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Disgusted man buys barbecue chicken from Woolworths with its shriveled HEAD still attached

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disgusted man buys barbecue chicken from woolworths with its shriveled head still attached

A man has been left horrified after he bought a roast chicken with its head still attached from Woolworths. 

Andrew Linder posted a picture of the chicken he bought from the supermarket giant on Facebook on Thursday.

The picture shows the chicken on a plate with the birds head slumped to the side beside the Woolworths branded packaging. 

‘So is this a new thing? Woolworths chicken with the head still attached?’ he captioned the post. 

Andrew Linder posted a picture of a chicken with its head still attached (pictured) that he bought from Woolworths on Facebook on Thursday

Andrew Linder posted a picture of a chicken with its head still attached (pictured) that he bought from Woolworths on Facebook on Thursday

Andrew Linder posted a picture of a chicken with its head still attached (pictured) that he bought from Woolworths on Facebook on Thursday

The man’s post was flooded with comments from people disgusted by the sight of the chicken’s shriveled head. 

‘Never seen that before! Would rather never see it again, either!’ one person wrote.

‘Thanks for the heads-up. I’m staying with Coles,’ another wrote.

‘Was thinking maybe it’s like the Golden Ticket equivalent for chooks? Winning a chook a week for a lifetime?’ added a third.

‘Makes up for the trauma. Although the chook suffered more trauma.’

Chicken heads are a common street food in Asian countries such as China, Thailand and The Philippines.

The heads are almost entirely fat, bone and gristle and serve as good snacks for pets. 

Eating a roast chicken head carries little to no risk of getting sick as long as the head has been properly cooked.  

A Woolworths spokesperson said the chicken was not up to standard and are in the process of organising a refund to Mr Linder

A Woolworths spokesperson said the chicken was not up to standard and are in the process of organising a refund to Mr Linder

A Woolworths spokesperson said the chicken was not up to standard and are in the process of organising a refund to Mr Linder

A Woolworths spokesperson told Daily Mail Australia they have been in contact with Mr Linder and are in the process of organising a full refund. 

‘We pride ourselves on providing high quality roast chickens to our customers and regret that this customer received one well below our usual standards,’ the spokesman said.

‘It’s clearly unacceptable and we’re following up with our chicken supply partner and in-store team to understand how this happened.

‘We’ve contacted the customer to apologise for their experience and will offer a refund.

‘We’re unaware of any similar reports on our roast chickens at this time.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Australia

Eli Lilly ends antibody drug trial early after it failed to help patients recover

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Eli Lilly & Co has ended its clinical trial of an antibody drug early after it was shown to not help hospitalized coronavirus patients recover.  

The ACTIV-3 study of the antibody LY-CoV555 (also known as bamlanivimab) was paused on October 13 due to ‘potential safety concerns’ and out of an ‘abundance of caution.’   

However, company officials have not revealed what the safety concerns were, or how many hospitalized participants were affected, after a pause was recommended by an independent safety board. 

In this particular trial, the antibody was being tested in combination with remdesivir, which recently became the first drug granted full US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval as a COVID-19 treatment.

In a statement on Monday, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which was sponsoring the trial, said the antibody treatment did not have any safety risk.

However, investigators found that there was no significant difference in outcomes between patients getting Lilly’s drug and those receiving a placebo. 

The National Institues of Health and Eli Lilly & Co announced they are ending clinical trial of a combination of an antibody, LY-CoV555, and remdesivir as a treatment for hospitalized coronavirus patients. Pictured:  Eli Lilly corporate headquarters in Indianapolis, April 2017

The National Institues of Health and Eli Lilly & Co announced they are ending clinical trial of a combination of an antibody, LY-CoV555, and remdesivir as a treatment for hospitalized coronavirus patients. Pictured:  Eli Lilly corporate headquarters in Indianapolis, April 2017

The National Institues of Health and Eli Lilly & Co announced they are ending clinical trial of a combination of an antibody, LY-CoV555, and remdesivir as a treatment for hospitalized coronavirus patients. Pictured:  Eli Lilly corporate headquarters in Indianapolis, April 2017

