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City bus driver fights a passenger after he refusing to stay behind the yellow line

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city bus driver fights a passenger after he refusing to stay behind the yellow line

A bus driver ended up knocking a passenger to the floor after he refused to stand behind a yellow line marked on the vehicle.

The interaction was all caught on cellphone camera after the passenger appeared to refuse to listen to the driver’s instructions.

The video starts with the argument already underway and the driver can be heard threatening to throw the driver off the bus.

An argument occurred on a city bus as a passenger refused to stand behind the driver

An argument occurred on a city bus as a passenger refused to stand behind the driver

The face-off was captured on cellphone video for two minutes

The face-off was captured on cellphone video for two minutes

An argument occurred on a bus as a passenger refused to stand behind the driver

The dispute escalated until a punch-up occurred between the pair

The dispute escalated until a punch-up occurred between the pair

The punches started flying after the passenger nudged the plastic safety screen towards the driver

The punches started flying after the passenger nudged the plastic safety screen towards the driver

The dispute escalated until a punch-up occurred between the pair

The driver ended up knocking the passenger to the floor after several punches

The driver ended up knocking the passenger to the floor after several punches

The driver ended up knocking the passenger to the floor after several punches 

It’s not clear what sparked the initial dispute but the passenger shows no sign of backing down.

The tension builds as the pair argue back and forth until the driver turns his back.

The passenger, dressed in a red t-shirt and shorts, then shoves the driver using the plastic safety screen. 

He does not take kindly to the physical assault and responds by violently hitting and punching the driver in a flurry of fists including one to his face.

The passenger quickly falls to the floor

The passenger quickly falls to the floor

He struggles to get back up after being knocked over

He struggles to get back up after being knocked over

The passenger quickly falls to the floor and struggles to get back up after being knocked over

The driver ends up landing several blows as the passenger is knocked off his feet and falls to the ground.

After turning around, blood can be seen dripping from the side of his face and once again he begins antagonizing the driver. 

It is not clear when or where the video was taken or indeed on which bus route the assault occurred.

When the passenger finally turns to the camera, blood can be seen dripping from the corner of his face

When the passenger finally turns to the camera, blood can be seen dripping from the corner of his face

Despite being wounded, he appears to be in no mood to give up

Despite being wounded, he appears to be in no mood to give up

When the passenger finally turns to the camera, blood can be seen dripping from the corner of his face. However, despite being wounded, he appears to be in no mood to give up

Once the passenger got back up he still refused to back down, continuing to antagonize the driver

Once the passenger got back up he still refused to back down, continuing to antagonize the driver

Once the passenger got back up he still refused to back down, continuing to antagonize the driver

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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I’ve got past what happened… Now I’m REALLY back, says Cliff Richard

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ive got past what happened now im really back says cliff richard

He’s been called ‘the Peter Pan of Pop’ for almost as long as Peter Pan himself. So how old, out of interest, does Sir Cliff Richard feel as he enters his ninth decade?

Is it 70, or perhaps even 50? After all, when we meet, he looks as slim, tanned and spry as he’s ever done (and millions have got the calendar to prove it!). Known for being a whizz on the tennis court (he still plays three times a week with a professional coach) he is also in better shape than most men half his age.

Yet surely even he must be starting to experience the odd creak and ache of the ageing process now . . .

‘It really doesn’t feel any different to me,’ Sir Cliff insists, though he does confess to needing a hearing aid, or ‘enhancer’ as he calls it, these days. ‘When I’m on stage singing Move It (his first ever hit released with The Shadows in 1958) I become 18.

Portrait of a superstar: Sir Cliff from his 2021 calendar

Portrait of a superstar: Sir Cliff from his 2021 calendar

Portrait of a superstar: Sir Cliff from his 2021 calendar

‘I don’t have any fear of being 80,’ he adds. ‘The funny thing is, as the years have gone by, each decade has been easier to deal with.

‘When I first hit 40, I thought: ‘Oh my goodness, 40.’ Fifty was absolutely no problem at all, nor 60 or 70. Now that I’m at 80, it doesn’t feel any different to me. Fortunately, I’ve been blessed with good health so that helps.’

Sir Cliff turned 80 on October 14, having started out as a singer, and recording his first record, at just 17. Over the years he might have been dismissed, or even mocked, by some for his easy-listening style, but he has outlived and outsold nearly all of his contemporaries.

He is the only performer to have had No 1 hits in five consecutive decades in the UK. (It was very nearly six decades but his 2006 song 21st Century Christmas was pipped to the top spot by X Factor winner Leona Lewis.) But even he — unstoppable for so many years — is no match for a pandemic and knows his limitations. As for so many others, celebrations have been curtailed and plans abandoned or postponed.

He was supposed to be throwing a party during his sold-out tour of the UK that had been due to start this month. Then there was the publication of a new autobiography The Dreamer to mark more than 60 years in the music business. While the book release is still happening, the tour has been pushed back a year but at least, as he says, ‘I will still be 80 when we start the tour — so we can still call it The Great 80 Tour’.

