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Carbon Theory launches a miracle Overnight Detox Serum in Australia for $31.99

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carbon theory launches a miracle overnight detox serum in australia for 31 99

The cult beauty brand behind a best-selling facial soap that banishes acne in just days has now unveiled its ‘miracle serum in a bottle’ for the first time in Australia.

Carbon Theory has launched the new $31.99 ‘Overnight Detox Serum’ after receiving praise from happy customers all over the UK and US.

The facial formula contains hero ingredients such as charcoal, tea tree oil, vitamin E, antioxidants and encapsulated cranberry that work wonders to draw out toxins, unclog pores and bacteria, all while rejuvenating your skin.

Carbon Theory has launched the new $31.99 'Overnight Detox Serum' in Australia after receiving praise from happy customers all over the UK and US

Carbon Theory has launched the new $31.99 'Overnight Detox Serum' in Australia after receiving praise from happy customers all over the UK and US

Carbon Theory has launched the new $31.99 ‘Overnight Detox Serum’ in Australia after receiving praise from happy customers all over the UK and US

The cult beauty brand behind a best-selling facial soap (left) that banishes acne in just days has now unveiled its 'miracle serum' (right)for the first time in Australia

The cult beauty brand behind a best-selling facial soap (left) that banishes acne in just days has now unveiled its 'miracle serum' (right)for the first time in Australia

The cult beauty brand behind a best-selling facial soap (left) that banishes acne in just days has now unveiled its ‘miracle serum’ (right)for the first time in Australia

And dozens of women agree it’s one of the best serums that money can buy, with many swearing by the product for transforming their complexion within days, leaving them with clearer skin. 

‘This is amazing, I have had bad skin and spots for years, plenty of hospital creams and medicines and still didn’t work. Been using this for 11 days now and my skin feels amazing soft, nice colour and nearly no spots,’ one woman said.

A second added: ‘Absolutely brilliant product. I’m now on to my third bottle of the serum. The best product I’ve ever used on my skin at night.’ 

While a third said: ‘Amazing! Just like everything else Carbon Theory have made, this is a miracle in a bottle. My skin has never looked better. I love the appearance of the little bottle it comes in, and the smell is nice too.’

One of the reasons why it’s so popular is because it contains ‘lab-formulated’ ingredients that claims to create a tight barrier around cells, leaving skin healthy and hydrated for longer.

The serum promises to soothe the effects of inflammation and redness, providing relief to itchy and irritated skin.

The facial formula contains hero ingredients such as charcoal, tea tree oil, vitamin E, antioxidants and encapsulated cranberry that works wonders to draw out toxins, unclogs pores and bacteria, all while rejuvenating your skin

The facial formula contains hero ingredients such as charcoal, tea tree oil, vitamin E, antioxidants and encapsulated cranberry that works wonders to draw out toxins, unclogs pores and bacteria, all while rejuvenating your skin

The facial formula contains hero ingredients such as charcoal, tea tree oil, vitamin E, antioxidants and encapsulated cranberry that works wonders to draw out toxins, unclogs pores and bacteria, all while rejuvenating your skin

The young woman who suffered severe cystic acne after she underwent an intense exfoliating treatment

The young woman who suffered severe cystic acne after she underwent an intense exfoliating treatment

In a matter of weeks, Jennifer said she noticed her complexion cleared up

In a matter of weeks, Jennifer said she noticed her complexion cleared up

Australian woman Jennifer Wilson who suffered severe cystic acne has cleared up her skin in just a matter of weeks after using the brand’s $14.99 facial cleansing bar (picture of the results one month apart of using Breakout Control Facial Cleansing Bar morning and night)

The activated charcoal draws out dirt and unblock pores while the tea tree oil has purifying properties to cleanse the skin and kills bacteria.

The Overnight Detox Serum is now available to purchase exclusively from the online Australian store for just $31.99.

The product now joins the best-selling $14.99 Breakout Control Facial Cleansing Bar, which launched at Priceline Australia earlier this year – and is now sold every 30 seconds worldwide.

Made with organic tea tree oil and charcoal to reduce inflammation, acne sufferers who tried the cleansing bar have praised its ability to transform their skin where other products had previously failed.

Fans of the soap claim it’s better than medicated products they’ve previously tried on prescription, describing it as a ‘miracle worker’. 

