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Carpenter Andrew Davey almost had to give up NRL before his debut against Sea Eagles on Saturday

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carpenter andrew davey almost had to give up nrl before his debut against sea eagles on saturday

Andrew Davey was ready to pull the pin on his unlikely journey from bush footy to mature-age NRL debutant at the end of July.

The 28-year-old was in the rare position of making less money playing NRL than he did when he was a carpenter due to coronavirus pay cuts and not having made his debut.  

But on Saturday the Parramatta Eels second-rower laced up his boots and took the field for the first time as a professional footballer against the Manly Warringah Sea Eagles.

In 2014, he was six years into his career as a full-time carpenter, playing footy in the Queensland mining town of Emerald.

He then moved clubs and emerged as Mackay’s best rookie in the Queensland Cup for 2016 and became the club’s player of the year in the following season.

Andrew Davey (pictured) was ready to pull the pin on his unlikely journey from bush footy to mature-age NRL debutant at the end of July

Andrew Davey (pictured) was ready to pull the pin on his unlikely journey from bush footy to mature-age NRL debutant at the end of July

Andrew Davey (pictured) was ready to pull the pin on his unlikely journey from bush footy to mature-age NRL debutant at the end of July 

The 28-year-old was in the rare position of making less money playing NRL than he did when he was a carpenter due to coronavirus pay cuts and having made his debut. Pictured with partner Daynee Grech

The 28-year-old was in the rare position of making less money playing NRL than he did when he was a carpenter due to coronavirus pay cuts and having made his debut. Pictured with partner Daynee Grech

The 28-year-old was in the rare position of making less money playing NRL than he did when he was a carpenter due to coronavirus pay cuts and having made his debut. Pictured with partner Daynee Grech

In 2014, he was six years into his career as a full-time carpenter, playing footy in the Queensland mining town of Emerald

In 2014, he was six years into his career as a full-time carpenter, playing footy in the Queensland mining town of Emerald

In 2014, he was six years into his career as a full-time carpenter, playing footy in the Queensland mining town of Emerald

He said he didn’t leave the bush to make the NRL – he just wanted a new challenge. 

Last year, Davey finally became a professional footballer at 27 when he joined the Eels.

And on Saturday, he became the second oldest debutant of the NRL era when the side faced Manly.

‘Growing up as a kid if you haven’t made footy by the time you’re 18 you’re told to get a job,’ Davey said.

‘I was a terrible football player so that happened earlier when I was 16.

‘I didn’t come through the grades, I definitely took the scenic route.’

He revealed in a video he thought his chance to make a professional squad ‘sailed away’ four years ago but it is ‘pretty special’ to finally be able to taking the field.  

Davey said he was told he would be lacing up his boots after he received a text message from head coach Brad Arthur summoning him.

‘I thought “I hope I am not in trouble” and he laid it out for me. I wasn’t sure how to feel,’ he said.

Davey (pictured in Saturday's match) said he was told he would be lacing up his boots after he received a text message from head coach Brad Arthur summoning him

Davey (pictured in Saturday's match) said he was told he would be lacing up his boots after he received a text message from head coach Brad Arthur summoning him

Davey (pictured in Saturday’s match) said he was told he would be lacing up his boots after he received a text message from head coach Brad Arthur summoning him

‘My hands were sweating and my knees started jiggling. I was quite nervous.’

Davey revealed he became emotional when he was presented with his jersey after the Captain’s Run, which was presented to him by the club’s prop David Gower. 

He said after 18 months at the club he sometimes felt like he would never get to take the field.  

Davey is one of those most impacted by coronavirus in the NRL as one of the game’s least experienced players he was slapped with a 20 per cent pay cut.

Davey (pictured with partner) is one of those most impacted by coronavirus in the NRL as one of the game's least experienced players he was slapped with a 20 per cent pay cut

Davey (pictured with partner) is one of those most impacted by coronavirus in the NRL as one of the game's least experienced players he was slapped with a 20 per cent pay cut

Davey (pictured with partner) is one of those most impacted by coronavirus in the NRL as one of the game’s least experienced players he was slapped with a 20 per cent pay cut

The actual month-on-month financial drop is actually far more, given players were paid in full for the months before the virus hit.

And with the NRL’s bubble, there was no chance of Davies picking up work on the side.

Which left him seriously considering answering calls from builders in Queensland to resume life as a chippy.

‘And it’s great money,’ Davey said.

