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Britain suffers 771 more Covid-19 cases amid warnings the infection rate could be at ‘tipping point’

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britain suffers 771 more covid 19 cases amid warnings the infection rate could be at tipping point

Britain today recorded 771 more coronavirus cases, just four more than this time last week, and six deaths amid fears more local lockdowns are ‘unavoidable’ with the outbreak having reached a ‘tipping point’.

It brings the total number of coronavirus cases in Great Britain, as of 9am today, to 303,952. Public Health Wales said two people have died after testing positive for coronavirus and there were no deaths in Scotland.

A further four people who tested positive for coronavirus have died in hospital in England, bringing the total number of confirmed reported deaths in hospitals to 29,342, NHS England said. 

Patients were aged between 78 and 84 years old and all had known underlying health conditions. Another five deaths were reported with no positive Covid-19 test result.

It brings the total number of deaths in Britain from coronavirus to 46,125. 

Meanwhile the number of cases in Wales rose by 21, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 17,279.

There have been 18 new cases of coronavirus recorded in Scotland in the past 24 hours and 260 people are in Scottish hospitals, three in intensive care, with Covid-19.   

Northern Ireland stopped reporting its COVID-19 data at weekends so the daily figures for positive cases are for Great Britain only. 

Health chiefs previously said 753 people are now being struck down with the infection each day. The rolling average has been consistently on the up since dropping to a four-month low of 546 on July 8.   

Separate worrying figures released Thursday showed coronavirus cases in England have doubled since June and are at the highest levels since May, with 4,200 people still getting infected each day. 

And government scientists are no longer convinced the R rate is below one, warning it may even be higher than the dreaded threshold in the South West and North West. 

In other developments to Britain’s escalating coronavirus crisis today: 

  • The Government was blasted for imposing a new lockdown in Manchester, east Lancashire and West Yorkshire at the start of Eid; 
  • Cornish locals said they were ‘too scared’ to go food shopping as visitors ignored social distancing and poured down narrow streets amid a rise in staycations;
  • A police officer suffered a head injury while trying to break up a mass street brawl after the force was called to a 200-strong Eid celebration in Ilford;
  • A tearful bride-to-be whose wedding plans were ruined by Boris Johnson’s U-turn on relaxing restrictions said she was ‘absolutely devastated’ and doesn’t know how to ‘move forward’; 
  • England football stars James Maddison, Jack Grealish and Dele Alli ignored Covid rules as they were photographed at a party in Ibiza 
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Sage member warns England should consider closing pubs to open schools next month

Professor Graham Medley, a member of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage), said England could have to consider closing pubs in order to reopen schools next month.

When asked about the chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty’s prediction that the country was ‘near the limits’ of opening up society, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine academic told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: ‘I think that’s quite possible.

‘I think we’re in a situation whereby most people think that opening schools is a priority for the health and wellbeing of children and that when we do that we are going to reconnect lots of households.

‘And so actually, closing some of the other networks, some of the other activities may well be required to enable us to open schools.

‘It might come down to a question of which do you trade off against each other and then that’s a matter of prioritising, do we think pubs are more important than schools?’

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Top experts have warned travel bans between regions may be needed to stop the outbreak from spiralling out of control again, just like it did in March before the national lockdown was introduced. And they called on Britain to take the spike in infections ‘seriously’, saying acting too late could lead to thousands more avoidable deaths and urging the nation to ‘be prepared’ for further action.  

Meanwhile, Boris Johnson revealed he was ‘squeezing the brake pedal’ on easing the coronavirus lockdown and insisted the government had no choice but to delay the further reopening of the already crippled economy because cases have began to ‘creep up’.

The rattled Prime Minister revealed the scheduled August 1 return of casinos, bowling alleys and close contact services like beauticians has now been pushed back to August 15 ‘at the earliest’. Professor Chris Whitty, England’s chief medical officer, warned ministers have pushed lockdown easing measures ‘to their limits’ and admitted that giving people more freedoms will ‘absolutely’ lead to the virus resurging.

