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Australian mum sparks hilarious debate by sharing a photo of bizarre plug-in doorbell

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australian mum sparks hilarious debate by sharing a photo of bizarre plug in doorbell

A photo of a bizarre ‘plug-in doorbell’ has sparked an amusing debate on social media.

The discussion started when an Australian woman posted a picture of the device in popular Facebook group, Mums Who Clean.

‘Not really a cleaning question, but I just moved into a house and was wondering if anyone knows what this is?’ she asked.

It appears to be a Syneco wireless door chime, which was previously available at Bunnings but is now out of stock.

The device plugs into a socket and converts the traditional doorbell sound to a choice of seven chimes, which include a gong, a cuckoo’s call and the melody of the iconic Big Ben clock at London’s Westminster Palace.

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This bizarre 'plug-in doorbell' has sparked amusing debate on social media

This bizarre 'plug-in doorbell' has sparked amusing debate on social media

People have offered very creative suggestions about what it might be

People have offered very creative suggestions about what it might be

This bizarre ‘plug-in doorbell’ has sparked amusing debate on social media, with people offering very creative suggestions about what it might be

But people suggested it could be something much more interesting, with hundreds offering creative responses from sex toy chargers to electronic repellants for children, in-laws and even President Donald Trump.

‘It’s a multiplug system for vibrators….says my friend,’ one woman replied.

‘It’s a tiny switchboard. I think one of them will connect you to the butler,’ said another.

‘Turn the lights off and it shoots a red beam across like a burglar alarm… as seen on any movie where they are trying to break in,’ said a third.

A fourth said: ‘It lights up red when the mother-in-law is at the front door.’ 

A fifth suggested the device might be a ‘Trump-repeller’, in reference to the divisive US President, to which another replied: ‘If only.’ 

34522414 8851709 image m 24 1602986624349

34522414 8851709 image m 24 1602986624349

‘It’s the “Continuum Transfunctioner”,’ one woman said, while someone else wrote: ‘It’s 2020 – nobody knows.’

‘It’s a child repellent. Keep those pesky little gremlins away,’ added a third.

‘Is it light-up contraceptive pills?’ a fourth wondered, referencing the comparable layout of hormonal pill packets. 

Dozens said the comments had brightened their mood in a year marked by grim news and daily drudgery.

‘Oh man I laughed at some of these! Thanks ladies for the good old laugh, needed that,’ one woman wrote.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Australia

Victoria breaks its streak of zero coronavirus cases with two new infections

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victoria breaks its streak of zero coronavirus cases with two new infections

Victoria has recorded two new coronavirus infections and a further two deaths, the state’s first fatalities from the virus for several days.

The figures, which were announced on Wednesday, come after two consecutive days of no new cases or deaths. 

The last coronavirus-related death in Victoria was on October 19.  Melbourne’s 14-day rolling average is at 2.7.

Despite the spike in cases, Melburnians have embraced their freedom after suffering through four months of an excruciating lockdown.

A man is seen out on his morning run in Melbourne on Wednesday, he appeared happy, pulling the peace sign

A man is seen out on his morning run in Melbourne on Wednesday, he appeared happy, pulling the peace sign

A man is seen out on his morning run in Melbourne on Wednesday, he appeared happy, pulling the peace sign

Some pubs opened at the strike of midnight to long lines, popped champagne and excited guests happy to be out of lockdown

Some pubs opened at the strike of midnight to long lines, popped champagne and excited guests happy to be out of lockdown

Some pubs opened at the strike of midnight to long lines, popped champagne and excited guests happy to be out of lockdown

As midnight struck across the long-suffering city, the shackles of Premier Daniel Andrews’ restrictions were thrown off – at least a little.

Two adults from one household can now visit each other’s homes accompanied by any children, reuniting families and best mates at long last.

Pubs, restaurants and cafes are free to open once again, after being closed, and later restricted to takeaway, and many going to the brink of ruin as a result. 

Households are restricted to one social gathering per day, meaning those who receive visitors can’t go to someone else’s home that same day.

