAT IS MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE?

Meningococcal disease is a bacterial infection that can cause death within hours if not recognised and treated in time.

There are five main strains of the infection, each of which now have a vaccine available in Australia.

Although the majority of victims will recover fully, 10% of those infected will die, and around 20% will have permanent disabilities.

If left untreated, the disease is fatal.

Amputation is not uncommon. Neither is organ failure and kidney damage, with extreme cases requiring long-term dialysis.

Babies and children up to five-years-old account for two-thirds of cases due to their less mature immune system.

Source: Meningococcal Australia 

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'When I woke up and saw my black fingers and feet - I was shocked,' she said (blackened feet pictured)

'When I woke up and saw my black fingers and feet - I was shocked,' she said (blackened feet pictured)

‘When I woke up and saw my black fingers and feet – I was shocked,’ she said (blackened feet pictured)

Juttima spent three months in hospital learning to walk again and waiting for her prosthetic legs to arrive, before she was allowed to return home in January 2019 (pictured before the illness)

Juttima spent three months in hospital learning to walk again and waiting for her prosthetic legs to arrive, before she was allowed to return home in January 2019 (pictured before the illness)

Doctors had to remove her legs and fingers in order to save her life, but it was still tough to accept (pictured in the hospital)

Doctors had to remove her legs and fingers in order to save her life, but it was still tough to accept (pictured in the hospital)

Juttima spent three months in hospital learning to walk again and waiting for her prosthetic legs to arrive, before she was allowed to return home in January 2019

What were Juttima’s symptoms? 

* Cold-like symptoms with a high fever.

* Purple spots appearing on her face and neck.

* Her skin becoming very sensitive to touch.

* Vomiting and diarrhoea.

* Tiredness. 

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Juttima first started feeling unwell whilst she was working and she decided to take herself to a medical clinic.

‘The first symptom was just a high fever. I took some paracetamol because I wanted to keep on working,’ she said.

‘I went to the medical centre where they told me my temperature was 39 degrees Celsius. I was too tired to go to the doctors so I just went home and got into bed.’

Her father went in to check on her through the night and lightly touched her arm, but Juttima pulled back quickly because her skin was very sensitive.  

The next morning, she woke up to find her symptoms had worsened and she could hardly get out of bed. 

‘I woke up vomiting and with diarrhoea. After I threw up, I looked in the mirror and there were bright purple spots all over my face and I was very pale,’ she said.

‘At that point I couldn’t walk and was crawling between the bedroom and bathroom.’

'The first symptom was just a high fever. I took some paracetamol because I wanted to keep on working,' she said (pictured before the illness)

'The first symptom was just a high fever. I took some paracetamol because I wanted to keep on working,' she said (pictured before the illness)

Juttima first started feeling unwell whilst she was working and she decided to take herself to the medical clinic at her workplace (pictured with her prosthetic legs)

Juttima first started feeling unwell whilst she was working and she decided to take herself to the medical clinic at her workplace (pictured with her prosthetic legs)

‘The first symptom was just a high fever. I took some paracetamol because I wanted to keep on working,’ she said (pictured before and after contracting meningitis)

Juttima's fingers and feet turned black as the bacteria from her illness went into her bloodstream, which caused blood poisoning (pictured learning to walk again)

Juttima's fingers and feet turned black as the bacteria from her illness went into her bloodstream, which caused blood poisoning (pictured learning to walk again)

Juttima’s fingers and feet turned black as the bacteria from her illness went into her bloodstream, which caused blood poisoning (pictured learning to walk again)

Juttima’s parents drove her to the hospital where the doctors knew instantly that something was wrong. That’s when they made the decision to put her on life support.

‘I was on life support for a week and unconscious. My family told me that my fingers and feet were starting to go black during that time and when I woke up, they were fully black,’ she said.

Juttima’s extremities turned black as the bacteria from her illness went into her bloodstream, which caused blood poisoning. 

‘When I woke up, I was hoping they would be able to fix it but I knew that there was no going back,’ she said.

Relearning how to use her remaining body parts was extremely difficult and a daily challenge. 

Juttima struggles with her mental health after her prosthetic legs arrived as she had to completely learn how to walk and use her hands again. 

'I was on life support for a week and unconscious. My family told me that my fingers and feet were starting to go black during that time and when I woke up, they were fully black,' she said

'I was on life support for a week and unconscious. My family told me that my fingers and feet were starting to go black during that time and when I woke up, they were fully black,' she said

‘I was on life support for a week and unconscious. My family told me that my fingers and feet were starting to go black during that time and when I woke up, they were fully black,’ she said

'When I woke up, I was hoping they would be able to fix it but I knew that there was no going back,' she said

'When I woke up, I was hoping they would be able to fix it but I knew that there was no going back,' she said

‘When I woke up, I was hoping they would be able to fix it but I knew that there was no going back,’ she said

‘I had to relearn how to write and I still struggle with picking up little things like coins and cotton tips, even doing up the buttons on my shirt,’ she said.