Cliff Richard celebrating his 80th

Cliff Richard celebrating his 80th

Cliff Richard celebrating his 80th

Meanwhile, the birthday bash has become an intimate dinner for six — so as to keep within Government rules — with close family and friends, including his pal Gloria Hunniford and her husband Stephen.

Like the rest of us, he has not always enjoyed the restrictions the pandemic has brought to our lives. Having flown back to the UK from the U.S. in late September he had to quarantine for 14 days and, in the older age group, he’s mindful about not mixing too much now. But as he says succinctly: ‘I’d rather be bored and locked down than dead!’

I don’t have any fear of being 80 – on stage, I feel like I’m 18 

He put the time to good use however: he even recorded a new album, Music — The Air That I Breathe, after lockdown which is to be released at the end of the month.

These days, while there’s still a definite twinkle in his eye, it’s perhaps not quite what it was. He lost much of his joie de vivre during the horrifically stressful events of six years ago, when he was investigated by police over allegations of historic child sexual abuse.

It all began when the BBC were tipped off about a police raid at his luxury apartment in Berkshire, in August 2014, which they filmed from a police helicopter. However, the investigation never got to court and, two years later, Sir Cliff was completely exonerated.

Movie magic: Cliff on the set of his timeless 1963 musical film Summer Holiday

Movie magic: Cliff on the set of his timeless 1963 musical film Summer Holiday

Movie magic: Cliff on the set of his timeless 1963 musical film Summer Holiday

South Yorkshire police later apologised for the way they handled the investigation and he successfully sued the BBC for invasion of privacy.

So, has he finally put these traumatic events, what he describes as a ‘living hell’, behind him? Sir Cliff pauses, carefully considering his words, before saying: ‘I think the best way to put it is that I remember what Gloria [Hunniford] said when she lost Caron, her daughter [Caron Keating the TV presenter died of breast cancer, aged just 41]. She was in a terrible state for a long while. When we asked how she was she said: ‘Look, I’ll get past this. I will get past it, but I’ll never get over it.’

I found myself on the kitchen floor and I couldn’t get up 

‘That’s true of me too, that I’ve got past it, but I don’t think I’ll ever get over it.

‘I still get emotionally tight reading about what I had to go through.

‘I don’t think anybody should expect you to get over anything major like that and say it never happened.’

It emerges that it was only last year that Sir Cliff’s spark began to return. ‘I went on tour and my musical director said to me: ‘Welcome back.’ I said: ‘It’s nice to do a little tour.’ But he replied: ‘No, I mean Cliff Richard has come back. You’re back to how you used to be.’ When I said: ‘I was back last year,’ he said: ‘You were back last year but this year you are really back.’

‘So, I assume that means I’ve lost the trauma that was in me, that it’s dissipated and gone.’

Still wowing his millions of fans

Still wowing his millions of fans

Still wowing his millions of fans

Sir Cliff has said in the past that he hopes what he went through — the way the BBC treated him as if they were ‘judge, jury and executioner’ — means nobody else will ever have to go through the same experience.

But he admits the time of the police raid is still ‘pretty vivid in my mind if I start thinking about it’.

He recalls having a breakdown in the kitchen of his Portuguese home, where he was when it happened: ‘When it actually happened, within two days I found myself on the floor of the kitchen. And I couldn’t get up.

‘I had guests in the house and John McElynn, a friend of mine, was with them and he came into the kitchen to find out where I was. And he found me on the floor. He knelt down and said: ‘What’s wrong?’ I said: ‘John, I feel as if I’m in a deep hole and I don’t know how to get out.’

That’s not an apology to me. That still means they think they were right 

‘He used to be a priest, so he knew what to say . . . He said: ‘Did you do this?’ I said: ‘No, of course not.’ He said: ‘Did you ever do anything like it?’ I said: ‘No, definitely not.’

‘He then said: ‘Get up. I trust you. I believe you didn’t do it; you know you didn’t do it and what’s more God knows you didn’t do it.’

‘He helped me up and it was a great start. I felt better and started to laugh again and was able to play some tennis.’

It didn’t stop the nightmares, however. ‘I used to wake up every night at 3.15am with my pulse thumping, thumping away. I thought: ‘I won’t commit suicide, but I might die of a heart attack.’ ‘

At least fans quickly rallied around, tying yellow ribbons to the gates of his Portuguese farm estate with messages of support.

Sometimes the support came from unlikely sources. He recalls encountering two guys with vests and tattoos walking towards him one day when he was at Faro Airport. ‘I’m calm, but I thought this looks like the kind of person who is going to punch me straight in the face.

‘But no. This guy came up to me, he put his thumb up and said: ‘All right, Sir Cliff?’ I said: ‘Yeah, I’m all right, thanks mate.’ I suddenly realised that even people in the street didn’t believe it was true.’