‘(When) I’m in the shower I just think, “oh my God, the money I am giving up”.

‘It’s hard, because I’m 28 years old. I’m not living with my parents. You have life insurance, car insurance. I have to pay rent.’

He said at the beginning of coronavirus, when the competition was suspended, it was a ‘kick in the guts’ because he wasn’t sure how he would prove himself in order to make his debut. 

Davey said the decision to return to the NRL was ‘one of the hardest’ he has ever had to make because he knew money would be tight.

Davey said the decision to return to the NRL was 'one of the hardest' he has ever had to make because he knew money would be tight

Davey said the decision to return to the NRL was 'one of the hardest' he has ever had to make because he knew money would be tight

Davey said the decision to return to the NRL was ‘one of the hardest’ he has ever had to make because he knew money would be tight

He said he told fibs to his parents declaring he would be OK but admitted he was on a timeline and admitted he wouldn’t have been able to stay past the end of the month if he hadn’t had the chance to play on Saturday. 

‘I knew this was what I wanted,’ he said.

‘I turned up in Parra gear every morning and see the life I get to live. I would be mad not to live it out for as long as I could.’ 

The forward was solid in his debut, copping a whack to the head in his first hit up from Joel Thompson but still finishing with a linebreak assist and error free.

And now he desperately craves a second shot.

‘I’d love to get that second one to prove I really do belong and it’s not a fluke.’

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Studio 10 hosts Sarah Harris and Angela Bishop reveal their tragic experiences with miscarriages

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studio 10 hosts sarah harris and angela bishop reveal their tragic experiences with miscarriages

Sarah Harris and Angela Bishop recounted their heartbreaking experiences with miscarriages in a very emotional episode of Studio 10 on Monday.

Speaking publicly for the first time about their tragic miscarriages, both women confessed they weren’t even aware of what the other had been through until recently, confessing there was a stigma about talking about it.

Sarah, 39, who was verging on tears during the segment, revealed she’d suffered a miscarriage eight weeks into her first pregnancy, and admitted just reliving it was causing her to get ‘all shaky’.

Speaking out: Sarah Harris (pictured) and Angela Bishop recounted their heartbreaking experiences with miscarriages on Studio 10 on Monday

Speaking out: Sarah Harris (pictured) and Angela Bishop recounted their heartbreaking experiences with miscarriages on Studio 10 on Monday

Traumatic: Speaking publicly for the first time about their tragic miscarriages, both women confessed they weren't even aware of what the other had been through. Pictured, Angela Bishop

Traumatic: Speaking publicly for the first time about their tragic miscarriages, both women confessed they weren't even aware of what the other had been through. Pictured, Angela Bishop

Speaking out: Sarah Harris (left) and Angela Bishop (right) recounted their heartbreaking experiences with miscarriages on Studio 10 on Monday

‘It was the day before the Logies… and I was trying on Spanx, as you do, and I was in the change room, and there was just blood everywhere,’ she said. 

‘I called my mother-in-law and said, “I don’t know what’s happening,” and she said, “You’re probably having a miscarriage.”‘

Sarah said she called her GP, who confirmed she was indeed having a miscarriage, and advised her to go for a scan on the Monday.

Getting emotional: Verging on tears, Sarah, 39, revealed she'd suffered a miscarriage eight weeks into her first pregnancy, and admitted just reliving it was causing her to get 'all shaky'

Getting emotional: Verging on tears, Sarah, 39, revealed she'd suffered a miscarriage eight weeks into her first pregnancy, and admitted just reliving it was causing her to get 'all shaky'

Getting emotional: Verging on tears, Sarah, 39, revealed she’d suffered a miscarriage eight weeks into her first pregnancy, and admitted just reliving it was causing her to get ‘all shaky’

‘For 36 hours, I just bled and thought, “Oh, well. That’s my first baby gone,” and I kind of just dealt with it in my own way,’ she revealed.

But after going for the scan, the sonographer discovered another heartbeat, and told Sarah she’d miscarried a twin, before she safely delivered her first son, Paul, in December 2015.

Sarah said the revelation that she was still pregnant led to what she described as a ‘horror’ few weeks, where she was too afraid to do anything in case she lost the other baby, too.

