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Australian reveals horror fight to get home for her father’s funeral and says it is now virtually

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australian reveals horror fight to get home for her fathers funeral and says it is now virtually

Jessica Sauer never imagined that she would not be able to return home, especially for a parent’s funeral.  

But two weeks after her father’s sudden death, the Australian expat living in Scotland has found herself locked out of the country as prices surge amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Ms Sauer, 26, received the devastating news on July 5 that her father Steven, 58, had passed away unexpectedly in her hometown, Armidale, in northern NSW. 

She and her partner Connor McLeod, 28, immediately kick-started the complex process to get her Scottish boyfriend a visa so he could accompany her back home. 

Jessica Sauer, 26, learnt on July 5 that her father Steven Wright (pictured together), 58, passed away in her hometown Armidale

Jessica Sauer, 26, learnt on July 5 that her father Steven Wright (pictured together), 58, passed away in her hometown Armidale

Jessica Sauer, 26, learnt on July 5 that her father Steven Wright (pictured together), 58, passed away in her hometown Armidale

Although still waiting approval, the couple rushed to buy flights on July 12 after learning the NSW Government  were about to start charging overseas travellers for hotel quarantine, costing around $4,000.   

But when they arrived at Manchester airport six days later for their Lufthansa flight, they were told they were not allowed board.

The issue was not Mr McLeod’s Australian visa status however, but the fact that Japan, their stopover destination, is currently prohibiting non-nationals from entering the transit terminal without a visa. 

They were told their only options were to book the next available economy flight on August 31 or buy a business class seat for a whopping £6,000 – around $11,000. 

‘I burst in tears and rushed to the bathroom. It was the most devastated that I have ever felt in my life,’ Ms Sauer told Daily Mail Australia.

‘The dread of having to call my mother and sister and tell them I wouldn’t be home.

‘We were next to teenagers in shorts boarding a flight to go on holiday in Spain, and there we were just trying to go home to bury my father.’

‘I felt so helpless. I felt like I had no hope left in humanity. ‘

The couple did not think to check transit visa requirements as they have never encountered them in the past. 

Ms Sauer and her partner Connor McLeod, 28, (pictured together) were stopped from boarding their Lufthansa flight on July 18 due to a new Japan transit rule prohibiting non-nationals from waiting in the airport without a visa

Ms Sauer and her partner Connor McLeod, 28, (pictured together) were stopped from boarding their Lufthansa flight on July 18 due to a new Japan transit rule prohibiting non-nationals from waiting in the airport without a visa

Ms Sauer and her partner Connor McLeod, 28, (pictured together) were stopped from boarding their Lufthansa flight on July 18 due to a new Japan transit rule prohibiting non-nationals from waiting in the airport without a visa

Having provided their passport details at the time of booking, they expected the airline would have flagged the restrictions prior to their flight.  

‘The worst case scenario at that stage was Connor not being able to board the flight and me going on without him,’ Ms Sauer said. 

‘We never comprehended that an Australian citizen would have a problem getting on the flight.

‘In no normal world would you have to check that you would have to pass through a country. We had not been notified at all and we had no idea we should have to check.’

Adding to their devastation a rising demand on business class seats meant there was no guarantee they would be able to secure a ticket. 

Since the number of arrivals allowed to enter was slashed from 7000 to 4000 earlier this month, Ms Sauer was told airlines have been selling the majority of available tickets from their business class pool to cover the cost of flying below capacity. 

‘It’s disgusting. The woman at the service desk told us the other day they 42 people in business class and only six in economy,’ she said.

Ms Sauer now fears she will not be home in time to attend her father's funeral with her sister (pictured together) and her mum

Ms Sauer now fears she will not be home in time to attend her father's funeral with her sister (pictured together) and her mum

Ms Sauer now fears she will not be home in time to attend her father’s funeral with her sister (pictured together) and her mum

Ms Sauer pictured with her father (left), sister Madeleine, (second left), grandmother (centre),  and mother Deb (second from the right) during a trip home last October

Ms Sauer pictured with her father (left), sister Madeleine, (second left), grandmother (centre),  and mother Deb (second from the right) during a trip home last October

Ms Sauer pictured with her father (left), sister Madeleine, (second left), grandmother (centre),  and mother Deb (second from the right) during a trip home last October

‘This whole process makes me sick, that airlines will just take your money and not have a care in the world for your best interests but also to my home country for making it impossible for an Australian Citizen to return home in an emergency.’ 

Ms Sauer has paid $1500 for her father’s body to be embalmed, in the hope she will see him one last time before he is cremated. 

With $8000 worth of flight refunds pending, and the prospect of now having to foot the bill of quarantine, she has no spare money to purchase an upfront ticket home.

Even if she made a flight tomorrow, the time frame to say goodbye to her dad is closing in. 

‘It impossible to comprehend we have to wait another six weeks to come home. 

 Even if I arrived in the next few days I would still be running out of time with quarantine. If I miss that time frame, I will miss the cremation.’