Pubs, shops and restaurants are allowed to open with 20 people indoors and 50 outside – and these limits will increase in two weeks time.

But hotel operators are concerned strict crowd limits will prevent them from turning a profit. 

Tattoo parlours and beauty services are also reopened, in addition to non-contact sport for adults. 

Woman in face masks are seen walking as the sun rises over Albert Park Lake in Melbourne as restriction are eased

Woman in face masks are seen walking as the sun rises over Albert Park Lake in Melbourne as restriction are eased

Woman in face masks are seen walking as the sun rises over Albert Park Lake in Melbourne as restriction are eased

Pubs, restaurants and cafes are free to open once again, after being closed, and later restricted to takeaway, and many going to the brink of ruin as a result (Pictured: People are seen dining outside St. Ali Cafe in South Melbourne on Wednesday morning)

Pubs, restaurants and cafes are free to open once again, after being closed, and later restricted to takeaway, and many going to the brink of ruin as a result (Pictured: People are seen dining outside St. Ali Cafe in South Melbourne on Wednesday morning)

Pubs, restaurants and cafes are free to open once again, after being closed, and later restricted to takeaway, and many going to the brink of ruin as a result (Pictured: People are seen dining outside St. Ali Cafe in South Melbourne on Wednesday morning)

Residents can gather outside with up to 10 people and there is no longer be any limit on the number of households that can come together at once.

Melburnians had only been able to welcome partners into their homes, or friends via the ‘singles bubble’.

Under the latest arrangements, people will also have to stay within their 25km travel limit – which was expanded from the initial 5km rule.

Mr Andrews described the home as the ‘most dangerous place’ for the spread of coronavirus.

‘I know that jars with people, it may not sound right, but when you think about it, that’s where people let their guard down, where people are not being supervised,’ he told reporters on Tuesday.

People are seen dining inside St. Ali Cafe in South Melbourne on Wednesday after restrictions were finally eased

People are seen dining inside St. Ali Cafe in South Melbourne on Wednesday after restrictions were finally eased

People are seen dining inside St. Ali Cafe in South Melbourne on Wednesday after restrictions were finally eased

Men are seen exercising in a park in Melbourne as the break of dawn on Wednesday as restrictions are finally eased

Men are seen exercising in a park in Melbourne as the break of dawn on Wednesday as restrictions are finally eased

Men are seen exercising in a park in Melbourne as the break of dawn on Wednesday as restrictions are finally eased

His argument was that homes were not a controlled environment like hospitality venues where social distancing can be enforced and industrial cleaning takes place.

Households were asked to keep a record of who visited their home and when to enable easy contact if an infection emerged.

Mr Andrews encouraged people to wear masks while visiting but conceded it was impossible to enforce.

‘I’m just being frank about it. We’re not going to have police knocking on every door every day, but we just ask people to use some common sense,’ he said.

A group wearing face masks are seen enjoying a  beverage at The Cherry Bar in Melbourne's CBD on Wednesday

A group wearing face masks are seen enjoying a  beverage at The Cherry Bar in Melbourne's CBD on Wednesday

A group wearing face masks are seen enjoying a  beverage at The Cherry Bar in Melbourne’s CBD on Wednesday

Shots! Melburnians celebrate with a rounds of shots poured by a bartender instead of among a few housemates stuck in never-ending lockdown

Shots! Melburnians celebrate with a rounds of shots poured by a bartender instead of among a few housemates stuck in never-ending lockdown

Shots! Melburnians celebrate with a rounds of shots poured by a bartender instead of among a few housemates stuck in never-ending lockdown

The restrictions on gatherings at home will remain in place beyond November 8, when the 25km limit and the ‘ring of steel’ separating the city from regional Victoria is lifted.

Masks will remain mandatory outdoors across the state for the rest of the year and probably into 2021, and should be worn inside gyms for most activities apart from running on a treadmill.

The government also released advice that home businesses such as hairdressers will be able to reopen if they have a ‘discrete retail area’.

