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Dan Crenshaw claims that ‘Marxism made its way into the US in the 60’s’

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dan crenshaw claims that marxism made its way into the us in the 60s

Republican Dan Crenshaw has suggested that Marxist followers are to blame for protests into Confederate statues across the country that have seen many pulled from their plinths. 

Crenshaw made the comments during a Fox News interview on Monday after writing a column in the National Review with the headline ‘We Can’t Let the Outrage Mob Win’.

In the article he suggested that far-left ‘radicals’ coupled with a ‘cancel culture and mob mentality’ were looking to carry out a ‘cultural revolution, a purge of traditional American narratives and icons,’ which includes the removal of Confederate statues. 

Texas Republican Dan Crenshaw has suggested that Marxist followers are to blame for protests over Confederate statues across the country

Texas Republican Dan Crenshaw has suggested that Marxist followers are to blame for protests over Confederate statues across the country

Texas Republican Dan Crenshaw has suggested that Marxist followers are to blame for protests over Confederate statues across the country

It was an argument he continued to pursue during Monday’s televised interview.  

‘There’s one party that will teach your kids to love America and there’s one party that won’t stand up for it,’ the Texas Republican said.

He was then asked what he found to be so objectionable about the attack on the historic monuments. 

‘We always knew that this would never stop with what is an honest and frankly a good debate to have about Confederate statues,’ Crenshaw began. 

‘I think we should have that debate, but now it’s gone to George Washington, now it’s gone to former President Ulysses S. Grant, now it’s gone to Abraham Lincoln, it’s burning the flag… It’s getting rid of the Pledge of Allegiance and the national anthem,’ Crenshaw said. 

During the interview to Fox & Friends, Crenshaw, right, suggested far-left radicals wanted to erase the country of its history and that part of the plan was to remove historic statues

During the interview to Fox & Friends, Crenshaw, right, suggested far-left radicals wanted to erase the country of its history and that part of the plan was to remove historic statues

During the interview to Fox & Friends, Crenshaw, right, suggested far-left radicals wanted to erase the country of its history and that part of the plan was to remove historic statues

‘They [the mob] want to erase the very things that unite us as Americans and the very things that stand for equality and justice and freedom and this was always part of the plan, it has been for decades actually and it started well back into when Marxism made its way into the United States in the 60s,’ he continued.

‘And they’re always looking to take advantage of some kind of situation, to make people think that their country is evil so that they can justify their own Marxist revolution. That is what’s happening here and you can’t be blind to that,’ Crenshaw said.  

Historic monuments and statues have become a focus of anger and acts of vandalism during Black Lives Matter protests that have occurred in the wake of Minneapolis resident George Floyd’s death at the end of May.   

Historic monuments and statues have become a focus of anger and acts of vandalism during Black Lives Matter protests that have occurred in the wake of Minneapolis resident George Floyd's death at the end of May The statue of former US President George Washington is covered in red paint after being vandalized in Washington Square Park in New York, Monday

Historic monuments and statues have become a focus of anger and acts of vandalism during Black Lives Matter protests that have occurred in the wake of Minneapolis resident George Floyd's death at the end of May The statue of former US President George Washington is covered in red paint after being vandalized in Washington Square Park in New York, Monday

Historic monuments and statues have become a focus of anger and acts of vandalism during Black Lives Matter protests that have occurred in the wake of Minneapolis resident George Floyd’s death at the end of May The statue of former US President George Washington is covered in red paint after being vandalized in Washington Square Park in New York, Monday

‘The whole political correctness debate was always just some kind of nice-feeling platform from which to launch this thing, which is essentially a purge of American ideals and the things that bring us together as Americans,’ Crenshaw declared as the interview on Fox & Friends rolled on.  

‘We can’t give into it.’ He said that ‘it’s not just protecting statues,’ but also about protecting American ideals.

‘I hope our local officials start to actually do that and get police out there and say, “You’re not going to do this anymore.” It’s also up to each one of us.’

Crenshaw, a former Navy SEAL who lost his eye in combat, was elected in 2018 and was one of the good stories of the night for Republicans, who lost control of the House in the midterm elections. 