 ‘It’s like being told your dad is dead but then getting back and being given a box of ashes.

‘You miss the process and you have no concept that box is your dad.’  

Over the past two weeks Ms Sauer has contacted Australian authorities more than a dozen times for advice only to be told to ‘wait’.

‘We have called the Department of Home Affairs, the Global Service Centre to try and push things on. We have been on the phone four or five times. But overall, we have just been told the same thing – just wait,’ she said.

Ms Sauer, a telecommunications consultant, met Mr McLeod while working the snow season at Falls Creek in 2015. The couple then began travelling across the globe together to work at other ski resorts

Ms Sauer, a telecommunications consultant, met Mr McLeod while working the snow season at Falls Creek in 2015. The couple then began travelling across the globe together to work at other ski resorts

Ms Sauer, a telecommunications consultant, met Mr McLeod while working the snow season at Falls Creek in 2015. The couple then began travelling across the globe together to work at other ski resorts

The couple have now settled in East Lothian, Scotland, where McLeod is originally from

The couple have now settled in East Lothian, Scotland, where McLeod is originally from

The couple have now settled in East Lothian, Scotland, where McLeod is originally from

‘We went to the Australian embassy in the UK. They were pretty unhelpful they just directed us to check the latest travel information on the website. So did the Department of Home Affairs.  

The Australian, who has spent more than five years chasing ski seasons across the globe, settled in Scotland in 2017, where the couple now own a home. 

Aside from paying for their mortgage, they now have the added expense of paying for her father’s unexpected funeral and travel costs.

Ms Sauer, a telecommunication consultant, is struggling to pay the bills and has had her hours reduced.

Ms Sauer said if she had made her July 18 flight, she may have been able to handle the quarantine fee should she have to, but the exorbitant cost of rebooking flights amid the government’s latest regulation has made new tickets inaccessible. 

‘I know there is a pandemic, and s**t is hitting the fan, and we have to quarantine, I would even be okay paying for it if we had made the flight,’ she said. 

Ms Sauer said is concerned about the effect the situation is having on her mum Deb and younger sister Madeleine, 24, who are now ‘on hold’ waiting for her returns. 

‘They are trying to be strong and carry on without me but it has already been two weeks.’

She believes she would not be facing such dire circumstances had the government not restricted incoming travellers and had a system in place to fast track entry for those in extreme situations. 

‘There is no system in place to help people in exceptional circumstances,’ she said. 

Ms Sauer pictured back in Australia with her father, sister and mother for Madeleine's 21st birthday in 2017

Ms Sauer pictured back in Australia with her father, sister and mother for Madeleine's 21st birthday in 2017

Ms Sauer pictured back in Australia with her father, sister and mother for Madeleine’s 21st birthday in 2017

‘Zero help. Zero guidance. Nothing. We have been given absolutely no help, just told ”you have to wait”. They don’t care.

‘We submitted forms two weeks ago to ask for a quarantine exemption to go straight to my sisters house and that has still not come back.’  

‘If they are letting 4000 people in every week, are they all going home for deaths?’ 

‘If not, who the f**k are they letting in? Why are they not prioritising? 

‘I can’t believe they let people from their own country go through this.’

Still seeking other options to get home early, but losing hope, Ms Sauer has managed to maintain her sense of humour. 

She reminisces about the last time she saw her father, during a trip home last year, and the when they last spoke six weeks ago.

Back then she could not have imagined the extraordinary challenges she would face trying to see him again during a global pandemic.

‘If you were going to die suddenly on me dad, could you not have waited a bit longer?’ she said.  

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Australia

Anti-lockown protesters in Melbourne threaten to cause another huge COVID-19 outbreak

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anti lockown protesters in melbourne threaten to cause another huge covid 19 outbreak

Anti-lockdown protesters in Melbourne are threatening to cause another COVID-19 outbreak as the city teeters on the brink of a third explosion and cases surge in the southeast.    

Public health authorities are racing to stop infections growing in the Casey and Dandenong council areas on the Melbourne’s southeast rim, which now has 90 active cases.

Five households in Clyde, Cranbourne North, Hallam and Narre Warren South are linked to 34 active cases.

Daniel Andrews urged covidiots on Saturday not to gather at planned protests across the city or ‘do anything to undermine’ its progress with tackling COVID-19.

It comes as Victoria recorded 21 new cases of COVID-19, the lowest daily increase since June, and a further seven deaths.  

Metropolitan Melbourne’s 14-day average has plummeted and now sits at 39.3 as the state moves to a COVID normal. In regional Victoria, the 14-day average is at just 1.9. 

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33359848 8749511 image a 3 1600472892472

Daniel Andrews (pictured) urged covidiots on Saturday not to gather at planned protests across the city or ‘do anything to undermine’ its progress with tackling COVID-19

A heavy Police presence is seen in Dandenong following an anti-lockdown protest on August 28

A heavy Police presence is seen in Dandenong following an anti-lockdown protest on August 28

A heavy Police presence is seen in Dandenong following an anti-lockdown protest on August 28

This is the ninth day in a row Victoria has recorded a daily infections increase below 50. 