Miracle baby: After going for the scan, the sonographer discovered another heartbeat, and told Sarah she'd miscarried a twin, before she safely delivered her first son, Paul, in December 2015. Pictured with sons Paul and Harry

Miracle baby: After going for the scan, the sonographer discovered another heartbeat, and told Sarah she'd miscarried a twin, before she safely delivered her first son, Paul, in December 2015. Pictured with sons Paul and Harry

Miracle baby: After going for the scan, the sonographer discovered another heartbeat, and told Sarah she’d miscarried a twin, before she safely delivered her first son, Paul, in December 2015. Pictured with sons Paul and Harry

She admitted that it was still something she was coming to terms with, having never really dealt with it.

‘I don’t think I really took the time to grieve it, because I had that beautiful baby in the end,’ she confessed.

Meanwhile, Angela, 53, became tearful, dabbing her eyes with a tissue as she revealed she was a week late going for her eight-week scan, and when she did finally see her obstetrician, she was told the baby had no heartbeat.

Distraught: A tearful Angela, 53, revealed she was a week late going for her eight-week scan, and when she did finally see her obstetrician, she was told the baby had no heartbeat

Distraught: A tearful Angela, 53, revealed she was a week late going for her eight-week scan, and when she did finally see her obstetrician, she was told the baby had no heartbeat

Distraught: A tearful Angela, 53, revealed she was a week late going for her eight-week scan, and when she did finally see her obstetrician, she was told the baby had no heartbeat

The mum-of-one said she was already terrified of going for pregnancy scans, because her 13-year-old daughter Amelia’s heart condition had been diagnosed during the 20-week scan.

‘I never really dealt with it, and I now know in retrospect that I went into a pretty bad period of depression,’ she added. 

Both women admitted they were shocked to hear about each other’s experiences, and said the ‘taboo’ culture of discussing miscarriages was something that needed to change.   

Heartbreak: The mum-of-one said she was already terrified of going for pregnancy scans, because her 13-year-old daughter Amelia's heart condition had been diagnosed during the 20-week scan

Heartbreak: The mum-of-one said she was already terrified of going for pregnancy scans, because her 13-year-old daughter Amelia's heart condition had been diagnosed during the 20-week scan

Heartbreak: The mum-of-one said she was already terrified of going for pregnancy scans, because her 13-year-old daughter Amelia’s heart condition had been diagnosed during the 20-week scan

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Princess Beatrice reveals her secret wedding was ‘so much fun’ as she opens up about summer nuptials

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princess beatrice reveals her secret wedding was so much fun as she opens up about summer nuptials

Princess Beatrice has said her secret wedding was ‘so much fun’ in her first comments about her surprise summer nuptials.  

The Queen’s granddaughter, 32, was due to marry Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi, 36, at St James’s Palace on 29 May but plans were postponed due to Covid-19 – and they instead tied the knot in a surprise secret ceremony at Windsor Castle on 17 July with just twenty guests. 

The royal has now spoken out about the wedding for the first time as she appeared in a video for the Forget Me Not Children’s Hospice and announced the winners of the organisation’s Kids Summer Art Competition 2020.

In a video released on their Twitter page, Princess Beatrice said: ‘I had the chance to get married this summer and it was so much fun.’      

Princess Beatrice, 32, has revealed her secret wedding was 'so much fun' as she opened up about summer nuptials for the first time since tying the knot

Princess Beatrice, 32, has revealed her secret wedding was 'so much fun' as she opened up about summer nuptials for the first time since tying the knot

Princess Beatrice, 32, has revealed her secret wedding was ‘so much fun’ as she opened up about summer nuptials for the first time since tying the knot

Appearing in the clip, Princess Beatrice opted for a midi floral gown for the occasion and wore her long auburn locks in soft curls. 

Beatrice has been working with the charity for the past eight years and is its official royal patron. 

The royal has visited the hospice on several occasions and spent time with both the young children and their families who receive the much needed support and care.  

The video appears to have been filmed at the same time as the royal’s wedding dress was unveiled at Windsor Castle last week. 

The Queen's granddaughter was due to marry Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi. 36, at St James's Palace on 29 May but plans were postponed due to Covid-19 - and they instead tied the knot in a surprise secret ceremony at Windsor Castle on 17 July with just twenty guests

The Queen's granddaughter was due to marry Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi. 36, at St James's Palace on 29 May but plans were postponed due to Covid-19 - and they instead tied the knot in a surprise secret ceremony at Windsor Castle on 17 July with just twenty guests

The Queen’s granddaughter was due to marry Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi. 36, at St James’s Palace on 29 May but plans were postponed due to Covid-19 – and they instead tied the knot in a surprise secret ceremony at Windsor Castle on 17 July with just twenty guests

The Sir Norman Hartnell gown, first worn by the Queen in the 1960s, was loaned to Beatrice by her grandmother for her low-key wedding to Edo. 