Still a pin-up star: Sir Cliff’s 2021 calendar

Still a pin-up star: Sir Cliff’s 2021 calendar

Still a pin-up star: Sir Cliff’s 2021 calendar

The pain of that time was compounded by the death in 2016 of one of his three beloved younger sisters, Donna, after a long illness. Cliff describes the immense relief he felt that she heard his name had been cleared shortly before she died: ‘She touched my face, and smiled as she lay in bed and I told her the news.’

Later, his legal team advised he should sue the BBC. Sir Cliff was reluctant: ‘It’s like suing Britain.’ But eventually he was persuaded to sue for invasion of privacy and won a landmark case in 2018, last year being awarded £2 million towards his £4.5 million legal costs.

Today, he continues to have conflicting feelings about the corporation. ‘I still think they are a fantastic institution and everywhere in the world, I know I can get the BBC World News. If they ever offered me another series I probably would do it.

‘But I was slightly confused when not a single person that was involved in creating that traumatic emotional time for me, not one single person, lost their job.

‘The wonderful thing is that the police in court actually apologised and said: ‘We made a mistake.’

‘That’s an apology. The only thing I’ve heard the BBC saying was: ‘We’re so sorry he was put through this, but we were just doing our job.’ That’s not an apology to me. That still means that they think they were right.

‘Then again, you can’t go through life without forgiving. So, at this moment, I’m comfortable, because I forgave them all. I can still talk about it. I don’t feel tainted by it.

‘But I’m still confused that not a head rolled even though they did this to me. They [the BBC] created a four-year vacuum with nothing but pain.’

Sir Cliff quickly got rid of his luxury apartment in Sunningdale, Berkshire, in the aftermath of the raid — no longer able to entertain thoughts of living there again.

He is slimming down his property portfolio in other ways, too. His six-bedroom Portuguese house — where he sought solace during that difficult time — is up for sale for £5.7 million, as well as his mansion on Barbados. (Sir Cliff knows the Barbadian Prime Minister and wants to ask her about the country’s recent decision to drop the Queen as head of state. ‘The Queen is so loved, it’s hard to believe they want to do this,’ he says.)

His plan is to build or buy smaller properties in sunny places where he already has homes. His down-sizing is inspired by his need to ‘slow down’ and ‘cut back’ but: ‘It’s hard to slow down because I love what I do so much, but I’m determined to give myself more time for myself. More time to stop and smell the roses.’

While the concept of retirement is anathema to Sir Cliff, he explains that: ‘I’ve found that it’s just nice to travel. When you go on tour, you hardly ever see the country’. You could say that after 62 years of hard work Sir Cliff just wants to go on a proper Summer Holiday . . .

He reveals that he already loves to go on luxury cruise ship holidays with a group of friends and it emerges that he’s even been known to get up on stage, impromptu and without any rehearsal, and sing a few hits during the evening’s cabaret shows.

‘I don’t think I sing out of tune, but I might sing the wrong tune!’ he jokes. While he has many friends, having dated a string of women in his younger years, Sir Cliff is probably the nation’s best-loved bachelor. Does he feel he missed out on marriage and family?

He talks about following his father’s advice, saying: ‘My father told me to focus and I focused. Yes, I’ve been out with gorgeous friends but, in the end, my life has been one focus only and that’s my career.

‘And in the end, I don’t miss being a father, even though I think I would have been a good father. But instead I hope I have been a really good uncle. [He has 15 nephews and nieces and a host of grand-nephews and nieces.]’

This could be a poignant admission about the price exacted in return for fame and success, but then the twinkle returns, and Cliff adds: ‘Probably at 80, it’s too late anyway.

‘Mind you, Des O’Connor became a father at 70-something, didn’t he!’

And as everyone should know by now, it never pays to underestimate Sir Cliff Richard.

The Dreamer is available from October 29, 2020; Music — The Air That I Breathe is available from October 30.

ON MONDAY: SCHOOL BRAWLS THAT MADE ME A FIGHTER. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Prince Andrew ‘could be sacked’ as Commodore of Britain’s most famous yacht club

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prince andrew could be sacked as commodore of britains most famous yacht club
Seafarer: Andrew is also a Vice Admiral of the Royal Navy

Seafarer: Andrew is also a Vice Admiral of the Royal Navy

Seafarer: Andrew is also a Vice Admiral of the Royal Navy

Prince Andrew faces the humiliation of being sacked as head of Britain’s most famous yacht club because of his links to Jeffrey Epstein.

Moves to strip him of his role as Commodore of London‘s Royal Thames Yacht Club were discussed on Monday at a secret meeting of its senior members.

To add insult to injury, the Mail understands that the club wants to replace the Duke with the Duchess of Cambridge, a keen sailor.

Leaked minutes from the meeting show that the club has had repeated discussions with Buckingham Palace on dumping former Navy helicopter pilot Andrew.

Vice Commodore George Ehlers said the club’s general committee ‘believe it is appropriate and in the interest of the club that these discussions should continue’.

The minutes said: ‘Contacts with the commodore and his office regarding patronage are current in the light of the changing developments within the royal household.’

The reference to ‘changing developments’ is believed to relate to the pressure that led to Prince Andrew being forced to resign from his public duties after last year’s car-crash Newsnight interview over his friendship with Epstein.

