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Careers experts reveal the three make or break factors that determine whether you will get the job

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careers experts reveal the three make or break factors that determine whether you will get the job

An Australian recruitment company director has revealed how to ensure your resume is always read and considered by employers.  

The director of Career Threads, Joanne Besser, told Seek that candidates must use the right language when writing a CV, avoid over explaining and make use of keywords that link to the job that has been advertised.

‘Put yourself in an employer’s shoes and consider their mindset, time schedule and what they’re requesting in the job description,’ Ms Besser told the publication.

Melbourne careers and LinkedIn expert Sue Ellson agreed and said it’s important to ensure a resume is ‘scan-friendly’ and passes the ‘skim reading test’.

Joanne Besser, director of Career Threads, told Seek candidates must use the right language when writing a resume, avoid over explaining and make use of keywords that link to the job advertised (stock image)

Joanne Besser, director of Career Threads, told Seek candidates must use the right language when writing a resume, avoid over explaining and make use of keywords that link to the job advertised (stock image)

Joanne Besser, director of Career Threads, told Seek candidates must use the right language when writing a resume, avoid over explaining and make use of keywords that link to the job advertised (stock image)

1. The language test

When writing a resume Ms Besser said it’s essential to write in a conversational, achievement-based style to ensure a candidate is explaining themselves and their experience well in a clear, concise manner.

Sue Ellson (pictured) said it's important to make sure a resume is 'scan-friendly'

Sue Ellson (pictured) said it's important to make sure a resume is 'scan-friendly'

Sue Ellson (pictured) said it’s important to make sure a resume is ‘scan-friendly’ 

This can easily be done by avoiding the use of vague language such as ‘performed multiple tasks’, and instead using result-driven language such as ‘increased performance by X% through introducing Z’.

Ms Ellson agreed with this tactic and recommended avoiding overusing the word ‘I’ while also formatting your CV well.

‘Conversational language is always preferred to discuss your achievements and success in the various positions you’ve had,’ she told FEMAIL. 

When formatting the resume itself, Ms Ellson recommends avoiding underlining headings, using a suitable sized font and ensuring the resume can be read on both a computer and phone or tablet. 

When writing a resume Ms Besser said it's essential to write in a conversational, achievement-based style to ensure a candidate is explaining themselves and their experience well in a clear, concise manner (stock image)

When writing a resume Ms Besser said it's essential to write in a conversational, achievement-based style to ensure a candidate is explaining themselves and their experience well in a clear, concise manner (stock image)

When writing a resume Ms Besser said it’s essential to write in a conversational, achievement-based style to ensure a candidate is explaining themselves and their experience well in a clear, concise manner (stock image)

2. The skim test

To ensure a resume passes the ‘skim test’, a candidate must be concise and list their achievements in a ‘hierarchy order’ with their most relevant experience at the top.

Both Ms Besser and Ms Ellson suggested this formatting to allow the employer to easily match the perfect candidate suitable to the job.

‘Each resume must be changed to suit the job advertised,’ Ms Ellson said.  

‘You should have one long resume with all your key information which is then adjusted and shortened each time to suit the job.’ 

This helpful tactic not only allows the candidate to form a new ‘hierarchy order’ each time but it also warrants the ‘scan-friendly’ layout.

HOW TO ENSURE YOUR RESUME PASSES EACH TEST  

1. The language test

  • Write in a conversational, achievement-based style 
  • Explain and discuss achievements in a clear, concise manner
  • Use result-driven language, such as ‘increased performance by X% through introducing Z’

2. The skim test

  • Be concise 
  • List achievements and experiences in a ‘hierarchy order’ with their most relevant information at the top 

3. The screen test

  • Identify the keywords used in the job description and incorporate these into your resume and LinkedIn profile 
  • Ask someone else to review the job advertisement alongside your resume to see if the two match
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To ensure a resume passes the 'skim test', a candidate must be concise and list their achievements in a hierarchy order with their most relevant experience at the top (stock image)

To ensure a resume passes the 'skim test', a candidate must be concise and list their achievements in a hierarchy order with their most relevant experience at the top (stock image)

To ensure a resume passes the ‘skim test’, a candidate must be concise and list their achievements in a hierarchy order with their most relevant experience at the top (stock image)

3. The screen test

Many job seekers may be unaware that large recruitment companies often use an automated applicant tracking system (ATS) that swiftly reviews resumes to search for specific key words relating to the job description.

Not only does this save the recruiters time but it also removes those who may not be suited to the job.

That being said, it’s essential for job seekers to incorporate the keywords from job descriptions into their resume to ensure it is read.

‘The employer is looking for matches with each application, so if you’re going to a project management job be sure to use the term “project management”,’ Ms Ellson said. 

Another simple way to conduct a screen test is to ask someone else to review the job advertisement alongside your resume to see if the two match.