Department of Health chiefs yesterday announced another 880 people tested positive for the potentially life-threatening virus – the most recorded in a day since June 28 (901).

It took the rolling seven-day average infections to 753. In comparison, the rate was 737 on Thursday and has been on the up for a fortnight amid mounting fears of a resurgence.

Government statistics show the official size of the UK’s outbreak now stands at 303,181. But the actual size of the outbreak is estimated to be in the millions, based on antibody testing data.

The deaths data does not represent how many Covid-19 patients died within the last 24 hours — it is only how many fatalities have been reported and registered with the authorities.

And the figure does not always match updates provided by the home nations. Department of Health officials work off a different time cut-off, meaning daily updates from Scotland and Northern Ireland are out of sync.

The count announced by NHS England every afternoon, which only takes into account deaths in hospitals, does not match up with the DH figures because they work off a different recording system.

For instance, some deaths announced by NHS England bosses will have already been counted by the Department of Health, which records fatalities ‘as soon as they are available’.

Around 63 people are succumbing to the illness each day, on average. But the fatality curve is no longer flattening as quickly as it was, with the rate having barely changed in the past 10 days.

It can take infected patients several weeks to die, meaning any spike in deaths won’t be immediately apparent in government figures.

It comes after the PM yesterday announced he is ‘squeezing the brake pedal’ on easing the coronavirus lockdown and announced the compulsory wearing of face masks is being extended. 

Mr Johnson used a Downing Street press conference yesterday to warn that coronavirus cases have started to ‘creep up’ and as a result the Government has no choice but to delay the further reopening of the economy.

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Plans to allow wedding receptions for up to 30 people in England have been delayed, as has the reopening of 'close contact' services like beauticians, ice rinks and a pilot to get crowds back to sports venues. However, shielding measures are still being eased while workers will still be encouraged to go back to the office next month

Plans to allow wedding receptions for up to 30 people in England have been delayed, as has the reopening of 'close contact' services like beauticians, ice rinks and a pilot to get crowds back to sports venues. However, shielding measures are still being eased while workers will still be encouraged to go back to the office next month

Plans to allow wedding receptions for up to 30 people in England have been delayed, as has the reopening of ‘close contact’ services like beauticians, ice rinks and a pilot to get crowds back to sports venues. However, shielding measures are still being eased while workers will still be encouraged to go back to the office next month

Street marshals have been patrolling hotspots after visitors were seen pouring down narrow streets without paying attention to social-distancing rules. Pictured: Tourists flock to Fistral beach in Cornwall yesterday

Street marshals have been patrolling hotspots after visitors were seen pouring down narrow streets without paying attention to social-distancing rules. Pictured: Tourists flock to Fistral beach in Cornwall yesterday

Street marshals have been patrolling hotspots after visitors were seen pouring down narrow streets without paying attention to social-distancing rules. Pictured: Tourists flock to Fistral beach in Cornwall yesterday

Cornish resorts have been labelled 'Benidorm on steroids' after floods of visitors have left residents too scared to leave their houses and go shopping for food. Pictured: Bustling streets in St Ives yesterday

Cornish resorts have been labelled 'Benidorm on steroids' after floods of visitors have left residents too scared to leave their houses and go shopping for food. Pictured: Bustling streets in St Ives yesterday

Cornish resorts have been labelled ‘Benidorm on steroids’ after floods of visitors have left residents too scared to leave their houses and go shopping for food. Pictured: Bustling streets in St Ives yesterday

CASES ARE ON THE UP… AND THE R RATE MAY BE ABOVE ONE 

Coronavirus cases in England are now at the highest levels since May and government scientists are ‘no longer confident’ the crucial R rate is below the dreaded level of one. 

Government statisticians yesterday admitted there is ‘now enough evidence’ to prove Covid-19 infections are on the up, calculating that 4,200 people are now catching the virus each day in England alone.

The estimate by the Office for National Statistics, which tracks the size of the outbreak by swabbing thousands of people, has doubled since the end of June and is 68 per cent up on the 2,500 figure given a fortnight ago.