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Masks are better than face shields: Experts say airborne droplets can get around the visors 

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masks are better than face shields experts say airborne droplets can get around the visors

Victorians must now wear fitted face masks instead of bandannas, scarves, plastic face shields as masks have been deemed more effective at stopping droplet spread.

Premier Daniel Andrews made the announcement Sunday ahead of Monday’s Step Two lifting of coronavirus restrictions across Victoria.

It means that bandannas and scarves are no longer enough – Melburnians must also wear a face mask with them or instead of them.

YES: face shield with a mask underneath

YES: face shield with a mask underneath

NO: face shield with no mask

NO: face shield with no mask

Pictured left: A face shield can be worn with a mask for extra splatter protection. Right: A face shield without a mask is banned in Victoria as of Monday as it lets in too many aerosol particles

As far as transparent plastic face shields go, Victorians must also wear a face mask underneath.

‘Face shields don’t meet the test of covering your nose and your mouth,’ Mr Andrews said on Sunday. 

‘You can wear a face shield if you want to in terms of your eyes, but it would need to be accompanied by a mask and we would recommend a two-ply mask. A shield is akin to not wearing a face covering.’  

Victorians will risk a fine of $200 if they do not wear a face mask while out.

WHY THE RULE CHANGE?

Face shields were never meant to be used without also wearing a face mask.

Professor Raina MacIntyre, head of the Biosecurity Research Program at the Kirby Institute at the UNSW said they are not appropriate protection in the community.

‘In Switzerland, where hotel staff could choose a mask or a shield, only those wearing a shield got infected,’ she told Daily Mail Australia on Monday.

‘The virus is spread by respiratory aerosols, which are breathed directly in, unfiltered, when wearing a shield.’  

A man walks past an outdoor photography exhibition of healthcare workers in Melbourne last Tuesday. Face masks are now mandatory in Victoria - a plastic face shield is not enough

A man walks past an outdoor photography exhibition of healthcare workers in Melbourne last Tuesday. Face masks are now mandatory in Victoria - a plastic face shield is not enough

A man walks past an outdoor photography exhibition of healthcare workers in Melbourne last Tuesday. Face masks are now mandatory in Victoria – a plastic face shield is not enough  

Switzerland’s hotel coronavirus outbreak prompted the country’s health department to declare face shields ineffective in July. 

Deakin University epidemiologist Catherine Bennett said masks sit more closely to the face and stop the majority of particles leaving or entering someone’s mouth or nose.

This decreases the risk that the droplets and particles of other people will reach the mucosal lining in your nose and mouth as you breathe.

It also reduces the amount of your own droplets in the air where they might infect others.   

‘If there is too much gaping at the sides, the particles or the droplets can make their way around the edge of the covering,’ she told the Herald Sun.

‘As soon as you having gaping holes, it is not effective. It’s that marginal gain you get in terms of reduced risk of transmission.’ 

WHY DON’T FACE SHIELDS WORK?

Face shields are only for direct splatter protection, for example if someone coughs directly in your face, Professor MacIntyre said.

‘They will not block aerosols, which can be breathed in, unfiltered, through the gaps around the edges,’ she told Daily Mail Australia.

‘Shields are designed to be used as an adjunct to masks, not as an alternative.’

Bandannas such as this one worn by a man at Edithvale Woolworths, Melbourne, in August, are now banned unless you are also wearing a face mask underneath

Bandannas such as this one worn by a man at Edithvale Woolworths, Melbourne, in August, are now banned unless you are also wearing a face mask underneath

Bandannas such as this one worn by a man at Edithvale Woolworths, Melbourne, in August, are now banned unless you are also wearing a face mask underneath

Professor MacIntyre said surgical or cloth face masks are not designed to filter aerosols. Instead they are designed as a physical barrier.

‘However, three layers or more in a cloth or surgical mask can be a good filter, as long as the mask fits closely around the face without any gaps,’ she said.

‘This then forces air through the face piece, which acts as a filter.’

Professor MacIntyre and other scientists conducted a study which was published in the medical journal Thorax, showing how much difference extra mask layers can make.

The team found a single-layered cloth mask reduced droplet spread somewhat but was not as good as a double-layered cloth mask.

A three-ply surgical mask was better than both, the research showed.    

‘We did not test more than two layers, but generally, more layers are better,’ the researchers wrote in The Conversation in July. 

‘For example, a 12-layered cloth mask is about as protective as a surgical mask, and reduces infection risk by 67 per cent.’

IS ANYTHING 100 PER CENT EFFECTIVE?