Metropolitan Melbourne is under strict Stage Four lockdown – limiting Melburnians travelling more than 5km from their homes and enforcing a 9pm to 5am curfew. 

The premier did not comment on where Saturday demonstrations would be, with protesters taking caution when sharing information online.  

Multiple rallies have taken place in Melbourne the past few weekends.  

Victoria Police have responded with a heavy presence – handing out dozens of fines and making arrests. 

‘Let’s not lose sight of the fact that this week we have seen, day after day, not the 725 cases we had five and a half weeks ago – we have made very significant progress,’ Mr Andrews said.

‘We’ve got regional Victoria opening up. People should be positive and optimistic this strategy is working, and therefore, let’s not any of us do anything to undermine that.’  

The premier on Saturday did not comment on where Saturday demonstrations would be, with protesters taking caution when sharing information online. Pictured: Protesters rallying against lockdown regulations on Monday on September 13

The premier on Saturday did not comment on where Saturday demonstrations would be, with protesters taking caution when sharing information online. Pictured: Protesters rallying against lockdown regulations on Monday on September 13

The premier on Saturday did not comment on where Saturday demonstrations would be, with protesters taking caution when sharing information online. Pictured: Protesters rallying against lockdown regulations on Monday on September 13

Mr Andrews’ comments also followed trying to dissuade protesters on Friday by saying their intended actions would be selfish and irresponsible. 

His comments also followed information of a new cluster emerging in the southeast of Melbourne.  

A surge of cases in the Casey and Dandenong area has been linked back to five households in the Afghan community.

There are currently 101 active coronavirus cases in the Casey and Dandenong area with 34 infections linked to five households

There are currently 101 active coronavirus cases in the Casey and Dandenong area with 34 infections linked to five households

There are currently 101 active coronavirus cases in the Casey and Dandenong area with 34 infections linked to five households

Metropolitan Melbourne is under strict Stage Four lockdown - limiting Melburnians travelling more than 5km from their homes and enforcing a 9pm to 5am curfew. Pictured: A person walking through Melbourne's empty city

Metropolitan Melbourne is under strict Stage Four lockdown - limiting Melburnians travelling more than 5km from their homes and enforcing a 9pm to 5am curfew. Pictured: A person walking through Melbourne's empty city

Metropolitan Melbourne is under strict Stage Four lockdown – limiting Melburnians travelling more than 5km from their homes and enforcing a 9pm to 5am curfew. Pictured: A person walking through Melbourne’s empty city

As residents in the city are still under strict Stage Four lockdown, it is thought the infected group may have breached the stay-at-home orders. 

Health authorities are scrambling to track and trace the new surge in cases, and the Victorian government has begun a recruitment drive which sees retired officers re-enlisted to bolster the state’s frontline virus efforts. 

‘Members of those households visiting other households,’ Department of Health and Human Services COVID-19 testing commander Jeroen Weimar said.

‘It is that limited amount of contact, relatively infrequent contact between these five households that has now meant that we have 34 people in five houses experiencing or living with a very real threat of the coronavirus.’

The Victorian government has even began a new recruitment drive that will see retired officers re-enlisted to bolster the state's frontline virus efforts

The Victorian government has even began a new recruitment drive that will see retired officers re-enlisted to bolster the state's frontline virus efforts

The Victorian government has even began a new recruitment drive that will see retired officers re-enlisted to bolster the state’s frontline virus efforts

Police conducting checks on motorists at checkpoints - alongside the Australian Defence Force - to ensure Victorians are following state rules

Police conducting checks on motorists at checkpoints - alongside the Australian Defence Force - to ensure Victorians are following state rules

Police conducting checks on motorists at checkpoints – alongside the Australian Defence Force – to ensure Victorians are following state rules

The cluster – impacting five households in Hallam, Clyde, Narre Warren South and Cranbourne North – first emerged on September 4. 

Cases in the southeast have now spread to Dandenong Police Station and a number of industrial work sites. 

Premier Daniel Andrews on Friday said the actions of the family’s involved in the cluster was ‘disappointing’. 

The cluster which has impacted the five households in Hallam, Clyde, Narre Warren South and Cranbourne North, first emerged on September 4

The cluster which has impacted the five households in Hallam, Clyde, Narre Warren South and Cranbourne North, first emerged on September 4

The cluster which has impacted the five households in Hallam, Clyde, Narre Warren South and Cranbourne North, first emerged on September 4

‘Five kilometres is one thing and visiting others is the real issue here,’ he said. 

‘The rules are in place for a reason and anyone who undermines this, undermines the entire strategy and it means the rules will be on for longer.’ 

The Victorian leader, however, ruled out fines for the group, telling reporters it may discourage others from being completely honest with contact tracers. 

