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Dan Crenshaw claims that ‘Marxism made its way into the US in the 60’s’

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Republican Dan Crenshaw has suggested that Marxist followers are to blame for protests into Confederate statues across the country that have seen many pulled from their plinths. 

Crenshaw made the comments during a Fox News interview on Monday after writing a column in the National Review with the headline ‘We Can’t Let the Outrage Mob Win’.

In the article he suggested that far-left ‘radicals’ coupled with a ‘cancel culture and mob mentality’ were looking to carry out a ‘cultural revolution, a purge of traditional American narratives and icons,’ which includes the removal of Confederate statues. 

Texas Republican Dan Crenshaw has suggested that Marxist followers are to blame for protests over Confederate statues across the country

Texas Republican Dan Crenshaw has suggested that Marxist followers are to blame for protests over Confederate statues across the country

Texas Republican Dan Crenshaw has suggested that Marxist followers are to blame for protests over Confederate statues across the country

It was an argument he continued to pursue during Monday’s televised interview.  

‘There’s one party that will teach your kids to love America and there’s one party that won’t stand up for it,’ the Texas Republican said.

He was then asked what he found to be so objectionable about the attack on the historic monuments. 

‘We always knew that this would never stop with what is an honest and frankly a good debate to have about Confederate statues,’ Crenshaw began. 

‘I think we should have that debate, but now it’s gone to George Washington, now it’s gone to former President Ulysses S. Grant, now it’s gone to Abraham Lincoln, it’s burning the flag… It’s getting rid of the Pledge of Allegiance and the national anthem,’ Crenshaw said. 

During the interview to Fox & Friends, Crenshaw, right, suggested far-left radicals wanted to erase the country of its history and that part of the plan was to remove historic statues

During the interview to Fox & Friends, Crenshaw, right, suggested far-left radicals wanted to erase the country of its history and that part of the plan was to remove historic statues

During the interview to Fox & Friends, Crenshaw, right, suggested far-left radicals wanted to erase the country of its history and that part of the plan was to remove historic statues

‘They [the mob] want to erase the very things that unite us as Americans and the very things that stand for equality and justice and freedom and this was always part of the plan, it has been for decades actually and it started well back into when Marxism made its way into the United States in the 60s,’ he continued.

‘And they’re always looking to take advantage of some kind of situation, to make people think that their country is evil so that they can justify their own Marxist revolution. That is what’s happening here and you can’t be blind to that,’ Crenshaw said.  

Historic monuments and statues have become a focus of anger and acts of vandalism during Black Lives Matter protests that have occurred in the wake of Minneapolis resident George Floyd’s death at the end of May.   

Historic monuments and statues have become a focus of anger and acts of vandalism during Black Lives Matter protests that have occurred in the wake of Minneapolis resident George Floyd's death at the end of May The statue of former US President George Washington is covered in red paint after being vandalized in Washington Square Park in New York, Monday

Historic monuments and statues have become a focus of anger and acts of vandalism during Black Lives Matter protests that have occurred in the wake of Minneapolis resident George Floyd's death at the end of May The statue of former US President George Washington is covered in red paint after being vandalized in Washington Square Park in New York, Monday

Historic monuments and statues have become a focus of anger and acts of vandalism during Black Lives Matter protests that have occurred in the wake of Minneapolis resident George Floyd’s death at the end of May The statue of former US President George Washington is covered in red paint after being vandalized in Washington Square Park in New York, Monday

‘The whole political correctness debate was always just some kind of nice-feeling platform from which to launch this thing, which is essentially a purge of American ideals and the things that bring us together as Americans,’ Crenshaw declared as the interview on Fox & Friends rolled on.  

‘We can’t give into it.’ He said that ‘it’s not just protecting statues,’ but also about protecting American ideals.

‘I hope our local officials start to actually do that and get police out there and say, “You’re not going to do this anymore.” It’s also up to each one of us.’

Crenshaw, a former Navy SEAL who lost his eye in combat, was elected in 2018 and was one of the good stories of the night for Republicans, who lost control of the House in the midterm elections. 