Coronavirus infects a person when viral particles come into contact with the mucosal membranes (the wet parts) in the nose, eyes and mouth.

Droplets with the viral particles are sprayed out of the mouth and nose when an infected person talks, laughs, sings, shouts, breathes, coughs and sneezes. 

The heavier droplets fall to surfaces where they can be picked up on your hands and fingers – and when you touch your eyes, nose or mouth, the virus on your hands infects the mucosal membranes.

The smaller, lighter aerosolised particles hang in the air where you can breathe them in, causing infection.  

According to a WHO-commissioned study on the effect of physical distancing, masks and eye protection against covid-19, no barrier is 100 per cent effective. 

Professor MacIntyre said the study,  published in The Lancet, found even respirators only reduce the risk of infection by 95 per cent.

Face masks reduced the risk of infection by 67 per cent and physical distancing of one metre reduces the risk by 82 per cent, according to the study.

‘The bottom line is no intervention gives you 100 per cent protection, you have to use them in combination to reduce the risk,’ Professor MacIntyre told Dr Norman Swan on the ABC’s health report in June.

‘Until the time that we can vaccinate people, you really have to use these interventions in combination.’ 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Australia

The REAL reason Simon Reeve was dumped from Sunrise

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the real reason simon reeve was dumped from sunrise

Simon Reeve was dumped from Sunrise after the same job at arch-rival Today was axed months earlier, network sources claim.

Reeve had since 2015 been the sport presenter on Weekend Sunrise until he was dropped by Channel Seven earlier this year and is suing for up to $1 million.

The lawsuit claims he should have been paid out as an employee, but Seven argues he was just a freelancer whose contract was not renewed. 

Reeve was believed to be a casualty of rampant cost-cutting across the Australian TV world with revenue devastated by the coronavirus pandemic.

However, a senior Seven source said the decision was directly linked to Weekend Today sport presenter Clint Stanaway leaving that show.

Simon Reeve was dumped from Weekend Sunrise in June and is now suing Channel Seven for up to $1 million, claiming he should have been given redundancy

Simon Reeve was dumped from Weekend Sunrise in June and is now suing Channel Seven for up to $1 million, claiming he should have been given redundancy

Simon Reeve was dumped from Weekend Sunrise in June and is now suing Channel Seven for up to $1 million, claiming he should have been given redundancy

‘Nine had dumped its weekend sports presenter on Today and we couldn’t justify keeping [Reeve] on. So we didn’t renew his contract,’ the source said.

‘He was just so expensive, flying him up and back and accommodating him – as well as the retainer. You can get a dedicated junior for half that and no expenses.

‘News was under such pressure. Axing him saved close to half a million [dollars] and didn’t lose anything on air.’

Since Stanaway’s departure, Weekend Today sport is presented by Jayne Azzopardi, who also reads the news.

That setup is now copied by Weekend Sunrise where Sally Bowrey presents both news and sport, negating the need for Reeve as an extra presenter.

Reeve’s status was not helped by his $250,000-a-year pay for six hours work a week, that also saw Seven fly him to Sydney from his Gold Coast home each week.

He was put up in fancy hotels like the Sofitel Sydney Wentworth, by Seven’s Martin Place studio, or the nearby Hilton or Intercontinental.

A senior Seven source said the decision to axe Reeve was directly linked to Weekend Today sport presenter Clint Stanaway (left) leaving that show and showing a dedicated sport guy wasn't necessary

A senior Seven source said the decision to axe Reeve was directly linked to Weekend Today sport presenter Clint Stanaway (left) leaving that show and showing a dedicated sport guy wasn't necessary

A senior Seven source said the decision to axe Reeve was directly linked to Weekend Today sport presenter Clint Stanaway (left) leaving that show and showing a dedicated sport guy wasn’t necessary

Reeve's departure meant Seven could save cash by having newsreader Sally Bowrey (pictured centre in the Sunrise studio with Reeve and their then-colleague Angela Cox)

Reeve's departure meant Seven could save cash by having newsreader Sally Bowrey (pictured centre in the Sunrise studio with Reeve and their then-colleague Angela Cox)

Reeve’s departure meant Seven could save cash by having newsreader Sally Bowrey (pictured centre in the Sunrise studio with Reeve and their then-colleague Angela Cox)

Senior network sources said the expenses ran as high as another $250,000 a year in business class flights, hotels, and airport transfers.