Protesters attempted to pull down the statue of Andrew Jackson in Lafayette Square near the White House last week in Washington, DC. Protests continue around the country over the deaths of African Americans while in police custody

Protesters attempted to pull down the statue of Andrew Jackson in Lafayette Square near the White House last week in Washington, DC. Protests continue around the country over the deaths of African Americans while in police custody

Protesters attempted to pull down the statue of Andrew Jackson in Lafayette Square near the White House last week in Washington, DC. Protests continue around the country over the deaths of African Americans while in police custody

Crenshaw’s article and interview such subjects come just days after President Trump signed an executive order to protect American monuments, memorials and statues.

The president said those who tried to bring them down would face ‘long prison time’ 

Crenshaw shared his concerns that ‘the mob’ [of protesters] won’t stop ‘until the destruction of America is complete because that is what they’re after fundamentally since Marxism runs deep in their ideology.’   

‘Tell corporate CEO’s to stop giving in, stop letting them erase everything about us,’ Crenshaw urged. ‘Cancel culture has no end.’

‘My well-intentioned liberal friends, they always want to give an inch and then another inch and then another inch because they want to be liked and they want to be liked by the far-left Progressives,’ Crenshaw explained.

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30210540 8473315 image a 92 1593495071642

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30210542 8473315 image a 90 1593495044117

President Trump signed an executive order to protect American monuments, memorials and statues

President Trump signed an executive order to protect American monuments, memorials and statues

President Trump signed an executive order to protect American monuments, memorials and statues

‘They think they can be appeased, but you can never appease the mob and this is the lesson that Americans have to learn.’  

‘It’s telling your teachers, start teaching why America is actually good, stop teaching the counter argument to America to our kids. They’re growing up hating this country.’

He ended the interview making a pitch as to why viewers should vote for the Republican party in November’s general election. 

‘There’s one party that will teach your kids to love America and there’s one party that won’t stand up for it and that really matters in 2020,’ Crenshaw said.

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Plastic face shields DON’T work

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plastic face shields dont work

Plastic face shields allow nearly 100 per cent of tiny airborne droplets released by infected patients to escape through visors, a study has warned.

The alternative to face masks were touted by industry experts as providing adequate protection from the virus, and have since been rolled out in supermarkets, hairdressers, nail salons and other businesses.

But modelling has cast doubt on the claims, after a computer simulation revealed almost 100 per cent of airborne droplets less than five micrometres in size escaped through the visor.

And half of larger droplets measuring 50 micrometres in size found their way into the air, posing a risk to others. One micrometre is one millionth of a metre. 

A study has found wearing just a plastic face shield offers next to no protection from coronavirus. Above is a hairdresser wearing one in Northampton, England, on July 4

A study has found wearing just a plastic face shield offers next to no protection from coronavirus. Above is a hairdresser wearing one in Northampton, England, on July 4

A study has found wearing just a plastic face shield offers next to no protection from coronavirus. Above is a hairdresser wearing one in Northampton, England, on July 4

The Duchess of Cornwall donned just a face shield when she visited a charity training centre in Milton Keynes on September 9

The Duchess of Cornwall donned just a face shield when she visited a charity training centre in Milton Keynes on September 9

The Duchess of Cornwall donned just a face shield when she visited a charity training centre in Milton Keynes on September 9

Makoto Tsubokura, team leader of the study carried out by the Riken Centre in Japan, cautioned against wearing face visors.

He told The Guardian: ‘Judging from the results of the simulation, unfortunately the effectiveness of face guards in preventing droplets from spreading from an infected person’s mouth is limited compared with masks.

‘This is especially true for small droplets of less than 20 micrometres,’ he said, and added all of the much smaller droplets also escape.

‘At the same time, it somehow works for the droplets larger than 50 micrometres.’

He said that those advised not to wear face masks, such as those with underlying respiratory issues or small children, could wear face shields instead, but only in outdoor or indoor settings that are properly ventilated.

The evidence follows on from research done at Florida Atlantic University’s College of Engineering and Computer Science published on September 1, which also found face shields are ineffective in halting the spread of coronavirus.

In the study, published in the journal Physics of Fluids, scientists placed flourescent substances in droplets so that they could monitor their spread. A mannequin was also set up to expel sneeze and cough droplets, with a mixture of distilled water and glycerin to generate a synthetic fog.