Protesters attempted to pull down the statue of Andrew Jackson in Lafayette Square near the White House last week in Washington, DC. Protests continue around the country over the deaths of African Americans while in police custody

Protesters attempted to pull down the statue of Andrew Jackson in Lafayette Square near the White House last week in Washington, DC. Protests continue around the country over the deaths of African Americans while in police custody

Protesters attempted to pull down the statue of Andrew Jackson in Lafayette Square near the White House last week in Washington, DC. Protests continue around the country over the deaths of African Americans while in police custody

Crenshaw’s article and interview such subjects come just days after President Trump signed an executive order to protect American monuments, memorials and statues.

The president said those who tried to bring them down would face ‘long prison time’ 

Crenshaw shared his concerns that ‘the mob’ [of protesters] won’t stop ‘until the destruction of America is complete because that is what they’re after fundamentally since Marxism runs deep in their ideology.’   

‘Tell corporate CEO’s to stop giving in, stop letting them erase everything about us,’ Crenshaw urged. ‘Cancel culture has no end.’

‘My well-intentioned liberal friends, they always want to give an inch and then another inch and then another inch because they want to be liked and they want to be liked by the far-left Progressives,’ Crenshaw explained.

President Trump signed an executive order to protect American monuments, memorials and statues

President Trump signed an executive order to protect American monuments, memorials and statues

President Trump signed an executive order to protect American monuments, memorials and statues

‘They think they can be appeased, but you can never appease the mob and this is the lesson that Americans have to learn.’  

‘It’s telling your teachers, start teaching why America is actually good, stop teaching the counter argument to America to our kids. They’re growing up hating this country.’

He ended the interview making a pitch as to why viewers should vote for the Republican party in November’s general election. 

‘There’s one party that will teach your kids to love America and there’s one party that won’t stand up for it and that really matters in 2020,’ Crenshaw said.

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India overtakes Russia to become country with world’s third highest number of coronavirus cases

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India has overtaken Russia to become the country with the world’s third highest number of coronavirus cases, with nearly 700,000 infections.  

The health ministry said 697,358 cases had now been recorded, a rise of 24,000 in the last 24 hours, while Russia has just over 681,000 cases.

India has registered 19,693 deaths from the virus, a much lower number than many other badly hit countries. 

India has overtaken Russia to become the country with the world's third highest number of coronavirus cases, with nearly 700,000 infections. Above, volunteers distribute free food during the pandemic in Guwahati on July 5

India has overtaken Russia to become the country with the world's third highest number of coronavirus cases, with nearly 700,000 infections. Above, volunteers distribute free food during the pandemic in Guwahati on July 5

India has overtaken Russia to become the country with the world’s third highest number of coronavirus cases, with nearly 700,000 infections. Above, volunteers distribute free food during the pandemic in Guwahati on July 5 

There have been almost 20,000 deaths in India since the first case was detected there in January.

India is now the world’s third worst-affected country, behind only the United States and Brazil.

It has seen eight times the number of cases as China, that has a similar-sized population and is where the virus originated late last year.

India's health ministry said 697,358 cases had now been recorded, a rise of 24,000 in the last 24 hours, while Russia has just over 681,000 cases

India's health ministry said 697,358 cases had now been recorded, a rise of 24,000 in the last 24 hours, while Russia has just over 681,000 cases

India’s health ministry said 697,358 cases had now been recorded, a rise of 24,000 in the last 24 hours, while Russia has just over 681,000 cases

Workers clean an artifical water channel at the 16th century Mughal monument Humayun's Tomb, after it was reopened for visitors which was closed since mid-March as part of measures to try and combat the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus, in New Delhi on July 6

Workers clean an artifical water channel at the 16th century Mughal monument Humayun's Tomb, after it was reopened for visitors which was closed since mid-March as part of measures to try and combat the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus, in New Delhi on July 6

Workers clean an artifical water channel at the 16th century Mughal monument Humayun’s Tomb, after it was reopened for visitors which was closed since mid-March as part of measures to try and combat the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus, in New Delhi on July 6

Officials said they had reversed a decision to reopen the Taj Mahal, India’s most famous tourist attraction, in the city of Agra, 125 miles southeast of New Delhi, on Monday, following a spate of new cases in the area. 

India’s Culture Ministry had decided to reopen all monuments across the country on Monday after more than three months with a cap on the number of visitors and mandatory wearing of face masks. 

After a strict nationwide lockdown, India has eased restrictions in most of the country except for the highest-risk areas. 

