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Celebrity pastry chefs reinvent the iconic lamington with a selection of VERY indulgent new flavours

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Australia’s Koko Black is joining forces with Tokyo-based dessert business, Tokyo Lamington, to bring an exclusive first taste of the brand’s cult lamingtons to Sydney and Melbourne.

The three flavours set to arrive in the eastern states include caramelised coconut, Davidson Plum and Sao Thome and a triple chocolate lamington. 

The trio of new limited edition lamingtons will be available to purchase for $21 for one day only on Tuesday July 7 across selected Koko Black cafes.

The fancy treats are the end result made by Eddie Stewart, Tokyo Lamington co-founder, and Remco Brigou, Head Chocolatier and Product Innovation Manager at Koko Black.

One of Australia's most loved chocolate brands Koko Black is joining forces with Tokyo-based desserterie, Tokyo Lamington, to bring an exclusive first taste of the brand's cult lamingtons to Sydney and Melbourne

One of Australia's most loved chocolate brands Koko Black is joining forces with Tokyo-based desserterie, Tokyo Lamington, to bring an exclusive first taste of the brand's cult lamingtons to Sydney and Melbourne

One of Australia’s most loved chocolate brands Koko Black is joining forces with Tokyo-based desserterie, Tokyo Lamington, to bring an exclusive first taste of the brand’s cult lamingtons to Sydney and Melbourne

The three flavours set to arrive in the eastern states include caramelised coconut, Davidson Plum and Sao Thome and a triple chocolate lamington

The three flavours set to arrive in the eastern states include caramelised coconut, Davidson Plum and Sao Thome and a triple chocolate lamington

The three flavours set to arrive in the eastern states include caramelised coconut, Davidson Plum and Sao Thome and a triple chocolate lamington

Each flavour was inspired by hero Koko Black products and are reminiscent of the rich, unique flavours the brand is known for.

While all three flavours vary from one another, each have a thick chocolate layer in the centre for a unique take on the traditional lamington.

The collaboration between the two businesses will arrive in celebration of World Chocolate Day and only a limited number of lamingtons will be available to purchase at each store – so customers should get in quick.

Tokyo Lamington, which is currently only located in Singapore and Tokyo, was co-founded by Mr Stewart, who is also one of the pastry chefs behind Black Star Pastry’s famous Strawberry and Watermelon Cake, as well as a mastermind behind the ever popular cult brand, N2 Extreme Gelato. 

WHAT ARE THE NEW THREE LAMINGTON FLAVOURS? 

Caramelised Coconut Lamington

Celebrating a Koko Black classic, the Caramelised Coconut, this decadent lamington features almond and caramelised coconut cremeux coated in delicious white chocolate with a caramelised coconut finish

Davidson Plum and Sao Thome Lamington

This unique lamington delivers an exquisite sweet and sour flavour, combining Australia’s native, sour Davidson Plum, with Koko Black’s rich, fruity dark Sao Thome chocolate 

The Sao Thome ganache comes coated in white chocolate, mixed with Davidson Plum coated in coconut with Davidson Plum

Triple Choc Lamington

The ultimate chocolate indulgence this World Chocolate Day, the Triple Choc Lamington is 80% dark chocolate ganache coated in silky dark chocolate, finished off with crisp dark chocolate shavings 

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While all three flavours vary, each have a thick chocolate layer in the centre for a unique take on the traditional lamington

While all three flavours vary, each have a thick chocolate layer in the centre for a unique take on the traditional lamington

While all three flavours vary, each have a thick chocolate layer in the centre for a unique take on the traditional lamington

The trio of new limited edition lamingtons will be available to purchase for $21 for one day only on Tuesday July 7 across selected Koko Black cafes

The trio of new limited edition lamingtons will be available to purchase for $21 for one day only on Tuesday July 7 across selected Koko Black cafes

The collaboration between the two businesses will arrive in celebration of World Chocolate Day and only a limited number of lamingtons will be available

The collaboration between the two businesses will arrive in celebration of World Chocolate Day and only a limited number of lamingtons will be available

The trio of new limited edition lamingtons will be available to purchase for $21 for one day only on Tuesday July 7 across selected Koko Black cafes

‘With COVID-19 pushing off our plans to open as early as we would have liked in Australia, Koko Black presented us with a really fantastic opportunity to partner with a like-minded brand to bring our product to our home market,’ Mr Stewart said.

