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Daryl Maguire: Gladys Berejikilan rejects claims she suspected corruption

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Gladys Berejiklian has rejected claims she suspected her ex-boyfriend’s dodgy dealings but did not ask him about them because she wanted to avoid getting caught up in any wrongdoing.

In her fourth face-off with journalists this week, the 50-year-old NSW premier again refused to resign, saying ‘hand on heart I have done nothing wrong’ as her ex Daryl Maguire, 61, faces a corruption inquiry. 

On Monday the inquiry heard a tapped phone call in which Maguire told Ms Berejiklian about a property deal he hoped to gain from before she replied: ‘I don’t need to know about that bit’.

Gladys Berejiklian (pictured today) has rejected claims she suspected her ex-boyfriend's dodgy dealings but did not ask him about them

Gladys Berejiklian (pictured today) has rejected claims she suspected her ex-boyfriend's dodgy dealings but did not ask him about them

Gladys Berejiklian (pictured today) has rejected claims she suspected her ex-boyfriend’s dodgy dealings but did not ask him about them

Sky News journalist Andrew Clennell on Friday suggested to the premier that she suspected Maguire was up to something but kept herself in the dark deliberately.

‘You are actively limiting the amount of information you knew,’ he said. 

The premier rejected that allegation, saying: ‘I have made that clear, absolutely not.’

On Monday she claimed she had said ‘I don’t need to know about that bit’ simply because she was not interested in Maguire’s finances.

Ms Berejiklian asked Maguire to resign as MP for Wagga Wagga in 2018 when another corruption inquiry heard he sought payment for brokering a property deal.

The premier called for his resignation after she attended a private hearing with corruption body ICAC as a witness. 

Clennell pressed the premier further, saying: ‘These conversations on the tapes, and the fact you only ended the relationship with Daryl Maguire once you had been to a private hearing with ICAC, indicates you are a leader that is not about right or wrong, but whether or not she will be caught.’

The premier replied: ‘I’m sorry, but I strongly refute that.’ 

Secret romance: Premier Gladys Berejiklian and former MP Daryl Maguire (pictured together) dated for five years from 2015 to 2020

Secret romance: Premier Gladys Berejiklian and former MP Daryl Maguire (pictured together) dated for five years from 2015 to 2020

Secret romance: Premier Gladys Berejiklian and former MP Daryl Maguire (pictured together) dated for five years from 2015 to 2020

Labor has accused Ms Berejikilian of turning a blind eye to corruption but she has insisted she was not aware of any wrongdoing. 

Clennell said: ‘So we’re just supposed to believe you?’ and the premier replied: ‘Well, I’ve done nothing wrong.’ 

The premier said she ‘absolutely’ expects to be Liberal Party leader at the next state election in March 2023. 

Asked what the test is for her to resign, she said: ‘When I’ve done something wrong.’ 

At the inquiry this week, Maguire admitted to running a cash-for-visa scheme from his office, ‘monetising’ his parliamentary position and secretly directing the company G8wayinternational from his office which ‘ultimately’ sought to sell access to the highest levels of government. 

On Monday the nation was shocked when Ms Berejiklian admitted to a secret five-year relationship with Maguire – which he said was ‘on again, off again’, and ended a month or two ago. 

34456364 8845933 image m 28 1602811658546

34456364 8845933 image m 28 1602811658546

Daryl Maguire (pictured) admitted he had an ‘on again, off again’ romance with the premier

The inquiry heard phone calls in which Maguire called her ‘babe’ and she called him her ‘numero uno’ – Spanish for number one.

‘I stuffed up in my personal life,’ the premier said. 

On Friday Maguire admitted he tried to ‘shield’ Ms Berejiklian from information that could ’cause her difficulties’.

The line of questioning related to how he hoped to make $1.5million from a land deal at Badgerys Creek, which could help pay off debts incurred by divorcing his ex-wife Maureen. He had raised a planning issue about the deal with the Premier. 

The ICAC listened to a call with Berejiklian in which Maguire told her ‘the good news is William tells me we’ve done our deal. 

‘So hopefully that’s about half of all that that’s gone now.’

Berejiklian replied: ‘That’s good. I don’t need to know about that bit’.  

Maguire admitted he was ‘at least concerned’ questions might be raised at that point about the propriety of his involvement in a Badgerys Creek land sale.

Counsel assisting ICAC Scott Robertson Robertson asked: ‘Do you agree… that at least in part you sought to shield some information from Ms Berejiklian?

‘Yes,’ he said.  

Maguire said he shared in general terms what he was up to and doing.

Mr Robertson said: ‘She was to some extent a sounding board to discuss the things you were involved in general terms at least?’ 

Maguire replied: ‘Yes.’

Robertson then asked: ‘Was it also the case as you understood it from either this call or other communication with Ms Berejiklian there was particular bits of information that she didn’t want to know about your activities?’

Maguire said: ‘Well, yes’.  

Later Mr Robertson said: ‘There was a point you stopped giving the details because you were concerned that might cause her to have to take steps in relation to that matter?’

Maguire responded: ‘Well, I thought it would cause her difficulties. So, I limited the information that I gave her, yes.’ 

From a $330million property deal to making bags of cash from a visa scheme: Inside the dodgy dealings of Gladys Berejiklian’s secret lover Daryl Maguire as he faces corruption inquiry

Gladys Berejiklian’s secret lover Daryl Maguire has admitted using his role as an MP to make money for himself including by accepting cash to help Chinese nationals get visas. 

A corruption inquiry heard Mr Maguire tried to broker property sales for cash payments and told the premier about some of the deals including a $5.8million motel and a $330million estate in western Sydney.

Ms Berejiklian, who manged to keep their five-year relationship secret until Monday, has denied doing anything wrong and insisted that she was not aware of any misconduct.  

On Wednesday Mr Maguire, who resigned from the state parliament in 2018, faces an ICAC corruption inquiry which has the power to recommend criminal charges. 

Here, Daily Mail Australia takes a look at his business ventures that the inquiry has mentioned, some of which clearly came to the attention of Ms Berejiklian.  

The motel, 2014

In a text message from 2014, before Ms Berejiklian became premier, Mr Maguire told her that he had brokered the sale of a motel for $5.8million and that he would get a $5,000 fee.

‘Hawkiss good news. One of my contacts sold a motel for 5.8 million I had put her in contact so I should make 5k,’ he wrote.

In a text message from 2014, before Ms Berejiklian became premier, Mr Maguire told her that he had brokered the sale of a motel for $5.8million and that he would get a $5,000 fee

In a text message from 2014, before Ms Berejiklian became premier, Mr Maguire told her that he had brokered the sale of a motel for $5.8million and that he would get a $5,000 fee

In a text message from 2014, before Ms Berejiklian became premier, Mr Maguire told her that he had brokered the sale of a motel for $5.8million and that he would get a $5,000 fee

Hawkiss, or hokis, is an Armenian term of affection meaning ‘my soul’ or ‘my beloved’.

Ms Berejiklian replied, saying: ‘Congrats!!! Great news!!! Woohoo’. 

At the inquiry on Monday the premier admitted that Mr Maguire was telling her ‘about particular commissions’.

She said she assumed he was disclosing his businesses interests as required. 

Badgerys Creek, 2017

In one recorded conversation Mr Maguire told Ms Berejiklian he had done a property deal at Badgerys Creek in western Sydney that would help pay off large debts incurred by divorcing his ex-wife Maureen.

‘We’ve done our deal so hopefully that’s about half of all that gone now,’ he said before the premier replied: ‘I don’t need to know about that bit.’ 

He is believed to be referring to a deal that would see a sprawling property owned by the Waterhouse racing family sold to Chinese buyers for around $330million.

Daryl Maguire is pictured with Louise Waterhouse

Daryl Maguire is pictured with Louise Waterhouse

Daryl Maguire is pictured with Louise Waterhouse

The potential buyer was concerned about road and zoning issues and Mr Maguire had allegedly agreed to ‘grease the wheels’ by speaking to authorities, the inquiry heard earlier this month.

In one phone call in November 2017, he told Louise Waterhouse’s property agent: ‘I’ve introduced Louise to people to fix the road… I’ll talk to you about it offline.’   

The deal was expected to make Mr Maguire up to $1million but it fell through.   