Cleaners and maintenance workers may attend homes provided they wear a mask and keep to the minimum necessary.

A man looks in a shop window as restaurants and cafes prepare for opening in Melbourne on October 27

A man looks in a shop window as restaurants and cafes prepare for opening in Melbourne on October 27

A man looks in a shop window as restaurants and cafes prepare for opening in Melbourne on October 27

There are 87 active cases of COVID-19 in Victoria, with five in hospital and one in intensive care

There are 87 active cases of COVID-19 in Victoria, with five in hospital and one in intensive care

There are 87 active cases of COVID-19 in Victoria, with five in hospital and one in intensive care

Halloween trick-or-treating is permitted on Saturday so long as it’s ‘contactless’, with people still barred from entering property including front yards and doorknocking.

Victoria recorded a second consecutive day of no new cases of coronavirus or deaths on Tuesday. The last time the state reported consecutive days of zero cases was March 5 and 6.

Pictured: Staff member brings heaters outside in preparation of businesses being allowed to reopen

Pictured: Staff member brings heaters outside in preparation of businesses being allowed to reopen

Pictured: Staff member brings heaters outside in preparation of businesses being allowed to reopen

Mr Andrews described the home as the 'most dangerous place' for the spread of coronavirus as businesses can enforce COVID-safe rules

Mr Andrews described the home as the 'most dangerous place' for the spread of coronavirus as businesses can enforce COVID-safe rules

Mr Andrews described the home as the ‘most dangerous place’ for the spread of coronavirus as businesses can enforce COVID-safe rules

Melbourne’s 14-day case average is down to 2.8 and there were six mystery cases in the fortnight to October 24. The corresponding figures for regional Victoria are 0.2 and zero.

There are 87 active cases of Covid-19 in Victoria, with five in hospital and one in intensive care.

From Wednesday, retail will reopen along with cafes, restaurants and pubs, though there are some restrictions on numbers.

Mr Andrews says it’s important Victorians continue to get tested for Covid-19, even if they have only the mildest symptoms.

Cheers! A group of women toast the end of lockdown minutes after midnight when bars were finally able to open legally

Cheers! A group of women toast the end of lockdown minutes after midnight when bars were finally able to open legally

Cheers! A group of women toast the end of lockdown minutes after midnight when bars were finally able to open legally

A red ribbon was then cut as the first group skipped inside to enjoy a sit-down meal, specially prepared by the late-night kitchen staff

A red ribbon was then cut as the first group skipped inside to enjoy a sit-down meal, specially prepared by the late-night kitchen staff

The restaurant was fully booked within minutes of the announcement it would open its doors at midnight – with people wearing masks lining up around the block

‘There’s no vaccine, which means getting tested, following the rules, playing your part, making good choices for your family and every family,’ he said.

He conceded there would be new Covid-19 cases and outbreaks, but the state was ‘well-placed’ to manage them.

Victorian Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton claimed the state’s contact tracing was the best in Australia.

‘Our biggest challenge now is complacency,’ he said.

Professor Sutton was confident an outbreak in Melbourne’s northern suburbs, which delayed the easing of restrictions by 24 hours, was under control. 

Victoria free at last: What are the changes? 

From Tuesday 27 October, 11.59pm

All retail, bars and restaurants open with 20 indoors and 50 outdoors

Beauty services and tattoo parlours open

Outdoor contact sport for under 18s back on and non-contact sport for adults

Four reasons to leave home removed

25km travel limit remains in place

Melbourne to regional VIC border remains  

Outdoor gatherings up to 10 people

Gatherings can be of more than two households

Weddings increase to 10 attendees, funerals to 20

Church services open with 10 indoors and 20 outdoors 

PT, fitness and dance classes can be held outdoors with up to 10 people 

Number of people at outdoor pools can increase to 50, subject to density limits 

Must work from home if you can

Regional Victoria from 11.59pm October 27

Gym and fitness studios can open for up to 20 people

Twenty people for indoor religious gatherings and 50 people for outdoor religious gatherings