Further complicating matters was this arrangement being scuttled in March when the NSW-Queensland border shut, ending Reeve’s appearances on Sunrise.

‘The axe was always going to fall on Simon. Seven flew him down and paid for his accommodation every week for the weekend show while production staff couldn’t get a cab charge,’ another Seven insider said.

‘It just wouldn’t happen today. I mean, nice guy, but hardly a star.’

Reeve’s high-paid position lasted so long because he was close to former Seven West Media chief executive Tim Worner who ‘protected’ him.

The pair go way back to when Reeve worked on Beyond 2000 in 1987 to 1993, which is when he began being employed via his company Simon Reeve Productions.

Seven put Reeve up in fancy hotels like the Sofitel Sydney Wentworth (pictured), by Seven's Martin Place studio, when he was in Sydney to present the show

Seven put Reeve up in fancy hotels like the Sofitel Sydney Wentworth (pictured), by Seven's Martin Place studio, when he was in Sydney to present the show

Seven put Reeve up in fancy hotels like the Sofitel Sydney Wentworth (pictured), by Seven’s Martin Place studio, when he was in Sydney to present the show

Reeve did not take his boning well, particularly when he was only offered a payout of five weeks wages.

On July 3, the shocked presenter wrote a 960-word email to billionaire Seven boss Kerry Stokes and chief operations officer Bruce McWilliam pleading for more.

The email obtained by Daily Mail Australia began by thanking the pair and outlining Reeve’s long career at the network, beginning in Perth 41 years ago.

‘I love television. It’s all I’ve known over 41 years since walking into the TVW Dianella building in February, 1979 as a pimply, clueless 17-year-old,’ he wrote.

‘Every single day I’ve cared deeply about the job I do and the product to which I contribute.’

But suddenly what first appeared to be a heartfelt letter of thanks to his bosses, morphed into a moan about how he was hard done by.  

The email complained he had been ‘very patient’ with Seven over three months in limbo since the border closure.

Instead he was ‘devastated’ to be told on the phone by Sunrise producer Michael Pell that his services were no longer required. 

‘When I asked… if there was an exit payment in mind, he suggested five weeks. I have to say that was a huge shock,’ he wrote.

Reeve's rambling email was sent to Seven's billionaire chairman Kerry Stokes (pictured) begging him to intervene and increase his payout

Reeve's rambling email was sent to Seven's billionaire chairman Kerry Stokes (pictured) begging him to intervene and increase his payout

Reeve’s rambling email was sent to Seven’s billionaire chairman Kerry Stokes (pictured) begging him to intervene and increase his payout

‘I broke the news to my family only yesterday, unable to pretend anymore that I was going back to work.

‘I would have walked into the sunset with no regrets if… I’d been offered fair exit terms, for what I feel has been an unfailingly wholehearted effort.’

Reeve said at 58 he was far from retirement and had ‘too much to give and to do’ and given the economy his family faced an uncertain future. 

‘I understand times are tough for the business, but five weeks won’t come close to giving my family and I a reasonable buffer,’ he wrote.

‘I’ve never quibbled over or demanded anything, the first number that was put on any contract with 7 I’ve been happy to sign, without an agent.

‘I’m stung and distraught to think my years with 7… was worth five weeks pay.

‘Aside from this, it doesn’t recognise I’ve spent these 12 weeks without pay, trying to find ways to be a contributor, with little feedback.’

Reeve then made a personal appeal to Mr Stokes and Mr McWilliam to intervene and secure him a much larger payout.

Reeve made a personal appeal to Mr Stokes and Mr McWilliam to intervene and secure him a much larger payout

Reeve made a personal appeal to Mr Stokes and Mr McWilliam to intervene and secure him a much larger payout

Reeve made a personal appeal to Mr Stokes and Mr McWilliam to intervene and secure him a much larger payout

‘I felt reaching out honestly to the two people who have been very good to me over many years at 7, might count towards reaching an agreement that enables a period of unprecedented certainty for my family, weekends home and the chance to find other work,’ he wrote.

‘I’ve avoided scandal and despised the privileged behaviour of others, conscious of my good fortune to have a job at 7.

‘I’ve been a lucky, loyal, bloody hard working and proud part of the network ecosystem.’ 

Court documents filed to support his claim include a reply to his email from Mr Stokes referring to Reeve as having ‘been made redundant’.

He claims this and a reply from McMillan saying he was ‘part of the DNA’ of Seven showed he was ‘treated as an employee of Seven by other officers and employees of Seven’.