G8way International

On Wednesday Mr Maguire admitted that he ‘partly’ turned his Macquarie St office over to the firm G8way International.

The company is described as an intermediary between China and Australia which ultimately sold access ‘to the highest levels of government’. 

Mr Maguire told the inquiry he secretly acted as a director of the business which had interests in milk powder, a coal mine, a gold mine, cotton, wine, steel and a showroom in Shenzhen, China.

Gladys Berejiklian (pictured) has denied having any knowledge about a so-called 'cash for visa' scam

Gladys Berejiklian (pictured) has denied having any knowledge about a so-called 'cash for visa' scam

Gladys Berejiklian (pictured) has denied having any knowledge about a so-called ‘cash for visa’ scam

He admitted receiving as many as 20 deliveries of thousands of dollars of cash at his parliamentary office for a scheme that helped Chinese nationals get Australian visas.

He also admitted keeping the money ‘off the books’ so he wouldn’t have to disclose it to Parliament. 

The ICAC inquiry previously heard that Mr Maguire introduced two Australian businessmen to the scheme that saw them get paid to employ Chinese nationals on a rural regional business visa without them having to turn up for work.

Mr Maguire said he suspected the scheme was not legitimate but continued because he was making money from it. 

Asked if she was aware of G8way’s interest in migration, Ms Berejiklian replied: ‘Absolutely not. And I’m shocked and disturbed, can I say, by what’s been revealed.’ 

Proposed trip to China, 2017 

In September 2017, Mr Maguire threatened to fly to China at the same time as an official trade mission to spruik a business deal involving a dairy in Leeton which was outside his electorate.

In an August 2017 letter marked ‘urgent’ and written on NSW parliamentary letterhead, Mr Maguire wrote to the chairman of the board of Chinese firm Bright Food over its interest in dairy facilities in Leeton.

Bright Food had delayed the sale of its controlling stake in a joint venture with local firm UWE.

Berejiklian and Maguire are seen meeting Chinese President Xi Jinping in November 2014

Berejiklian and Maguire are seen meeting Chinese President Xi Jinping in November 2014

Berejiklian and Maguire are seen meeting Chinese President Xi Jinping in November 2014

Mr Maguire said failure of the venture would raise ‘very serious questions by our government … about future joint ventures with Chinese companies’.

‘In order to avoid this potential embarrassment, I will fly to Shanghai to meet with you face to face in a genuine effort to resolve this pending crisis,’ he wrote.

Ms Berejiklian’s chief of staff had to effectively order Mr Maguire to ‘cease and desist’, the inquiry heard. 

Sarah Cruikshank initially thought it was ‘ridiculous’ that Mr Maguire would head to Shanghai over a business deal involving a southern NSW dairy, she told the inquiry.

She recalled quickly moving to stop the trip but said she was unaware Mr Maguire harboured a desire to join the board of one of the dairy’s owners, UWE.

Had she known that information, she’d have reported the then-Wagga Wagga MP to the anti-corruption commission immediately, she said.

‘I mean, it’s pretty serious,’ she said.

Visas for cash and using his role to make money: What did Daryl Maguire admit to? 

* Between 2012 and 2018 Mr Maguire sought to use his public office with a view of making money for himself and his associates.

* He admits he should have updated the premier immediately about his conflicts of interest and knew he was obliged to not ‘knowingly conceal’ such matters from her.

* He admits using his parliamentary staff, email, office and printer to run networking business G8wayInternational

* Electoral staff in Wagga Wagga were also helped him pursue personal business interests.

* He was deliberately kept off G8way’s books but effectively help direct it, using it to make personal profits.

* More than once he received at his parliamentary office deliveries of thousands of dollars of cash associated with a visa scheme for Chinese nationals

* He became suspicious the visa scheme wasn’t legitimate but decided to proceed anyway because he was ‘making money’.

Source: AAP  

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In a recorded phone call Ms Berejiklian can be heard telling Mr Maguire that Ms Cruickshank had concerns about his travel.

‘All right babe, what do you think?’ Mr Maguire asked.

‘I just got home, did Sarah ring you from my office?’ Ms Berejiklian replied.

‘No, why?’ he said.

Ms Berejiklian said: ‘She sent me a text, when she has to ring a member of parliament she lets me know.’

‘They seem to think it’s in your electorate. I didn’t say anything, It’s none of my business, I’m just letting you know.’      

Meeting with Joseph Alha, November 2017

The inquiry heard Mr Maguire took property developer Joseph Alha to ‘bump into’ Ms Berejiklian in her office after having a drink with him beforehand.

Mr Alha allegedly wanted to drum up support for developments in southwest Sydney.

Under NSW laws, property developers cannot donate to political parties but can meet with politicians. 

Asked if she remembered the meeting, Ms Berejiklian said: ‘I have no direct recollection but I may have very well met him at a party, forum or some such event.’  

She said Mr Maguire did not introduce her to people any more than other MPs.

‘It was pretty much common, it would be consistent with every other member of parliament. It wasn’t more or less,’ she said.    

Gladys Berejiklian and Daryl Maguire: A timeline

MARCH 2015: Ms Berejiklian and Mr Maguire begin a ‘close personal relationship’ around the time of the NSW election. Ms Berejiklian was the transport minister while Mr Maguire, a parliamentary secretary, was separated from his ex-wife.

APRIL 2, 2015: Ms Berejiklian appointed NSW treasurer after the coalition is re-elected.

JANUARY 23, 2017: Ms Berejiklian becomes NSW premier, replacing Mike Baird. Mr Maguire is retained as a parliamentary secretary in her government.

AUGUST 2017: Ms Berejiklian tells Mr Maguire she would like him to quit parliament at the 2019 election so the pair can go public with their relationship. Ms Berejiklian says Mr Maguire also wanted that.

SEPTEMBER 7, 2017: Ms Berejiklian is heard in a telephone intercept saying she ‘didn’t need to know about that bit’ as Mr Maguire discusses his financial interests at Badgerys Creek Airport, and a land deal which would net him a large windfall. A day earlier, Mr Maguire texted Ms Berejiklian that ‘we clinched the land deal’.

NOVEMBER 2017: Louise Waterhouse, a western Sydney landowner, twice emailed Ms Berejiklian after being given her private address by Mr Maguire. She requested help with rezoning changes around Badgerys Creek Airport that would benefit a parcel of her land. Ms Berejiklian did not respond.

JULY 13, 2018: Mr Maguire appears before ICAC, with evidence heard that he sought payments to help broker deals for property developers.

AUGUST 3, 2018: Mr Maguire resigns from the Berejiklian government at the behest of Ms Berejiklian and other frontbenchers, with Ms Berejiklian saying she is ‘pleased’ and ‘relieved’ but privately she remains in contact with Mr Maguire.

MARCH 23, 2019: The coalition retains government in the 2019 NSW election.

SEPTEMBER 13, 2020: Ms Berejiklian cuts off all contact with Mr Maguire and agrees to support an ICAC inquiry into his business interests.

OCTOBER 12, 2020: Ms Berejiklian’s relationship with Mr Maguire is revealed at ICAC.

Source: AAP 

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Coronavirus UK: Hull, Bath and Derby outbreaks growing quickest

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coronavirus uk hull bath and derby outbreaks growing quickest

Covid-19 outbreaks are growing fastest in Hull, Derby, and Bath, according to official data that MailOnline has converted into an interactive tool to show how quickly cases are rising in your town. 

Hull and Derby saw their coronavirus epidemics almost double in the seven-day spell ending October 25, with seven-day infection rates jumping to 279 and 329 cases per 100,000 people, respectively. 

Both cities, along with the rest of Staffordshire and Derbyshire, will be moved from Tier One into Tier Two from Saturday to try and stem the rise in infections, it was announced yesterday as England crept another step closer towards a full national lockdown.

But most of the authorities where epidemics have grown the most remain in Tier One, where only the rule of six and 10pm curfew apply. Scientists have argued these rules are not stringent enough to shrink the outbreak, with top Government advisers warning the current growth is ‘very bleak’.  

For example, North Somerset and Bath and North East Somerset, where cases jumped up 83 per cent and 70 per cent in one week, have yet to be hit by any tougher virus-controlling restrictions. It comes despite warnings that the coronavirus crisis is ‘speeding up’ in the south of the country. 