‘I know many Victorians, when you see examples of people not following the rules, that’s disappointing, it makes you angry,’ Mr Andrews said.

‘You need to look at the bigger picture here.

‘We don’t want a situation where people don’t have a sense of confidence and indeed, you know, the sense they’re obliged to tell us the full story as quickly as possible. That’s what we need.’ 

The success of Melbourne's ongoing lockdown could be at risk with a new cluster in the southeast of the city. Pictured: A coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

The success of Melbourne's ongoing lockdown could be at risk with a new cluster in the southeast of the city. Pictured: A coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

The success of Melbourne’s ongoing lockdown could be at risk with a new cluster in the southeast of the city. Pictured: A coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

The Casey and Dandenong cluster is testing the capacity of COVID-detectives. Pictured: Heath workers are seen at a coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

The Casey and Dandenong cluster is testing the capacity of COVID-detectives. Pictured: Heath workers are seen at a coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

The Casey and Dandenong cluster is testing the capacity of COVID-detectives. Pictured: Heath workers are seen at a coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

A health worker is pictured approaching a vehicle at a COVID-19 testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

A health worker is pictured approaching a vehicle at a COVID-19 testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

A health worker is pictured approaching a vehicle at a COVID-19 testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

Despite the new cluster, Victoria’s overall case numbers are continuing to decline. 

With contact tracers ‘painstakingly’ working around the clock to slow the spread of the virus and bringing the city out of lockdown, the Victorian government is set to introduce a controversial new policy seeing retired cops re-enlisted in the force.

The Department of Justice and Community Safety and the Department of Health and Human Services is behind the push which will see former cops given paid training before being assigned specific COVID-19 roles.

These roles include industry enforcement, testing support, door-knocking and the airport patrol. 

A man with a dog is seen being questioned by two police officers in the Dandenong area

A man with a dog is seen being questioned by two police officers in the Dandenong area

A man with a dog is seen being questioned by two police officers in the Dandenong area

However, not everybody is in favour of the move to bring back veteran police.     

‘Police veterans have a real contribution to make to the ongoing safety of the community but their use to issue infringements, detain people and conduct checks on private property is entirely inappropriate,’ Opposition Police and Community Safety spokesman David Southwick told the Herald Sun.   

Ivan Ray, who served in the Victorian Police Force for more than three decades, said it was a recipe for disaster for the veterans. 

‘It’s effectively a health department police force, and we know the Health Department is no good at enforcement, we saw that in the hotel quarantine operation,’ Mr Ray said.

‘Veterans can play a part and they can support policing, but it has to be by the police department.’

Health authorities are urging anyone in the southeast of Melbourne to diligently monitor their health and immediately get tested if feeling unwell. 

Health authorities are urging anyone in the southeast of Melbourne to diligently monitor their health and immediately get tested if feeling unwell

Health authorities are urging anyone in the southeast of Melbourne to diligently monitor their health and immediately get tested if feeling unwell

Health authorities are urging anyone in the southeast of Melbourne to diligently monitor their health and immediately get tested if feeling unwell

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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg DEAD

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justice ruth bader ginsburg dead

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died aged 87 after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer, the Supreme Court has announced. 

The judge, only the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court Justice, passed away surrounded by her family at her home in Washington D.C. following complications with her illness. 

Ginsburg, who served for almost 27 years on the highest court of the land, had battled several bouts of cancer after first being diagnosed in 2009.

Her death paves the way for Donald Trump to expand his conservative majority on the Supreme Court ahead of November’s election. 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured above in 2009, served for almost 27 years on the highest court of the land and was the second woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured above in 2009, served for almost 27 years on the highest court of the land and was the second woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured above in 2009, served for almost 27 years on the highest court of the land and was the second woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court

Ginsburg, the leader of the court’s four-member liberal wing, voiced concerns about the political impact of her passing in the days leading up to her death. 

‘My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed,’ the legal pioneer said in a statement dictated to her granddaughter Clara Spera days before her death.

Chief Justice John Roberts led tributes to his colleague Friday describing her as a ‘champion of justice’.

‘Our nation has lost a justice of historic stature,’ Roberts said in a statement. 

‘We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her, a tired and resolute champion of justice.’  

Ginsburg’s death gives Trump the opportunity to name her successor.

The president has already appointed two members of the Supreme Court, Justices Neil M. Gorsuch and Brett M. Kavanaugh, in a move that pushes the court increasingly right wing.

The replacement of Ginsburg by another Republican will leave the court Democrats outnumbered, with six Republicans to their three.   

Incredible life of the woman who became the Notorious RBG: How Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Brooklyn-born daughter of Russian Jewish migrants became a trailblazer, the second woman to serve as Supreme Court Justice and a feminist pop culture icon 

by Dusica Sue Malesevic for DailyMail.com

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court Justice, a legal pioneer who broke barriers for women in law, a feminist icon to many, and the recent pop culture phenomenon known as the ‘Notorious RBG’ has died. She was 87.