The Kerala state capital, Thiruvananthapuram imposed a new lockdown from Monday with public transport shut and only pharmacies allowed to open. Above, a banner displays masks for sale in Kochi, Kerala state

The Kerala state capital, Thiruvananthapuram imposed a new lockdown from Monday with public transport shut and only pharmacies allowed to open. Above, a banner displays masks for sale in Kochi, Kerala state

The Kerala state capital, Thiruvananthapuram imposed a new lockdown from Monday with public transport shut and only pharmacies allowed to open. Above, a banner displays masks for sale in Kochi, Kerala state

The country’s major cities have been worst hit by the pandemic. New Delhi and Mumbai each have about 100,000 cases, with 3,000 dead in the capital and nearly 5,000 in Mumbai.

New Delhi has opened a new 10,000-bed temporary virus hospital while other cities are tightening restrictions on movement to head off a new surge in cases.

The Kerala state capital, Thiruvananthapuram imposed a new lockdown from Monday with public transport shut and only pharmacies allowed to open. 

The clampdown came after hundreds of new cases were reported across the state, which had been praised for its action to curtail the pandemic.

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‘You’re a coward’: Widow of young dad shot dead in the driveway says she knows who murdered him

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The widow of a young father shot dead in his driveway says she knows who murdered him – and has issued a stark warning to the killer.

Kylee Guy had to fund her own private investigation into the murder of her husband after police failed to find the killer – who has still not been brought to justice.

The dotting father-of-two from Fielding, a rural town near Palmerston North, New Zealand, was gunned down before dawn on July 8, 2010, while his heavily pregnant wife slept in their home with their young son.

On the eve of the 10th anniversary of his death, his widow has gone public about her quest for justice in an interview on TVNZ’s Sunday program.

Mrs Guy said she knew ‘100 percent’ who killed her husband and she had a special warning for them.

‘You’re a coward,’ she told Sunday.

‘And if you can live with yourself for doing this – taking a father away from his children who was a good man – (you are) a coward.”  

Scott Guy (pictured left) with wife Kylee Guy (right). He was gunned down in a driveway near his house on July 8, 2010. Kylee says she knows who killed him but the police investigation has stalled and nobody has yet been brought to justice

Scott Guy (pictured left) with wife Kylee Guy (right). He was gunned down in a driveway near his house on July 8, 2010. Kylee says she knows who killed him but the police investigation has stalled and nobody has yet been brought to justice

Scott Guy (pictured left) with wife Kylee Guy (right). He was gunned down in a driveway near his house on July 8, 2010. Kylee says she knows who killed him but the police investigation has stalled and nobody has yet been brought to justice

Mrs Guy wept as she pleaded for anyone with information to come forward so the killer can be brought to justice. 

Kylee Bullock, then a trainee early childhood teacher, met Mr Guy when she was just 18 years old at a rodeo. 

Mr Guy was a dairy farmer and an action man who could ride a bucking bull and jump through hoops of fire on horseback. 

Mrs Guy described him as a ‘softie’ who had always wanted to be a dad, and would do anything to help people.

Kylee was just 18 and a trainee early childhood teacher when she first met Mr Guy at a rodeo and immediately fell in love with the charming, gentle, funloving dairy farmer

Kylee was just 18 and a trainee early childhood teacher when she first met Mr Guy at a rodeo and immediately fell in love with the charming, gentle, funloving dairy farmer

Kylee was just 18 and a trainee early childhood teacher when she first met Mr Guy at a rodeo and immediately fell in love with the charming, gentle, funloving dairy farmer

She married him in 2005 and the couple soon had a son, Hunter.

The couple were busy doing up their house, while 31-year-old Mr Guy worked on his parents’ nearby dairy farm.

Mrs Guy was heavily pregnant with their second son Drover in 2010 when tragedy struck.

Mr Guy had woken early to milk the cows and his wife was still in bed with Hunter when she heard the noise of a truck outside.

It was a neighbour who had found Mr Guy lying dead at the end of the driveway, shot through the neck.

Mrs Guy tried to go outside but the police told her to stay inside. 

Kylee and Scott married in 2005 just two years after they met, and built a home in Fielding, NZ

Kylee and Scott married in 2005 just two years after they met, and built a home in Fielding, NZ

Kylee and Scott married in 2005 just two years after they met, and built a home in Fielding, NZ

Two months later Mrs Guy gave birth to Drover, a baby boy left without a father. 