Public Health England’s weekly surveillance report revealed only 20 of all 150 authorities in England saw a drop in infections last week, including Nottingham where cases dropped by 30 per cent. Despite the city’s outbreak shrinking, it will be thrown under the toughest Tier Three restrictions from tomorrow, along with the rest of the county.

And the data offered more proof that the tightest lockdown measures do work, with Liverpool, Knowsley, Sefton and St Helens all seeing their weekly coronavirus infection rates drop. All of the Merseyside area has been under Tier Three lockdown since October 14. 

It suggests the brutal restrictions — which ban people from socialising with anyone outside their own household and mean many pubs, bars, and in some cases gyms, have to close — are beginning to work. However, scientists say the true effect of measure won’t be clear until a few weeks have passed. 

It comes as Boris Johnson is facing renewed pressure from his medical officers to impose a nation-wide shutdown before and after Christmas in a bid to allow families to gather over the holidays. Dominic Raab today hinted No10 could introduce a new Tier Four set of even stricter restrictions and refused to rule out a national lockdown. 

Percentage change in coronavirus cases across London in the week to October 25: The five local authorities where the infection rate grew the most are: Kingston upon Hull City, 92.81 per cent; Derby, 91.84 per cent; North Somerset, 82.99 per cent; Medway, 77.17 per cent; and Bath and North East Somerset 69.72 per cent

Percentage change in coronavirus cases across London in the week to October 25: The five local authorities where the infection rate grew the most are: Kingston upon Hull City, 92.81 per cent; Derby, 91.84 per cent; North Somerset, 82.99 per cent; Medway, 77.17 per cent; and Bath and North East Somerset 69.72 per cent

 Percentage change in coronavirus cases across London in the week to October 25: The five local authorities where the infection rate grew the most are: Kingston upon Hull City, 92.81 per cent; Derby, 91.84 per cent; North Somerset, 82.99 per cent; Medway, 77.17 per cent; and Bath and North East Somerset 69.72 per cent

Yesterday it was announced another 16 authorities would be dragged into Tier Two from Saturday. A number of them were among the 20 places where outbreaks have significantly worsened, according to Public Health England (PHE) data. 

PHE’s data is based on the number of positive swabs within the week October 19 to 25. The new infections can be divided by the population size for each given area to give a case rate per 100,000 people. This allows for figures between different areas to be compared accurately. 

For example in Kingston upon Hull, 279 new cases were diagnosed per 100,000 people in that seven-day period. The week prior, the figure was 145, showing an increase of 93 per cent.

Similarly Derby city’s infection rate rose by 92 per cent, from 171 to 328 cases per 100,000. It suggests that the outbreak is doubling every seven days in those locations. 

But both areas may have asked for more testing to help them contain the virus, meaning just looking at the growth may not paint the entire picture. Department of Health statistics that breakdown tests processed by local authority only go up until October 21, meaning it is not possible to tell exactly how much swabbing skewed the figures over that fortnight.

Earlier this week, Derby’s director of public health, Dr Robyn Dewis, called for all the city’s 259,000 residents to start adhering to Tier Two restrictions.

The advice came in anticipation of being moved into the higher level, which ministers confirmed last night would be happening. Amber Valley, Bolsover, Derbyshire Dales, Derby City, South Derbyshire, and the whole of High Peak will be moved into Tier Two as of Saturday. 

Dr Dewis told MailOnline: ‘I can never feel pleased to be asking our residents to make restrictions in their daily lives, however I do feel that it is urgent that we take action to reduce the spread of the virus. 

‘We have seen a rapid growth across the city with all wards affected. Importantly we are now seeing a significant increase in the over 60s who are infected.’

Meanwhile, North Somerset (83 per cent increase) and Bath and North East Somerset (70 per cent increase) also saw major growths in their outbreaks. 

But their infection rates of 130.2 and 191 are currently well below the average for the UK (230 per 100,000). This may explain why they remain in the ‘medium’ alert level, Tier One. 

Matt Lenny, director of public health at North Somerset Council said in a statement: ‘Analysis of the latest case data also shows that there’s no clear pattern of infection in local communities. 

‘The case data tells us that the virus is circulating generally in our community and we are no longer seeing greater rates of infection just in younger people.

‘I urge every resident in North Somerset to make the right choices when going about their daily lives.

‘We are at a critical point as cases rise and people mix and spend more time indoors. We should all be acting as if we already have the virus and modifying our behaviours to reduce the spread.’  

While places in Somerset are not considered Covid-19 hotspots in England, they may become so if measures are not adopted sooner, rather than later, to slow the spread of growth. 

WHERE DID THE INFECTION RATE GROW THE MOST? 

Kingston upon Hull, City of 92.81%

Derby 91.84%

North Somerset 82.99%

Medway 77.17%

Bath and North East Somerset 69.72%

South Gloucestershire 62.13%

Herefordshire, County of 58.10%

Derbyshire 57.98%

Stoke-on-Trent 56.79%

Lincolnshire 55.26%

Staffordshire 55.21%

Leicestershire 54.29%

Southampton 54.02%

Brighton and Hove 52.57%

Milton Keynes 50.88%

Swindon 49.99%

East Riding of Yorkshire 49.32%

Dudley 49.07%

West Sussex 46.89%

Leicester 46.57%

 

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WHERE DID THE INFECTION RATE GROW THE LEAST? 

Nottingham -30.00%

Liverpool -20.98%

York -20.25%

Windsor and Maidenhead -20.09%

Knowsley -18.18%

County Durham -15.51%

Sefton -12.54%

Rutland -11.63%

Devon -11.12%

Camden -10.03%

Halton -7.95%

South Tyneside -5.35%

Hackney and City of London -4.60%

Richmond upon Thames -3.96%

St. Helens -3.80%

Hartlepool -3.68%

Slough -3.02%

Sheffield -2.46%

Leeds -1.22%

Newcastle upon Tyne -0.42%

 

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Experts have previously said it’s the speed at which an outbreak is growing — and not its current size — that is the most important factor when considering the severity of the situation in any given area. 

Ministers are understood to analyse a ‘basket’ of indicators to make decisions on Covid-19 restrictions, including the infection rate, hospital admissions and speed of growth. 

Dominic Raab says Government is ‘ready’ for TIER FOUR COVID restrictions 

Dominic Raab today hinted the Government could introduce a new Tier Four set of even stricter coronavirus restrictions as he refused to rule out a national lockdown. 

The Government’s current local lockdown system is based on three tiers but there are fears that even the most draconian rules in Tier Three are not enough to stop the spread of the disease. 

A new Tier Four could see non-essential shops told to close and travel limited to getting to work and school. 

Mr Raab said the Government is ‘always ready for further measures’ as he insisted ministers intend to stick to their localised approach of cracking down on infections. 

But the Foreign Secretary admitted that both Germany and France had also used a strategy of local crackdowns before ultimately being forced into new nation shutdowns. 

He would only go so far as saying the Government is ‘striving to avoid’ following the UK’s European neighbours as he resisted imposing a ‘blanket approach or a blunt approach’. 

Mr Raab told the BBC’s Radio 4 Today programme: ‘We are always ready for further measures that we can take but I think the most important thing about further measures is we continue on the track that we are on of targeting the virus.

‘The difference between now and the first lockdown is we are in a much better place to really focus on where the virus is the greatest and I think that is right, not only in scientific and virus management terms, I think in terms of the way people feel about tackling the virus it is fair, it fits the natural justice that we are focusing on the areas where the uptick is the greatest and we are not taking a one-size-fits-all approach or a blanket approach or a blunt approach.’

Mr Raab said the Government wanted to avoid the ‘arbitrariness of a blanket approach’ as he claimed the public favour targeted restrictions. 

However, he did not rule out eventually having to impose a national lockdown after France and Germany made the move earlier this week. 

He said: ‘You mention France. France of course tried a localised approach and then fell back on the national approach.

‘What I think that shows you, Germany is the same, is how important it is that we all rally together at local level through to national level, communities, local leaders, national leaders, and really lean in to the localised focused approach.

‘That is the most effective way to tackle the virus and avoid the blanket approach which I don’t think would be in the best interests of this country and which we are striving to avoid.’