However, a senior Seven source told Daily Mail Australia that Reeve selectively edited Mr Stokes’ email and removed the context.

‘Kerry told Simon he wasn’t aware he’d been made redundant. He couldn’t have been aware as Simon wasn’t made redundant. His contract expired,’ they said.

‘Simon was the one who told Kerry he’d been made redundant… Kerry took his word for it.’

Reeve has been on and off Channel Seven for the past 40 years. Above, he poses with longtime colleagues Mel Doyle and Kylie Gillies at a Seven Christmas party in 2007

Reeve has been on and off Channel Seven for the past 40 years. Above, he poses with longtime colleagues Mel Doyle and Kylie Gillies at a Seven Christmas party in 2007

Reeve has been on and off Channel Seven for the past 40 years. Above, he poses with longtime colleagues Mel Doyle and Kylie Gillies at a Seven Christmas party in 2007

The source said Reeve had been contracted through his company, Simon Reeve Productions, for three decades – at his own urging.

They claimed Reeve wanted to be an independent contractor via his company in an elaborate scheme to save on tax.

‘Simon Reeve Productions has been in business for a long time as an Independent Producer which also provided his personal services as well as trying to get various film projects up, with varying degrees of success,’ the source said.

‘That’s not something employees can do which is presumably why he did it through Simon Reeve Productions.’

Reeve claims Seven breached his ‘ongoing contract’ and misrepresented his employment status by claiming he was an independent contractor.

He wants the contract between SRP and Seven declared in breach of the Fair Work Act ‘in that they falsely represented that Reeve was employed as independent contractor’.

However, the senior source said Seven’s contractor arrangement were in recent years audited to make sure they complied with the law. 

Those that did not had to become employees and and have PAYE tax deducted.  

The source also claimed Seven paid Reeve about $10,000 for a documentary about rhinos the network was yet to receive. 

Simon Reeve’s rambling email

Dear Kerry and Bruce,

I just wanted to say thank you for the opportunities and wonderful times with the 7 network, since I commenced my second stint of employment back from living in Botswana in 2002.

From producing Undercover Angels, hosting Quizmaster, the incredible Bali bombing appeal, News presenting, Sunrise, Weekend Sunrise, It’s Academic for 9 years, The Force for 13 years, commentating at the Athens and Beijing Olympics, It Takes Two, Million Dollar Minute, the odd failed pilot and many memorable Telethons, there have been few dull moments.

Live television especially has a way of producing adrenaline like few other professions and I will never forget the visceral moment the surviving members of the Bali bombings from Kingsley Football club walked into the studio at TVW as I stood in front of a camera introducing them, with people standing and clapping thunderously, including the floor crew.

Simon Reeve is suing Seven, claiming it breached his 'ongoing contract' and misrepresented his employment status

Simon Reeve is suing Seven, claiming it breached his 'ongoing contract' and misrepresented his employment status

Simon Reeve is suing Seven, claiming it breached his ‘ongoing contract’ and misrepresented his employment status

I was near speechless with the emotion and haven’t had an experience in television like it, before or since.

It seemed the ultimate expression of our platform that day to convey something important and make a difference.

I will also never forget announcing Trevor Sauer winning $750,000 on Quizmaster in 2002 and Andrew Skarbek pocketing a million bucks on MDM in 2015. 

There’s something about saying, ‘That’s correct… you have just won a million dollars’ that triggers a first (OMG) thought for the Chairman of the company!

I love television. It’s all I’ve known over 41 years since walking into the TVW Dianella building in February, 1979 as a pimply, clueless 17 year old. Every single day I’ve cared deeply about the job I do and the product to which I contribute.

When Michael rang me Thursday of last week to say the role of Weekend Sunrise sports presenter/features reporter was no longer required, I was devastated.

I’ve been very patient over the past 3 months as Martin Place has dealt with Covid-19 disruption, offering work arounds including relocating to Sydney for as long as it took, but understanding the challenges. 

It hasn’t been easy with no pay through this time thrust upon us. I thought with Jim’s departure and Ryan’s leaving in the past fortnight, it stood me in good stead as an experienced hand to keep my job. It wasn’t to be.

When I asked Michael in that same phone call if there was an exit payment in mind, he suggested 5 weeks.

I have to say that was a huge shock.

I broke the news to my family only yesterday, unable to pretend anymore that I was going back to work.