Her wedding gown will be on display from September 24 until November 22, the Royal Collection Trust announced earlier this month. 

Princess Beatrice and Edo enjoyed a slimmed-down wedding at the Royal Chapel of All Saints at Royal Lodge, Windsor on July 17. 

The ceremony details were not made public beforehand and the pair were originally due to marry in the Chapel Royal followed by a reception in the gardens of Buckingham Palace – but their wedding was postponed because of the coronavirus outbreak.

Appearing in the charity video, the royal beamed as she described her own secret summer wedding as 'such fun'

Appearing in the charity video, the royal beamed as she described her own secret summer wedding as 'such fun'

Appearing in the charity video, the royal beamed as she described her own secret summer wedding as ‘such fun’ 

The clip appears to have been filmed on the same day that Princess Beatrice attended the unveiling of her bridal gown at Windsor Castle last week

The clip appears to have been filmed on the same day that Princess Beatrice attended the unveiling of her bridal gown at Windsor Castle last week

The clip appears to have been filmed on the same day that Princess Beatrice attended the unveiling of her bridal gown at Windsor Castle last week 

Beatrice’s father the Duke of York walked her down the aisle but he did not feature in the photographs released by Buckingham Palace. The wedding was also attended by The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh. 

Princess Beatrice’s latest comments come as the York family celebrate the news that Beatrice’s younger sister Princess Eugenie is expecting her first baby.

The royal, who married husband Jack Brooksbank in October 2018, are expecting the baby in early 2021. 

Sharing the news on Instagram last week, Eugenie, 30, wrote: ‘Jack and I are so excited for early 2021….,’ alongside photos of baby slippers and her and Jack smiling. 

Princess Beatrice and Edo enjoyed a slimmed-down wedding at the Royal Chapel of All Saints at Royal Lodge, Windsor on July 17, attended by just 20 guests

Princess Beatrice and Edo enjoyed a slimmed-down wedding at the Royal Chapel of All Saints at Royal Lodge, Windsor on July 17, attended by just 20 guests

Princess Beatrice and Edo enjoyed a slimmed-down wedding at the Royal Chapel of All Saints at Royal Lodge, Windsor on July 17, attended by just 20 guests

Her mother Sarah Ferguson shared her excitement, writing: ‘I am so excited by the news that Eugenie and Jack are expecting their first child.

‘Thrilled for them both and in my 60th year cannot wait to be a grandmother. Welcoming a new baby into the York family is going to be a moment of profound joy.’

On her Storytime with Fergie and Friends channel, she read out – appropriately enough – a tale of magic called Nanna Maureen, by Casey Gillespie.

The baby will be the first grandchild for Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson, and will be the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh’s ninth great-grandchild.

Princess Beatrice's comments come days after her younger sister Princess Eugenie announced she is expecting her first baby with husband Jack Brooksbank

Princess Beatrice's comments come days after her younger sister Princess Eugenie announced she is expecting her first baby with husband Jack Brooksbank

Princess Beatrice’s comments come days after her younger sister Princess Eugenie announced she is expecting her first baby with husband Jack Brooksbank

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33608656 8771821 image a 2 1601023919328

Pitter patter of tiny feet! Eugenie, 30, shared the news on Instagram on Friday with a sweet photo of baby slippers and the caption: 'Jack and I are so excited for early 2021

Pitter patter of tiny feet! Eugenie, 30, shared the news on Instagram on Friday with a sweet photo of baby slippers and the caption: 'Jack and I are so excited for early 2021

Pitter patter of tiny feet! Eugenie, 30, shared the news on Instagram on Friday with a sweet photo of baby slippers and the caption: ‘Jack and I are so excited for early 2021

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Daniel Andrews is urged to resign over hotel quarantine failure

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daniel andrews is urged to resign over hotel quarantine failure

Calls are growing for Daniel Andrews to resign after an inquiry heard the state’s hotel quarantine disaster caused 768 deaths and more than 18,000 coronavirus infections. 

Victorian Opposition leader Michael O’Brien said the quarantine operation was ‘the worst failure of public administration in Victorian history’. 

He added: ‘If accountability for the deaths and damage is to mean anything, all those responsible must go – starting with Andrews.’