‘It’s been a really exciting project and working with a master chocolatier like Remco Brigou, who demonstrates so much respect and sophistication when using native ingredients and creating new products has been incredible,’ he said.

‘It’s pushed our boundaries for Tokyo Lamington even further and we’re excited to see what the future holds for us here in Australia.’

Mr Brigou said: ‘The key for both Eddie and I when developing the lamington flavours was to reflect our joint passion for celebrating our brands’ Australian heritage in a contemporary way.’

The lamingtons are expected to sell out fast, so eager shoppers should act swiftly by visiting participating Koko Black cafes. 

WHERE CAN I PURCHASE THE NEW LAMINGTONS? 

SYDNEY

  • The Strand Arcade and Queen Victoria Building Koko Black stores 

MELBOURNE

  • Carlton 
  • Chadstone 
  • Como Centre (South Yarra) 
  • Doncaster
  • Highpoint Shopping Centre (Maribyrnong)
  • Town Hall
  • Royal Arcade
  • The Glen Shopping Centre (Glen Waverely) 

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‘Not there to please everyone’: Steve Waugh opens up on bitter 21-year feud with Shane Warne

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Former Australian cricket captain Steve Waugh has explained his reasoning behind the decision that sparked a 21-year feud with spin king Shane Warne.

The 55-year-old recalled dropping an out-of-form Warne for finger spinner Colin Miller for the series-deciding match against the West Indies in Antigua in 1999.

Warne had recently returned from shoulder surgery and was being outperformed by fellow leg spinner Stuart MacGill, with rival batsman Brian Lara in devastating form throughout the series.

Waugh told former England captain Michael Atherton on Sky Sports Cricket he made the decision to ensure his team would produce their best performance.

‘It was my first tour as captain to West Indies. As a captain, you are expected to make difficult decisions. That’s why you are given the job. You are not there to please everyone,’ he said.

Shane Warne and Steve Waugh kiss the 1999 World Cup trophy after a victory over Pakistan at Lords

Shane Warne and Steve Waugh kiss the 1999 World Cup trophy after a victory over Pakistan at Lords

Shane Warne and Steve Waugh kiss the 1999 World Cup trophy after a victory over Pakistan at Lords

‘I always wanted to be loyal to be my players to a certain point, but at the end of the day, you gotta be loyal to the team and their performance.

‘Back in those days, when you are on tour, the two players and the coach picked the team, the selectors didn’t have anything to do with it.

‘I found it strange, because you had selectors picking teams for series at home, but on away tours it was up to the captain to basically make the decision.

‘Warnie had just come back from a shoulder surgery. I think he was put back into the team too quickly. We had both Stuart MacGill and him in the previous Test, turning the ball the same way. Lara, and all the left-handers were hitting with the spin, and I just thought it was the right decision.

‘I didn’t consult too many players. I think, when you consult too many people, as a captain, you get confused. At the end of the day, you are there to make the decision, it was a tough one, of course.’ 

The decision to drop Warne proved to be vital, with Australia winning the deciding test by 176 runs to retain the Frank Worrell Trophy, while Warne’s replacement Miller posted figures of of 3/66 from 38 overs.

Steve Waugh and Shane Warne hoist the World Cup Trophy during a parade in Melbourne in June 1999

Steve Waugh and Shane Warne hoist the World Cup Trophy during a parade in Melbourne in June 1999

Steve Waugh and Shane Warne hoist the World Cup Trophy during a parade in Melbourne in June 1999

Waugh has consistently defended the decision to leave Warne out of the squad in Antigua, saying it was for the benefit of the team. 

‘Looking back, I think it was the right decision, but it was also the making of me as a captain because I can make that big decision that was not going to be easy, but I knew it was beneficial for the team at the time,’ he said.

‘In a lot of ways, I was trying to protect Shane, because he wasn’t bowling well at the time. Obviously, he didn’t see it that way, but if we had gone on to lose on the next Test, it wouldn’t have been good for anyone.’