A US study showed face shields blocked the initial transmission of particles but that most spread around the sides

A US study showed face shields blocked the initial transmission of particles but that most spread around the sides

A US study showed face shields blocked the initial transmission of particles but that most spread around the sides

A US study showed face shields blocked the initial transmission of particles but that most spread around the sides

A US study showed face shields blocked the initial transmission of particles but that most spread around the sides

Face shields were revealed to drop the initial forward motion of the droplets, but other particles spread around the ‘shield’ and escaped.

Study co-author, Professor Manhar Dhanak, said: ‘From this latest study, we were able to observe that face shields are able to block the initial forward motion of the exhaled jet, however, aerosolised droplets expelled with the jet are able to move around the visor with relative ease.

‘Over time, these droplets can disperse over a wide area in both lateral and longitudinal directions, albeit with decreasing droplet concentration.’

Lead author Professor Siddhartha Verma added: ‘Face shields have noticeable gaps along the bottom and the sides, and masks with exhalation ports include a one-way valve which restricts airflow when breathing in, but allows free outflow of air.

‘The inhaled air gets filtered through the mask material, but exhaled breath passes through the valve unfiltered.’

The research concluded that face shields are not as effective as regular face masks. 

The Government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) has also recommended that hairdressers wear face masks rather than face shields as there is ‘no evidence’ the latter offers protection against Covid-19.

Waitrose employee Michael, 20, wears a face shield at their store in Westfield, White City, London, on April 15

Waitrose employee Michael, 20, wears a face shield at their store in Westfield, White City, London, on April 15

Waitrose employee Fergall, 16, wears a face shield at the same store on April 15

Waitrose employee Fergall, 16, wears a face shield at the same store on April 15

Waitrose staff wear face shields at a store in White City, London, on April 15

The New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (NERVTAG) and the Environmental and Modelling group (EMG) presented the evidence on July 23, almost three weeks after hairdressers re-opened on July 4.

In order to welcome back clients, hairdressers, barbers, nail technicians and tattooists were told by the government that clear visors would be adequate enough to protect against Covid-19. It is not clear what this guidance was based on.

SAGE said in July face shields are ‘likely’ to protect the wearer against large droplets — the most common route of Covid-19 transmission — but there is no hard proof that this is the case.

Similarly, there is no evidence — and it is ‘unlikely’ — that face shields are an effective control against aerosol transmission.

It is currently unclear if the virus is spread through aerosols — which are tiny particles that linger in the air for long periods of time.

But NERVTAG and EMG admitted it is possible airborne transmission plays a part in the spread of the coronavirus, but only in areas that are poorly ventilated.

The paper said: ‘Based on the current evidence, it is possible that transmission through aerosols could happen where a person who generates significant amounts of virus is in a poorly ventilated space with others for a significant amount of time.’

The World Health Organisation said last month it is looking over evidence that the coronavirus is airborne, and if found to be true, it could mean a change in course for trying to control the disease.

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Can you spot the embarrassing detail in the Rugby Australia unveiling of their new captain?

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can you spot the embarrassing detail in the rugby australia unveiling of their new captain

Rugby Australia has decided to unveil their new Wallabies captain emblazoned with the name of their sponsor Qantas – just hours after the airline ended their 30-year association with the code.   

The Wallabies on Wednesday announced star flanker Michael Hooper has been reinstated as captain of the national rugby team in the Hunter Valley, using portrait shots of the 28-year-old wearing the famous jersey with the Qantas logo on the front. 

Only hours before, Qantas made the shock decision to terminate their $5 million sponsorship of the Wallabies as the coronavirus continues to cripple the airline. 

Flanker Michael Hooper (pictured) was reinstated by Rugby Australia as The Wallabies captain

Flanker Michael Hooper (pictured) was reinstated by Rugby Australia as The Wallabies captain

Flanker Michael Hooper (pictured) was reinstated by Rugby Australia as The Wallabies captain

Qantas chief customer officer Stephanie Tully announced on Wednesday that the long-running partnership with the national rugby union team was over, as well as sponsorship of Cricket Australia and the Football Federation of Australia.

‘In an environment where thousands of our people have lost jobs and thousands more are stood down while they wait for flying to restart, we can’t maintain these sponsorships in the way we have in the past,’ Ms Tully said in a statement. 

‘While we’re dealing with this crisis and its aftermath, the cash cost of our sponsorships has to be zero.