The collar-wearing octogenarian captured the public’s imagination – especially for those on the left who offered everything from kale to protective bubbles to later on wearing masks on social media to safeguard her continued tenure on the highest court in the land. The list of things that Ginsburg inspired is long: two films, memes that range from the ribald to inspirational, mountains of memorabilia from t-shirts to totes, cocktails, a book on her workout, and even tattoos.

But beyond the persona of the ‘Notorious RBG’ and her groundbreaking law career, Ginsburg was a mother of two, had two grandchildren, and was married to her husband Martin D. Ginsburg for 56 years until his death in 2010. She blazed a path for women in the legal profession, and at five-foot-one had become a towering figure in Washington, D.C. 

Ginsburg battled several bouts of cancer after being first diagnosed in 2009. 

Above, Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) at Fort Sill, Oklahoma in 1954. They were married for 56 years and met while they both attended Cornell University. After graduating, the couple moved to Fort Sill so Martin could do his military service

Above, Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) at Fort Sill, Oklahoma in 1954. They were married for 56 years and met while they both attended Cornell University. After graduating, the couple moved to Fort Sill so Martin could do his military service

Above, Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) at Fort Sill, Oklahoma in 1954. They were married for 56 years and met while they both attended Cornell University. After graduating, the couple moved to Fort Sill so Martin could do his military service

It was love at first Charles Dickens. Ruth Bader Ginsburg, (left), pictured here with her husband of 56 years, Martin D. Ginsburg (right). They met while college students at Cornell University during the 1950s. Ruth was impressed by Martin's answer to a quiz question during a literature class taught by famous novelist Vladimir Nabokov, according to the biography called ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life’ by Jane Sherron De Hart

It was love at first Charles Dickens. Ruth Bader Ginsburg, (left), pictured here with her husband of 56 years, Martin D. Ginsburg (right). They met while college students at Cornell University during the 1950s. Ruth was impressed by Martin's answer to a quiz question during a literature class taught by famous novelist Vladimir Nabokov, according to the biography called ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life’ by Jane Sherron De Hart

It was love at first Charles Dickens. Ruth Bader Ginsburg, (left), pictured here with her husband of 56 years, Martin D. Ginsburg (right). They met while college students at Cornell University during the 1950s. Ruth was impressed by Martin’s answer to a quiz question during a literature class taught by famous novelist Vladimir Nabokov, according to the biography called ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life’ by Jane Sherron De Hart

The Ginsburg family, above, in a photo taken in 1958. Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) with their daughter Jane C. Ginsburg (center). Jane C. Ginsburg followed in her mother's steps and became a lawyer after graduating from Harvard Law School, and currently teaches at Columbia Law School

The Ginsburg family, above, in a photo taken in 1958. Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) with their daughter Jane C. Ginsburg (center). Jane C. Ginsburg followed in her mother's steps and became a lawyer after graduating from Harvard Law School, and currently teaches at Columbia Law School

The Ginsburg family, above, in a photo taken in 1958. Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) with their daughter Jane C. Ginsburg (center). Jane C. Ginsburg followed in her mother’s steps and became a lawyer after graduating from Harvard Law School, and currently teaches at Columbia Law School

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (center) and Martin D. Ginsburg (standing behind her) married in 1954 after she graduated at the top of her class at Cornell. Their first child, Jane C. Ginsburg, was born in  1955, and their second child, James S. Ginsburg, in 1965. Shown here on Oct. 21, 1993 at the Supreme Court, are from left, son-in-law George T. Spera Jr and her daughter Jane C. Ginsburg, her husband Martin, and her son James S. Ginsburg. The judge's grandchildren Clara Spera (left) and Paul Spera (right) are in front

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (center) and Martin D. Ginsburg (standing behind her) married in 1954 after she graduated at the top of her class at Cornell. Their first child, Jane C. Ginsburg, was born in  1955, and their second child, James S. Ginsburg, in 1965. Shown here on Oct. 21, 1993 at the Supreme Court, are from left, son-in-law George T. Spera Jr and her daughter Jane C. Ginsburg, her husband Martin, and her son James S. Ginsburg. The judge's grandchildren Clara Spera (left) and Paul Spera (right) are in front

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (center) and Martin D. Ginsburg (standing behind her) married in 1954 after she graduated at the top of her class at Cornell. Their first child, Jane C. Ginsburg, was born in  1955, and their second child, James S. Ginsburg, in 1965. Shown here on Oct. 21, 1993 at the Supreme Court, are from left, son-in-law George T. Spera Jr and her daughter Jane C. Ginsburg, her husband Martin, and her son James S. Ginsburg. The judge’s grandchildren Clara Spera (left) and Paul Spera (right) are in front

A 2018 biography emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s during a time where some women went to college to get their ‘MRS degree,’ meaning that it was a means to an end to find a spouse. Ginsburg said Martin was the ‘the only young man I dated who cared that I had a brain,’ and they had a long-lasting marriage until Martin died in 2010 from cancer at the age of 78. They are pictured here at a gala opening night dinner after a Washington Opera performance on October 21, 2000