Calls are growing for Daniel Andrews (pictured) to resign after an inquiry heard the state's hotel quarantine disaster caused 768 deaths

Calls are growing for Daniel Andrews (pictured) to resign after an inquiry heard the state's hotel quarantine disaster caused 768 deaths

Calls are growing for Daniel Andrews (pictured) to resign after an inquiry heard the state’s hotel quarantine disaster caused 768 deaths

Victorian Opposition leader Michael O'Brien said the quarantine operation (pictured are travellers arriving) was 'the worst failure of public administration in Victorian history'

Victorian Opposition leader Michael O'Brien said the quarantine operation (pictured are travellers arriving) was 'the worst failure of public administration in Victorian history'

Victorian Opposition leader Michael O’Brien said the quarantine operation (pictured are travellers arriving) was ‘the worst failure of public administration in Victorian history’

On Monday afternoon the final day of Victoria’s hotel quarantine inquiry heard the program’s failure was responsible for the deaths of all 768 residents who have died in the state’s second wave.

Counsel assisting Ben Ihle said: ‘The failure by the hotel quarantine program to contain this virus is at today’s date responsible for the deaths of 768 people and the infection of some 18,490 others.

‘One only needs to pause and to reflect on those figures to appreciate the full scope of devastation and despair’.

‘This was a program which failed to meet its primary objective.’ 

Mr Ihle said protective gear was not used properly, staff were poorly trained and there was a lack of social distancing at the quarantine hotels. 

He said the system was set up quickly and the government failed to monitor it.

‘What was established was necessarily untested and prudence dictated that the program should have been accompanied by intensive ongoing monitoring and auditing,’ he said.

‘The Victorian government failed to adequately ensure that this was done.’

Former Health Minister Jenny Mikakos resigned on Saturday after Mr Andrews said she was ‘accountable’ for the quarantine program. 

On Sunday Mr Andrews said he would not resign, telling reporters: ‘I don’t run from problems and challenges’. 

The final day of Victoria's hotel quarantine inquiry heard the program's failure was responsible for the deaths of all 768 residents who died in the state's second wave. Pictured: Security guards at a quarantine hotel

The final day of Victoria's hotel quarantine inquiry heard the program's failure was responsible for the deaths of all 768 residents who died in the state's second wave. Pictured: Security guards at a quarantine hotel

The final day of Victoria’s hotel quarantine inquiry heard the program’s failure was responsible for the deaths of all 768 residents who died in the state’s second wave. Pictured: Security guards at a quarantine hotel

Melbourne’s second wave of coronavirus was sparked in late May when the disease escaped from a quarantine hotel and rapidly spread around the city. 

‘The scientific evidence now strongly suggests, and we submit that the board can comfortably find, that 90 per cent of positive cases in Victoria since [26 May] are attributable to that initial outbreak at the Rydges in late May,’ Mr Ihle said.

The Victorian government has been criticised for using private security guards to man the hotels instead of the police and ADF troops like in New South Wales and Queensland.

The inquiry heard the fateful decision to use guards was likely made at a meeting at the state control centre on the afternoon March 27.

But the decision wasn’t made by one person or government department.

Rather, counsel assisting the inquiry Rachel Ellyard said it was a ‘creeping assumption that became a reality’.

‘While no one person made a decision, by the end of that state control centre meeting, it was understood by all present that that was what was going to happen,’ Ms Ellyard said in her closing submission on Monday.

Opposition leader Michael O'Brien

Opposition leader Michael O'Brien

Opposition leader Michael O’Brien

In that meeting, Victoria Police Assistant Commissioner Mick Grainger said it was the force’s ‘preference’ that private security be used.

Emergency Management Commissioner Andrew Crisp stepped out of the meeting to take a call from Victoria Police Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton.

Mr Crisp then texted Mr Grainger: ‘I stepped out to speak to Graham and I let him know you’re in this meeting… He made it clear… that private security is the first security option at hotels and not police’.

Ms Ellyard said Victoria Police’s preference was a ‘substantial contributing factor to that creeping consensus’.

‘The expression of a preference can readily be understood to have given the clear impression that police weren’t going to do it and there needed to be an alternative,’ she said.

Ms Ellyard said once the decision had been made, no one in the meeting gave ‘any specific consideration’ to the suitability of private security for the role.

Contracts written up by the Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions left infection control and training in personal protective equipment use to the security companies.

Hotels, meanwhile, were responsible for cleaning, unless a returned traveller tested positive to Covid-19.