‘Qantas has had a very long association with Rugby Australia and the Wallabies, and we’ve stuck with each other during difficult times. Unfortunately, this pandemic has been the undoing.’

The Wallabies, who have been sponsored by Qantas since 1990 and have fragile finances from COVID-19, will now have to find a new major sponsor to step into the airline’s shoes. 

Rugby Australia Interim Chief Executive Rob Clarke was saddened with Qantas’ decision.

Hooper (centre) poses with Wallabies coach Dave Rennie (left) and Interim Rugby Australia CEO Rob Clarke (right) after being announced as Wallabies captain in the Hunter Valley on Wednesday

Hooper (centre) poses with Wallabies coach Dave Rennie (left) and Interim Rugby Australia CEO Rob Clarke (right) after being announced as Wallabies captain in the Hunter Valley on Wednesday

Hooper (centre) poses with Wallabies coach Dave Rennie (left) and Interim Rugby Australia CEO Rob Clarke (right) after being announced as Wallabies captain in the Hunter Valley on Wednesday

‘While it is obviously disappointing to lose such a loyal partner, it is understandable given the world we are all now living in, and the challenges we are all facing,’ he said in a statement.

‘There aren’t many 30-year partnerships in Australian sport, and I want to thank Qantas for everything they have done for our great game.

‘Alan (Joyce) and his team have been transparent and collaborative in their discussions with us and they have now given us the opportunity to prepare for 2021 and beyond.’

Qantas will also not be paying any sponsorship fees to Cricket Australia and the Football Federation Australia for the next 12 months.

The cash-strapped airline will continue ‘in-kind support’ such as free flights and marketing before a further review takes place next year. 

Qantas will continue to support the Australian Olympic Committee and Paralympics Australia and fly both teams to the rescheduled Tokyo Olympics in 2021.

The changes are expected to save $20 million a year.

Ms Tully said the airline’s partners had been incredibly understanding of the situation, particularly as many were facing their own COVID challenges. 

The Wallabies (pictured), who have been sponsored by Qantas since 1990, will now have to find a new major sponsor to step into the airline's shoes.

The Wallabies (pictured), who have been sponsored by Qantas since 1990, will now have to find a new major sponsor to step into the airline's shoes.

The Wallabies (pictured), who have been sponsored by Qantas since 1990, will now have to find a new major sponsor to step into the airline’s shoes.

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Disney and Pixar sued by company claiming ‘character Duke Caboom was based off of Evel Knievel’

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disney and pixar sued by company claiming character duke caboom was based off of evel knievel

Disney, Pixar, and their subsidiaries are being sued for allegedly basing the Toy Story 4 character Duke Caboom off of legendary stunt performer Evel Knievel.

According to documents obtained by TMZ, a company called K&K Promotions, whose president happens to be Evel’s son Kelly, ‘claims they own all the rights to Evel Knievel’s likeness, persona, and brand.’

They also claimed that Disney ‘did NOT get any type of approval’ from K&K Promotions to use Knievel as inspiration. 

Uh oh: Disney, Pixar, and their subsidiaries are being sued for allegedly basing the Toy Story 4 character Duke Caboom off of legendary stunt performer Evel Knievel; Duke Caboom in Toy Story 4

Uh oh: Disney, Pixar, and their subsidiaries are being sued for allegedly basing the Toy Story 4 character Duke Caboom off of legendary stunt performer Evel Knievel; Duke Caboom in Toy Story 4

Uh oh: Disney, Pixar, and their subsidiaries are being sued for allegedly basing the Toy Story 4 character Duke Caboom off of legendary stunt performer Evel Knievel; Duke Caboom in Toy Story 4

K&K Promotions stated in their lawsuit that Knievel’s recognizable persona and legacy, including ‘a nod to his famous stunt cycle toy from the ’70s,’ is littered throughout the fourth Toy Story installment.  

Duke Caboom, who is voiced by actor Keanu Reeves, is meant to be a toy version of ‘the greatest Canadian stuntman’ and, similar to that of the old school Evel Knievel toys, he ‘comes with an energizer to wind up and release his bike.’ 

K&K Promotions also alleged that higher ups at Disney ‘instructed’ everyone involved in Toy Story 4, from the all-star cast to the post-production crew, to ‘avoid using Evel’s name during interviews, as well as other trademarked items.’ 