Warne has been vocal in his frustration with Waugh’s decision for many years.

‘Disappointed is not a strong enough word,’ the 50-year-old wrote in his 2018 autobiography No Spin.

Waugh (pictured with wife Lynette) has defended his decision to leave Warne out of the match, which Australia won before winning the series

Waugh (pictured with wife Lynette) has defended his decision to leave Warne out of the match, which Australia won before winning the series

Waugh (pictured with wife Lynette) has defended his decision to leave Warne out of the match, which Australia won before winning the series

Warne (with former partner Simone in April 2010) wrote in his autobiography about Waugh's decision 'disappointed is not a strong enough word'

Warne (with former partner Simone in April 2010) wrote in his autobiography about Waugh's decision 'disappointed is not a strong enough word'

Warne (with former partner Simone in April 2010) wrote in his autobiography about Waugh’s decision ‘disappointed is not a strong enough word’

‘When the crunch came Tugga didn’t support me, and I felt so totally let down by someone who I had supported big time and was also a good friend.

‘Steve will always say the result justifies the decision, but I don’t think it’s as simple as that. I lost a bit of respect for him after that.

‘I believe he should have backed me – as I always believe the art of captaincy is to support your players and back them every time. This gains the respect from the players and makes them play for you. He didn’t, it’s history, but I never found it easy with him after that.’

Warne sounded bitter when he spoke about missing the test match on I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here in 2016.

‘I don’t like Steve Waugh for a lot of reasons, but that was the reason,’ he said.

Warne and Waugh look downcast at a press conference at Sydney airport in August 1999

Warne and Waugh look downcast at a press conference at Sydney airport in August 1999

Warne and Waugh look downcast at a press conference at Sydney airport in August 1999

Warne reignited his feud with his former captain in May when he called Waugh ‘the most selfish cricketer’ he ever played with.

Another former Australian captain Mark Taylor weighed in on the dispute, who despite the winning result, believed Waugh made the wrong call.

‘For the final test match, Steve went with MacGill and left Warne out, and that certainly irked Shane Warne at the time, and I don’t think he’s ever forgiven him,’ Taylor said on Sport Sunday.

The veteran of 104 tests said it was no secret the pair weren’t mates and believes the rookie captain made the wrong choice in leaving his star spinner out of the side for a must-win match.

‘At the time, no. I didn’t think it was (the correct decision),’ Taylor said. 

‘If you had to make a decision between the two leggies, which I think Australia had to do at that stage because Brian Lara was playing so well, I’d have gone for the guy who’s been great for so long, even though he wasn’t at his best.’

Warne rests his head on Waugh's shoulder as the Australian world cup team pose for their official team photo in 1999

Warne rests his head on Waugh's shoulder as the Australian world cup team pose for their official team photo in 1999

Warne rests his head on Waugh’s shoulder as the Australian world cup team pose for their official team photo in 1999

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Incredible images capture July’s ‘buck moon’ lighting up the sky above New York

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Revelers celebrating July 4 in New York were wowed by a dazzling ‘buck moon’ rising above the Empire State building.

Across the US the supermoon, named after the season when young male deer grow their antlers, took on an orange hue as it hung low in the late evening skies.

It was also a lunar eclipse of sorts, with half the sun’s light blocked out – making for these eerie and spectacular images.

The moon, which appears annually at the beginning of summer, is often also called the ‘thunder moon’ because of the frequency of thunder storms during the hot, dry summer months.

July’s eclipse started at 11.08pm in the US (Eastern Time) and ended Sunday at 1.53am – but it was only 35 per cent visible, according to Space.com.   

A full lunar eclipse can turn the moon red but during this penumbral eclipse only the outer shadow of the Earth, known as the penumbra, fell onto the face of the moon. It caused only a slight darkening.  