One in 1,500 people currently have the coronavirus – 0.07 per cent of the population. But experts believe the rate is twice as high in London and still rising. The figure does not include care homes and hospitals. 

Number 10’s scientific advisers also upped the R rate in the UK, saying they now believe it stands between 0.8 and 0.9. It had been as low as 0.7 since May.

SAGE also revealed the growth rate – the average number of people each Covid-19 patient infects – may have jumped to above one in the South West, home to the stay-cation hotspots of Devon, Cornwall and Dorset. And they said it was likely to be equally high in the North West. Matt Hancock last night announced tough new lockdown measures in Greater Manchester and parts of Lancashire and Yorkshire. 

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He said that the scheduled August 1 return of casinos, bowling alleys and so-called close contact services like beauticians has now been pushed back to August 15 ‘at the earliest’.

The mandatory wearing of face coverings will be extended to include galleries and places of worship while there will also now be a ‘greater police presence’ to ensure people wear masks and comply with social distancing.

Meanwhile, England’s Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty warned as he stood alongside the PM that the UK has potentially reached a limit for how much of society can be safely opened up.

Professor Whitty said ‘we have probably reached near the limit or the limits of what we can do’ and that ‘if we wish to do more things in the future, we may have to do less of some other things’.

The comments are likely to spook financial markets and prompt doubts over whether schools will be able to return as planned in September.

He said: ‘We have to be realistic about this. The idea that we can open up everything and keep the virus under control is clearly wrong.’

It comes as separate data yesterday revealed the coronavirus outbreak in England is growing, with an additional 1,000 people catching the disease every day compared to last week.

The ONS data, which goes up to July 26, is considered to be some of the most accurate available. It estimates how many people have the coronavirus infection in the community, and not hospitals and care homes.

The figures are far higher than those reported by the Department of Health every day, which only reports Covid-19 cases confirmed with a lab-read test. Thousands of patients never develop any symptoms.

ONS collect data from swab tests sent regularly to people’s homes to test whether they are infected with the virus at the time. The people are chosen to be representative of the UK population. 

The organisation follows trends over a six-week period. This week’s update was based on the results of 116,026 swab tests collected over six weeks. During these weeks, 59 individuals from 58 households tested positive. 

Only very small numbers of people test positive in any given period, which creates a wide range of possible estimates for the ONS to choose from about how many people in the community have the virus. 

During the most recent week (July 20 to July 26), ONS estimates that around 4,200 people became newly infected with Covid-19 per day. It could be as low as 2,200 or as high as 8,100 based on their calculations.  

The possible range in this week’s estimate is between 23,700 to 53,200 – up from the 18,500 to 39,900 reported last week, and the 15,000 and 34,000 a fortnight ago. This does not include patients in hospitals or care home residents, who cannot be tested at home.  

‘There is now evidence to suggest a slight increase in the number of people in England testing positive on a nose and throat swab in recent weeks,’ the report said.

It follows a low point of cases in June, when 0.06 per cent of the population were infected in the week ending June 18, a drastic drop from the 0.25 per cent measured in mid-May.

Professor Chris Whitty said coronavirus cases are rising in the UK because ministers pushed lockdown easing measures 'to their limits'

Professor Chris Whitty said coronavirus cases are rising in the UK because ministers pushed lockdown easing measures 'to their limits'

Boris Johnson announced he is 'squeezing the brake pedal' on the easing of lockdown after an increase in coronavirus cases

Boris Johnson announced he is 'squeezing the brake pedal' on the easing of lockdown after an increase in coronavirus cases

Boris Johnson announced he is ‘squeezing the brake pedal’ on the easing of lockdown after an increase in coronavirus cases

What lockdown easing measures were postponed? 

Wedding receptions of more than 30 people will no longer be allowed to take place tomorrow as had been planned. They are delayed until at least August 14

Test sporting events will be put on ice for the next two weeks until August 15. 

Close contact beauty services such as facials cannot open until at least August 15. 

Casinos, bowling alleys  and ice rinks cannot reopen until the same date.