A 2018 biography emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s during a time where some women went to college to get their ‘MRS degree,’ meaning that it was a means to an end to find a spouse. Ginsburg said Martin was the ‘the only young man I dated who cared that I had a brain,’ and they had a long-lasting marriage until Martin died in 2010 from cancer at the age of 78. They are pictured here at a gala opening night dinner after a Washington Opera performance on October 21, 2000

A 2018 biography emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s during a time where some women went to college to get their ‘MRS degree,’ meaning that it was a means to an end to find a spouse. Ginsburg said Martin was the ‘the only young man I dated who cared that I had a brain,’ and they had a long-lasting marriage until Martin died in 2010 from cancer at the age of 78. They are pictured here at a gala opening night dinner after a Washington Opera performance on October 21, 2000

Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her engagement photo taken in December 1953 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her engagement photo taken in December 1953 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her engagement photo taken in December 1953 

Born on March 15, 1933 in Brooklyn, Joan Ruth Bader was the second daughter of Russian Jewish immigrants, Celia and Nathan Bader. Her older sister, who would later die at aged six from meningitis, nicknamed her ‘Kiki’ for apparently being ‘a kicky baby.’ Her mother, Celia, a garment factory worker, would encourage Ruth – she went by her middle name to distinguish herself from the other Joans in her Brooklyn class – to attain a higher level of education than she did. 

‘My mother told me two things constantly. One was to be a lady, and the other was to be independent. The study of law was unusual for women of my generation. For most girls growing up in the ’40s, the most important degree was not your BA, but your MRS,’ she recalled to the ACLU, referring to the idea that women went to college to land a man, get married and become a missus – not to get a bachelor’s degree. 

Her mother died from cancer right before Ginsburg graduated from high school.

In 1950, Ginsburg started attending Cornell University where she would meet her husband, Martin D. Ginsburg, during a literature class taught by famous novelist Vladimir Nabokov, according to the biography called ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life’ by Jane Sherron De Hart.

Martin was able to answer Nabokov’s quiz question about Charles Dickens, and Ginsburg was smitten, later saying that Martin was the ‘the only young man I dated who cared that I had a brain.’

‘Meeting Marty was by far the most fortunate thing that ever happened to me,’ Ginsburg said in one of the films about her, the documentary ‘RBG.’ ‘Marty was a man blessed with a wonderful sense of humor. I tend to be rather sober.’

At aged 21, Ginsburg, who majored in government, graduated at the top of her class in 1954 at Cornell and married Martin soon after. Their first child, Jane C. Ginsburg, was born on July 21, 1955. Due to Martin’s military service, they moved to Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

‘After dinner, the newlyweds often spent their evenings reading aloud to each other from Pepys, Tolstoy, Dickens and even Spinoza, although the philosopher was tougher fare,’ De Hart wrote, according to a Washington Post article about the biography.

De Hart emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s, and the couple decided they both would pursue careers. After two years in Oklahoma, Ginsburg and Martin went to Harvard Law School in 1956. Women had only started being admitted to the law school six years earlier, and Ginsburg was one of nine women in a class of about 500.

Martin graduated from Harvard in 1958 and practiced tax law in New York. Ginsburg switched schools, attending Columbia Law School to be close to her husband. In 1959, she graduated with her law degree, a Juris Doctor, from Columbia, and was tied for first in her class.

A young Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured here in 1977, who broke barriers in the legal profession to become the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court justice

A young Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured here in 1977, who broke barriers in the legal profession to become the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court justice

A young Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured here in 1977, who broke barriers in the legal profession to become the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court justice

Despite the credentials, Ginsburg, now 26, was still a woman and she had a hard time finding a place at a law firm after graduation.

‘You think about what would have happened… Suppose I had gotten a job as a permanent associate. Probably I would have climbed up the ladder and today I would be a retired partner. So often in life, things that you regard as an impediment turn out to be great good fortune,’ Ginsburg said during the documentary series, ‘Makers: Women Who Make America.’

Ginsburg was also rejected for a Supreme Court clerkship due to being a woman. But there were successes as well: she was the first female member of the Harvard Law Review and was elected to the Columbia Law Review as well. Eventually, Ginsburg landed a clerkship for a judge of the US District Court for the Southern District of New York.

After two years with the Southern District, Ginsburg was a research associate and associate director for the Project of International Procedure at Columbia Law School. She also learned Swedish, and conducted research in Sweden for a book that she co-authored on civil procedure in the country. 