It also resulted in calls for him to relinquish a number of honorary military appointments. The issue of his links to the club is on the agenda at its annual general meeting on Wednesday.

The duke has denied claims by Virginia Roberts, Epstein’s former ‘sex slave’, that she was forced to sleep with him.

Skilled: Andrew competes off the Isle of Wight. Moves to strip him of his role as Commodore of London's Royal Thames Yacht Club were discussed on Monday at a secret meeting of its senior members

Skilled: Andrew competes off the Isle of Wight. Moves to strip him of his role as Commodore of London's Royal Thames Yacht Club were discussed on Monday at a secret meeting of its senior members

Skilled: Andrew competes off the Isle of Wight. Moves to strip him of his role as Commodore of London’s Royal Thames Yacht Club were discussed on Monday at a secret meeting of its senior members

Epstein, 66, committed suicide in prison in New York last year while awaiting trial on sex trafficking charges.

Being sacked by the yacht club would be a new low for the prince, who took over as commodore in 1986 from Prince Charles, now its Admiral.

The Duke of Edinburgh is its patron, and Lord Mountbatten was also commodore.

Based in Knightsbridge, just half a mile from Buckingham Palace, it is the world’s oldest continuously operating yacht club. Its royal links go back to 1775 when the Duke of Cumberland, brother of George III, put up a silver cup for a race on the Thames. Past commodores include several monarchs.

The Mail has learned that two senior members pressed Mr Ehlers at last week’s meeting about action to replace Andrew, who was appointed Vice Admiral of the Royal Navy by the Queen in 2015 to mark his 55th birthday. Mr Ehlers is said to have described the matter as ‘very sensitive’.

Founded in 1775, the Royal Thames Yacht Club is the oldest continuously operating yacht club in the world as well as being the oldest royal yacht club

Founded in 1775, the Royal Thames Yacht Club is the oldest continuously operating yacht club in the world as well as being the oldest royal yacht club

Founded in 1775, the Royal Thames Yacht Club is the oldest continuously operating yacht club in the world as well as being the oldest royal yacht club

Prestigious: Public rooms at the exclusive Royal Thames Yacht Club in Knightsbridge

Prestigious: Public rooms at the exclusive Royal Thames Yacht Club in Knightsbridge

Prestigious: Public rooms at the exclusive Royal Thames Yacht Club in Knightsbridge

A source said: ‘There is a strong feeling that Andrew is not a suitable commodore. It is a family-orientated club and Andrew is not in keeping with that. There is a strong desire to replace him with Kate. She is an accomplished sailor and would be a huge asset as the club’s first female commodore.

‘The Palace is digging its heels in because they want to avoid further embarrassment for Andrew. If the RTYC removes him other similar organisations will follow. It is complicated by the club’s royal status – the role of commodore is effectively in the gift of the Queen.’

Chief executive Christian Horvath confirmed some members had questioned Andrew’s future at the club, adding: ‘We have always had royal involvement. During his 34 years as commodore Prince Andrew has promoted and supported sailing activities.

‘Following a webinar meeting… the vice commodore wrote clarifying some issues raised by a small number of members. We have no further comment.’

A source close to Andrew said: ‘The duke has been on the receiving end of false accusations for years and understands why some organisations might want to keep their distance.

‘All patronages are on hold whilst he has temporarily stepped aside from public duties to clear his name. He is thinking about how to best serve his country and will work with his family, advisers and stakeholders on what that will look like.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Chinese couple’s US surrogate cared for baby as they couldn’t travel

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chinese couples us surrogate cared for baby as they couldnt travel

A surrogate mother who gave birth to a little girl for a Chinese couple during the pandemic has told how she took care of the newborn for nearly three months while the new parents fought travel restrictions to enter the US, she told DailyMail.com in an exclusive interview.

Jennifer Parson, from Tucson, Arizona, said despite two previous surrogacy journeys, nothing could have prepared her for a worldwide pandemic that would throw both families’ plans in the lurch.

The 31-year-old explained she became aware of Covid-19 a bit earlier than most since the baby’s parents were from Shenzhen, China, just outside Hong Kong, and were placed on strict lockdown in early January.

In the following months, the parents came to the heartbreaking realization they wouldn’t be able to travel to the US by June for the birth of their first child, so they asked if Parson would be willing to take care of their newborn daughter until they were able to come.

Parson, who shares a mixed household of four children with her husband Rob, barely hesitated when she said yes. And out of a sign of appreciation for her selflessness, the family decided to name the baby Jennifer.

Parson told DailyMail.com: ‘The whole point of going into surrogacy is to have that reward at the end knowing that you helped somebody else create their family.

‘I think knowing that we had so many challenges put in front of us and still both parties handled it with absolute grace – that was the most rewarding thing.’

Baby Jennifer flew back to China with her parents on September 20 and Parson admitted it was emotional to say goodbye, adding: ‘It really showed how much love goes into creating a family.

‘She was a part of our family. We absolutely adored every aspect and every moment of everything that she had to offer.’