But Boris Johnson urged workers to return to work as planned from next week.

Face masks will be compulsory in most indoor public spaces including places of worship and museums. 

Police will have new powers to enforce social distancing rules including the wearing of face masks. 

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New Zealand records four new COVID-19 cases and plunges back into lockdown

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new zealand records four new covid 19 cases and plunges back into lockdown

New Zealand has plunged back into a strict lockdown after four members of one family tested positive for coronavirus – despite 102 days of zero community transmission. 

The nation has been the envy of the world for its handling of the COVID-19 crisis, particularly after passing the 100 day milestone.

But from midday on Wednesday, Auckland will reenter a stage three lockdown and the rest of the nation will enter a level two lockdown after new cases were identified on Tuesday.  

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern scheduled a last minute press conference for about 9.15pm on Tuesday night as word spread of the lockdown.  

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern scheduled a last minute press conference for about 9.15pm on Tuesday night as word spread of the lockdown

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern scheduled a last minute press conference for about 9.15pm on Tuesday night as word spread of the lockdown

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern scheduled a last minute press conference for about 9.15pm on Tuesday night as word spread of the lockdown

Contact tracing is now underway among multiple workplaces across New Zealand, and close contacts of the confirmed cases have been instructed to self isolate. 

Ms Ardern is concerned about the origin of the virus, given the family have no links to overseas travel.

‘We have not yet been able to determine the source of these cases, there is no known link to hotel quarantine.

‘One of the most important lessons we have learned from overseas is to go hard at this… In line with our precautionary approach, we will be asking Aucklanders to take swift lockdown’.  

Ms Ardern admitted authorities are ‘expecting to see more cases’ linked to the cluster. 

The popular PM will plunge Auckland back into a stage three lockdown from Wednesday in an attempt to stem the spread of the virus as part of her ‘resurgence plan’.

‘You are asked to stay home in your bubble unless you are an essential worker’. 

All bars, restaurants and public services must close by midday on Wednesday, as gatherings of more than 10 are prohibited.

‘If you are in Auckland, we ask that you wear a mask when accessing essential services.’

The popular PM will plunge Auckland back into a stage three lockdown from Wednesday in an attempt to stem the spread of the virus as part of her 'resurgence plan'

The popular PM will plunge Auckland back into a stage three lockdown from Wednesday in an attempt to stem the spread of the virus as part of her 'resurgence plan'

The popular PM will plunge Auckland back into a stage three lockdown from Wednesday in an attempt to stem the spread of the virus as part of her ‘resurgence plan’

‘While this initial three day lockdown will primarily effect the Auckland region, I am asking our team of five million to stay alert as well. We have defeated this virus before and can do it again.’ 

The rest of the nation will enter a three day level two lockdown. 

If contact tracing and widespread testing do not identify the source of the current outbreak, the lockdown could be extended.

‘If we are not able to identify the source, we should be able to identify whether we have wider geographic spread.’

Authorities hope their swift action will help to manage the potential spread of the virus following the latest outbreak. 

New Zealand went into level 4 lockdown on March 25, acting swiftly once the threat of COVID-19 was present.

By April 27, the virus appeared somewhat under control and the lockdown was eased to level 3. 

May 13 signalled the beginning of level 2 lockdown while most restrictions were entirely eased on June 9. 

Ms Ardern said she has no doubt New Zealand will defeat the virus for a second time. 

More to come. 

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Australians could travel to Bali from NEXT MONTH as Indonesian officials push for travel bubble

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australians could travel to bali from next month as indonesian officials push for travel bubble

Australians could be allowed to travel to Bali from as early as next month as Indonesian officials push for a travel bubble between the two nations. 

Indonesia‘s Minister for Maritime Affairs and Investment Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan said Australia is one of a select number of countries officials would like to welcome tourists ahead of plans to reopen Bali on September 11.

‘We have to carefully selected (countries), so I think Australia, New Zealand later on, China, of course, and maybe South Korea and Japan. We are studying day by day,’ he said. 