After serving as a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for 13 years, Ginsburg was nominated by President Bill Clinton to Supreme Court after Justice Byron White announced he was retiring. Clinton (left) is shaking Ginsburg's hand during the announcement in the Rose Garden at the White House on June 14, 1993

After serving as a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for 13 years, Ginsburg was nominated by President Bill Clinton to Supreme Court after Justice Byron White announced he was retiring. Clinton (left) is shaking Ginsburg's hand during the announcement in the Rose Garden at the White House on June 14, 1993

After serving as a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for 13 years, Ginsburg was nominated by President Bill Clinton to Supreme Court after Justice Byron White announced he was retiring. Clinton (left) is shaking Ginsburg’s hand during the announcement in the Rose Garden at the White House on June 14, 1993

'The announcement of this vacancy,' Clinton said on June 14, 1993, 'brought forth a unique outpouring of support for distinguished Americans on Judge Ginsburg’s behalf. What caused that outpouring is the essential quality of the judge herself: her deep respect for others and her willingness to subvert self-interest to the interest of our people and their institutions.' Ginsburg (pictured) at the announcement ceremony at the White House's Rose Garden

'The announcement of this vacancy,' Clinton said on June 14, 1993, 'brought forth a unique outpouring of support for distinguished Americans on Judge Ginsburg’s behalf. What caused that outpouring is the essential quality of the judge herself: her deep respect for others and her willingness to subvert self-interest to the interest of our people and their institutions.' Ginsburg (pictured) at the announcement ceremony at the White House's Rose Garden

‘The announcement of this vacancy,’ Clinton said on June 14, 1993, ‘brought forth a unique outpouring of support for distinguished Americans on Judge Ginsburg’s behalf. What caused that outpouring is the essential quality of the judge herself: her deep respect for others and her willingness to subvert self-interest to the interest of our people and their institutions.’ Ginsburg (pictured) at the announcement ceremony at the White House’s Rose Garden

In 1963, she started teaching at Rutgers University School of Law when there were few female law professors. Also during this time, she and Martin had their second child, James S. Ginsburg, on September 8, 1965. She taught at Rutgers until 1972 and then moved to Columbia Law School, where, at aged 39, she was the first woman put on a tenure track.

She taught at Columbia for eight years, co-authored a law school book, and also worked as general counsel for the ACLU, where she argued several hundred gender discrimination cases, six of which were before the Supreme Court. 

By 1980, Ginsburg, then 47, was selected to be a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, which is often a springboard to the Supreme Court. After thirteen years as a judge on that court, President Bill Clinton nominated the 60-year-old Ginsburg for the Supreme Court after Justice Byron White said he was retiring. 

‘The announcement of this vacancy,’ Clinton said on June 14, 1993, according to a YouTube video courtesy of the William J. Clinton Presidential Library, ‘brought forth a unique outpouring of support for distinguished Americans on Judge Ginsburg’s behalf. What caused that outpouring is the essential quality of the judge herself: her deep respect for others and her willingness to subvert self-interest to the interest of our people and their institutions.’

At the announcement, Ginsburg said: ‘Most closely, I have been aided by my life’s partner, Martin D. Ginsburg, who has been, since our teenage years, my best friend and biggest booster.’

On August 4, 1993, the US Senate confirmed her by a vote of 96 to 3, the New York Times reported. She was sworn in as a justice on August 10, 1993.

Later in October 1993, a photo shows Ginsburg and her family at the court. Her daughter, Jane C. Ginsburg, followed in her footsteps, graduating from Harvard Law School, and currently teaches at Columbia Law School. She married George T. Spera Jr and they have two children together: Paul Spera, who is an actor, and Clara Spera, who is also a lawyer and clerked for the US District of the Southern District of New York. 

With a vote of 96 to 3, the US Senate approved Ginsburg's nomination to the Supreme Court. She was confirmed, on August 3, 1993, to the position vacated by retiring Associate Justice Byron White. President Bill Clinton (left), who nominated Ginsburg (right), is seen here walking with her on the White House colonnade

With a vote of 96 to 3, the US Senate approved Ginsburg's nomination to the Supreme Court. She was confirmed, on August 3, 1993, to the position vacated by retiring Associate Justice Byron White. President Bill Clinton (left), who nominated Ginsburg (right), is seen here walking with her on the White House colonnade

With a vote of 96 to 3, the US Senate approved Ginsburg’s nomination to the Supreme Court. She was confirmed, on August 3, 1993, to the position vacated by retiring Associate Justice Byron White. President Bill Clinton (left), who nominated Ginsburg (right), is seen here walking with her on the White House colonnade

On August 10, 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was sworn in as a Supreme Court Justice - the second woman appointed to the court. Pictured above is Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist (right) swearing Ginsburg (with arm raised) in while her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (second from right) and President Bill Clinton (left) look on

On August 10, 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was sworn in as a Supreme Court Justice - the second woman appointed to the court. Pictured above is Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist (right) swearing Ginsburg (with arm raised) in while her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (second from right) and President Bill Clinton (left) look on

On August 10, 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was sworn in as a Supreme Court Justice – the second woman appointed to the court. Pictured above is Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist (right) swearing Ginsburg (with arm raised) in while her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (second from right) and President Bill Clinton (left) look on