Investigators paused the trial on October 13 due to 'potential safety concerns' and out of an 'abundance of caution.' Pictured: A researcher at Eli Lilly tests possible COVID-19 antibodies in a laboratory in Indianapolis, May 2020

Investigators paused the trial on October 13 due to 'potential safety concerns' and out of an 'abundance of caution.' Pictured: A researcher at Eli Lilly tests possible COVID-19 antibodies in a laboratory in Indianapolis, May 2020

Investigators paused the trial on October 13 due to ‘potential safety concerns’ and out of an ‘abundance of caution.’ Pictured: A researcher at Eli Lilly tests possible COVID-19 antibodies in a laboratory in Indianapolis, May 2020

NIH officials say they found no safety concerns but that there was no difference between patients receiving the drug and those getting a placebo, Pictured: Eli Lilly researchers prepare cells to produce possible COVID-19 antibodies for testing in a laboratory, May 2020

NIH officials say they found no safety concerns but that there was no difference between patients receiving the drug and those getting a placebo, Pictured: Eli Lilly researchers prepare cells to produce possible COVID-19 antibodies for testing in a laboratory, May 2020

NIH officials say they found no safety concerns but that there was no difference between patients receiving the drug and those getting a placebo, Pictured: Eli Lilly researchers prepare cells to produce possible COVID-19 antibodies for testing in a laboratory, May 2020

‘The [Data and Safety Monitoring Board] reviewed data from the ACTIV-3 trial…and recommended no further participants be randomized to receive LY-CoV555,’ the NIH statement read.  

‘This recommendation was based on a low likelihood that the intervention would be of clinical value in this hospitalized patient population.’

Before the trial closed, 326 participants had been enrolled and they will continue to be followed for 90 days. 

Lilly told The Wall Street Journal that it will continue testing its antibody therapy in other studies, and does not expect the recent news to impact its success.

Additionally, the drugmaker is waiting to see if the FDA grants approval for the drug as a solo treatment for mild to moderately ill COVID-19 patients who are not hospitalized.  

Lilly did not immediately reply to DailyMail.com’s request for comment. 

The antibody was developed by Indianapolis-based Lilly and the Canadian company AbCellera Biologics. 

It recognizes the virus once a person is infected and attaches to the spike-shaped protein the virus uses to infect cells, preventing the pathogen from spreading throughout the body.  

Antibodies are proteins that the body makes when it is infected. They attach to the virus to kill it.   

The blood of COVID-19 survivors, known as convalescent plasma, is currently being tested as a treatment for patients because it contains these antibodies.

However, the types of antibodies a donor has, and their strength, can vary, which makes large-scale production unrealistic. 

Lilly says its antibody treatment was developed after it was identified from a blood sample taken from one of the first US patients who recovered from COVID-19.

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The drugs that Lilly and other companies are testing are concentrated versions of specific antibodies, which can be produced in mass doses.

They are being tested to treat newly diagnosed COVID-19 patients in hope of preventing serious disease or death, and to try to prevent infection in people at high risk of these outcomes such as nursing home residents and health workers.   

In an earnings call on Tuesday, the drug maker said its net income fell to $1.208 billion, or $1.33 a share, in the third quarter, down from $1.254 billion, or $1.37 a share, during the same time last year.  

According to Reuters, Lilly said it expects COVID-19 research and development this year to cost around $400 million, which led to shared dropping four percent before the opening bell. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Doctor hits back at trolls who called her ‘too attractive’ to do her job

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doctor hits back at trolls who called her too attractive to do her job

A doctor has criticized online trolls who told her she is ‘too pretty’ to work in the healthcare industry. 

Medina Culver, 31, who lives in Las Vegas with her husband, has more than 27,000 followers on Instagram and delights her fans with regular posts about her life as a physician. 