Jennifer Parson, a surrogate mother who gave birth to a little girl for a Chinese couple during the pandemic, has told how she took care of the newborn for nearly three months while the new parents fought travel restrictions to enter the US, she told DailyMail.com in an exclusive interview

Jennifer Parson, a surrogate mother who gave birth to a little girl for a Chinese couple during the pandemic, has told how she took care of the newborn for nearly three months while the new parents fought travel restrictions to enter the US, she told DailyMail.com in an exclusive interview

Jennifer Parson, a surrogate mother who gave birth to a little girl for a Chinese couple during the pandemic, has told how she took care of the newborn for nearly three months while the new parents fought travel restrictions to enter the US, she told DailyMail.com in an exclusive interview

And in a sign of appreciation for her selflessness, the family decided to name the baby Jennifer after her surrogate mother

And in a sign of appreciation for her selflessness, the family decided to name the baby Jennifer after her surrogate mother

And in a sign of appreciation for her selflessness, the family decided to name the baby Jennifer after her surrogate mother 

Baby Jennifer flew back to China with her parents on September 20 and Parson admitted it was emotional to say goodbye, adding: 'It really showed how much love goes into creating a family. She was a part of our family. We absolutely adored every aspect and every moment of everything that she had to offer'

Baby Jennifer flew back to China with her parents on September 20 and Parson admitted it was emotional to say goodbye, adding: 'It really showed how much love goes into creating a family. She was a part of our family. We absolutely adored every aspect and every moment of everything that she had to offer'

Baby Jennifer flew back to China with her parents on September 20 and Parson admitted it was emotional to say goodbye, adding: ‘It really showed how much love goes into creating a family. She was a part of our family. We absolutely adored every aspect and every moment of everything that she had to offer’

Parson told DailyMail.com: 'The whole point of going into surrogacy is to have that reward at the end knowing that you helped somebody else create their family. I think knowing that we had so many challenges put in front of us and still both parties handled it with absolute grace was the most rewarding thing'

Parson told DailyMail.com: 'The whole point of going into surrogacy is to have that reward at the end knowing that you helped somebody else create their family. I think knowing that we had so many challenges put in front of us and still both parties handled it with absolute grace was the most rewarding thing'

Parson told DailyMail.com: ‘The whole point of going into surrogacy is to have that reward at the end knowing that you helped somebody else create their family. I think knowing that we had so many challenges put in front of us and still both parties handled it with absolute grace was the most rewarding thing’

Parson said the whole experience was immensely rewarding, saying: 'We're definitely looking forward to still having them as a part of our extended family for a long time'

Parson said the whole experience was immensely rewarding, saying: 'We're definitely looking forward to still having them as a part of our extended family for a long time'

Parson said the whole experience was immensely rewarding, saying: ‘We’re definitely looking forward to still having them as a part of our extended family for a long time’

Parson began her surrogacy journey in 2012, first with an unsuccessful pregnancy with a couple from Paris and then a successful pregnancy with a couple from Germany in 2014, giving birth to boy-girl twins.

She explained the initial application process is lengthy, going through a background check and psychology evaluation to ensure candidates are qualified.

The teacher’s assistant, who is pursuing her Bachelor’s degree in science and early childhood education in order to be a teacher, explained she wanted to be a surrogate because while she loved the pregnancy experience, she didn’t want any more children herself.

She said: ‘I started my family when I was pretty young and pregnancy was always really easy for me. I noticed that’s not always the case, some people have a really hard time either getting pregnant or just the pregnancy in itself is very difficult.

‘I knew, especially after my third one, that I loved pregnancy but I didn’t want more kids for myself.

‘So with my family being completed, I wanted to still give the gift of someone else having the same experience as us.’

Parson laughed and said to sum it up: ‘I wanted to be pregnant and help somebody but I didn’t want more kids.’

After her most recent surrogacy experience back in 2014, Parson said she was ready to be a surrogate again, and working with an international agency she was eventually paired with baby Jennifer’s parents.

She said: ‘We met on a Zoom phone call with the couple and we hit it off immediately. We definitely knew that we felt comfortable with going forward with the process.

‘It was pretty fast, then we had to go to LA and have a medical screening.’

Contracts were signed in early February of 2019 and the embryo transfer was completed that October.

Parson said while the first trimester was going really well, Covid-19 cases began to slowly sprout up in China.