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (left) with her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (right). At the announcement for her nomination to the Supreme Court on on June 14, 1993, Ginsburg said: 'Most closely, I have been aided by my life’s partner, Martin D. Ginsburg, who has been, since our teenage years, my best friend and biggest booster'

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (left) with her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (right). At the announcement for her nomination to the Supreme Court on on June 14, 1993, Ginsburg said: 'Most closely, I have been aided by my life’s partner, Martin D. Ginsburg, who has been, since our teenage years, my best friend and biggest booster'

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (left) with her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (right). At the announcement for her nomination to the Supreme Court on on June 14, 1993, Ginsburg said: ‘Most closely, I have been aided by my life’s partner, Martin D. Ginsburg, who has been, since our teenage years, my best friend and biggest booster’

In her biography, ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life,’ Jane Sherron De emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s, and the couple decided they both would pursue careers. After two years in Oklahoma, Ginsburg and Martin went to Harvard Law School in 1956. Women had only started being admitted to the law school six years earlier, and Ginsburg was one of nine women in a class of about 500.

In her biography, ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life,’ Jane Sherron De emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s, and the couple decided they both would pursue careers. After two years in Oklahoma, Ginsburg and Martin went to Harvard Law School in 1956. Women had only started being admitted to the law school six years earlier, and Ginsburg was one of nine women in a class of about 500.

Jane Sherron De Hart, in her book, ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life,’ emphasized the ‘proto-feminism’ of Martin D. Ginsburg (left) in the 1950s, and the couple decided they both would pursue careers. Both Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) and Martin went to Harvard Law School in 1956. Women had only started being admitted to the law school six years earlier, and Ginsburg was one of nine women in a class of about 500

Ginsburg told the New Republic that her grandchildren loved the fact that she had become an Internet sensation. 

‘At my advanced age – I’m now an octogenarian – I’m constantly amazed by the number of people who want to take my picture,’ she said in 2014.

Not only did people want their photo taken, an interest in her workout also took hold. In her eighties, Ginsburg would do exercises such as a wall squat with a yoga ball. So much so that her trainer of many years, Bryant Johnson, wrote the book ‘The RBG Workout.’

When Ginsburg joined the court in 1993, Sandra Day O’Connor had already been on it since 1981. Sandra Day O’Connor became the first woman to serve on the Supreme Court, nominated by President Ronald Reagan. Ginsburg called O’Connor a mentor, and Ginsburg told The Washington Post that they ‘thought it would be appropriate if we included as part of our robe something typical of a woman.

‘So I have many, many collars.’

Fans of Ginsburg have parsed her collars, which were sometimes lace, gold embellished and beaded. One was dubbed ‘the dissenter.’

A feminist icon to many, Ginsburg told ‘Makers,’ the documentary series, that feminism is ‘that notion that we should each be free to develop our own talents, whatever they may be, and not be held back by artificial barriers – manmade barriers, certainly not heaven sent.’  

After O’Connor retired in early 2006, Ginsburg was the only woman on the court until Sonia Sotomayor was confirmed on August 8, 2009. Ginsburg was also close to conservative justice Antonin Scalia until his death in February 2016.

‘We care about this institution more than our individual egos and we are all devoted to keeping the Supreme Court in the place that it is, as a co-equal third branch of government and I think a model for the world in the collegiality and independence of judges,’ Ginsburg said on C-SPAN.

In 2015, Ginsburg told MSNBC how she would liked to be remembered.  

‘Someone who used whatever talent she had to do her work to the very best of her ability. And to help repair tears in her society, to make things a little better through the use of whatever ability she has. To do something, as my colleague David Souter would say, outside myself. ‘Cause I’ve gotten much more satisfaction for the things that I’ve done for which I was not paid.’  

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Victoria records 21 new coronavirus cases and seven deaths

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victoria records 21 new coronavirus cases and seven deaths

Victoria has recorded 21 new cases of COVID-19 in the lowest daily increase since June, and a further seven deaths. 

Metropolitan Melbourne’s 14-day average has plummeted and now sits at 39.3 as the state moves to a COVID normal. 

In regional Victoria, the 14-day average is at just 1.9.

Victoria recorded 21 new cases of COVID-19 and seven deaths on Saturday. Pictured: A resident walks along South Wharf in Melbourne as part of their permitted exercise on Wednesday

Victoria recorded 21 new cases of COVID-19 and seven deaths on Saturday. Pictured: A resident walks along South Wharf in Melbourne as part of their permitted exercise on Wednesday

Victoria recorded 21 new cases of COVID-19 and seven deaths on Saturday. Pictured: A resident walks along South Wharf in Melbourne as part of their permitted exercise on Wednesday

The daily update comes as disgruntled Melburnians revealed they are planning to take to the streets again in protest of the city’s Stage Four lockdown restrictions. 

Over the last two weekends protesters have clashed with police at the Shrine Of Remembrance, The Tan track and Queen Victoria Market.

Police arrested 74 people and issued at least 176 infringement notices during last Sunday’s protest at the market.  

More to come. 

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