Mr Raab said it is ‘crucially important’ to ‘carry the public with us’ and that he believed the Government’s tiered approach is the best way to do that. 

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South Gloucestershire, in the south west, and Herefordshire in the West Midlands, also saw their outbreaks rapidly grow in the space of one week, by around 60 per cent. However, their infection rates are also lower than the national average and currently stand at 192 and 86, respectively.

The figures indicate the ‘second wave’ is now affecting all corners of England, and not just the north.   

Scientists warned this week infections are ‘speeding up’ in the south.

A worrying Government-funded study by Imperial College London found that the outbreak appears to be growing fastest in London and the South West, where rules are comparatively lax, and slowest in the northern regions with the toughest restrictions. 

They predicted the R rate — the average number of people each carrier infects — is also higher than two in the South East, East and South West, which have mostly escaped any tough local lockdowns.  

But the R rate in the capital is higher than anywhere else in England, at three. For comparison, the experts claimed the national R rate is around 1.6. Cases are doubling every three days compared to every nine days in the rest of England, the study claimed.  

The PHE data shows just 20 out of 149 councils recorded a fall in their Covid-19 infection rates in the week ending October 25. For comparison, 23 saw a dip the week before. 

A  number of large cities saw their infection rates drop in the week to October 25. This includes Nottingham (down 30 per cent), Liverpool (down 21 per cent), Sheffield (down 2.46 per cent) and Leeds (down 1.22 per cent).

But despite this, Nottingham and Leeds will be plunged into Tier Three restrictions this weekend. And there are no clear path for Liverpool and Sheffield to move out of their local ‘lockdowns’.

Liverpool, and the rest of Merseyside including Halton, Knowsley, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral, went straight into Tier Three when the tiered system came into force on October 14. All those places saw infection rates drop in the most recent week, other than Wirral, where cases only rose by 6 per cent. 

A number of places under Tier Two also saw drops in infection rates, including York (20 per cent), South Tyneside (5 per cent) and Newcastle upon Tyne (down a slight 0.42 per cent).

Parts of London — Camden (down 10 per cent), Hackney and City of London (down 4.60 per cent) and Richmond upon Thames (down 3.96 per cent) — also saw improvements in infection rates. These areas have some of the highest infection rates in London, suggesting that residents have acted to control the coronavirus.

But it’s understood London could be thrown into Tier Three lockdown within two weeks unless infection rates drop significantly across the whole capital. 

Londoners are currently banned from meeting indoors with anyone they don’t live with. 

However London Mayor Sadiq Khan is piling on pressure on No10 to drag the city into Tier Three, despite infection rates varying across the 32 different boroughs – from 223 positive tests per 100,000 people in Ealing over the most recent week, to 103 per 100,000 in Lewisham. 

It comes after the Government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage) reportedly said this week all of England could be in Tier Three lockdown by mid-December if a national lockdown is not adopted before.

They said virus rates all over the country will soar past the levels seen in areas already put into the ‘very high’ category by the festive season, The Sun reported, with ‘a government source’ saying: ‘The latest Sage numbers are utterly bleak.’

SAGE has piled fresh pressure on Boris Johnson to impose tougher restrictions as it warned up to 85,000 people could die in a second wave. A ‘reasonable worst case scenario’ put forward by SAGE suggested daily deaths could remain above 500 for three months or more until March next year.

Almost 60 per cent of the population – around 32.6 million – will be under stricter rules by Monday

Almost 60 per cent of the population – around 32.6 million – will be under stricter rules by Monday

Almost 60 per cent of the population – around 32.6 million – will be under stricter rules by Monday

London ‘will go into Tier 3 lockdown in two weeks’ as Britain faces a super-spreader Christmas

London could be plunged into Tier 3 lockdown within two weeks as England creeped closer towards full national lockdown by the back door last night, with millions told they will face extra curbs.    

Boris Johnson is facing renewed pressure from his medical officers to impose a nation-wide shutdown before and after Christmas in a bid to allow families to gather over the holidays, and sources close so Sadiq Khan expect the capital to be locked down imminently.

Senior figures are warning that the UK’s three-tier system is not enough to ‘get on top of the numbers’, with deputy chief medical officer Jonathan Van-Tam reportedly beginning to change his mind over whether regional lockdowns will suppress the virus . He backed the move at a No 10 press conference last week

Presenting what one source called ‘very, very bleak’ data to a meeting of Covid-O, the the Cabinet subcommittee on coronavirus, he said that daily hospital admissions had reached the highest level since April at 1,404.  

There are fears that the whole country will be at Tier 3 by Christmas, and unable to meet extended family members unless the Government takes harsh, draconian action before the season.

Allowing people to visit family at Christmas will be a ‘spreader event’ that could cause a spike in infections many times worse than that caused by the return of university students, experts believe. 

But introducing national restrictions before and after Christmas, while lifting them for the big day could help minimise the impact. 

One senior health official told the Telegraph that anti-Covid measures were most likely to be successful if they were taken on a national basis rather than toughening up the rules for Tier 3. 

They added that a post-Christmas ‘circuit-breaker’ lockdown could also help reverse numbers and curb rising numbers of hospitalisations as fears spread that Britain’s ICUs could be overrun.

‘Releasing measures for two days is unlikely to cause a big upswing,’ a source said.’ But it won’t do nothing. Christmas brings people from all over the country to sit inside together, so its quite likely to be a spreading event.

‘But people want to see their loved ones and they want to make physical contact, and we have to recognise that.’ 

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Independent experts told MailOnline it’s likely most of the places in England that are in Tier One will move into Tier Two by Christmas because the Rule of Six and 10pm curfew are not enough to stamp out rising infections. 

Martin McKee, a professor of European public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and member of Independent Sage, said: ‘We unfortunately have allowed the infection to get out of control and as a consequence we are going to need to turn this around, otherwise it will just keep going up, more will get seriously ill and more people will die.

‘The sooner we impose tighter restrictions, the better. I see MPs saying “the rates are low in my area so we shouldn’t do anything”. It’s not about if case are low, it’s about if they are increasing rapidly. 

‘We saw very clearly in March that it’s better sooner than later. So we really should be doing this now, we really have no time to lose.’

But Professor McKee stressed that with tighter restrictions, three essential things are needed — a clampdown on indoor social mixing where the virus can spread easily, mental health support, and a working test and trace system. Currently the UK’s NHS Test and Trace is not performing to the ‘world beating’ status that was promised.

Professor McKee added: ‘As long as infections are going up, we have a major problem. Simply because of the nature of exponential growth. It’s a simple nature of mathematics. Even if the infections are going up even slightly, the rate of growth will go upwards faster. 

‘On the other hand, if we can put in really stringent measure to stop people mixing with each other, you can get a large drop in quite a short period of time.

Professor Paul Hunter, an infectious disease expert at the University of East Anglia, said: ‘The Tier One restrictions are clearly not working in terms of suppressing the epidemic. I suspect the government would decide to increase, in most areas of the country, will at least move into Tier Two in the next month. And some of the current Tier Two will move into Tier Three. 

‘The interesting thing is it’s not going up quite as quickly in the northern cities as it was. And in some of those cities, such as Liverpool, it does seem to be declining a bit already.

‘I think it’s a little too early to say whether these Tier Two/Tier Three levels are not working. The bottom line is the higher restrictions may be working but it’s too early to be sure.

‘In the southern small town rural areas, that’s where a lot of the current increases are at the moment. It’s very obvious cases are increasing in the south now. Pretty much everywhere in between is on the up.

‘The issue is what time will they decide that is no longer acceptable or tolerable and then increase restrictions in those areas.’

Simon Clarke, an associate professor in cellular microbiology at University of Reading, said: ‘Are local restriction enough? They should be, but the problem is not so much going from Tier Two to Three, but going from One to Two. We know in certain parts of the country that is not happening quickly enough.

‘My gut feeling is we are heading for tightening restrictions between now and into the new year. I think that it will be something like Tier Three or perhaps tighter. I think we will get a tier 4 added on top. But it’s just a guess.’ 

Britain is slowly creeping one step closer to a de facto lockdown every day, with the UK confirming another 23,065 positive test results and 280 deaths yesterday.

Cases are up 8.6 per cent on the 21,242 announced last Thursday, while deaths have increased by 48 per cent in the same time. 