Indonesian officials are hoping to implement a travel bubble with Australia. Pictured: Atuh Beach in Bali (stock image)

Indonesian officials are hoping to implement a travel bubble with Australia. Pictured: Atuh Beach in Bali (stock image)

Indonesian officials are hoping to implement a travel bubble with Australia. Pictured: Atuh Beach in Bali (stock image)

Mr Luhut, who was speaking at an address to the Jakarta Foreign Correspondents Club on Monday, said discussions would be held with the Australian government. 

‘Right now we negotiate with Australia. We will see what happens, what they need from us and what we need from them,’ he said.

‘We need to negotiate standard of care because nobody can claim they’re better than others. Look at America right now. Look at Singapore right now.’ 

Mr Luhut said he believes Indonesia is currently handling the coronavirus pandemic ‘okay’ but needs to remain vigilant. 

According to the minister, Indonesia remains on track to reopen its international borders in September. Bali welcomed domestic travellers on July 31 and saw about 4,000 additional arrivals daily. 

Tourism brings in billions of dollars to the Indonesian economy each year.

Indonesia's Minister for Maritime Affairs and Investment Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan said his government would speak to Australia about the proposed travel bubble

Indonesia's Minister for Maritime Affairs and Investment Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan said his government would speak to Australia about the proposed travel bubble

Indonesia’s Minister for Maritime Affairs and Investment Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan said his government would speak to Australia about the proposed travel bubble

Pictured: Flight attendants wearing face mask walk through Bali's international airport during the coronavirus pandemic

Pictured: Flight attendants wearing face mask walk through Bali's international airport during the coronavirus pandemic

Pictured: Flight attendants wearing face mask walk through Bali’s international airport during the coronavirus pandemic

There were more than 16million visitors to Indonesia last year, including 1.3million Australians, Sydney Morning Herald reported.

Despite Mr Luhut’s hopeful comments, there is little indication the Australian government would implement a travel bubble with Indonesia anytime soon. 

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said Australia’s international borders remain closed for the foreseeable future and citizens are advised against leaving. 

On Tuesday, NT Chief Minister Michael Gunner warned border controls on visitors from coronavirus hotspots would remain in place for at least 18 months. 

Queensland has barred visitors from NSW and Victoria, while WA Premier Mark McGowan announced his borders could remain shut until mid-next year.

Indonesia has recorded more than 127,000 coronavirus cases and more than 5,700 deaths.  

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Viewers left in tears after ‘powerful’ Black Lives Matter series Unsaid Stories

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viewers left in tears after powerful black lives matter series unsaid stories

A new ITV drama about the Black Lives Matter movement has left viewers in tears after showing a terrified father banishing his daughter from the protests because he watched his best friend be killed at one. 

The first episode of Unsaid Stories aired last night at 9pm, titled Generational, and saw dad Oliver (played by English actor Nicholas Pinnock) catch his teenage daughter Justina (Yasmin Monet Prince) trying to sneak out to a rally. 

After the concerned parent tries to stop his loved one from going, he’s forced to explain his decision, recalling the moment his best friend was killed by racists following an anti-racist protest. 

The emotional scenes – played across a 15-minute episode – were labelled ‘incredibly powerful and moving’ by Twitter users who rushed to praise the short-series for its ‘honest’ writing.

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A new ITV drama about the Black Lives Matter movement has left viewers in tears after showing a terrified father banishing his daughter, pictured together, from the protests because he watched his best friend be killed at one

A new ITV drama about the Black Lives Matter movement has left viewers in tears after showing a terrified father banishing his daughter, pictured together, from the protests because he watched his best friend be killed at one

A new ITV drama about the Black Lives Matter movement has left viewers in tears after showing a terrified father banishing his daughter, pictured together, from the protests because he watched his best friend be killed at one

Viewers were left in tears following the emotional scenes, with one Twitter user, above, writing: ''#UnsaidStories promised ourselves we wouldn't but part one got us bawling already. Great job everybody'

Viewers were left in tears following the emotional scenes, with one Twitter user, above, writing: ''#UnsaidStories promised ourselves we wouldn't but part one got us bawling already. Great job everybody'

Viewers were left in tears following the emotional scenes, with one Twitter user, above, writing: ”#UnsaidStories promised ourselves we wouldn’t but part one got us bawling already. Great job everybody’

One viewer wrote: ‘#UnsaidStories promised ourselves we wouldn’t but part one got us bawling already. Great job everybody.’