The buck moon rises behind Lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center in New York City on July 5, 2020 as seen from Kearny, New Jersey

The buck moon rises behind Lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center in New York City on July 5, 2020 as seen from Kearny, New Jersey

The buck moon rises behind Lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center in New York City on July 5, 2020 as seen from Kearny, New Jersey

The moon, beginning to wane, rises beyond a downtown office building Sunday, July 5, in Kansas City, Mo. The penumbral lunar eclipse was the third of four

The moon, beginning to wane, rises beyond a downtown office building Sunday, July 5, in Kansas City, Mo. The penumbral lunar eclipse was the third of four

The moon, beginning to wane, rises beyond a downtown office building Sunday, July 5, in Kansas City, Mo. The penumbral lunar eclipse was the third of four

A plane flies across the moon as the orange-hued satellite is seen over Lower Manhattan in New York City, United States on July 5

A plane flies across the moon as the orange-hued satellite is seen over Lower Manhattan in New York City, United States on July 5

A plane flies across the moon as the orange-hued satellite is seen over Lower Manhattan in New York City, United States on July 5

Revelers look out over Wisconsin Point as fireworks were shot off and a waxing gibbous moon rose over the horizon, seen from Superior, Wis., Saturday, July 4

Revelers look out over Wisconsin Point as fireworks were shot off and a waxing gibbous moon rose over the horizon, seen from Superior, Wis., Saturday, July 4

Revelers look out over Wisconsin Point as fireworks were shot off and a waxing gibbous moon rose over the horizon, seen from Superior, Wis., Saturday, July 4

Pictured: A Fourth of July fireworks display lighting up the sky in Stillwell, Kanas, as the full moon rises in the distance. The eclipse 11:08 pm in the US and in early hours of the next morning in the UK

Pictured: A Fourth of July fireworks display lighting up the sky in Stillwell, Kanas, as the full moon rises in the distance. The eclipse 11:08 pm in the US and in early hours of the next morning in the UK

Pictured: A Fourth of July fireworks display lighting up the sky in Stillwell, Kanas, as the full moon rises in the distance. The eclipse 11:08 pm in the US and in early hours of the next morning in the UK

Pictured: The moon passing by the Empire State Building before Macy's Fourth of July Fireworks Spectacular in New York City

Pictured: The moon passing by the Empire State Building before Macy's Fourth of July Fireworks Spectacular in New York City

Pictured: The moon passing by the Empire State Building before Macy’s Fourth of July Fireworks Spectacular in New York City

Pictured: Full moon seen between the clouds over Lower Manhattan in New York City on July 5. A penumbral lunar eclipse happens only when the outer shadow of the earth is on the face of the moon

Pictured: Full moon seen between the clouds over Lower Manhattan in New York City on July 5. A penumbral lunar eclipse happens only when the outer shadow of the earth is on the face of the moon

Pictured: Full moon seen between the clouds over Lower Manhattan in New York City on July 5. A penumbral lunar eclipse happens only when the outer shadow of the earth is on the face of the moon

Pictured: The moon seen over Lower Manhattan in New York City on July 5, 202. A full eclipse happens when the sun, the moon and Earth are exactly aligned

Pictured: The moon seen over Lower Manhattan in New York City on July 5, 202. A full eclipse happens when the sun, the moon and Earth are exactly aligned

Pictured: The moon seen over Lower Manhattan in New York City on July 5, 202. A full eclipse happens when the sun, the moon and Earth are exactly aligned

Pictured: A triangle of Saturn, the moon and Jupiter rise over One World Trade Center in New York City on July 5, 2020 as seen from Jersey City, New Jersey

Pictured: A triangle of Saturn, the moon and Jupiter rise over One World Trade Center in New York City on July 5, 2020 as seen from Jersey City, New Jersey

Pictured: A triangle of Saturn, the moon and Jupiter rise over One World Trade Center in New York City on July 5, 2020 as seen from Jersey City, New Jersey

Pictured: The buck moon rises behind Lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center in New York City on July 5, 2020 as seen from Kearny, New Jersey

Pictured: The buck moon rises behind Lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center in New York City on July 5, 2020 as seen from Kearny, New Jersey

Pictured: The buck moon rises behind Lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center in New York City on July 5, 2020 as seen from Kearny, New Jersey

Pictured: The buck moon rises behind Lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center in New York City on July 5. July's full moon is called a 'buck moon' because it comes at the beginning of Summer when male deer grow their new antlers

Pictured: The buck moon rises behind Lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center in New York City on July 5. July's full moon is called a 'buck moon' because it comes at the beginning of Summer when male deer grow their new antlers