In one recent video, Medina replied to the suggestion that she’s ‘too attractive’ for her career by writing: ‘Well thank you… I am pretty ambitious, pretty hard working and pretty determined to achieve my dreams.’ 

Titled ‘when someone tells me you’re too pretty to be a real doctor’, Medina later claimed ‘people have said [similar] more times than I can count’. 

Fans rushed to praise the medical professional for addressing her critics, but others branded her arrogant, with some even suggesting the ‘too pretty’ claims never happened. 

Medina Culver (pictured), 31, who lives in Las Vegas with her husband, has more than 27,000 followers on Instagram and delights her fans with regular posts about her life as a physician

Medina Culver (pictured), 31, who lives in Las Vegas with her husband, has more than 27,000 followers on Instagram and delights her fans with regular posts about her life as a physician

Medina Culver (pictured), 31, who lives in Las Vegas with her husband, has more than 27,000 followers on Instagram and delights her fans with regular posts about her life as a physician

In one recent video, Medina replied to the suggestion that she's 'too attractive' for her career writing: 'Well thank you... I am pretty ambitious, pretty hard working and pretty determined to achieve my dreams.'

In one recent video, Medina replied to the suggestion that she's 'too attractive' for her career writing: 'Well thank you... I am pretty ambitious, pretty hard working and pretty determined to achieve my dreams.'

In one recent video, Medina replied to the suggestion that she’s ‘too attractive’ for her career writing: ‘Well thank you… I am pretty ambitious, pretty hard working and pretty determined to achieve my dreams.’

She captioned the video: 'Pretty women can be more than pretty faces....we can also be bada** doctors.'

She captioned the video: 'Pretty women can be more than pretty faces....we can also be bada** doctors.'

She captioned the video: ‘Pretty women can be more than pretty faces….we can also be bada** doctors.’ 

Medina writes about her accomplishments in medicine on her Instagram account in a bid to inspire women but also isn’t afraid to capture other areas of her day-to-day routines, including bikini-clad trips to the pool. 

Taking to her account to address suggestions she’s ‘too attractive’ for her job, she captioned the video: ‘Pretty women can be more than pretty faces….we can also be bada** doctors.’ 

Medina, who studied for eight years at university, later replied to a comment on the clip which asked if people had actually suggested she was ‘too pretty’ to work in the healthcare industry.

Medina (pictured) writes about her accomplishments in medicine on her Instagram account in a bid to inspire women but also isn't afraid to capture other areas of her day-to-day routines, including bikini-clad trips to the pool

Medina (pictured) writes about her accomplishments in medicine on her Instagram account in a bid to inspire women but also isn't afraid to capture other areas of her day-to-day routines, including bikini-clad trips to the pool

Medina (pictured) writes about her accomplishments in medicine on her Instagram account in a bid to inspire women but also isn’t afraid to capture other areas of her day-to-day routines, including bikini-clad trips to the pool

Medina (pictured), who studied for eight years at university, later replied to a comment on the clip which asked if people had actually suggested she was 'too pretty' to work in the healthcare industry

Medina (pictured), who studied for eight years at university, later replied to a comment on the clip which asked if people had actually suggested she was 'too pretty' to work in the healthcare industry

Medina (pictured), who studied for eight years at university, later replied to a comment on the clip which asked if people had actually suggested she was ‘too pretty’ to work in the healthcare industry

'Oh yes! People have said it more times than I can count,' she wrote in a reply to one of her followers (pictured)

'Oh yes! People have said it more times than I can count,' she wrote in a reply to one of her followers (pictured)

‘Oh yes! People have said it more times than I can count,’ she wrote in a reply to one of her followers (pictured)

‘Oh yes! People have said it more times than I can count,’ she wrote.

Many of social media users applauded Medina for speaking out on the issue, with one writing: ‘I love your video! So honest and refreshing,’ while another said: ‘So awesome! Love this so much!’

But some critics labelled her ‘conceited’, with one person writing: ‘Humble brag much? I bet literally no one has said this to her lol.’