‘It took longer to learn how to use my prosthetic legs – I’ve only just started to walk with no crutches so it’s taken me over a year.

‘This has changed my life but I hope to inspire other people and when I’m having a bad day, I always look back to when I was in hospital and my family were told that I might not make it and that motivates me to keep on going because I’m still here.’

Juttima has realised her life can be ‘normal’ now that she has adapted to the changes. 

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Inside Sydney architect Clinton Cole’s House of Parts – with a rooftop spa and basement CAR LIFT

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inside sydney architect clinton coles house of parts with a rooftop spa and basement car lift

An architect has transformed an old fashioned terrace into a luxury family home, complete with a rooftop spa, temperature-controlled wine cellar, 20-metre swimming pool and a car lift in the basement. 

When Clinton Cole was asked to redesign an 1890s two-storey in Sydney’s Eastern Suburbs tailored to the needs of a young family with four children under the age of six, the father-of-three knew he was the man for the job.

Mr Cole exceeded his clients’ expectations by turning the historic shell into a spectacular mansion known as the ‘House of Parts’, cobbled together from a mishmash of themes including caves and treehouses.

The result of the project – which ran from 2013 to 2014 and saw Mr Cole work 100-hour weeks – is a striking six-bedroom split over four storeys with an attic gym, landscaped garden, spacious sun deck and five bathrooms, one with a tub big enough to fit all four kids at once.

‘Maybe they’ve outgrown it by now,’ Mr Cole told Daily Mail Australia.

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The 'House of Parts': Architect Clinton Cole created this striking four-storey family home in Sydney's Eastern Suburbs in 2014

The 'House of Parts': Architect Clinton Cole created this striking four-storey family home in Sydney's Eastern Suburbs in 2014

The ‘House of Parts’: Architect Clinton Cole created this striking four-storey family home in Sydney’s Eastern Suburbs in 2014

The dining room and entertainment deck run parallel to a 20-metre swimming pool (pictured) which reflects sunlight upstairs

The dining room and entertainment deck run parallel to a 20-metre swimming pool (pictured) which reflects sunlight upstairs

The dining room and entertainment deck run parallel to a 20-metre swimming pool (pictured) which reflects sunlight upstairs

‘It is certainly unique, but it’s for a big family. We resisted having one concept and did it all differently – that’s why it’s called a house of parts.’

The timber and bent steel staircase leading to the first floor wraps around the dining room, which Mr Cole describes as the ‘bullseye’ that the rest of the house was built around.

‘We treated it like a centre piece – a bullseye – and everything came around that,’ he said.

A glass sliding door curves around the wall behind the dining table, providing access to an outdoor entertainment deck fitted with a barbecue, serving area and seating space.

The stairs to the first floor wraps around the dining room (pictured), which Mr Cole calls the 'bullseye' that the entire house has been built around

The stairs to the first floor wraps around the dining room (pictured), which Mr Cole calls the 'bullseye' that the entire house has been built around

The stairs to the first floor wraps around the dining room (pictured), which Mr Cole calls the ‘bullseye’ that the entire house has been built around

Timber and stone were reused from the demolition of the original terrace, built at some time during the 1890s

Timber and stone were reused from the demolition of the original terrace, built at some time during the 1890s

Mr Cole said while the design is undoubtedly grand, 'it's for a big family'

Mr Cole said while the design is undoubtedly grand, 'it's for a big family'

Timber (left) and stone (right) were reused from the demolition of the original terrace, built at some time during the 1890s

The lap pool cost upwards of $200,000 to install, but offers more than its money's worth during Sydney's long summers

The lap pool cost upwards of $200,000 to install, but offers more than its money's worth during Sydney's long summers

The lap pool cost upwards of $200,000 to install, but offers more than its money’s worth during Sydney’s long summers

Award-winning Sydney architect, Clinton Cole (pictured)

Award-winning Sydney architect, Clinton Cole (pictured)

Award-winning Sydney architect, Clinton Cole (pictured)

All six bedrooms overlook the outdoor swimming pool, which Mr Cole said cost upwards of $200,000 to install.

It runs along one side of the house, reflecting sunlight onto the upstairs ceilings all year round, and offers more than its money’s worth during Sydney’s long summers. 

Sustainability is at the heart of the house, which was rebuilt with stone, brick and timber salvaged from the demolition of the original building.

A further nod to renewable energy are rainwater storage tank, wind turbine and solar panels installed on the roof to power the home as naturally as possible.

And rather than relying on multiple air conditioning units to keep the house cool in summer, Mr Cole used cross ventilation, a structural technique designed to increase the flow of cool air coming in and force hot air out.