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Boris Johnson is facing renewed pressure from his medical officers to impose a nation-wide shutdown before and after Christmas in a bid to allow families to gather over the holidays

Boris Johnson is facing renewed pressure from his medical officers to impose a nation-wide shutdown before and after Christmas in a bid to allow families to gather over the holidays

Boris Johnson is facing renewed pressure from his medical officers to impose a nation-wide shutdown before and after Christmas in a bid to allow families to gather over the holidays

Boris Johnson is facing renewed pressure from his medical officers to impose a nation-wide shutdown before and after Christmas in a bid to allow families to gather over the holidays, and sources close so Sadiq Khan expect the capital to be locked down imminently.

Senior figures are warning that the UK’s three-tier system is not enough to ‘get on top of the numbers’, with deputy chief medical officer Jonathan Van-Tam reportedly beginning to change his mind over whether regional lockdowns will suppress the virus . He backed the move at a No 10 press conference last week

Presenting what one source called ‘very, very bleak’ data to a meeting of Covid-O, the the Cabinet subcommittee on coronavirus, he said that daily hospital admissions had reached the highest level since April at 1,404. 

Allowing people to visit family at Christmas will be a spreader event that could cause a spike in infections many times worse than that caused by the return of university students, experts believe.

But introducing national restrictions before and after Christmas, while lifting them for the big day could help minimise the impact. 

Almost 60 per cent of the population – around 32.6 million – will be under stricter rules by Monday, and it is understood London could be moved into the top tier in two weeks unless infection rates drop significantly.

Sixteen areas will move into the ‘high risk’ Tier Two at midnight including Oxford, Luton, East Riding of Yorkshire, Kingston Upon Hull, Derbyshire Dales, Derby and Staffordshire.

That means that more than 21.6 million face the restrictions that include a ban on socialising indoors with anyone from another household, whether at home or in bars, restaurants and cafes. 

A further 11 million will be in the ‘very high risk’ Tier Three from midnight on Sunday when Leeds and the rest of West Yorkshire are added to the places where pubs are closed unless serving food.

This will leave only 23.7million without enhanced restrictions.

With tougher restrictions in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, it means just over three-fifths of the UK population are living under extra lockdown restrictions.