Reeve regularly worked on Sunrise and was a regular presence when Mel and Kochie were on the couch. Above, the trio together in 2013 - with Kochie the only survivor

Reeve regularly worked on Sunrise and was a regular presence when Mel and Kochie were on the couch. Above, the trio together in 2013 - with Kochie the only survivor

Reeve regularly worked on Sunrise and was a regular presence when Mel and Kochie were on the couch. Above, the trio together in 2013 – with Kochie the only survivor

I would have walked into the sunset with no regrets if after 18 incredible years with 7, I’d been offered fair exit terms, for what I feel has been an unfailingly whole hearted effort. Decency and work ethic are everything to me. Funny, but I’m most proud of It’s Academic. 

I know I’m well respected and liked by my colleagues and have been a sounding board for many on air people, producers and others over the years, through their own challenges.

I’m 58 and far from thoughts of retirement. Not that Linda would let me, not that I can, not that I’d want to. I have too much to give and to do. We face a very uncertain future given the state of the industry and the economy more generally. 

I understand times are tough for the business, but 5 weeks won’t come close to giving my family and I a reasonable buffer.

I’ve never quibbled over or demanded anything, the first number that was put on any contract with 7 I’ve been happy to sign, without an agent.

I’ve much preferred direct, eye to eye ‘gentlemen’s’ agreements.

Bruce, I have always enjoyed speaking and dealing with you and your honesty and integrity.

I believe I still had a lot to offer 7 and as much as anyone on air across the network, I think I represented a good example of the best of our brand. 

In some capacity I reckon I’ve been on air pretty much every day on our network for the last 10 years or so, either live, with a new episode or on a re-run of a show.

People I meet comment on this all the time.

Reeve (above with Larry Emdur and Monique Wright) has been on Sunrise for about a decade but hasn't appeared on screen since March

Reeve (above with Larry Emdur and Monique Wright) has been on Sunrise for about a decade but hasn't appeared on screen since March

Reeve (above with Larry Emdur and Monique Wright) has been on Weekend Sunrise for about a decade but hasn’t appeared on screen since March

I know cost cutting is a reality of our industry and our company at the moment, but I’m stung and distraught to think my 18 years with 7 this time (plus 8 years when I was a much younger chap, and another 5 years on Beyond 2000) … 31 years on the screens of 7, was worth 5 weeks pay. 

Aside from this, it doesn’t recognise I’ve spent these 12 weeks without pay, trying to find ways to be a contributor, with little feedback.

This is a personal note Kerry and Bruce and I apologise for its length. However I felt reaching out honestly to the 2 people who have been very good to me over many years at 7, might count towards reaching an agreement that enables a period of unprecedented certainty for my family, weekends home and the chance to find other work.

I hope you can view it in the genuine spirit in which it is written.

Although I’ve witnessed a lot, I’ve avoided scandal and despised the privileged behaviour of others, conscious of my good fortune to have a job at 7. 

I’ve been a lucky, loyal, bloody hard working and proud part of the network eco-system. 

It would be a pleasure to speak to either of you further if you wanted, or a staff member you might want to put me in touch with, in the context of this background.

If you got this far, I deeply appreciate it.

All the very best to you both.

Yours sincerely,

Simon Reeve

Reeve with his daughter Stella Reeve and music legend Molly Meldrum

Reeve with his daughter Stella Reeve and music legend Molly Meldrum

Reeve with his daughter Stella Reeve and music legend Molly Meldrum

Reeve then sent this reply later that day after Mr Stokes and Mr McWilliam responded:

Dear Kerry and Bruce

Thanks so much for the kind replies.

(I have literally been out picking up horse poo for the last 2 hours.)

I understand the strain out there. It’s palpable even here in Covid free Qld.

I would not have written this at all, there is too much on your plates to address individual circumstances and I would have limped off into the sunset after these years happily enough if there had been an exit plan that reflected my 18 years this time around and my long association with the 7 brand overall.

But I was shattered after that call as it goes to the core of our self worth. It’s been an average week.

I do deeply appreciate your messages and hope we can work something out and that our paths cross again down the bumpy road.

Kindest regards

Simon.

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His exit was contrasted with former Sunrise host Mel Doyle, who was publicly feted by a host of stars and praise from the network, while Reeve went without fanfare.  

A senior Seven source told Daily Mail Australia that Reeve was given the same opportunity by Sunrise producer Michael Pell.