Funerals can have 20 people indoors and 50 people outdoors

Indoor non-contact sport returns for children

Indoor pools open up to 20 people

From 8 November

25km travel limit scrapped 

Travel to regional VIC allowed 

Retail, pubs and restaurants allowed 40 people indoors, 70 outdoors

Funerals allowed indoors with 20 and outdoors with 50

Non-contact sport for U18s allowed indoors 

Gyms and indoor fitness will be able to reopen

Holiday accommodation to re-open

Religious gatherings will expand with up 20 people and a faith leader indoors, and 50 outside

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Town in Sicily auctions abandoned houses for €1

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town in sicily auctions abandoned houses for e1

A beautiful town in Sicily has become the latest in a growing trend in Italy to see its abandoned homes auctioned off for €1 each to reverse the trend of depopulation.

Picturesque Salemi will sell off some of its dilapidated properties for a pittance in a bid to bring people back to the town.

It has seen its population shrink considerably over the last 50 years, after at least 4,000 residents fled following the 1968 earthquake in Sicily’s Belice Valley.

Salemi in Sicily, Italy, has become the latest town in the country's south to auction off homes for €1 in a bid to reverse the trend of depopulation

Salemi in Sicily, Italy, has become the latest town in the country's south to auction off homes for €1 in a bid to reverse the trend of depopulation

Salemi in Sicily, Italy, has become the latest town in the country’s south to auction off homes for €1 in a bid to reverse the trend of depopulation

Houses will go up on sale at a starting price of €1 each and sold to the highest bidder, in the same way the Sicilian town of Sambuca did last year

Houses will go up on sale at a starting price of €1 each and sold to the highest bidder, in the same way the Sicilian town of Sambuca did last year

Houses will go up on sale at a starting price of €1 each and sold to the highest bidder, in the same way the Sicilian town of Sambuca did last year

The town suffered a mass migration of residents after the 1968 earthquake in Sicily's Belice Valley destroyed much of its architecture. Pictured: The remains of the Matrice church restored by the architect Alvaro Siza

The town suffered a mass migration of residents after the 1968 earthquake in Sicily's Belice Valley destroyed much of its architecture. Pictured: The remains of the Matrice church restored by the architect Alvaro Siza

The town suffered a mass migration of residents after the 1968 earthquake in Sicily’s Belice Valley destroyed much of its architecture. Pictured: The remains of the Matrice church restored by the architect Alvaro Siza

All the homes being auctioned have multiple floors and thick walls and those on Belvedere Street, overlooking a green valley, are considered the most attractive

All the homes being auctioned have multiple floors and thick walls and those on Belvedere Street, overlooking a green valley, are considered the most attractive

All the homes being auctioned have multiple floors and thick walls and those on Belvedere Street, overlooking a green valley, are considered the most attractive

Town mayor Domenico Venuti told CNN: ‘All buildings belong to the city council, which speeds up the sale and reduces red tape.

‘Before launching the scheme we first had to recover the old parts of Salemi where the houses are located, upgrading infrastructures and services from roads to electric grids and sewage pipes.

‘Now the town is ready for the next step.’

Salemi is by no means the first town in southern Italy to trial the one-euro-home project, with Cinquefrondi in Calabria doing the same thing in July and Mussomeli and Bivona, both in Sicily, trying it last year.

Salemi officials were among the first to suggest the idea of selling houses for next to nothing. Pictured: An empty pool at the hotel Villa Mokarta in the town

Salemi officials were among the first to suggest the idea of selling houses for next to nothing. Pictured: An empty pool at the hotel Villa Mokarta in the town

Salemi officials were among the first to suggest the idea of selling houses for next to nothing. Pictured: An empty pool at the hotel Villa Mokarta in the town

Maintenance work was needed on risky crumbly areas of the town and the coronavirus pandemic also delayed the project

Maintenance work was needed on risky crumbly areas of the town and the coronavirus pandemic also delayed the project

Maintenance work was needed on risky crumbly areas of the town and the coronavirus pandemic also delayed the project