Contracts were signed in early February of 2019 and the embryo transfer was completed that October. Parson said while the first trimester was going really well, Covid-19 cases began to slowly sprout up in China. Pictured: Ultrasound at 17 weeks of baby Jennifer

Contracts were signed in early February of 2019 and the embryo transfer was completed that October. Parson said while the first trimester was going really well, Covid-19 cases began to slowly sprout up in China. Pictured: Ultrasound at 17 weeks of baby Jennifer

Contracts were signed in early February of 2019 and the embryo transfer was completed that October. Parson said while the first trimester was going really well, Covid-19 cases began to slowly sprout up in China. Pictured: Ultrasound at 17 weeks of baby Jennifer   

But Parson explained that she wasn't that concerned about the virus because it seemed so far away in China, adding: 'We thought it had plenty of time to resolve itself. June was their due date. We couldn't still be fighting this, we thought.' Pictured: Parson at 22 weeks in February

But Parson explained that she wasn't that concerned about the virus because it seemed so far away in China, adding: 'We thought it had plenty of time to resolve itself. June was their due date. We couldn't still be fighting this, we thought.' Pictured: Parson at 22 weeks in February

But Parson explained that she wasn’t that concerned about the virus because it seemed so far away in China, adding: ‘We thought it had plenty of time to resolve itself. June was their due date. We couldn’t still be fighting this, we thought.’ Pictured: Parson at 22 weeks in February 

She said: ‘December is when we started to really understand that there was something happening over there [China].

‘They were supposed to come down for the anatomy scan which was at the 20-week mark in January. 

‘They had hoped to come and they let us know that unfortunately they weren’t able to travel because they were being quarantined in China. They weren’t able to leave their house.

‘So that really brought it to our attention, like ”Oh wow. So this is happening”.

But Parson explained she wasn’t that concerned about the virus because it seemed so far away in China, adding: ‘We thought it had plenty of time to resolve itself.

‘June was their due date. We wouldn’t still be fighting this, we thought.’

But slowly coronavirus made its way to the United States, and in March flights from China were halted.

Parson said: ‘It still kind of felt surreal because we’re like, ”Okay, well that’s three months away. Surely they can’t shut down the country for more than three months of travel”.  But little did we know.

‘I think April and May is when we really started to get more and more nervous.’

Parson said the parents even looked at options at traveling to a third country that wasn’t barred from entering the United States and quarantining there before entering the country, but that wasn’t a safe bet either.

So in May they asked Parson and her husband if they would be willing to care for their newborn in the event that they weren’t able to make it to the US for the birth.

She said: ‘I could tell that they were extremely sad not to be able to be here because they had never had a baby before.’

Parson said she could tell they weren’t trying to put too much pressure on her, but the other options would be for the surrogate agency to care for the baby or hiring a full-time caregiver.

Parson said the parents even looked at options at traveling to a third country that wasn't barred from entering the United States and quarantining there before entering the country, but that wasn't a safe bet either. So in May, they asked Parson and her husband if they would be willing to care for their newborn in the event that they weren't able to make it there for the birth. Pictured: Baby Jennifer soon after she was born

Parson said the parents even looked at options at traveling to a third country that wasn't barred from entering the United States and quarantining there before entering the country, but that wasn't a safe bet either. So in May, they asked Parson and her husband if they would be willing to care for their newborn in the event that they weren't able to make it there for the birth. Pictured: Baby Jennifer soon after she was born

Parson said the parents even looked at options at traveling to a third country that wasn’t barred from entering the United States and quarantining there before entering the country, but that wasn’t a safe bet either. So in May, they asked Parson and her husband if they would be willing to care for their newborn in the event that they weren’t able to make it there for the birth. Pictured: Baby Jennifer soon after she was born 

As the due date approached, Parson was getting paperwork together in order to ensure things went smoothly at the hospital. She asked the parents if they had decided on a name yet and was shocked when told they were deciding between a family name of Yolanda or Jennifer. Parson said: 'I was like, 'Jennifer, as in my name Jennifer?' I told them not to feel pressured at all to do that and they said, 'No it's something that's important to us because it is part of her story'

As the due date approached, Parson was getting paperwork together in order to ensure things went smoothly at the hospital. She asked the parents if they had decided on a name yet and was shocked when told they were deciding between a family name of Yolanda or Jennifer. Parson said: 'I was like, 'Jennifer, as in my name Jennifer?' I told them not to feel pressured at all to do that and they said, 'No it's something that's important to us because it is part of her story'

As the due date approached, Parson was getting paperwork together in order to ensure things went smoothly at the hospital. She asked the parents if they had decided on a name yet and was shocked when told they were deciding between a family name of Yolanda or Jennifer. Parson said: ‘I was like, ‘Jennifer, as in my name Jennifer?’ I told them not to feel pressured at all to do that and they said, ‘No it’s something that’s important to us because it is part of her story’

Pictured: Parson bought a stuffed animal for baby Jennifer and put a picture of her parents in it, so they could feel close by to their daughter

Pictured: Parson bought a stuffed animal for baby Jennifer and put a picture of her parents in it, so they could feel close by to their daughter

Pictured: Parson bought a stuffed animal for baby Jennifer and put a picture of her parents in it, so they could feel close by to their daughter 

Parson explained they made sure to capture everything of baby Jennifer's first few months, to ensure her parents felt included and that they weren't missing out

Parson explained they made sure to capture everything of baby Jennifer's first few months, to ensure her parents felt included and that they weren't missing out

Parson explained they made sure to capture everything of baby Jennifer’s first few months, to ensure her parents felt included and that they weren’t missing out

She said: ‘I said yes of course immediately. There was no question. We said we’ll do whatever you guys need.