They believe that Disney attempted to pull a similar stunt with the Toy Story character Forky, who, despite his name, closely resembles a Spork.

Owned: According to documents obtained by TMZ , a company called K&K Promotions, whose president happens to be Evel's son Kelly, 'claims they own all the rights to Evel Knievel's likeness, persona, and brand'; Evel pictured in 1976

Owned: According to documents obtained by TMZ , a company called K&K Promotions, whose president happens to be Evel's son Kelly, 'claims they own all the rights to Evel Knievel's likeness, persona, and brand'; Evel pictured in 1976

Owned: According to documents obtained by TMZ , a company called K&K Promotions, whose president happens to be Evel’s son Kelly, ‘claims they own all the rights to Evel Knievel’s likeness, persona, and brand’; Evel pictured in 1976

No permission: They also claimed that Disney 'did NOT get any type of approval' from K&K Promotions to use Knievel as inspiration; Evel pictured in 1975

No permission: They also claimed that Disney 'did NOT get any type of approval' from K&K Promotions to use Knievel as inspiration; Evel pictured in 1975

 No permission: They also claimed that Disney ‘did NOT get any type of approval’ from K&K Promotions to use Knievel as inspiration; Evel pictured in 1975

K&K Promotions described an interview where Forky voice actor Tony Hale appeared to be ‘performing mental gymnastics’ as he attempted to avoid addressing Forky’s likeness to the quirky utensil.  

Another aspect of the lawsuit pertains to the ungodly amount of Toy Story 4 merchandise that was produced by Disney and featured Duke Caboom’s image.

K&K Promotions said that Disney made a startling amount of money off of the merchandise and that they are ‘asking a judge for big-time damages.’

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33513334 8762967 image a 144 1600844712371

All throughout: K&K Promotions stated in their lawsuit that Knievel's recognizable persona and legacy, including 'a nod to his famous stunt cycle toy from the '70s,' is littered throughout the fourth Toy Story installment

All throughout: K&K Promotions stated in their lawsuit that Knievel's recognizable persona and legacy, including 'a nod to his famous stunt cycle toy from the '70s,' is littered throughout the fourth Toy Story installment

All throughout: K&K Promotions stated in their lawsuit that Knievel’s recognizable persona and legacy, including ‘a nod to his famous stunt cycle toy from the ’70s,’ is littered throughout the fourth Toy Story installment

Toy Story 4 hit theaters in June of 2019 and raked in $1.073billion at the worldwide box office, making it the highest grossing film of the franchise.

Evil Knievel, who was often seen donning his signature red, white, and blue jumpsuit, rose to prominence in the late 1960s as an entertainer and renown daredevil.

He would attract audiences from around the globe as he attempted to soar over lines of parked cars on his trust motorcycle.

Most famously, Knievel attempted to soar ‘151 feet over the fountains of Caesars Palace in Las Vegas’ on his motorcycle in 1967. 

Merchandise: K&K Promotions said that Disney made a startling amount of money off of the merchandise and that they are 'asking a judge for big-time damages'

Merchandise: K&K Promotions said that Disney made a startling amount of money off of the merchandise and that they are 'asking a judge for big-time damages'

Merchandise: K&K Promotions said that Disney made a startling amount of money off of the merchandise and that they are ‘asking a judge for big-time damages’

But, unfortunately, he crashed and garnered significant injuries from the stunt, including a crushed pelvis and femur and a major concussion.

He retired from the extreme stunt word in 1980, but his legacy lived on through show footage and his highly sought after merchandise. 

According to the New York Times, Evel Knievel toy ‘had sales in the hundreds of millions for Ideal and other companies’ in the 1970s and 1980s.

He passed away at the age of 69 on November 30, 2007.

Legend: Evil Knievel, who was often seen donning his signature red, white, and blue jumpsuit, rose to prominence in the late 1960s as an entertainer and renown daredevil; Evel pictured

Legend: Evil Knievel, who was often seen donning his signature red, white, and blue jumpsuit, rose to prominence in the late 1960s as an entertainer and renown daredevil; Evel pictured

Legend: Evil Knievel, who was often seen donning his signature red, white, and blue jumpsuit, rose to prominence in the late 1960s as an entertainer and renown daredevil; Evel pictured

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