‘He offered Simon the option of doing an official goodbye on air with Weekend Sunrise. He declined,’ they said.

‘Big contrast to how Mel Doyle handled her departure.’

Reeve had essentially worked odd jobs on Seven in recent years, hosting game shows Million Dollar Minute and It’s Academic and presenting sport on Weekend Sunrise.

Court documents allege he was told to ‘cease performing services’ on Weekend Sunrise on March 16 by producer Matt McGrane. 

Reeve was flown from his large property on the Gold Coast (pictured) to Sydney each weekend, and put up in a hotel, each week to present the sport on Weekend Sunrise. This photo of him at home in July shows his white beard getting longer

Reeve was flown from his large property on the Gold Coast (pictured) to Sydney each weekend, and put up in a hotel, each week to present the sport on Weekend Sunrise. This photo of him at home in July shows his white beard getting longer

Reeve was flown from his large property on the Gold Coast (pictured) to Sydney each weekend, and put up in a hotel, each week to present the sport on Weekend Sunrise. This photo of him at home in July shows his white beard getting longer

Reeve frequently posts photos in Instagram of himself on the property - working in the yard or relaxing in the tranquil surrounds

Reeve frequently posts photos in Instagram of himself on the property - working in the yard or relaxing in the tranquil surrounds

Reeve frequently posts photos in Instagram of himself on the property – working in the yard or relaxing in the tranquil surrounds

He only appeared on screen twice more – reporting on Seven’s ANZAC Day coverage and shops reopening in Brisbane as the coronavirus lockdown ended.

His court filing insisted his ‘age, seniority, and length of service’ entitled him to 12 months notice, but insiders questioned whether his profile warranted this assessment.

‘Let’s be frank – he’s not a star, never was a star. Show his photo to 100 people walking through Martin Place and none of them will know who he is,’ one said.

‘You have casuals and staff who are quietly being let go after years of service, not replaced and now on JobSeeker and Simon wants more money? It fails the pub test.’ 

Reeve ‘lawyering up’ has not gone over well with Seven’s rank and file, either – many of them were made redundant and others are on JobKeeper.

Many of those who survived the months of culling took pay cuts and the network handed out $200 food vouchers to staffers struggling to stay afloat.

Reeve spent most of the week, when not put up in a swanky Sydney hotel, relaxing on his two-acre estate in well-to-do Tallai.

He acquired the 7,735sqm five-bedroom, three bathroom house and estate he shares with his wife Linda for $848,000 in 2010.

Reeve spent most of the week, when not put up in a swanky Sydney hotel, relaxing on his two-acre estate in well-to-do Tallai he bought for $848,000 in 2010

Reeve spent most of the week, when not put up in a swanky Sydney hotel, relaxing on his two-acre estate in well-to-do Tallai he bought for $848,000 in 2010

Reeve spent most of the week, when not put up in a swanky Sydney hotel, relaxing on his two-acre estate in well-to-do Tallai he bought for $848,000 in 2010

He and his wife Linda also bought a four-bedroom terrace overlooking Sydney's Coogee Beach for $549,000 in 1998, which they rent out for $1,250 a week

He and his wife Linda also bought a four-bedroom terrace overlooking Sydney's Coogee Beach for $549,000 in 1998, which they rent out for $1,250 a week

He and his wife Linda also bought a four-bedroom terrace overlooking Sydney’s Coogee Beach for $549,000 in 1998, which they rent out for $1,250 a week

Reeve frequently posts photos in Instagram of himself on the property – working in the yard or relaxing in the tranquil surrounds.

The white beard he sports in each photo, and shaved off before going on air, has grown considerably longer in recent photos.

The couple also bought a four-bedroom terrace overlooking Sydney’s Coogee Beach for $549,000 in 1998, which they rent out for $1,250 a week. 

Reeve’s lawyer John Laxton told the Federal Court in Sydney on Thursday that his client was seeking ‘in excess of $500,000’ and up to $1 million.

Seven will defend the case and is expected to argue Reeve had ‘changed his tune’ on being a contractor after leaving. 

Reeve is yet to respond to messages from Daily Mail Australia and Seven declined to comment. 

‘All I am asking for is nothing more than all Australian workers are entitled to… even those living on the Gold Coast,’ he earlier told the Daily Telegraph.  