‘If it was our situation, we would rather have somebody that the baby is comfortable with and at least knows their voices, so they have a little bit of familiarity instead of a complete stranger. So we said yes as soon as they asked.’

As the due date approached, Parson was getting paperwork together in order to ensure things went smoothly at the hospital.

She asked the parents if they had decided on a name yet and was shocked when she learned they were deciding between a family name of Yolanda or Jennifer.

Parson said: ‘I was like, ”Jennifer, as in my name Jennifer?” I told them not to feel pressured at all to do that and they said, ”No it’s something that’s important to us because it is part of her story”.’

In the weeks leading up to the birth, Parson learned that baby Jennifer was breached and after unsuccessfully trying naturally to get her to move, they went into the hospital for a checkup and learned they would have to have a C-section later that day.

Parson said they were initially told about the delivery plan that morning, so they quickly let baby Jennifer’s parents know. 

The surgery time kept getting pushed back until late that night, so luckily with the time difference of 15 hours, baby Jennifer’s parents were awake, leaving work because they were so excited.

Baby Jennifer was born late on June 9, weighing 6lbs, 10 oz and measuring 18in.

Parson praised her ‘amazing’ husband Rob who kept the family updated and took photos and videos of the first moments of baby Jennifer’s life.

Parson explained they made sure to capture everything of baby Jennifer’s first few months, to ensure her parents felt included and that they weren’t missing out.

She explained: ‘There’s so much that happens in the first three months that as a veteran parent you almost take that for granted.

Baby Jennifer was born late on June 9, weighing 6lbs, 10 oz and measuring 18in

Baby Jennifer was born late on June 9, weighing 6lbs, 10 oz and measuring 18in

Baby Jennifer was born late on June 9, weighing 6lbs, 10 oz and measuring 18in

Parson praised her 'amazing' husband Rob (pictured) who kept the family updated and took photos and videos of the first moments of baby Jennifer's life. Parson explained they made sure to capture everything to ensure her parents felt included

Parson praised her 'amazing' husband Rob (pictured) who kept the family updated and took photos and videos of the first moments of baby Jennifer's life. Parson explained they made sure to capture everything to ensure her parents felt included

Parson praised her ‘amazing’ husband Rob (pictured) who kept the family updated and took photos and videos of the first moments of baby Jennifer’s life. Parson explained they made sure to capture everything to ensure her parents felt included

Parson said: 'We made sure to take as many pictures and videos as we could throughout the day, just different things, different activities, like her in her new swing, showing them what we were doing with her'

Parson said: 'We made sure to take as many pictures and videos as we could throughout the day, just different things, different activities, like her in her new swing, showing them what we were doing with her'

Parson said: ‘We made sure to take as many pictures and videos as we could throughout the day, just different things, different activities, like her in her new swing, showing them what we were doing with her’

She continued: ‘I definitely wanted to send as many videos to really make them feel like they were here and as many pictures.

‘I had asked them what they wanted to see, like did they want to see a diaper change? And they did! That was kind of surprising but they wanted to see everything because they were missing it.

‘So we sent videos of us changing her diaper. They wanted to see her crying to even know what that sounds like because newborn crying is so different in the first couple of weeks.

‘We just made sure to take as many pictures and videos as we could throughout the day, just different things, different activities, like her in her new swing, showing them what we were doing with her.

‘It was really important for us because we wanted to make sure that they felt a 100 percent included.’

All the while, baby Jennifer’s parents were figuring out a way to travel to Arizona.

Parson explained it wasn’t just the ban on Chinese nationals coming into the US, but the restricted number of flights coming and leaving the country that made planning difficult.

But at the end of July, they informed Parson they finally managed to secure a flight for August 30.

Parson quickly began preparing for their arrival and planned for them to stay for the first week in a new camper her family had recently bought, parking it out in their driveway so they could be close to baby Jennifer as they began her transition over to them. 

She explained: ‘That way we didn’t have to worry about hotels and so that they could really spend as much time as possible just getting to know their baby.’

Finally, on August 31 Jennifer’s parents arrived in Arizona after hours of traveling.

Parson explained they were very nervous about picking up the virus while traveling, so they came dressed in full protection suits and wanted to meet their daughter after they had cleaned up.

Parson said: ‘They wanted to take as many precautions as possible so that they didn’t have any issues when it came to the virus while they were traveling.