‘Responsibility for managing the risk of infection and providing for the safety of those involved in the program should have remained with the state. No contract should have purported to outsource those matters,’ Ms Ellyard said.

Counsel assisting Tony Neal QC said there was no suggestion those who set up the program worked other than with ‘the best of intentions and to the best of their ability’.

‘Bad faith or corruption is not what the evidence shows,’ he said.

‘Yet it is true that the hastily assembled program failed at two locations within approximately two and a half months and with disastrous consequences.

‘A multitude of decisions, actions and inaction, many of which compounded the effect of the other, ultimately expressed itself in the outbreaks which subverted the very reason for the existence of a hotel quarantine program. 

Hotel quarantine: A timeline 

* March 27 – National cabinet announces returned overseas travellers will have to complete 14 days of hotel quarantine. The Australia Defence Force prepares 100 personnel in each large state (and 50 in smaller states and territories) to ‘support expected quarantine compliance monitoring requests’. NSW and Queensland accept the support, Victoria decides to use private security guards. The decision is made at a 4:30pm meeting in Victoria’s state control centre.

* March 28 – At another state control centre meeting, Emergency Management Victoria Commissioner Andrew Crisp says there is no need for ADF ‘boots on the ground’. Victoria’s hotel quarantine program, named Operation Soteria, launches at 11:59pm.

* April 8 – Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet secretary Philip Gaetjens emails Victoria’s Department of Premier and Cabinet secretary Chris Eccles to offer ADF assistance.

* April 9 – Public Health Commander Finn Romanes writes to Department of Health and Human Services secretary warning of a ‘risk to the health and safety of detainees’ due to governance issues. Letter backed by Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton and his deputy Annaliese van Diemen.

* April 11 – Man takes own life while in quarantine at Pan Pacific hotel.

* May 15 – A family of four with COVID-19 are moved to the Rydges on Swanston hotel, a ‘hot’ hotel.

* May 25 – A staff member at the Rydges on Swanston tests positive to COVID-19. Two others develop symptoms.

* May 27 – Rydges on Swanston outbreak first identified by the DHHS. It will grow to 17 people who have either worked at the hotel, or are household members or social contacts.

* June 1 – Stage-three restrictions eased.

* June 14 – Staff member at Stamford Plaza tests positive to COVID-19.

* June 17 – Stamford Plaza outbreak identified by DHHS. The cluster will grow to 46 people.

* June 21 – Further easing of restrictions.

* June 24 – Mr Crisp requests 850 ADF personnel to replace private security at hotels. Request rescinded a day later as the Department of Justice and Community Safety takes over the program.

* June 26 – It’s revealed 30 per cent of travellers in hotel quarantine are refusing tests.

* June 29 – Hot-spot Melbourne suburbs return to lockdown and international flights diverted.

* June 30 – Premier Daniel Andrews announces an inquiry into the hotel quarantine program after genomic sequencing revealed a number of COVID-19 cases can be linked to ‘staff members in hotel quarantine breaching well-known and well-understood infection control protocols’.

* July 4 – Hard lockdown announced at short notice for nine public housing towers. State records 108 new cases – its first day above 100 since late March.

* July 4, July 6, July 11 – As Victorian cases escalate, Prime Minister Scott Morrison writes to Mr Andrews three times offering ADF support.

* July 6 – The Victoria-NSW border shuts for first time in century.

* July 8 – Melbourne and Mitchell Shire go into stage-three lockdown for six weeks.

* July 20 – Hotel Quarantine Inquiry begins.

* August 2 – Victoria records 671 cases and seven deaths. State of disaster declared, stage four restrictions imposed.

* August 5 – Stage four restrictions delay inquiry’s public hearings by two weeks. State records 725 new cases and 15 deaths.

* August 11 – Mr Andrews tells a parliamentary inquiry ADF support was not offered for hotel quarantine, sparking war of words with federal Defence Minister Linda Reynolds.

* August 17 – Public hearings at inquiry begin.

* August 18 – DHHS epidemiologist Charles Alpren tells inquiry 99 per cent of active cases in Victoria stem from Rydges and Stamford outbreaks.

* September 6 – Stage four restrictions extended until October.

* September 25 – Mr Andrews appears before inquiry, apologises for mistakes. The program is responsible for more than 18,000 COVID-19 infections and 750 deaths.

* September 26 – Health Minister Jenny Mikakos resigns.

* September 28 – Inquiry’s closing submissions. Final report due November 6.

Source: AAP 

 

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