Pictured: The buck moon rises behind Lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center in New York City on July 5. July’s full moon is called a ‘buck moon’ because it comes at the beginning of Summer when male deer grow their new antlers

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Student, 21, who died when a Sydney North Head WWII bunker collapsed on top of her is laid to rest

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High-achieving university student Annika Ferry, 21, tragically lost her life when part of a concrete bunker she was reportedly hanging on collapsed on top of her

High-achieving university student Annika Ferry, 21, tragically lost her life when part of a concrete bunker she was reportedly hanging on collapsed on top of her

High-achieving university student Annika Ferry, 21, tragically lost her life when part of a concrete bunker she was reportedly hanging on collapsed on top of her

Family and friends have laid to rest a talented, ‘funny and goofy’ student who tragically died when a WWII bunker collapsed on top of her at a well-known scenic spot.

Annika Ferry, 21, died on June 24 when part of the concrete bunker she was hanging on broke off and collapsed on top of her at North Head on Sydney’s Northern Beaches while on a sunrise walk.

In front of a 70-strong congregation at Manly Life Church in Fairlight on Monday, her father Dr Jim Ferry said his daughter ‘Anni’ – who was studying engineering at university – touched everyone she met and was not easily forgotten.  

‘Thank you for scoring all the goals,’ he said as he told those gathered at the funeral about his daughter’s commendable ATAR and sporting prowess.

The student’s mother Helen added her daughter ‘loved life and life loved her back’.

Pictured: A memorial for Ms Ferry - adorned with flowers and photo tributes from well-wishers. Her father Dr Jim Ferry said his daughter 'Anni' - who was studying engineering at university - touched everyone she met and was not easily forgotten

Pictured: A memorial for Ms Ferry - adorned with flowers and photo tributes from well-wishers. Her father Dr Jim Ferry said his daughter 'Anni' - who was studying engineering at university - touched everyone she met and was not easily forgotten

Pictured: A memorial for Ms Ferry – adorned with flowers and photo tributes from well-wishers. Her father Dr Jim Ferry said his daughter ‘Anni’ – who was studying engineering at university – touched everyone she met and was not easily forgotten

Ms Ferry (pictured) in a photo shared by her friend Bec Bennett. Ms Ferry 'loved life and life loved her back', her mother Helen said at a memorial service for her on Monday

Ms Ferry (pictured) in a photo shared by her friend Bec Bennett. Ms Ferry 'loved life and life loved her back', her mother Helen said at a memorial service for her on Monday

Ms Ferry (pictured) in a photo shared by her friend Bec Bennett. Ms Ferry ‘loved life and life loved her back’, her mother Helen said at a memorial service for her on Monday

‘She was commander and captain without the stripes. She was an exceptional human being,’ she said according to the Manly Daily

The young student will be laid to rest at Frenchs Forest Bushland Cemetery at the far western edge of the Northern Beaches. 

Ms Ferry’s family who spoke at the funeral – which included her brothers Anton and Christian – also told of the young woman’s commitment to veganism and her interest in environmental conservation.

The friend who was with her during the heartbreaking events of two weeks ago, Bec Bennett, 21, also read out a speech to Ms Ferry.

She had planned to read it to her birthday party in January, but forgot to take with her.

‘I’m so grateful for our friendship. You’re such a brilliant, talented, ambitious young lady,’ she said. 

‘I’m so excited to see the undoubtedly spectacular things you will conquer in the years to come.’ 

The emotional speech follows Ms Bennett making the same fateful trek she and Ms Ferry had made seven days prior – intent on enjoying the sunrise, just as they had planned.