Her two-year-old son Hunter began going into the garden to build stairways to the sky to try to get his father back.

Mrs Guy began to be afraid as time passed and police didn’t find the killer.

However a terrible twist came when NZ Police arrested and charged a relative of Mr Guy’s with his murder.

There had been tension between the two men over the future of the family’s farm.

The relative admitted to burning down an old house on the Guy’s property.

He also took an axe to the new home they had built, spraying angry graffiti on the side. 

The relative was acquitted of murder after a four-week jury trial at the High Court in Wellington in July 2012.

There is no suggestion he was in anyway involved in Mr Guy’s death.  

Left without answers, Mrs Guy was determined to find justice and closure for her family so she hired her own private investigators. 

She told TVNZ’s Sunday program she was determined to find the killer.

‘I’m going to get this person,’ she said. 

Scott Guy was just 31 years old when he was gunned down at the end of a driveway near the home he and Kylee had built. Heavily pregnant with their second son, Drover, Kylee was inside the house in bed at the time

Scott Guy was just 31 years old when he was gunned down at the end of a driveway near the home he and Kylee had built. Heavily pregnant with their second son, Drover, Kylee was inside the house in bed at the time

Scott Guy was just 31 years old when he was gunned down at the end of a driveway near the home he and Kylee had built. Heavily pregnant with their second son, Drover, Kylee was inside the house in bed at the time

The investigators combed phone records of potential suspects and looked into whether there were any accomplices, and they turned up evidence which they handed to police, but it came to nothing.  

The family is now asking for a new team of police investigators to take over the case.

NZ Police detective inspector Ross McKay told Daily Mail Australia the information had been assessed but wasn’t significant enough to restart the investigation.

‘No information provided has been significant or necessitated resuming the investigation,’ he said via email on Monday.

Det-Inspector McKay said the investigation remained open but inactive.

‘The investigation file has not been reviewed post-trial, however components of the investigation have been reviewed as a result of information received.’

Scott and Kylee had their first son, Hunter, who was described as the centre of Scott's universe

Scott and Kylee had their first son, Hunter, who was described as the centre of Scott's universe

Scott and Kylee had their first son, Hunter, who was described as the centre of Scott’s universe

Kylee Guy had been a happy, smiley person before the killing but she doesn't smile like this any more. She desperately wants closure in this case, for the guilty person to be brought to justice and she is pleading with the public to provide any evidence they have to NZ Police

Kylee Guy had been a happy, smiley person before the killing but she doesn't smile like this any more. She desperately wants closure in this case, for the guilty person to be brought to justice and she is pleading with the public to provide any evidence they have to NZ Police

Kylee Guy had been a happy, smiley person before the killing but she doesn’t smile like this any more. She desperately wants closure in this case, for the guilty person to be brought to justice and she is pleading with the public to provide any evidence they have to NZ Police

Police are limited in what they can say about the details of the case as the investigation is open but Det-Inspector McKay said there were no staff currently dedicated to the case.

‘If any reliable, new information is presented, appropriate resources would be directed to thoroughly assess, evaluate, and if necessary, resume the investigation,’ he said.  

Kylee Guy’s private investigation had to end due to a lack of funds, but she is desperate for justice and closure.

She had preferred to keep quiet and out of the limelight but when nothing had come of the investigation after 10 years she had to go public. 

‘I want justice for Scott,’ she said.

‘For my children – I want it over so that we can move on with our lives.’    

Anyone with specific information to offer can contact New Zealand Police on 105.

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Pauline Hanson insists extraordinary rant about Melbourne housing commission residents wasn’t racist

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Pauline Hanson has refused to back down after her extraordinary Today show rant labelling Melbourne’s locked-down housing commission residents ‘drug addicts and alcoholics’ led to her being banned from Channel Nine’s flagship breakfast show.

Nine executives ruled the ever-outspoken One Nation senator had crossed a line when she told host Allison Langdon residents complaining about being locked in their towers should ‘know what it’s like to be in tough conditions’.  

‘Come on Ally, we’ve seen food being delivered there,’ Hanson replied. 

‘A lot of them are drug addicts as well, they are getting their medication, they are alcoholics so they’re being looked after in that way.’