Reeve, far right, was a long term contributor to Weekend Sunrise but is understood to be living on the Gold Coast

Reeve, far right, was a long term contributor to Weekend Sunrise but is understood to be living on the Gold Coast

Reeve, far right, was a long term contributor to Weekend Sunrise but is understood to be living on the Gold Coast

In Reeve’s statement of claim, which was filed to the Federal Court, he argues that he was an employee according to the Fair Work Act and therefore was entitled to annual leave payments, a notice period for his departure and a redundancy package.    

‘It was an implied term of the ongoing contract that Seven would provide Reeve with reasonable notice of termination,’ his statement of claims reads.

‘Reasonable notice for Reeve as at 25 June 2020 given his age, seniority and length of service, was not less than 12 months’ notice of termination.’

Reeve is claiming 12 months’ salary in lieu of termination notice in court, as well as compensation over the failure to receive annual leave, interest and costs.        

The lawsuit sets the stage for what could be the highest-profile court stoush Seven has faced since the network and Mr Worner’s executive assistant Amber Harrison sued one another in 2017. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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‘Maybe Clintons won’t get away with it’: Trump retweets after probe into Russia-gate expands

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maybe clintons wont get away with it trump retweets after probe into russia gate

Donald Trump said last night ‘maybe the Clintons won’t get away with it after all’ after federal prosecutor John Durham’s probe into the FBI’s Russia investigation expanded to look into alleged corruption at the Clinton Foundation.

Durham, put in charge of the Russia-gate review by Attorney General William Barr, has sought evidence about federal investigations from around the same time which were looking into the Clinton Foundation, sources told The New York Times.

Durham’s team has revealed that they are comparing the two investigations, as well as looking at whether the Russia inquiry investigators broke the law.

It was not clear whether Durham’s officials were looking into similar allegations at the Clinton Foundation or to what extent it would feature in the conclusions of his inquiry.

Trump last night retweeted conservative commentator David J Harris Jr, who shared a link to an article about the latest developments, writing ‘Maybe the Clintons won’t get away it after all.’ 

John Durham

John Durham

Hillary and Bill Clinton

Hillary and Bill Clinton

John Durham’s (left) inquiry is now also looking into the Clinton Foundation (Hillary and Bill, right) probe – which was contemporaneous but separate to the Russia probe which was previously thought to be his subject matter

Durham’s approach is ‘highly unusual,’ sources told the Times, and the inclusion of the Clinton investigation suggests that his scope is much broader than previously thought.

The Russia probe – into foreign election interference – and the Clinton Foundation inquiry – into alleged bribery and corruption – differ substantively and have involved largely different investigators and prosecutors.

It comes amid fears by Trump’s opponents that Durham’s work is being weaponized politically.

Democrats last week called on the Justice Department’s inspector general to look at whether Durham’s inquiry was impartial after one of his top lieutenants resigned, reportedly over concerns that their findings would be dropped before election day.

The Clinton Foundation probe started five years ago under the Obama administration and has not resulted in criminal charges to date.

In a statement the foundation said: ‘The Clinton Foundation has regularly been subjected to baseless, politically motivated allegations, and time after time these allegations have been proven false.’

Republicans have claimed that the FBI’s top brass and the DoJ under Barack Obama gave preferential treatment to the Clintons.

They accuse the organizations of taking an overtly political stance against Trump while showing reluctance to investigate allegations about the Clinton Foundation and Hillary Clinton – particularly her use of a private email server as Secretary of State.

‘There was a clear double standard by the Department of Justice and FBI when it came to the Trump and Clinton campaigns in 2016,’ Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsay Graham said in August.

Durham’s investigation has produced one criminal case so far against an FBI lawyer for attempting to secure a wiretap to eavesdrop on a former Trump adviser.

US President Donald J. Trump holds a news briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, DC on Sunday, September 27, 2020

US President Donald J. Trump holds a news briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, DC on Sunday, September 27, 2020

US President Donald J. Trump holds a news briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, DC on Sunday, September 27, 2020

Former FBI attorney Kevin Clinesmith pleaded guilty in August to falsifying a document to justify surveillance of Trump campaign adviser Carter Page as part of the Russia probe.

It was not clear at the time whether Clinesmith had flipped and was assisting Durham’s investigation. 

Sen. Graham last week teased the newly reported scope of Durham’s investigation, telling Sean Hannity on Fox News to ‘stay tuned.’

‘You think you are mad about the phones being wiped?’ Graham said. ‘We’ll talk in about 10 or 12 days and we’ll see if there is something else you can get mad about.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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