The 'House of Parts' has been cobbled together from a mishmash of themes including treehouses and caves (pictured)

The 'House of Parts' has been cobbled together from a mishmash of themes including treehouses and caves (pictured)

The ‘House of Parts’ has been cobbled together from a mishmash of themes including treehouses and caves (pictured)

The gym opens onto a spa on the rooftop deck

The gym opens onto a spa on the rooftop deck

One of the bathrooms has a tub big enough to fit all four children

One of the bathrooms has a tub big enough to fit all four children

The gym opens onto a spa on the rooftop deck (left) and one of the bathrooms (right) has a tub big enough to fit all four kids

The individuality of the home was recognised when the 'House of Parts' won the World Architecture Awards Cycle 22 in 2016

The individuality of the home was recognised when the 'House of Parts' won the World Architecture Awards Cycle 22 in 2016

The individuality of the home was recognised when the ‘House of Parts’ won the World Architecture Awards Cycle 22 in 2016

That means when a window is opened on the ground floor, warm, stuffy air is pushed through a window on the first floor and vice versa.

‘It works really well when you have a basement embedded in rock like it is here,’ Mr Cole said.

Below ground, the basement houses a temperature-controlled wine cellar and perhaps the most memorable feature of all – a hydraulic car lift.

Two cars can be driven through the garage door at ground level, then stacked on top of the other with one elevated by the lift. Few Australian homes can boast such a feat.

The spacious living area opens onto the garden and entertainment deck, blurring the lines between indoor and outdoor

The spacious living area opens onto the garden and entertainment deck, blurring the lines between indoor and outdoor

The spacious living area opens onto the garden and entertainment deck, blurring the lines between indoor and outdoor

Sustainability is at the heart of the house (pictured from the street) which was rebuilt with stone, brick and timber salvaged from the demolition of the original building

Sustainability is at the heart of the house (pictured from the street) which was rebuilt with stone, brick and timber salvaged from the demolition of the original building

Sustainability is at the heart of the house (pictured from the street) which was rebuilt with stone, brick and timber salvaged from the demolition of the original building

That individuality was recognised when the ‘House of Parts’ won the World Architecture Awards Cycle 22 in February 2016 – a coveted title in the design industry.

The family who commissioned the house have lived in it since 2015 and are delighted to own such a unique property in a central Sydney location.

Mr Cole did not disclose the total cost of the project and its worth has not been valued at current market rates. 

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Husband reunited with missing wife after she got in the wilderness for three nights

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husband reunited with missing wife after she got in the wilderness for three nights

An elderly hiker has been reunited with her husband after being lost on Queensland’s Fraser Island for three nights.  

Madeleine Nowak, 73, was found alive and well on Sunday morning after she became separated from a tour group on the island’s Great Walk on Thursday.

After spending three nights sleeping rough, she walked from the scrub onto Eastern Beach, about 7km from where she got lost, and approached campers for help.

Acting Inspector Brooke Flood said Dr Nowak’s reunion with her husband was ‘extremely emotional’.  

Elderly hiker Madeleine Nowak, 73, (pictured) was rescued and reunited with her husband on Sunday after being lost for three day's on Queensland's Fraser Island

Elderly hiker Madeleine Nowak, 73, (pictured) was rescued and reunited with her husband on Sunday after being lost for three day's on Queensland's Fraser Island

Elderly hiker Madeleine Nowak, 73, (pictured) was rescued and reunited with her husband on Sunday after being lost for three day’s on Queensland’s Fraser Island

‘Everybody involved in the search effort was just so relieved. It’s been a really, really long three days,’ she told reporters.  

LifeFlight’s Brent Morgan said Dr Nowak left the trail after coming across a fallen tree on the track.

She decided to go around it before becoming disoriented and unable to rediscover the path.

‘The last few days she’s been heading east,’ Mr Morgan said. 

A land, air and sea search and rescue commenced on Thursday evening and continued throughout Friday and Saturday.

Dr Nowak got lost after coming across a fallen tree while with a hiking group on Fraser Island's Great Walk on Thursday

Dr Nowak got lost after coming across a fallen tree while with a hiking group on Fraser Island's Great Walk on Thursday

Dr Nowak got lost after coming across a fallen tree while with a hiking group on Fraser Island’s Great Walk on Thursday

Those searches were halted at night and restarted each morning at first light.

Dr Nowak knew air crews were looking for her but was unable to wave them down in difficult terrain.

‘The bushland’s very dense and very thick,’ Insp Flood said.

‘The missing person actually said she heard choppers overhead but because of the canopy she just couldn’t get their attention.’

Dr Nowak is believed to have walked 6-7km from where she was last seen, making it harder for authorities to pin down her whereabouts.

Police have reminded adventurers to stay put if they become lost or disoriented to aid rescue efforts.