She also said refugees should be accustomed to tough conditions having experienced life in the war-torn countries they came from. 

Within hours Channel Nine announced she would no longer be a regular contributor on the show – with a spokesperson for the network calling her comments ‘ill-informed and divisive’.

But speaking to Sky News’ Andrew Bolt wearing a shirt emblazoned with the Australian flag on Monday evening, Ms Hanson denied claims her comments were ‘ill-informed’ and that they constituted racism.

The senator had attracted heavy criticism for saying refugees living inside the towers should learn English during the controversial interview with Langdon and Stefanovic.

‘As long as I’m a member of parliament, I’m going to keep speaking out and saying what I feel, what needs to be said if we’re going to have a cohesive society,’ she said.

‘I’m up for election in two years time – if they don’t want me, good. Don’t vote for me. That’s as simple as that. Until then, they’ve got me for the next two years and if you don’t like its stiff biccies.

‘I’m not disrespectful to people but I will call out the way I see it which is in tune with a lot of Australians.’ 

She claimed she was only being called racist because people disagreed with her point of view.

‘Having criticism is not racism. I’m not racist and people misuse that word when they disagree with what you have to say,’ she said. 

Pauline Hanson has denied claims her comments about Melbourne's locked down public housing residents were 'ill-informed' and that they constituted racism. She had said refugees should be accustomed to tough conditions having experienced life in the war-torn countries they came from

Pauline Hanson has denied claims her comments about Melbourne's locked down public housing residents were 'ill-informed' and that they constituted racism. She had said refugees should be accustomed to tough conditions having experienced life in the war-torn countries they came from

Pauline Hanson has denied claims her comments about Melbourne’s locked down public housing residents were ‘ill-informed’ and that they constituted racism. She had said refugees should be accustomed to tough conditions having experienced life in the war-torn countries they came from 

Hanson’s rant led to widespread outrage on social media and Channel Nine announced within hours she would no longer be a regular contributor on the Today show.

‘The Today show has advised Pauline Hanson that she will no longer be appearing on our programme as a regular contributor,’ a Nine spokesperson said. 

‘We don’t shy away from diverse opinions and robust debate on the Today show. But this morning’s accusations from Pauline Hanson were ill-informed and divisive. 

Pauline Hanson (left) has been banned from her regular appearance on the Today show after a shocking rant about residents in Melbourne's public housing towers on Monday that led host Allison Langdon to ask: 'Do you have a heart Pauline?'

Pauline Hanson (left) has been banned from her regular appearance on the Today show after a shocking rant about residents in Melbourne's public housing towers on Monday that led host Allison Langdon to ask: 'Do you have a heart Pauline?'

Pauline Hanson (left) has been banned from her regular appearance on the Today show after a shocking rant about residents in Melbourne’s public housing towers on Monday that led host Allison Langdon to ask: ‘Do you have a heart Pauline?’

Hanson labelled people living in nine public housing towers across Melbourne 'drug addicts and alcoholics' in her extraordinary statement on Monday

Hanson labelled people living in nine public housing towers across Melbourne 'drug addicts and alcoholics' in her extraordinary statement on Monday

Hanson labelled people living in nine public housing towers across Melbourne ‘drug addicts and alcoholics’ in her extraordinary statement on Monday

‘At a time of uncertainty in this national and global health crisis, Australians have to be united and supportive of one another. We need to get through this together.’ 

Hanson earlier hit back at the network in an interview with The Australian, saying its decision to axe her as a regular contributor is ‘detrimental’ to free speech. 

‘We’re getting to the point to where you can’t give your opinion. What Channel 9 has done is detrimental to freedom of speech,’ she said.

Some 3,000 public housing residents who have been subjected to a 'hard lockdown' by the Victorian government in a bid to stop the spread of COVID-19 inside the walls of the towers

Some 3,000 public housing residents who have been subjected to a 'hard lockdown' by the Victorian government in a bid to stop the spread of COVID-19 inside the walls of the towers

Some 3,000 public housing residents who have been subjected to a ‘hard lockdown’ by the Victorian government in a bid to stop the spread of COVID-19 inside the walls of the towers

‘Channel 9 is going down the wrong path here. People in Queensland are very concerned about COVID. I’ve been speaking about people coming here and not learning the English language for years … they don’t know what to do.  