HOW TO STRUCTURE A RESUME 

When constructing a resume, Sue Ellson recommends the following order: 

1. First name, last name and contact details 

2. Career Objective

3. Skills – professional, technical and personal 

3. A career snapshot listing your past and/or current jobs and how long you were in each position for 

4. Employment History – detailing 2-3 relevant jobs, the duties involved and the achievements made 

5. Other details – education, courses, references 

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Evil rapist who threatened to kill his 13-year-old victim is sentenced to just nine MONTHS in jail 

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evil rapist who threatened to kill his 13 year old victim is sentenced to just nine months in jail

An evil rapist who sexually assaulted a 13-year-old girl in a park and threatened to kill her if she called police has been sentenced to just nine months behind bars. 

Craig Anthony Mclean, 30, from Gympie, Queensland, preyed on a young teenager for a year from July 2018.  

The relationship initially started with months of ‘hugging and kissing’ before he raped her in late 2019 at a local lookout when she refused his advances, The Courier Mail reports. 

The girl reported the incident to police and he was charged with two counts of indecent treatment of a child under 16, one count of having carnal knowledge with a child under 16, and one count of possessing child exploitation material.   

Craig Anthony Mclean (pictured), 30, from  Gympie, QLD, was sentenced to nine months behind bars last week for sexually assaulting a 13-year-old girl from 2018 to 2019

Craig Anthony Mclean (pictured), 30, from  Gympie, QLD, was sentenced to nine months behind bars last week for sexually assaulting a 13-year-old girl from 2018 to 2019

Craig Anthony Mclean (pictured), 30, from  Gympie, QLD, was sentenced to nine months behind bars last week for sexually assaulting a 13-year-old girl from 2018 to 2019

Mclean tried to take his own life twice in the hours before his sentencing hearing at Gympie District Court last week.  

He pleaded guilty and was sentenced to two years and three months in prison with the remainder of the term to be suspended once he serves nine months. 

The court heard the girl had told McLean she was not ready for sex in November 2018, and ran away from him during an encounter later that year when he reached beneath her bra and pants after she told him to stop. 

The pair met again a few months later in a park and had sex on a bench, exchanging sexually explicit photos into 2019. 

Mclean convinced the girl to meet him at a lookout, promising nothing would happen between them, but slowly began touching her despite her resistance, the court heard. 

When he ripped open her pants and she threatened to call the police if he did not stop, he told her: ‘I will take your life if you call the police’.

She fought back until he stopped and he eventually dropped her home, with the girl then reporting the incident to police the following day. 

The court heard Mclean attempted to take his own life twice the morning of the sentencing hearing

The court heard Mclean attempted to take his own life twice the morning of the sentencing hearing

The court heard Mclean attempted to take his own life twice the morning of the sentencing hearing

He was charged after voluntarily attending the local police station in November 2019, and released on bail on the condition he did not use social media, which he then breached several times.  

He was arrested in January for threatening to kill anyone who reported him to police and placed in custody before being released on bail again in August.

The morning of last week’s hearing, he was rushed to hospital after trying to take his life in a park before making a second attempt later that day, the court heard. 

The judge said Mclean’s behaviour through out the course of the case’s proceedings had demonstrated ‘substantial self-interest’ rather than remorse for his victim. 

Mclean was placed on a 15-month good behaviour bond for using a carriage service to harass and a six month sentence, to be served concurrently, for breaching a previous suspended sentence. 

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NSW Police and AFP bust as alleged text message scam duo who stole thousands in Sydney

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nsw police and afp bust as alleged text message scam duo who stole thousands in sydney

Two men have been arrested for allegedly being part of a text message scam that steals Australian’s identities and their money.

Officers raided two homes in Macquarie Park and Burwood, NSW, on Tuesday, where they seized hundreds of SIM cards, nine SIM boxes, phones, laptops and hard drives. 

Fake ID documents, drugs, drug paraphernalia, a money counter and cash was also allegedly discovered. 

The SIM boxes were allegedly used to send text messages that claimed to be from banks or telecommunications companies and asked for personal or financial information.

This is known as a smishing scam. 

Two men have been arrested for allegedly being part of a text message scam that steals Australian's identities and their money

Two men have been arrested for allegedly being part of a text message scam that steals Australian's identities and their money

Two men have been arrested for allegedly being part of a text message scam that steals Australian’s identities and their money

Police will allege the men had direct access to and control of the SMS boxes, which sent more than 10,000 messages in two weeks.

In one instance, a person allegedly lost $30,000 after 45 customers from one bank were targeted. 

One telecommunications provider found 49,000 texts made to their customers in one week.

The Australian Federal Police worked with organisations such as Westpac, the Commonwealth Bank, ANZ and TPG Telecom.  

The 50-year-old man from Macquarie Park was charged with eight counts of false or misleading information, one count of using a telecommunications network with intent to commit serious offence and one count of drug possession.

He was also charged with dealing in identification information using a carriage service,  honestly obtaining or dealing in financial information and dealing with property suspected of being proceeds of crime.