All the while, baby Jennifer's parents were figuring out a way to travel to Arizona. Parson explained it wasn't just the ban on Chinese nationals coming into the US, but the restricted number of flights coming and leaving the country that made planning difficult. But at the end of July, they informed Parson they finally managed to secure a flight for August 30

All the while, baby Jennifer's parents were figuring out a way to travel to Arizona. Parson explained it wasn't just the ban on Chinese nationals coming into the US, but the restricted number of flights coming and leaving the country that made planning difficult. But at the end of July, they informed Parson they finally managed to secure a flight for August 30

All the while, baby Jennifer’s parents were figuring out a way to travel to Arizona. Parson explained it wasn’t just the ban on Chinese nationals coming into the US, but the restricted number of flights coming and leaving the country that made planning difficult. But at the end of July, they informed Parson they finally managed to secure a flight for August 30

Parson said: 'My husband's grandmother had crocheted him a blanket when he was a baby, and so we gave her that same blanket that he used in his 40-year-old bassinet. It has all the names and birth dates embroidered on it, and hers is on there too'

Parson said: 'My husband's grandmother had crocheted him a blanket when he was a baby, and so we gave her that same blanket that he used in his 40-year-old bassinet. It has all the names and birth dates embroidered on it, and hers is on there too'

Parson said: ‘My husband’s grandmother had crocheted him a blanket when he was a baby, and so we gave her that same blanket that he used in his 40-year-old bassinet. It has all the names and birth dates embroidered on it, and hers is on there too’

She continued: ‘They took about 30 minutes or so to kind of collect themselves. You could tell that they were just so really excited. It was one of those moments.

‘They were waiting so long for it and it was definitely touching. Everyone was a little teary eyed.’

During the course of the week, the parents got to learn baby Jennifer’s routine, how to change her diaper, how to hold her and how to feed her.

Parson said: ‘The last thing that anybody wanted to do was frustrate either party. I think taking a few days so that she could get used to them throughout the day, it made it more comfortable for them.’

After the first week, the parents took baby Jennifer to a rented house down the road from Parson, where they still visited and helped out by driving them to the grocery store.

And after nearly three weeks in Arizona, it was time to say goodbye to baby Jennifer.

Parson said: ‘We knew the goodbye was coming and it was hard.

‘We sent them off with a photo album that had all the pictures of her up until the point they got here. It also had her hat and shirt from the hospital, her footprints. 

‘My husband’s grandmother had crocheted him a blanket when he was a baby, and so we gave her that same blanket that he used in his 40-year-old bassinet. It has all the names and birth dates embroidered on it, and hers is on there too. 

‘We definitely had some tears at the airport, but I was also excited for them because they had waited such a long time to travel here, to get used to taking care of her – all while working remotely. ‘

And after nearly three weeks in Arizona, it was time to say goodbye to baby Jennifer. Parson said: 'We knew the goodbye was coming and it was hard'

And after nearly three weeks in Arizona, it was time to say goodbye to baby Jennifer. Parson said: 'We knew the goodbye was coming and it was hard'

And after nearly three weeks in Arizona, it was time to say goodbye to baby Jennifer. Parson said: ‘We knew the goodbye was coming and it was hard’

Parson said the whole experience was immensely rewarding, saying: 'It really showed how much love goes into creating a family. When she was here, she was a part of our family'

Parson said the whole experience was immensely rewarding, saying: 'It really showed how much love goes into creating a family. When she was here, she was a part of our family'

Parson said the whole experience was immensely rewarding, saying: 'It really showed how much love goes into creating a family. When she was here, she was a part of our family'

Parson said the whole experience was immensely rewarding, saying: 'It really showed how much love goes into creating a family. When she was here, she was a part of our family'

Parson said the whole experience was immensely rewarding, saying: ‘It really showed how much love goes into creating a family. When she was here, she was a part of our family’

But while Parson isn't planning on becoming a surrogate again, explaining that three surrogacy pregnancies were enough for her, she'd only do it again for baby Jennifer's family. She said: 'They were sort of robbed of her first three months - so if that couple in general came to me and wanted another baby, they would be the only ones that I'd be a surrogate for'

But while Parson isn't planning on becoming a surrogate again, explaining that three surrogacy pregnancies were enough for her, she'd only do it again for baby Jennifer's family. She said: 'They were sort of robbed of her first three months - so if that couple in general came to me and wanted another baby, they would be the only ones that I'd be a surrogate for'

But while Parson isn’t planning on becoming a surrogate again, explaining that three surrogacy pregnancies were enough for her, she’d only do it again for baby Jennifer’s family. She said: ‘They were sort of robbed of her first three months – so if that couple in general came to me and wanted another baby, they would be the only ones that I’d be a surrogate for’

Parson said the whole experience was immensely rewarding, saying: ‘It really showed how much love goes into creating a family. When she was here, she was a part of our family.

‘We absolutely adored every aspect and every moment of everything that she had to offer. It was magic.  

‘I think the most rewarding thing was seeing two families with unconditional love just work with each other with no issues.

‘We did everything that we could and they did everything that they could to make sure their baby was the 100 percent sole focus. I think that’s really special.

‘It seemed very simplistic, like ”this is what we have to do” and it allowed us not to panic about anything because there was such a focus on where our hearts were at. So it was definitely a positive experience.’

But while Parson isn’t planning on becoming a surrogate again, explaining that three surrogacy pregnancies were enough for her, she’d only do it again for baby Jennifer’s family.

She said: ‘They were sort of robbed of her first three months – so if that couple in general came to me and wanted another baby, they would be the only ones that I’d be a surrogate for.’ 

Parson added: ‘We’re definitely looking forward to still having them as part of our extended family for a long time.’ 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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