Another said: ‘All she posts are conceited TikToks of her making cutsie faces at the camera and pointing at her life accomplishments lol.’ 

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Reaction: Many of social media users (above) applauded Medina for speaking out on the issue

Reaction: Many of social media users (above) applauded Medina for speaking out on the issue

Reaction: Many of social media users (above) applauded Medina for speaking out on the issue

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But some critics (above) labelled her 'conceited', with one person writing: 'Humble brag much? I bet literally no one has said this to her lol.'

But some critics (above) labelled her 'conceited', with one person writing: 'Humble brag much? I bet literally no one has said this to her lol.'

But some critics (above) labelled her ‘conceited’, with one person writing: ‘Humble brag much? I bet literally no one has said this to her lol.’

While a third added: ‘I have a feeling no one has ever said “you are too pretty to be a doctor” unless it was a pickup line and not to be taken seriously.’

Elsewhere, in another inspiring post, Medina revealed how she was happy to pose in a bikini, despite critics saying it was ‘unprofessional’.

‘Remember that article that was posted about women not being professional or able to do their jobs as physicians because they listed photos in a bikini….yeah me neither,’ she wrote. 

‘Proud to be a female physician more than ever these days! #medbikini.’

Elsewhere, in another inspiring post (above), Medina revealed how she was happy to pose in a bikini, despite critics saying it was 'unprofessional'

Elsewhere, in another inspiring post (above), Medina revealed how she was happy to pose in a bikini, despite critics saying it was 'unprofessional'

Elsewhere, in another inspiring post (above), Medina revealed how she was happy to pose in a bikini, despite critics saying it was ‘unprofessional’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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KFC Australia launches bright State of Origin burgers for footy fans

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kfc australia launches bright state of origin burgers for footy fans

KFC is set to launch two new brightly coloured State of Origin burgers – complete with two succulent chicken fillets, double cheese, and a creamy mustard sauce.

Australian diners will be able to order the $9.95 Origin Recipe burger in the colour of their favourite team – blue (New South Wales) or maroon (Queensland).

In a ‘world first’ for footy fans, customers can tuck into the unique burgers from the sidelines between Tuesday, November 3 to Wednesday, November 11.

For the first time in its 40-year history, the State of Origin series will take place on Wednesday, November 4, and ending on November 18 due to COVID-19

Australian diners will be able to order the $9.95 Origin Recipe burger in the colour of their favourite State of Origin team - blue (New South Wales) or maroon (Queensland)

Australian diners will be able to order the $9.95 Origin Recipe burger in the colour of their favourite State of Origin team - blue (New South Wales) or maroon (Queensland)

Australian diners will be able to order the $9.95 Origin Recipe burger in the colour of their favourite State of Origin team – blue (New South Wales) or maroon (Queensland)

‘We’re thrilled to launch the Origin Recipe Burger to celebrate this year’s State of Origin series,’ Kristi Woolrych, chief marketing officer of KFC Australia, said. 

‘The State of Origin is one of the biggest moments on the sporting calendar and it now has its own epic burger to match.

‘We all know fans love to don a scarf, a jersey and even paint their face but we felt something was missing – you couldn’t eat your support.

‘The burgers will be a great way for footy fans to show their true colours throughout the series.’ 

For eight days only, the burgers will be available in 13 restaurants across New South Wales, ACT and Queensland.

The Origin Recipe Burger can be purchased on its own for $9.95 or if you’re feeling extra peckish, you can grab it in a combo for $12.45 with regular chips and a regular soft drink or in a boxed meal for $15.45 with a drumstick, regular chips, regular potato and gravy and regular soft drink.

Australian diners will be able to order the $9.95 Origin Recipe burger in the colour of their favourite team - blue (New South Wales) or maroon (Queensland)

Australian diners will be able to order the $9.95 Origin Recipe burger in the colour of their favourite team - blue (New South Wales) or maroon (Queensland)

Australian diners will be able to order the $9.95 Origin Recipe burger in the colour of their favourite team – blue (New South Wales) or maroon (Queensland)

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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