Another said: ‘Such a wonderfully written, moving and important short film,’ while a third added: ‘Quiet, moving, powerful… long enough to tell it’s story, important enough to prompt conversations.’ 

While a fourth impressed viewer wrote on Twitter: ‘Wow that was brilliant. So moving. Thanks ITV.’

Unsaid stories is a new four-part ITV series of short films inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement.

In the first episode, when Oliver catches his teenage daughter, Justina, sneaking out, the usual scenes of antagonism between parent and child follow.  

The first episode of Unsaid Stories aired last night at 9pm, titled Generational, and saw dad Oliver (played by English actor Nicholas Pinnock) catch his teenage daughter Justina (pictured) (Yasmin Monet Prince) trying to sneak out to a rally

The first episode of Unsaid Stories aired last night at 9pm, titled Generational, and saw dad Oliver (played by English actor Nicholas Pinnock) catch his teenage daughter Justina (pictured) (Yasmin Monet Prince) trying to sneak out to a rally

The first episode of Unsaid Stories aired last night at 9pm, titled Generational, and saw dad Oliver (played by English actor Nicholas Pinnock) catch his teenage daughter Justina (pictured) (Yasmin Monet Prince) trying to sneak out to a rally

After the concerned parent tries to stop his loved one (pictured together) from going, he's forced to explain his decision, recalling the moment his best friend was killed by racists following an anti-racist protest

After the concerned parent tries to stop his loved one (pictured together) from going, he's forced to explain his decision, recalling the moment his best friend was killed by racists following an anti-racist protest

After the concerned parent tries to stop his loved one (pictured together) from going, he’s forced to explain his decision, recalling the moment his best friend was killed by racists following an anti-racist protest

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The emotional scenes - played across a 15-minute episode - were labelled 'incredibly powerful and moving' by Twitter users (above) who rushed to praise the short-series for its 'honest' writing

The emotional scenes - played across a 15-minute episode - were labelled 'incredibly powerful and moving' by Twitter users (above) who rushed to praise the short-series for its 'honest' writing

The emotional scenes – played across a 15-minute episode – were labelled ‘incredibly powerful and moving’ by Twitter users (above) who rushed to praise the short-series for its ‘honest’ writing

However, it is soon discovered that Justina is sneaking out to a Black Lives Matter march, leaving her father shocked and concerned. 

His daughter cannot understand why he doesn’t appear to support the anti-racism cause and begs for an explanation.

Eventually, a heartbroken Oliver reveals that he protested racism in his youth when at university, but never attended another rally after his first because he watched his best friend be killed by racists following it.

He recalled how he and his friend were walking back home after a protest when they were attacked by racists.

Unsaid stories is a new four-part ITV series of short films inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement. Pictured: Oliver (played by English actor Nicholas Pinnock) and his teenage daughter Justina (Yasmin Monet Prince)

Unsaid stories is a new four-part ITV series of short films inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement. Pictured: Oliver (played by English actor Nicholas Pinnock) and his teenage daughter Justina (Yasmin Monet Prince)

Unsaid stories is a new four-part ITV series of short films inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement. Pictured: Oliver (played by English actor Nicholas Pinnock) and his teenage daughter Justina (Yasmin Monet Prince)

Oliver said nearby police failed to help when he ran and upon his return, his friend Anton had been beaten to death.

‘[The attackers] must have realised they’d gone too far as all of a sudden they’d just stopped,’ Oliver told his daughter.

‘Every inch of Anton’s face was covered in blood. I watched my best friend die. Just like that, Anton was gone.’ 

After comforting her father, Justina convinces him to attend the protest with her and the pair are captured making their way to the event. 

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