Ms Bennett last week returned to the scene of her tragic death one week on. The 21-year-old posted this video online of her looking at the sunrise over the ocean

Ms Bennett last week returned to the scene of her tragic death one week on. The 21-year-old posted this video online of her looking at the sunrise over the ocean

Ms Bennett last week returned to the scene of her tragic death one week on. The 21-year-old posted this video online of her looking at the sunrise over the ocean

Ms Ferry (left) and Ms Bennett (right) had trekked to the popular selfie spot when the incident occurred. The 21-year-olds were outdoor lovers and regularly ventured to remote parts of New South Wales

Ms Ferry (left) and Ms Bennett (right) had trekked to the popular selfie spot when the incident occurred. The 21-year-olds were outdoor lovers and regularly ventured to remote parts of New South Wales

Ms Ferry (left) and Ms Bennett (right) had trekked to the popular selfie spot when the incident occurred. The 21-year-olds were outdoor lovers and regularly ventured to remote parts of New South Wales

Undeterred by the temporary fence around the WWII bunker, Ms Bennett and friends climbed into the area at North Head to lay flowers.

Ms Bennett – a star athlete who has represented Australia – blew bubbles and smiled as she looked out over the ocean.

Metres in front of her, others sat and watched the sun as it rose out of the ocean. 

There are several World War II bunkers located along Sydney's north head, designed to protect from a potential Japanese invasion

There are several World War II bunkers located along Sydney's north head, designed to protect from a potential Japanese invasion

There are several World War II bunkers located along Sydney’s north head, designed to protect from a potential Japanese invasion

A week earlier Ms Ferry had playfully hung from the concrete roof of the bunker and posed for photos when it gave way.

Police are investigating whether she died as a result of the fall, or the impact of the WWII structure collapsing on top of her.

With her family desperate for answers, the tragedy has now been handed over to the NSW state coroner. 

Undeterred by the temporary fence around the WWII bunker, Ms Bennett and friends climbed into the area at North Head to lay flowers

Undeterred by the temporary fence around the WWII bunker, Ms Bennett and friends climbed into the area at North Head to lay flowers

Undeterred by the temporary fence around the WWII bunker, Ms Bennett and friends climbed into the area at North Head to lay flowers

While investigations continue, the local Northern Beaches Council has fenced off the bunkers, which are a popular spot for people to watch the sunrise and take selfies. 

Despite the horror she experienced first hand, Ms Bennett organised a memorial for her friend on June 28 with dozens uniting together to commemorate Ms Ferry’s life.

In a quirky post that typified her best friend, Ms Bennett encouraged those attending to ‘tell me stories of how you met her’ and offered to answer any questions, ‘in good time’.

The two 21-year-olds had trekked through bush to watch the sunrise from the popular vantage point at North Head when a piece of concrete on a WWII bunker gave way and hit Ms Ferry on the head (She is pictured with Ms Bennett)

The two 21-year-olds had trekked through bush to watch the sunrise from the popular vantage point at North Head when a piece of concrete on a WWII bunker gave way and hit Ms Ferry on the head (She is pictured with Ms Bennett)

The two 21-year-olds had trekked through bush to watch the sunrise from the popular vantage point at North Head when a piece of concrete on a WWII bunker gave way and hit Ms Ferry on the head (She is pictured with Ms Bennett) 

Ms Ferry's heartbroken family and friends gathered arm-in-arm at sunset last Sunday as part of a memorial to the talented student

Ms Ferry's heartbroken family and friends gathered arm-in-arm at sunset last Sunday as part of a memorial to the talented student

Ms Ferry’s heartbroken family and friends gathered arm-in-arm at sunset last Sunday as part of a memorial to the talented student

Ms Ferry's father Jim last week shared tragic photos of the engineering student, 21, posing at a concrete WWII bunker just moments before she died

Ms Ferry's father Jim last week shared tragic photos of the engineering student, 21, posing at a concrete WWII bunker just moments before she died

Ms Ferry’s father Jim last week shared tragic photos of the engineering student, 21, posing at a concrete WWII bunker just moments before she died

‘Let’s have a cuddle, a cry, a boogie, a flop, a gallop, a yell, a handstand, goddamit bring a kite. Let’s fly a kite,’ Ms Bennett wrote.

‘Get there as early as you’d like and stay as long as you need but I’ll get there around 3.30pm and at around 4.50pm we’re all going to hop in a circle as the sun sets.

‘Anyone is welcome to join, we’ll explain as we go and in the centre of the circle we’ll have a big photo of Anni and flowers. So many flowers. And absolutely anything else you’d like to add.