‘I really don’t care if I don’t go on Channel 9. I have Facebook followers and speak to people in the street and I go on numerous Sky programs. It’s no skin off my nose.’ 

Hanson claimed the network was sending a clear message to all Australians that those who ‘step outside the boundaries’ will be ‘silenced’.

Hanson said refugees who fled war-torn countries should be able to deal with being locked up. (Pictured: Angry tower residents place signs in their windows showing messages of despair amid total lockdown)

Hanson said refugees who fled war-torn countries should be able to deal with being locked up. (Pictured: Angry tower residents place signs in their windows showing messages of despair amid total lockdown)

Hanson said refugees who fled war-torn countries should be able to deal with being locked up. (Pictured: Angry tower residents place signs in their windows showing messages of despair amid total lockdown)

The senator then took to social media to double down on her remarks.

‘It’s being reported I made ‘a number of controversial comments’ this morning. I’ve gone back over the interview and I’m struggling to see what I said that was so controversial,’ she said. 

Nine’s news and current affairs director Darren Wick said in a statement that Hanson’s remarks were ‘ill-informed and divisive’.

‘The Today Show has advised Pauline Hanson that she will no longer be appearing on our program as a regular contributor,’ he said in a statement.

‘We don’t shy away from diverse opinions and robust debate on the Today Show.

‘But this morning’s accusations from Pauline Hanson were ill-informed and divisive.

‘At a time of uncertainty in this national and global health crisis, Australians have to be united and supportive of each other. We need to get through this together.’ 

Hanson argued other Australians have also been through a similar lockdown, and said it is no different to the housing commission quarantine

Hanson argued other Australians have also been through a similar lockdown, and said it is no different to the housing commission quarantine

Hanson argued other Australians have also been through a similar lockdown, and said it is no different to the housing commission quarantine

Hanson hit out at the 3,000 residents who have been subjected to a ‘hard lockdown’ by the Victorian government in a bid to stop the spread of COVID-19 inside the walls of the towers.

Many residents have complained at a lack of notice before the lockdown came into force and say they have not been supplied with food or essentials.

The nine public housing towers across Flemington, Kensington and North Melbourne are home to some of Victoria’s most vulnerable people, including refugees who fled to Australia from wartorn countries.

‘I saw them taking a truck load of food to them, all the rest of it –  if they are from war torn countries, which some of these people are, they know what it is like to be in tough conditions,’ she said.

More than 3000 tenants in nine buildings were unprepared for the surprise decision and many had been left without groceries

More than 3000 tenants in nine buildings were unprepared for the surprise decision and many had been left without groceries

More than 3000 tenants in nine buildings were unprepared for the surprise decision and many had been left without groceries 

‘Have a look at the facts before you criticise. The governments and all of these … interest groups and everyone will make sure they’re well looked after.’

Hanson rejected suggestions that health authorities and the government should be communicating with residents in their native languages.    

‘Why should we? Why should we put everything out in someone else’s language when you come to Australia,’ she said.

‘We should not be putting out literature in their own language. Learn to speak English when you come here to this country. That’s a big problem that we have in Australia.’ 

‘A lot of these people are from non-English speaking backgrounds, probably English is their second language who haven’t adhered to the rules of social distancing. They all used a lot of the same laundry,’ she said.

Following her rant, Hanson was asked by Langdon: ‘Do you have a heart Pauline?’ 

Hanson went on to say the no-warning lockdown was justified if residents were not practicing social distancing. 

Towers in the suburbs of Flemington (pictured), Kensington and North Melbourne will be closed for five days

Towers in the suburbs of Flemington (pictured), Kensington and North Melbourne will be closed for five days

Towers in the suburbs of Flemington (pictured), Kensington and North Melbourne will be closed for five days

Medical staff wearing PPE holding material about to walk into the Flemington Public housing flats

Medical staff wearing PPE holding material about to walk into the Flemington Public housing flats

Medical staff wearing PPE holding material about to walk into the Flemington Public housing flats

‘Why is it they are in that situation? Why has the government gone to this high-rise building and shut it down? Possibly because a lot of these people weren’t doing the right thing,’ she said.

‘There has to be a reason why they have targeted this set of blocks, apartment blocks. Ask that question.’  