The Collegio dei Gesuiti, which hosts the Mafia's Museum Leonardo Sciascia in Salemi

The Collegio dei Gesuiti, which hosts the Mafia's Museum Leonardo Sciascia in Salemi

The 1968 earthquake in Sicily's Belice Valley has left much of the medieval town in ruins, including the Piazza Alicia (pictured)

The 1968 earthquake in Sicily's Belice Valley has left much of the medieval town in ruins, including the Piazza Alicia (pictured)

The 1968 earthquake in Sicily’s Belice Valley has left much of the medieval town in ruins, including the Piazza Alicia (pictured left). Right: The Collegio dei Gesuiti, which hosts the Mafia’s Museum Leonardo Sciascia in Salemi

The homes up for auction located in the town's historic city centre enclosed by the ancient town walls and date back to the 1600s

The homes up for auction located in the town's historic city centre enclosed by the ancient town walls and date back to the 1600s

The homes up for auction located in the town’s historic city centre enclosed by the ancient town walls and date back to the 1600s

But Salemi officials were among the first to suggest the idea of selling houses for next to nothing.

Mr Venuti said the project could not be signed off on time because of bureaucratic issues and the need to give some of the properties a makeover first.

Maintenance work was needed on risky crumbly areas of the town and the coronavirus pandemic also delayed the project.

Italy was one of the countries worst hit by Covid-19 earlier this year but Sicily was one of the least impacted areas in the country.

The buildings are made from a yellowish-pink solid sandstone extracted from nearby caves called 'campanedda' or 'bell' in local dialect

The buildings are made from a yellowish-pink solid sandstone extracted from nearby caves called 'campanedda' or 'bell' in local dialect

The buildings are made from a yellowish-pink solid sandstone extracted from nearby caves called ‘campanedda’ or ‘bell’ in local dialect

Much of the town lies abandoned

Much of the town lies abandoned

Salemi officials were among the first to suggest the idea of selling houses for next to nothing

Salemi officials were among the first to suggest the idea of selling houses for next to nothing

Much of the town lies abandoned. Salemi officials were among the first to suggest the idea of selling houses for next to nothing

The medieval town was seriously damaged by the Belice earthquake in 1968, which saw at least 4,000 residents flee

The medieval town was seriously damaged by the Belice earthquake in 1968, which saw at least 4,000 residents flee

The medieval town was seriously damaged by the Belice earthquake in 1968, which saw at least 4,000 residents flee

Potential buyers are not required to visit Salemi before making an offer, according to town mayor Domenico Venuti

Potential buyers are not required to visit Salemi before making an offer, according to town mayor Domenico Venuti

Potential buyers are not required to visit Salemi before making an offer, according to town mayor Domenico Venuti

Salemi currently has around 30 reported cases within its 10,971 population but Mr Venuti insisted that now was the right time to move forward with the project, despite some resident’s concerns about the spread.

Houses will go up on sale at a starting price of €1 (£0.91) each and sold to the highest bidder, in the same way the Sicilian town of Sambuca did last year.

They are located in the town’s historic city centre enclosed by the ancient town walls and date back to the 1600s.

All have multiple floors and thick walls, while a few have panoramic balconies and those on Belvedere Street, overlooking a green valley, are considered the most attractive.

The town’s main piazza is a crumbled church, with the ruins of its stone apse still standing after the 1968 earthquake which killed at least 231 people in the region.

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34892150 8883347 image a 34 1603789248465

Thousands of residents fled Salemi after the 1968 earthquake. Pictured: A displaced family stand outside the ruins of their home

Thousands of residents fled Salemi after the 1968 earthquake. Pictured: A displaced family stand outside the ruins of their home

Thousands of residents fled Salemi after the 1968 earthquake. Pictured: A displaced family stand outside the ruins of their home

The earthquake sequence, centred between the towns of Gibellina, Salaparuta and Poggioreale, killed at least 231 people, possibly more than 400, with between 632 and about 1,000 injured and left 100,000 homeless. Pictured: Salemi after the earthquake