HOW HAVE INFECTION RATES CHANGED IN YOUR AREA? 
Local authority name Sept 21 to 27 Sept 28 to Oct 4 Change Oct 5 to 11 Change Oct 12 to 18 Change Oct 19 to 25 Change
Barking and Dagenham 62 63.41 39.18% 98.17 54.82% 119.3 21.52% 131.51 10.23%
Barnet 43.2 86.39 267.77% 110.64 28.07% 114.68 3.65% 140.7 22.69%
Barnsley 76.56 148.66 336.85% 279.91 88.29% 457.33 63.38% 499.06 9.12%
Bath and North East Somerset 37.25 67.78 367.77% 120.03 77.09% 112.79 -6.03% 191.43 69.72%
Bedford 47.9 74.44 138.90% 81.37 9.31% 87.14 7.09% 88.29 1.32%
Bexley 28.19 56.39 141.40% 66.05 17.13% 82.97 25.62% 113.58 36.89%
Birmingham 147.92 159.31 28.64% 190.92 19.84% 227.36 19.09% 257.75 13.37%
Blackburn with Darwen 182.37 257.86 30.41% 446.24 73.06% 576.5 29.19% 774.24 34.30%
Blackpool 91.79 197.21 169.60% 288.28 46.18% 424.54 47.27% 425.97 0.34%
Bolton 244.13 265 9.80% 335.25 26.51% 442.01 31.84% 546.34 23.60%
Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole 25.55 74.12 252.95% 134.57 81.56% 144.44 7.33% 184.91 28.02%
Bracknell Forest 25.3 40.8 212.40% 53.04 30.00% 81.6 53.85% 84.86 4.00%
Bradford 184.34 293.27 98.37% 335.14 14.28% 395.72 18.08% 481.13 21.58%
Brent 50.64 79.45 181.74% 99.16 24.81% 98.55 -0.62% 113.41 15.08%
Brighton and Hove 21.66 62.22 448.68% 82.51 32.61% 93.51 13.33% 142.67 52.57%
Bristol, City of 28.27 66.47 275.54% 156.46 135.38% 245.37 56.83% 333.64 35.97%
Bromley 27.68 55.67 242.58% 70.11 25.94% 89.97 28.33% 108.93 21.07%
Buckinghamshire 24.82 48.35 182.75% 88.98 84.03% 86.77 -2.48% 104.6 20.55%
Bury 216.24 290.59 52.89% 389.55 34.05% 430.39 10.48% 526.21 22.26%
Calderdale 97.42 173.56 135.27% 242.6 39.78% 311.65 28.46% 410.49 31.72%
Cambridgeshire 18.06 45.29 355.18% 65.34 44.27% 67.48 3.28% 82.17 21.77%
Camden 27.4 55.55 138.11% 111.84 101.33% 121.84 8.94% 109.62 -10.03%
Central Bedfordshire 23.56 37.76 67.67% 51.27 35.78% 61.67 20.28% 71.37 15.73%
Cheshire East 61.17 141.35 287.90% 168.68 19.33% 173.11 2.63% 215.8 24.66%
Cheshire West and Chester 78.12 143.7 220.12% 191.21 33.06% 199.08 4.12% 214.53 7.76%
Cornwall and Isles of Scilly 40.4 26.58 32.17% 32 20.39% 30.78 -3.81% 44.95 46.04%
County Durham 110.55 201.29 209.30% 338.05 67.94% 329.56 -2.51% 278.44 -15.51%
Coventry 74.56 108.2 95.13% 166.34 53.73% 184.11 10.68% 199.99 8.63%
Croydon 32.58 66.46 307.98% 75.25 13.23% 79.39 5.50% 105.76 33.22%
Cumbria 51.2 86.6 252.03% 121.6 40.42% 152.4 25.33% 170.2 11.68%
Darlington 103.93 176.03 358.53% 206.92 17.55% 286.51 38.46% 296.81 3.59%
Derby 43.14 82.78 124.21% 134.08 61.97% 171.39 27.83% 328.8 91.84%
Derbyshire 44.35 93.44 201.23% 144.51 54.66% 186.5 29.06% 294.63 57.98%
Devon 18.82 84.37 957.27% 105.69 25.27% 78.52 -25.71% 69.79 -11.12%
Doncaster 62.84 147.81 177.73% 220.27 49.02% 350.76 59.24% 513.64 46.44%
Dorset 11.36 25.1 352.25% 60.76 142.07% 72.39 19.14% 103.3 42.70%
Dudley 56.28 79.29 90.28% 102.3 29.02% 150.81 47.42% 224.82 49.07%
Ealing 55.29 98.01 248.91% 139.85 42.69% 162.08 15.90% 212.4 31.05%
East Riding of Yorkshire 49.83 109.33 372.06% 133.36 21.98% 172.35 29.24% 257.35 49.32%
East Sussex 14.72 30.51 359.49% 44.86 47.03% 50.43 12.42% 58.32 15.65%
Enfield 42.54 72.8 158.52% 93.77 28.80% 137.21 46.33% 138.41 0.87%
Essex 26.66 48.35 176.92% 69.97 44.72% 90.25 28.98% 99.05 9.75%
Gateshead 162.33 241.02 83.08% 255.38 5.96% 259.34 1.55% 355.84 37.21%
Gloucestershire 19.62 40.5 200.00% 62 53.09% 62.63 1.02% 68.6 9.53%
Greenwich 36.47 50.7 217.27% 75.36 48.64% 85.43 13.36% 92.73 8.55%
Hackney and City of London 55.36 101.77 311.03% 132.37 30.07% 164.35 24.16% 156.79 -4.60%
Halton 265.82 343.1 80.49% 387.91 13.06% 340 -12.35% 312.96 -7.95%
Hammersmith and Fulham 45.91 75.08 238.96% 115.59 53.96% 163.12 41.12% 190.12 16.55%
Hampshire 16.78 35.08 219.20% 55.48 58.15% 68.35 23.20% 94.32 38.00%
Haringey 40.95 89.34 192.73% 116.88 30.83% 126.93 8.60% 142.57 12.32%
Harrow 42.2 95.95 244.28% 116.26 21.17% 127.81 9.93% 133.78 4.67%
Hartlepool 153.74 250.9 213.35% 274.39 9.36% 348.06 26.85% 335.24 -3.68%
Havering 58.18 60.49 80.46% 100.56 66.24% 126.76 26.05% 148.72 17.32%
Herefordshire, County of 12.97 22.3 152.83% 37.86 69.78% 54.46 43.85% 86.1 58.10%
Hertfordshire 30.94 66.83 166.79% 87.35 30.70% 90.79 3.94% 106.68 17.50%
Hillingdon 57.35 75.28 117.95% 102.32 35.92% 135.24 32.17% 160 18.31%
Hounslow 57.82 81.39 166.24% 105.7 29.87% 139.21 31.70% 177.15 27.25%
Isle of Wight 11.29 12.7 259.77% 17.63 38.82% 24.69 40.05% 31.04 25.72%
Islington 42.89 76.3 198.40% 90.32 18.37% 121.25 34.24% 126.62 4.43%
Kensington and Chelsea 24.34 81.34 262.80% 94.15 15.75% 135.14 43.54% 138.99 2.85%
Kent 16.44 34.46 240.51% 50.46 46.43% 54.25 7.51% 75.24 38.69%
Kingston upon Hull, City of 35.41 95.85 555.16% 107.01 11.64% 144.74 35.26% 279.08 92.81%
Kingston upon Thames 33.24 72.11 255.57% 101.97 41.41% 144.78 41.98% 184.22 27.24%
Kirklees 118.92 192.37 106.85% 254.44 32.27% 300.37 18.05% 388.82 29.45%
Knowsley 335.41 602.54 182.30% 700.64 16.28% 663.52 -5.30% 542.88 -18.18%
Lambeth 41.71 77.6 272.00% 92.94 19.77% 122.38 31.68% 137.1 12.03%
Lancashire 160.6 246.02 139.88% 347.6 41.29% 387.44 11.46% 426.22 10.01%
Leeds 170.46 379.13 239.39% 394.63 4.09% 393.5 -0.29% 388.71 -1.22%
Leicester 111.51 140.31 23.94% 184.06 31.18% 222.46 20.86% 326.06 46.57%
Leicestershire 51.12 92.19 124.47% 161.58 75.27% 176.87 9.46% 272.89 54.29%
Lewisham 34 64.09 206.21% 77.16 20.39% 79.13 2.55% 90.57 14.46%
Lincolnshire 27.85 63.19 238.82% 92.61 46.56% 103.65 11.92% 160.93 55.26%
Liverpool 342.94 580.27 186.43% 681.47 17.44% 584.69 -14.20% 462.01 -20.98%
Luton 61.96 72.28 41.28% 89.65 24.03% 141.28 57.59% 150.2 6.31%
Manchester 307.67 558.19 215.22% 474.62 -14.97% 438.99 -7.51% 486.2 10.75%
Medway 17.59 30.87 177.36% 38.77 25.59% 45.59 17.59% 80.77 77.17%
Merton 26.63 47.93 266.72% 77.95 62.63% 95.38 22.36% 134.11 40.61%
Middlesbrough 136.19 259.61 375.30% 280.89 8.20% 351.82 25.25% 353.95 0.61%
Milton Keynes 24.86 45.28 139.20% 65.69 45.08% 63.46 -3.39% 95.75 50.88%
Newcastle upon Tyne 299.19 492.37 204.91% 466.94 -5.16% 313.39 -32.88% 312.07 -0.42%
Newham 66.26 75.04 100.75% 103.36 37.74% 129.41 25.20% 142.16 9.85%
Norfolk 17.3 38.01 228.52% 50.89 33.89% 63.89 25.55% 84.71 32.59%
North East Lincolnshire 35.1 76.46 481.00% 162.32 112.29% 237.52 46.33% 339.68 43.01%
North Lincolnshire 47.59 94.03 224.02% 151.49 61.11% 170.06 12.26% 191.54 12.63%
North Somerset 27.9 39.99 56.33% 54.87 37.21% 71.15 29.67% 130.2 82.99%
North Tyneside 156.32 232.31 137.93% 251.55 8.28% 210.67 -16.25% 279.44 32.64%
North Yorkshire 67.47 113.1 188.82% 134.29 18.74% 141.09 5.06% 164.39 16.51%
Northamptonshire 24.43 60.14 198.02% 96.25 60.04% 107.53 11.72% 127.31 18.39%
Northumberland 171.2 180.19 114.38% 175.54 -2.58% 176.47 0.53% 179.88 1.93%
Nottingham 94.32 609.79 1523.94% 927.91 52.17% 610.69 -34.19% 427.46 -30.00%
Nottinghamshire 49.74 137.04 387.17% 220.47 60.88% 272.27 23.50% 325.03 19.38%
Oldham 193.58 295.64 62.27% 382.52 29.39% 468.56 22.49% 661.72 41.22%
Oxfordshire 25.59 64.48 309.14% 86.31 33.86% 89.35 3.52% 111.9 25.24%
Peterborough 35.1 62.3 223.13% 81.58 30.95% 95.92 17.58% 125.09 30.41%
Plymouth 23.27 37.77 80.03% 68.68 81.84% 103.01 49.99% 141.55 37.41%
Portsmouth 32.11 50.72 194.54% 104.7 106.43% 144.25 37.77% 163.79 13.55%
Reading 29.67 43.89 343.78% 74.79 70.40% 95.81 28.11% 109.41 14.19%
Redbridge 73.06 110.74 78.84% 125.15 13.01% 136.95 9.43% 168.4 22.96%
Redcar and Cleveland 70.73 173.53 395.80% 210.72 21.43% 280.71 33.21% 323 15.07%
Richmond upon Thames 39.39 108.58 593.36% 144.94 33.49% 153.02 5.57% 146.96 -3.96%
Rochdale 202.78 335.41 126.06% 429.83 28.15% 508.97 18.41% 574.16 12.81%
Rotherham 100.98 203.08 228.66% 279.57 37.66% 386.19 38.14% 493.2 27.71%
Rutland 42.58 85.16 580.19% 132.74 55.87% 107.7 -18.86% 95.17 -11.63%
Salford 195.49 317.19 114.36% 390.21 23.02% 495.3 26.93% 588.79 18.88%
Sandwell 113.26 114.78 19.67% 146.45 27.59% 216.17 47.61% 275.23 27.32%
Sefton 226.84 371.19 194.83% 477.19 28.56% 438.48 -8.11% 383.49 -12.54%
Sheffield 121.74 385.74 519.76% 455.16 18.00% 431.05 -5.30% 420.45 -2.46%
Shropshire 42.4 59.11 193.79% 86.34 46.07% 84.48 -2.15% 119.45 41.39%
Slough 82.92 86.93 217.03% 92.28 6.15% 155.14 68.12% 150.46 -3.02%
Solihull 90.12 119.7 61.87% 174.7 45.95% 209.36 19.84% 223.69 6.84%
Somerset 13.87 32.9 362.73% 39.13 18.94% 45.89 17.28% 61.36 33.71%
South Gloucestershire 24.2 58.58 255.25% 88.04 50.29% 118.56 34.67% 192.22 62.13%
South Tyneside 221.89 274.88 37.42% 245.07 -10.84% 235.14 -4.05% 222.55 -5.35%
Southampton 19.01 42.77 199.93% 60.19 40.73% 74.05 23.03% 114.05 54.02%
Southend-on-Sea 31.13 42.59 143.79% 48.05 12.82% 68.81 43.20% 82.46 19.84%
Southwark 47.99 60.53 114.42% 79.35 31.09% 95.66 20.55% 121.69 27.21%
St. Helens 254.17 347.76 167.24% 443.56 27.55% 437.47 -1.37% 420.85 -3.80%
Staffordshire 38.66 82.2 173.82% 121.2 47.45% 169.06 39.49% 262.4 55.21%
Stockport 110.42 227.32 162.62% 297.18 30.73% 299.91 0.92% 396.02 32.05%
Stockton-on-Tees 100.84 233.6 339.02% 342.54 46.64% 357.24 4.29% 447.43 25.25%
Stoke-on-Trent 49.54 60.46 54.99% 118.19 95.48% 192.3 62.70% 301.51 56.79%
Suffolk 8.41 33.49 298.22% 46.37 38.46% 55.03 18.68% 72.63 31.98%
Sunderland 215.7 296.72 108.61% 299.24 0.85% 321.92 7.58% 323.72 0.56%
Surrey 27.08 66.29 350.65% 83.01 25.22% 94.8 14.20% 106.58 12.43%
Sutton 23.75 36.83 162.14% 81.9 122.37% 90.14 10.06% 114.85 27.41%
Swindon 19.35 27.9 181.82% 45.46 62.94% 69.31 52.46% 103.96 49.99%
Tameside 174.4 245.48 74.84% 322.75 31.48% 371.31 15.05% 513.92 38.41%
Telford and Wrekin 43.92 56.16 173.02% 81.73 45.53% 154.01 88.44% 211.28 37.19%
Thurrock 24.09 43.02 226.16% 75.14 74.66% 122.17 62.59% 157.74 29.12%
Torbay 14.68 49.9 466.40% 82.19 64.71% 100.54 22.33% 126.23 25.55%
Tower Hamlets 62.51 85.61 164.80% 97.92 14.38% 133.64 36.48% 148.73 11.29%
Trafford 139.88 279.75 277.28% 336.63 20.33% 327.36 -2.75% 429.74 31.27%
Wakefield 86.13 163.93 243.96% 238.87 45.71% 310.64 30.05% 401.08 29.11%
Walsall 83.37 122.25 81.76% 168.84 38.11% 211.57 25.31% 305.8 44.54%
Waltham Forest 47.3 79.43 147.21% 94.95 19.54% 102.53 7.98% 135.75 32.40%
Wandsworth 37.92 71.89 243.48% 101.31 40.92% 114.35 12.87% 143.78 25.74%
Warrington 197.61 268.55 102.15% 337.6 25.71% 348.55 3.24% 406.64 16.67%
Warwickshire 40.49 70.94 98.05% 101.05 42.44% 126.14 24.83% 166.63 32.10%
West Berkshire 22.72 39.13 181.92% 49.23 25.81% 57.43 16.66% 83.94 46.16%
West Sussex 21.64 33.1 148.69% 43.06 30.09% 50.35 16.93% 73.96 46.89%
Westminster 29.08 71.18 220.63% 88.02 23.66% 108.3 23.04% 135.08 24.73%
Wigan 160.04 274.45 124.39% 407.71 48.56% 460.66 12.99% 655.99 42.40%
Wiltshire 15.2 32.8 221.57% 53.8 64.02% 68 26.39% 84.2 23.82%
Windsor and Maidenhead 31.7 80.57 335.75% 113.59 40.98% 141.33 24.42% 112.93 -20.09%
Wirral 193.82 252.77 61.86% 315.42 24.79% 267.27 -15.27% 282.71 5.78%
Wokingham 28.64 45 327.76% 61.36 36.36% 76.55 24.76% 95.26 24.44%
Wolverhampton 83.16 75.94 21.21% 133.66 76.01% 191 42.90% 246.43 29.02%
Worcestershire 43.47 70.83 232.22% 93.15 31.51% 105.24 12.98% 128.4 22.01%
York 72.64 195.14 341.89% 266.36 36.50% 307.19 15.33% 244.99 -20.25%