‘Wear as much colour as possible. Or something you wore with Anni that time. Lots of yellows and oranges. She’ll love that.’ 

Her father, a renowned northern beaches doctor, said his daughter would have liked the ‘Anni-type get together’.   

Ms Ferry was a keen outdoors lover and regularly went on hikes or camping trips with friends

Ms Ferry was a keen outdoors lover and regularly went on hikes or camping trips with friends

Ms Ferry was a keen outdoors lover and regularly went on hikes or camping trips with friends

Dr Ferry, a renowned Manly obstetrician, said the two friends set out at 5.30am to walk through the popular, but rugged, section of Sydney Harbour National Park.

‘Annika wasn’t doing anything stupid. She was being her adventurous and joyful self. Annika loved sunrises,’ he told the Manly Daily.  

‘I wanted people to see the photographs of Annika at North Head to show the joy she was feeling watching that beautiful sunrise.’ 

The road leading towards the remote tracks has now been closed off as local council engineers perform checks on the safety of the bunkers

The road leading towards the remote tracks has now been closed off as local council engineers perform checks on the safety of the bunkers

The road leading towards the remote tracks has now been closed off as local council engineers perform checks on the safety of the bunkers

Dr Ferry said his daughter, a former student at the Queenwood School at Mosman, was an avid traveller who had a passion for the environment. 

‘She was into climbing and running. She played a lot of tennis. She played soccer. She just loved life. Light sparkled from her,’ he said.  

The remote location of the bunkers, nestled among dense bush, meant the Westpac Rescue Helicopter was required to assist.

Ms Ferry's family was well known among the northern beaches community, with her father Dr James Gerry a renowned obstetrician. Annika is pictured with her father and brothers Anton (left) and Christian (right)

Ms Ferry's family was well known among the northern beaches community, with her father Dr James Gerry a renowned obstetrician. Annika is pictured with her father and brothers Anton (left) and Christian (right)

Ms Ferry’s family was well known among the northern beaches community, with her father Dr James Gerry a renowned obstetrician. Annika is pictured with her father and brothers Anton (left) and Christian (right)

The road leading towards the remote tracks has now been closed off as local council engineers perform checks on the safety of the bunkers.

Ms Ferry was a Dean’s Honour List recipient at the University of New South Wales in 2019 for her work studying renewable energy engineering. 

She and Ms Bennett – who represented Australia at the IAAF World Championships in 2019 and hopes to compete at the Olympics one day – had trekked through dense bushland in a bid to reach the spot for the perfect sunrise photo.

Ms Ferry (pictured with her dad) had been studying engineering at the University of New South Wales after graduating from Queenwood School for Girls in Mosman. She visited Antarctica with her father last year

Ms Ferry (pictured with her dad) had been studying engineering at the University of New South Wales after graduating from Queenwood School for Girls in Mosman. She visited Antarctica with her father last year

Ms Ferry (pictured with her dad) had been studying engineering at the University of New South Wales after graduating from Queenwood School for Girls in Mosman. She visited Antarctica with her father last year

The friends loved the great outdoors and had documented several of their recent travels on social media.

Paramedics walked hundreds of metres through the bush to reach Ms Ferry, but by the time they arrived it was too late to save her. 

Harrowing footage from the scene showed a distraught Ms Bennett clutching onto paramedics as she was taken to hospital, where she was treated for shock. 

Northern Beaches acting inspector Stuart Byrnes said the 'inhospitable' terrain around the North Head area had made it difficult for police to reach Ms Ferry and Ms Bennett

Northern Beaches acting inspector Stuart Byrnes said the 'inhospitable' terrain around the North Head area had made it difficult for police to reach Ms Ferry and Ms Bennett

Northern Beaches acting inspector Stuart Byrnes said the ‘inhospitable’ terrain around the North Head area had made it difficult for police to reach Ms Ferry and Ms Bennett

NSW Police acting inspector Stuart Byrnes admitted the death was a ‘sad accident’.

‘There was only two people there, and one of them has gone to hospital in shock, we’re still trying to get to the bottom to the lead-up of it all,’ he told reporters.

‘We believe it was a very sad accident and our thoughts go out to the family, but it’s the subject of an investigation at the moment.’ 

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