Officers raided two homes in Macquarie Park and Burwood, NSW, on Tuesday, where they seized hundreds of SIM cards, nine SIM boxes, phones, laptops and hard drives

Officers raided two homes in Macquarie Park and Burwood, NSW, on Tuesday, where they seized hundreds of SIM cards, nine SIM boxes, phones, laptops and hard drives

Officers raided two homes in Macquarie Park and Burwood, NSW, on Tuesday, where they seized hundreds of SIM cards, nine SIM boxes, phones, laptops and hard drives

The SIM boxes were allegedly used to send test messages that claimed to be from banks or telecommunications companies and asked for personal or financial information

The SIM boxes were allegedly used to send test messages that claimed to be from banks or telecommunications companies and asked for personal or financial information

The SIM boxes were allegedly used to send test messages that claimed to be from banks or telecommunications companies and asked for personal or financial information

WHAT IS SMISHING? 

Smishing is a emerging form phishing.

It is when scammers use text messaging to trick people into giving them personal information. 

People are told not to trust texts from people they don’t know. 

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The 30-year-old is expected to face similar charges.   

Chris Goldsmid, AFP Commander Cybercrime Operations, said: ‘This fraud syndicate had absolutely no regard for the hardworking Australians they stole from, victims who may be struggling since the bushfires and COVID-19 hit the nation.’

Detective Superintendent Matthew Craft, Commander from NSW Police’s Cybercrime squad, said offenders are adapting to technology to stop them.  

‘These types of scams become somewhat redundant when the community heeds the advice to never provide confidential personal information to people you don’t know and can’t identify,’ he said.

Legitimate businesses will never call or SMS customers seeking confidential information. Always be suspicious when you receive such requests.’ 

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The COVID-19 scam you MUST avoid: Fraudsters pretend to be contact tracers

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the covid 19 scam you must avoid fraudsters pretend to be contact tracers

Con artists are pretending to be government COVID-19 tracers in an elaborate new text message scam.

Fake SMS messages warn innocent Australians that a possible coronavirus case has been detected in their neighbourhood.

The alert then asks victims to click on a link on a map to find out ‘the most dangerous places to avoid tomorrow’.

Scamwatch, which is run by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, posted the message on Twitter with warning to all recipients. 

Fake SMS messages warn innocent Australians that a possible coronavirus case has been detected in their neighbourhood (pictured)

Fake SMS messages warn innocent Australians that a possible coronavirus case has been detected in their neighbourhood (pictured)

Fake SMS messages warn innocent Australians that a possible coronavirus case has been detected in their neighbourhood (pictured)

‘Beware of the latest COVID-19 themed government impersonation scam,’ Scamwatch wrote.

How to protect yourself against scams: 

Don’t click on hyperlinks in text/social media messages or emails, even if it appears to come from a trusted source.

Go directly to the website through your browser. For example, to reach the MyGov website type ‘my.gov.au’ into your browser yourself.

Never respond to unsolicited messages and calls that ask for personal or financial details, even if they claim to be a from a reputable organisation or government authority – just press delete or hang up.

 Source: Scamwatch

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‘If you receive this text, don’t click the link, just delete it.’

The watchdog also urged people who are unsure whether a message is legitimate to to contact the relevant agency.

According to scamwatch, fraudsters have collected more than $3.3million from Australians who have fallen victim to scams since the outbreak of COVID-19.  

‘Scammers are hoping that you have let your guard down,’ Scamwatch said on its website.

‘Do not provide your personal, banking or superannuation details to strangers who have approached you.’   

A new tax office scam was also found on Wednesday to be targeting people in the form of a phone voicemail message or SMS.

The ploy urges people to hand over their credit card details – threatening taxpayers with arrest if they don’t comply.

‘Attention: this call is from the legal department of Services Australia,’ the message says.

‘Your Tax File Identification Number has been suspended and we have filed a case under your name. 

‘So, before this matter goes to Federal Court and you could get arrested kindly press 1. I repeat press 1 to know about your legal case.’ 

A spokesperson from the Australian Tax Office said the body is concerned about the increasing number of people paying fake tax debt scammers. 

The watchdog urged people who are unsure whether a message is legitimate to to contact the relevant agency (stock image)

The watchdog urged people who are unsure whether a message is legitimate to to contact the relevant agency (stock image)

The watchdog urged people who are unsure whether a message is legitimate to to contact the relevant agency (stock image)

‘Scammers pretending to be from the ATO are contacting members of the community, telling them that they have a tax debt and that if they don’t pay it straight away they will be arrested,’ they said.

‘These scammers will often request payment through unusual methods, such as cryptocurrency, pre-paid credit cards or gift cards, and will try to keep people on the line until they have paid.’

They urged anyone who received a phone call, text message or voicemail demanding money not to send a payment or provide personal information.  

‘We will never threaten you with immediate arrest or demand payment through unusual means.’

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