‘If you stay as near as possible to where you have gone missing, the chances of you being located during a search dramatically increase,’ Insp Flood said.

Dr Nowak is in good health and expected to be released from Hervey Bay Hospital after undergoing precautionary checks. 

Dr Nowak survived on food and water rations before emerging onto the Eastern Beach, about 7km from where she got lost, and approached some campers for help

Dr Nowak survived on food and water rations before emerging onto the Eastern Beach, about 7km from where she got lost, and approached some campers for help

Dr Nowak survived on food and water rations before emerging onto the Eastern Beach, about 7km from where she got lost, and approached some campers for help

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‘I knew she was gone’: Mother’s heartbreaking reaction after running over her 17-month-old daughter

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i knew she was gone mothers heartbreaking reaction after running over her 17 month old daughter

The grieving parents of a baby girl who died after being run over by the family’s 4WD have told of how they broke the devastating news to her young sister and brother. 

Anna Seagren, aged 17 months, was killed when she was hit at the family’s farm on Victor Harbor Road in Mount Jagged, South Australia, at about 3.45pm on Friday. 

‘I saw her as soon as I made the mistake so I knew that she was gone,’ said heartbroken mother Jessi Seagren.

Beautiful toddler Anna Seagren, 17 months, was killed when she was accidentally run over by her parents' 4WD in Mount Jagged, south of Adelaide, South Australia on Friday

Beautiful toddler Anna Seagren, 17 months, was killed when she was accidentally run over by her parents' 4WD in Mount Jagged, south of Adelaide, South Australia on Friday

Beautiful toddler Anna Seagren, 17 months, was killed when she was accidentally run over by her parents’ 4WD in Mount Jagged, south of Adelaide, South Australia on Friday

Parents Danny Seagren (left) and Jessi (right) told of the devastating moment they had to break the news to their other young children that they would never see their baby sister again

Parents Danny Seagren (left) and Jessi (right) told of the devastating moment they had to break the news to their other young children that they would never see their baby sister again

Parents Danny Seagren (left) and Jessi (right) told of the devastating moment they had to break the news to their other young children that they would never see their baby sister again

Jessi had taken the vehicle to pick up her eldest daughter, Grace, from the bus stop when the tragic accident unfolded. 

South Australia Police said late on Friday night that paramedics had tried to save the girl at the scene, but sadly she could not be revived.

Jessie and her husband, Danny, then had to face the unbearable task of telling their other young children Grace, five, and three-year-old Jack that they would never see their little sister again.  

‘We’ve told the other kids that she’s an angel now and she’s not going to come home anymore – but we can still talk to her and we love her, and that we were lucky to be her parents for those 17 months,’ Jessi told Seven News Adelaide.

Jessi and Danny reached out to warn other parents who think it can never happen to them, pleading with them to slow down, don’t rush and to give their babies an extra last cuddle.

‘We just didn’t see her come out,’ Jessi said.

Paramedics worked on Anna Seagren (pictured) but she could not be revived

Paramedics worked on Anna Seagren (pictured) but she could not be revived

Paramedics worked on Anna Seagren (pictured) but she could not be revived

Devastated mum Jessi said she didn't see toddler Anna (pictured) come out

Devastated mum Jessi said she didn't see toddler Anna (pictured) come out

Devastated mum Jessi said she didn’t see toddler Anna (pictured) come out

The parents told of how much they loved their beautiful little girl who completed their family and have said how much they would miss her. 

‘She was really cheeky, really cuddly and affectionate. She was just a perfect, happy, boisterous, gorgeous girl,’ Jessi told Adelaide Now. 

Shattered at their loss, the Seagrens remembered the happy tot for her cheerfulness and playful nature.

‘She loved going on the motorbikes. ‘She loved the chickens. She would chase them around,’ Mrs Seagren said.

‘(And) she loved her swimming lessons. She was learning to kick her legs.’

Anna was ‘best mates’ with her brother Jack and copied everything he did.

They said their baby girl will be ‘really missed’.  

One child is run over in their own driveway across Australia each week, according to South Australia’s Department for Infrastructure and Transport.

More than a third of children aged under six who died in crashes were killed ‘off road’ in yards, car parks and driveways. 

ONE TODDLER IS RUN OVER IN THEIR DRIVEWAY EVERY WEEK 

In Australia, one toddler is run over in their driveway every week.

On average, seven children die each year

90 per cent of those killed aged under five 

60 are seriously injured after being hit by a motor vehicle at home 

 70 per cent of those injured are aged under five

 TO KEEP YOUR CHILD SAFE YOU CAN:

 Always supervise, hold their hands, when a vehicle is to be moved 

Put the children in the car when you move it  

Encourage children to play in areas far from the driveway 

Limit access to the driveway with fencing or gates

Know your car’s blind spots  

 Source: South Australia Department for Infrastructure and Transport website

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