The earthquake sequence, centred between the towns of Gibellina, Salaparuta and Poggioreale, killed at least 231 people, possibly more than 400, with between 632 and about 1,000 injured and left 100,000 homeless. Pictured: Salemi after the earthquake

The earthquake sequence, centred between the towns of Gibellina, Salaparuta and Poggioreale, killed at least 231 people, possibly more than 400, with between 632 and about 1,000 injured and left 100,000 homeless. Pictured: Salemi after the earthquake

The immediate relief effort was hampered by a lack of disaster relief planning at both local and provincial levels. Pictured: A displaced family hang out their washing to dry after losing their home

The immediate relief effort was hampered by a lack of disaster relief planning at both local and provincial levels. Pictured: A displaced family hang out their washing to dry after losing their home

The immediate relief effort was hampered by a lack of disaster relief planning at both local and provincial levels. Pictured: A displaced family hang out their washing to dry after losing their home

The houses are made from a yellowish-pink solid sandstone extracted from nearby caves called ‘campanedda’ or ‘bell’ in local dialect, named after the noise it makes when hit with a hammer.

Rural families in medieval times would sleep in the upper floors of the buildings, while their animals would live in the floors below.

The town is located at an altitude of 450 meters above sea level, meaning it is cooler than much of Sicily during the island’s notoriously hot summers.

Potential buyers are not required to visit Salemi before making an offer, according to Mr Venuti, but they are required to send a detailed restyle plan to demonstrate their commitment to the project.

He said there are at least another 100 dwellings in the town that could potentially be sold after this first lot. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Australia

Cocaine hits Australian streets laced with drug from China

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cocaine hits australian streets laced with drug from china

Authorities fear a US-style opioid death surge after cocaine reached Australian streets laced with fentanyl – a drug so deadly it takes an amount equivalent to just four grains of salt to kill. 

The NSW Health Dep­artment issued a warning to the public, saying the opioids fentanyl and acetylfentanyl have ‘recently been identified as likely adulterants in cocaine or ketamine’.

Fentanyl is used legally by doctors for pain relief, but dealers have started using the chemical to cut other drugs. 

Fentanyl is used legally by doctors for pain relief, but dealers have started using the chemical to cut other drugs

Fentanyl is used legally by doctors for pain relief, but dealers have started using the chemical to cut other drugs

Fentanyl is used legally by doctors for pain relief, but dealers have started using the chemical to cut other drugs

The Department told Australians to look out for symptoms of drowsiness or skin going blue if people have taken cocaine.

The drug has killed tens of thousands of people in the United States, prompting President Donald Trump to call on China to declare fentanyl a ‘controlled substance’ and stop pumping it out.  

NSW Poisons Information Centre Professor Andrew Dawson said people in NSW who recently took what they believed to be cocaine or ketamine developed toxicity from acetylfentanyl and fentanyl in NSW.

‘We’ve seen several people recently where acetylfentanyl was taken unknowingly and was associated with serious harm,’ Prof Dawson told The Daily Telegraph. 

‘It’s important that people realise an overdose can occur with very small doses of fentanyl-related substances.’

The warning comes a week after a man died and two women were hospitalised after overdosing on cocaine in Lidcombe, in Sydney’s south west. 

Health authorities haven’t determined if fentanyl led to the incidents. 

Dr John Coyne from Australian Strategic Policy said it’s ‘incredibly difficult’ for the Chinese government to be able to control and regulate the pharmaceutical industry. 

‘We need to work with the Chinese government to better regulate their chemical and pharmaceutical industries in mainland China to prevent these sorts of drugs from being produced there and moved around the globe,’ he said. 

The warning comes a week after a man died and two women were hospitalised after overdosing on cocaine in Lidcombe, in Sydney's south west

The warning comes a week after a man died and two women were hospitalised after overdosing on cocaine in Lidcombe, in Sydney's south west

The warning comes a week after a man died and two women were hospitalised after overdosing on cocaine in Lidcombe, in Sydney’s south west

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