CORONAVIRUS CASES IN AUSTRALIA: 8,449

New South Wales: 3,240

Victoria: 2,660

Queensland: 1,067

Western Australia: 618

South Australia: 443

Tasmania: 228

Australian Capital Territory: 108

Northern Territory: 30

TOTAL CASES: 8,394 

DEATHS: 106

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Hanson argued other Australians have also been through a similar lockdown, and said it is no different to the housing commission quarantine.

‘We’ve gone through months of people, the public being locked up. We’ve gone through months where people couldn’t go to the park, gyms, couldn’t go to the park, couldn’t go any where,’ she said. 

‘Australian people have been locked up in their homes for ages.

‘We really need to clean up the COVID-19. Make up your mind. You either want to clean up COVID-19 or you don’t. And you have to make the tough decisions if we are going to get this country back on track.’

The end of Hanson’s year-long role at the Today show comes after she parted ways with Seven News rival Sunrise over a clash with host David Koch about the Christchurch massacre. 

Premier Andrews locked the doors to nine housing towers from 4pm on Saturday amid fears the virus is spreading rapidly within their walls.

The ‘hard lockdown’ will force 3,000 people in towers across Flemington, Kensington and North Melbourne to stay inside – with armed police on every floor of every block ensuring they do not leave for any reason over the next five days.

Residents who refuse to be tested for coronavirus could be locked up for as long as 14 days; the same quarantine period as people arriving from overseas. 

‘We do have milk and bread, but if we are going to be in lockdown for 14 days, which is what we have been told, it is not going to last that long,’ Fleming tower resident Thana Sirag said. 

Ms Sirag said she just wants to be treated like other households dealing with the virus.

‘We are put under much more severe circumstances than everyone else, we are being treated like prisoners,’ Ms Sirag said.

Premier Andrews locked the doors to nine public housing towers from 4pm on Saturday amid fears the virus is spreading rapidly within their walls

Premier Andrews locked the doors to nine public housing towers from 4pm on Saturday amid fears the virus is spreading rapidly within their walls

Premier Andrews locked the doors to nine public housing towers from 4pm on Saturday amid fears the virus is spreading rapidly within their walls 

The 'hard lockdown' will see 3,000 people in towers across Flemington, Kensington and North Melbourne forced to stay inside Pictured: Police enforce a lockdown at public housing towers on Racecourse Road in Flemington

The 'hard lockdown' will see 3,000 people in towers across Flemington, Kensington and North Melbourne forced to stay inside Pictured: Police enforce a lockdown at public housing towers on Racecourse Road in Flemington

The ‘hard lockdown’ will see 3,000 people in towers across Flemington, Kensington and North Melbourne forced to stay inside Pictured: Police enforce a lockdown at public housing towers on Racecourse Road in Flemington

Victoria has for weeks been grappling with an outbreak of coronavirus across various Melbourne hotspots.

The state racked up another 74 new cases on Sunday, bringing its confirmed infections total to 2536.

Some 12 Victorian postcodes have been put into stage three lockdown until at least July 29 in order to prevent the spread of the virus.

Two of those areas, covering North Melbourne, Hotham Hill, Kensington and Flemington in the city’s inner northwest are home to the nine public housing towers.

Premier Daniel Andrews said the hard lockdown was about the safety of residents as well as the entire state.

‘This is not about punishment, this is about protection for you and your loved ones,’ he said.

‘And then, by extension, it’s about protecting the entire state and we don’t make those decisions lightly.’

Which suburbs are in lockdown? 

 3012 – Brooklyn, Kingsville, Maidstone, Tottenham, West Footscray

3021 – Albanvale, Kealba, Kings Park, St Albans

3032 – Ascot Vale, Highpoint City, Maribyrnong, Travancore

3038 – Keilor Downs, Keilor Lodge, Taylors Lakes, Watergardens

3042 – Airport West, Keilor Park, Niddrie

3046 – Glenroy, Hadfield, Oak Park

3047 – Broadmeadows, Dallas, Jacana

3055 – Brunswick South, Brunswick West, Moonee Vale, Moreland West

3060 – Fawkner

3064 – Craigieburn, Donnybrook, Mickelham, Roxburgh Park, Kalkallo  

FROM 11.59 ON SATURDAY JULY 4:

3031 – Flemington, Kensington

3051 – North Melbourne

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