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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COVID-positive people spread the infection to others at home 53% of the time

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covid positive people spread the infection to others at home 53 of the time

If someone in your household tests positive for COVID-19, there is a 53 percent chance they will pass it on to you or someone else living under your roof, a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) finds. 

And the transmission rate was similar regardless of whether the first coronavirus patient was an adult or child. 

Prior research has found that a person is more likely to catch coronavirus at home than in other locations such as stores or public transit. 

But the CDC authors also warn that rates of secondary infections are higher in the US than in other nations where people are more consistently isolated within or outside their homes, or where families are more likely to wear masks at home. 

People who have coronavirus pass it to other members of their households about 53% of the time, no matter how  old the first patient is, the CDC found (file)

People who have coronavirus pass it to other members of their households about 53% of the time, no matter how  old the first patient is, the CDC found (file)

People who have coronavirus pass it to other members of their households about 53% of the time, no matter how  old the first patient is, the CDC found (file) 

The CDC closely tracked 101 Americans who tested positive for coronavirus and 191 people who lived with them. 

People between 18 and 49 were most likely to be the index patients – the first infected – and primary infections were least common among children younger than 12. 

Young children represented just five percent of all index patients, and people aged 50 and older made up 41 percent of cases. 

Nearly a quarter (22 percent) of the index patients had some form of underlying condition. Asthma was the most common, with 23 percent of initial coronavirus patients suffering the common respiratory condition.  

More importantly, 19 percent of all household members of initial coronavirus cases had underlying  conditions that might make them more vulnerable to infection and severe COVID-19. 

Thirteen percent had asthma, seven percent had each heart disease and diabetes, one percent had kidney disease and two percent were immunocompromised or smoked. 

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Most of the first cases in each household did not have symptoms when they tested positive, while  41 percent did. 

People who have symptoms likely have higher viral loads and are more infectious than asymptomatic people, though research suggests that people with no symptoms are anywhere between 25 and 75 percent as infectious as those  with symptoms. 

But within a week, 67 percent developed symptoms. 

In total, the virus was passed from the first case to at least one other household member in 53 percent of homes.  

Transmissions happened fast. Three-quarters of secondary infections happened within just five days of the first household member getting sick. 

The rate of transmission from children under 12 to other household members was even higher, at 57 percent. 

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35050194 8898021 image a 18 1604078280882

People aged  50 or older were actually least likely to pass coronavirus to a family member, which happened in 43 percent of cases. 

Young adults between 18 and 49 were most likely to infect another person in their household, transmitting the infection 59 percent of the time. 

‘Secondary infection rates were high across all racial/ethnic groups. Substantial transmission occurred whether the index patient was an adult or a child,’ the CDC authors noted. 

‘Other studies, particularly those conducted abroad, might have found lower secondary infection rates because of rapid isolation of patients in facilities outside households or different adoption of control measures, such as mask use, in the home.’ 

The CDC researchers urged that anyone who has tested positive for COVID-19 be isolated, preferably outside the home, but at least within it. 

What’s more, they underscored how frequently initial cases had no symptoms at  the time of the their positive tests, signalling that isolating as soon as there’s been a possible exposure might be wise to prevent the infection from spreading at home.  

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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US reports single-day record of 88,500 cases with states like Illinois reporting all-time highs

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us reports single day record of 88500 cases with states like illinois reporting all time highs

The US set a record-high number of coronavirus cases with more than 88,500 new infections reported in a single day Thursday.

This breaks the previous record set on Saturday of 83,757 and brings the total number of cases to 8.9 million.   

Several states also reported their own single-day high number of cases with nearly 6,400 new cases recorded in Illinois, more than 2,000 in Colorado and more than 1,000 in North Dakota.

The seven-day rolling average number of new daily cases also hit a high of 76,541 according to a DailyMail.com analysis of data from Johns Hopkins University.  

President Donald Trump tweeted on Friday that ‘more testing equals more cases’ and claimed that COVID-19 coronavirus deaths are ‘WAY DOWN.’

However, while daily deaths are low compared to figures seen in the early days of the pandemic, they are creeping back upward with 971 fatalities reported on Thursday and 994 reported on Wednesday.

On average, about 800 people are dying per day, according to the DailyMail.com analysis.

Death rates have dropped for the most severely ill patients – from more than 25 percent to less than 10 percent, according to one New York City hospital – but experts say the recent surge in infections could undo the progress.

The US set a record-high with more than 88,500 new coronavirus cases on Thursday, breaking the previous single-day record of around 83,700 on Saturday

The US set a record-high with more than 88,500 new coronavirus cases on Thursday, breaking the previous single-day record of around 83,700 on Saturday

The US set a record-high with more than 88,500 new coronavirus cases on Thursday, breaking the previous single-day record of around 83,700 on Saturday

The seven-day rolling average number of new daily cases also hit a new high of 76,541 (second from right), according to data from Johns Hopkins University as hospitalizations and deaths tweak upward

The seven-day rolling average number of new daily cases also hit a new high of 76,541 (second from right), according to data from Johns Hopkins University as hospitalizations and deaths tweak upward

The seven-day rolling average number of new daily cases also hit a new high of 76,541 (second from right), according to data from Johns Hopkins University as hospitalizations and deaths tweak upward

In Illinois, health officials reported a single-day high of 6,363 new COVID-19 cases on Thursday and cases are up 151% since October 1

In Illinois, health officials reported a single-day high of 6,363 new COVID-19 cases on Thursday and cases are up 151% since October 1

In Illinois, health officials reported a single-day high of 6,363 new COVID-19 cases on Thursday and cases are up 151% since October 1

Cases have been surging across the country, with the Midwest and Mountain West in particular seeming to shatter new records every day.

In Illinois, health officials reported a single-day high of 6,363 new COVID-19 cases on Thursday.

Statewide metrics since October 1 are staggering with cases up 151 percent, deaths up 82 percent and hospitalizations up 73 percent, reported WLS-TV.

‘We have a real problem on our hands and people’s lives hang in the balance,’ Gov. JB Pritzker said during a press conference yesterday.

Pritzker recently banned indoor dining in restaurants and indoor service at bars and has called for no gatherings of more than 25 guests or 25 percent of overall room capacity  

In nearby Wisconsin, things aren’t much better. 

On Thursday, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services reported 4,870 new infections – nearly a 37 percent positive test rate – and second only to the record-high of 5,262 recorded on Tuesday.

According to WBAY, the state has added almost 15,000 coronavirus cases to the total count in the last four days.

Health officials say the seven-day rolling average is 4,128 new cases a day and the seven-day average positivity rate is 29.11 percent, both figures of which are all-time highs.

Wisconsin was the subject of a recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that tracked the spread of COVID-19 at a summer camp in the southeastern part of the state. 

Between July 2 and August 11, one camper, who tested negative before arrival, contracted the virus and then spread it to nearly 80 percent of the camp’s attendees.

‘COVID-19 spreads like wildfire when you bring a lot of people together in a relatively small space,’ Julie Willems Van Dijk, told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

‘If there was one person who was ill with COVID-19, they easily spread that to everyone in their housing unit and then the nature of summer camp where you eat meals together, go swimming together, do activities together, sing around the campfire together – all of those activities are great spreading events. 

On Thursday, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services reported 4,870 new infections with a record-high seven day rolling average and seven-day average positive test rate

On Thursday, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services reported 4,870 new infections with a record-high seven day rolling average and seven-day average positive test rate

On Thursday, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services reported 4,870 new infections with a record-high seven day rolling average and seven-day average positive test rate

North Dakota is reporting 99 new infections 100,000 people, but previously was the first US state to surpass 100 per 100,000 since the pandemic began

North Dakota is reporting 99 new infections 100,000 people, but previously was the first US state to surpass 100 per 100,000 since the pandemic began

North Dakota is reporting 99 new infections 100,000 people, but previously was the first US state to surpass 100 per 100,000 since the pandemic began

South Dakota now has the worst rate in the nations with 109 cases per 100,000 people and a positive test rate of 40%

South Dakota now has the worst rate in the nations with 109 cases per 100,000 people and a positive test rate of 40%

South Dakota now has the worst rate in the nations with 109 cases per 100,000 people and a positive test rate of 40%

Among the Great Plains, two states, North Dakota and South Dakota, were largely spared from the virus until recently, and currently have two of the country’s worst outbreaks 

In North Dakota, health officials reported a record of 1,222 new cases on Thursday after three straight days of declines and shattering the previous high of 1,038 on October 22. 

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35007100 8893785 image a 18 1603993653285

The state has the second worst infection rate with 99 cases per 100,000 people. 

This is a slight drop of its previous high of 105 per 100,000, which at the time made it the first US state to surpass 100 per 100,000 since the pandemic began.

‘This is what may appear to be the beginning of the fall surge’ that experts such as Dr Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, has warned about for months, said Gov Doug Burgum during a briefing on Thursday.

With holidays like Thanksgiving and Christmas coming up, he added: ‘This is going to be a real challenging time.’  

South Dakota, meanwhile, is reporting 95 cases per 100,000 – much higher than the US overall of 22 cases per 10,000 people, and the current worst rate in the nation.

What’s more, the state reported 1,000 cases on Thursday, which a positive test rate of 40 percent.

Trump’s explanation of more testing doesn’t explain the surge. Vox reports that the testing average in South Dakota increased by 11 percent but cases soared by 20 percent

Dr Bonny Specker, an epidemiologist at South Dakota State University, told the site that the reason for the rise in the Dakota was due to a lack of public health measures. 

‘Federal and many state leaders have not implemented mandates or reinforced [public health agencies] recommendations to prevent the spread of the virus,’ she said.

‘In South Dakota, the governor had the information needed to minimize the impact of this virus on the health of South Dakotans, but she ignored that information as well as national recommendations from the CDC.’ 

Wyoming currently ranks fifth in the nation with 57.9 new infections per 100,000 people and a positive test rate of 55.21%

Wyoming currently ranks fifth in the nation with 57.9 new infections per 100,000 people and a positive test rate of 55.21%

Wyoming currently ranks fifth in the nation with 57.9 new infections per 100,000 people and a positive test rate of 55.21%

 In the Mountain West, the least populous state in the union – Wyoming – now ranks among the worst states for COVID-19 infection rate.

The state now ranks fifth in the nation with 57.9 new infections per 100,000 people. 

Wyoming has seen 2,298 new confirmed and probable cases of the virus in the past week, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

This means the positive test rate is now at 55.21 percent. It’s a huge jump from the roughly 500 people testing positive in Wyoming in July.

Dr Deborah Birx, the coordinator for the White House Coronavirus Task Force, visited the Wind River Hotel and Casino on Wednesday to Wyoming’s COVID-19 response.

She said the surge is due to lack of face masks indoors and the need of people under 35 to get tested regularly regardless of whether or not they display symptoms.

‘Wear your mask, physically distance, but really pay attention to what you’re doing in the household, in both public and private spaces, to not gather in that way that we know is spreading the virus,’ Birx said. 

Daily deaths are low compared to figures seen in the early days of the pandemic, with 971 recorded on Thursday, but are creeping back up towards 1,000 per day

Daily deaths are low compared to figures seen in the early days of the pandemic, with 971 recorded on Thursday, but are creeping back up towards 1,000 per day

Daily deaths are low compared to figures seen in the early days of the pandemic, with 971 recorded on Thursday, but are creeping back up towards 1,000 per day

Experts say the reason for the drop in death rate is likely due to a combination of factors including better understanding of how to treat the disease AND  better awareness among the general public

Experts say the reason for the drop in death rate is likely due to a combination of factors including better understanding of how to treat the disease AND  better awareness among the general public

Experts say the reason for the drop in death rate is likely due to a combination of factors including better understanding of how to treat the disease AND  better awareness among the general public

However, across the US. researchers have found that the death rate among the most seriously ill patients seems to be improving.

A new study from NYU Langone Health looked at the outcomes of more than 5,000 COVID-19 patients hospitalized among the system’s three hospitals between March and August.

Experts say the reason for the drop in death rate is likely due to a combination of factors including better understanding of how to treat the disease, better awareness among the general public and people being treated before their cases become serious.

‘We don’t have a magic bullet cure, but we have a lot, a lot of little things, that add up,’ senior author Dr Leora Horwitz, director of NYU Langone’s Center for Healthcare Innovation & Delivery Science, told The New York Times. 

We understand better when people need to be on ventilators and when they don’t, and what complications to watch for, like blood clots and kidney failure. 

‘We understand how to watch for oxygen levels even before patients are in the hospital, so we can bring them in earlier. And of course, we understand that steroids are helpful, and possibly some other medications.’  

However, with cases and hospitalizations on the rise, there is fear that deaths will not be far behind.

‘If hospitals that aren’t prepared for large numbers of people have to deal with a large influx of Covid patients, or small hospitals get pulled into it, we should expect that mortality could change unfortunately. That’s a warning,’ Tom Inglesby, director of the Center for Health Security at Johns Hopkins University, told The Times.

Medical experts are worrying that the surges in cases around the country could reverse or roll back those gains.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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