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Ethiopian tribe held a photographer and his daughter at gunpoint when they visited

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ethiopian tribe held a photographer and his daughter at gunpoint when they visited

A photographer told of his horror after two members of the generally-peaceful Suri tribe in Ethiopia held him and his daughter at gunpoint in a horrific robbery ordeal. 

Geography teacher-turned photographer Trevor Cole, 64, said one tribesman pointed a Kalashnikov while another brandished a machete at him, his 20-year-old daughter and another photographer during a visit to the Omo Valley.

A guide was able to pay off the men – who were drunk on locally-brewed alcohol Araki – in local currency. 

Due to nearby war, weapons such as AK-47 assault rifles and Kalashnikovs have become quite commonplace in Suri communities – and there is very little intervention from Ethiopian authorities.

Mr Cole said: ‘The Suri tribesmen, two of them, were under the influence of Araki, a locally brewed alcohol, and were intent on robbery. I was with one other photographer and my daughter, who was 20 at the time, so they were tense moments. 

‘My guide and good friend, however, was excellent and we managed to pay them off with local currency.

‘The Suri tribe are in general not aggressive even though they are armed in many cases with AK47s and Kalashnikovs. 

‘These are to stop other tribes taking their livestock and also for occasional intertribal conflicts. They sometimes get aggressive when they drink the Araki and it is then that there is the greatest risk. 

The Omo Valley is home to eight different tribes with a collective population of 200,000 people. 

Geography teacher-turned photographer Trevor Cole, 64, captured a series of incredible images of Suri tribespeople on his travels

Geography teacher-turned photographer Trevor Cole, 64, captured a series of incredible images of Suri tribespeople on his travels

Mr Cole captured Suri women posing with their face paint

Mr Cole captured Suri women posing with their face paint

Geography teacher-turned photographer Trevor Cole, 64, captured a series of incredible images of Suri tribespeople on his travels. Pictured: Some members of the Suri tribe wear intricate face paint

Members of Ethiopia's Suri tribe showcase their breathtaking face paint in a stunning images captured in the Omo Valley

Members of Ethiopia's Suri tribe showcase their breathtaking face paint in a stunning images captured in the Omo Valley

Members of Ethiopia’s Suri tribe showcase their breathtaking face paint in a stunning images captured in the Omo Valley

A tribe member in the Omo Valley in Ethiopia carrying a weapon

A tribe member in the Omo Valley in Ethiopia carrying a weapon

Members of the Suri tribe drain blood from a cow

Members of the Suri tribe drain blood from a cow

Members of the Suri tribe in Ethiopia are generally peaceful, but have been known to carry weapons. Left: A tribe member in the Omo Valley in Ethiopia carrying a weapon. Right: Members of the Suri tribe drain blood from a cow

Due to nearby war, weapons such as AK-47 assault rifles and Kalashnikovs have become quite commonplace in Suri communities – and there is very little intervention from Ethiopian authorities. Pictured: A Suri tribesman with a gun

Due to nearby war, weapons such as AK-47 assault rifles and Kalashnikovs have become quite commonplace in Suri communities – and there is very little intervention from Ethiopian authorities. Pictured: A Suri tribesman with a gun

Pictured: A Suri tribesman with a gun

Pictured: A Suri tribesman with a gun

Due to nearby war, weapons such as AK-47 assault rifles and Kalashnikovs have become quite commonplace in Suri communities – and there is very little intervention from Ethiopian authorities. Pictured: Suri tribesmen with guns

The Omo Valley is home to eight different tribes with a collective population of 200,000 people. Pictured: A Suri tribesperson with a gun

The Omo Valley is home to eight different tribes with a collective population of 200,000 people. Pictured: A Suri tribesperson with a gun

Pictured: A Suri tribesman with a gun

Pictured: A Suri tribesman with a gun

The Omo Valley is home to eight different tribes with a collective population of 200,000 people. Pictured: Suri tribespeople with guns

A Suri farmer carries a gun as he herds his goats. Tribespeople have been known to carry weapons amid widespread cattle raiding and nearby wars

A Suri farmer carries a gun as he herds his goats. Tribespeople have been known to carry weapons amid widespread cattle raiding and nearby wars

A Suri farmer carries a gun as he herds his goats. Tribespeople have been known to carry weapons amid widespread cattle raiding and nearby wars

Two children are photographed posing with their orange and white face paint as they huddle together in Ethiopia's Omo Valley

Two children are photographed posing with their orange and white face paint as they huddle together in Ethiopia's Omo Valley

Two children are photographed posing with their orange and white face paint as they huddle together in Ethiopia’s Omo Valley 

Suri tribeswomen wear lip plates measuring up to 24 inches - often in a bid to help attract a wealthy husband

Suri tribeswomen wear lip plates measuring up to 24 inches - often in a bid to help attract a wealthy husband

Suri tribeswomen wear lip plates measuring up to 24 inches – often in a bid to help attract a wealthy husband

In some cases, girls have their two lower teeth removed and their bottom lip sliced at the age of 12 in order to squeeze in the huge clay plate

In some cases, girls have their two lower teeth removed and their bottom lip sliced at the age of 12 in order to squeeze in the huge clay plate

In some cases, girls have their two lower teeth removed and their bottom lip sliced at the age of 12 in order to squeeze in the huge clay plate

Farmers in the Suri tribe pose with their cattle in the Omo Valley in Ethiopia

Farmers in the Suri tribe pose with their cattle in the Omo Valley in Ethiopia

Farmers in the Suri tribe pose with their cattle in the Omo Valley in Ethiopia. The Suri tribe are generally welcoming to visitors as they look for different means to survive amid rising violence and land wars

Suri tribespeople pose with their intricate floral headpieces and breathtaking face paint. The artistry is often shown to tourists

Suri tribespeople pose with their intricate floral headpieces and breathtaking face paint. The artistry is often shown to tourists

Suri tribespeople pose with their intricate floral headpieces and breathtaking face paint. The artistry is often shown to tourists

Mr Cole said one tribesman pointed a Kalashnikov while another brandished a machete at him, his 20-year-old daughter and another photographer during a visit to the Omo Valley. Pictured: One of Mr Cole's images of the Suri tribe

Mr Cole said one tribesman pointed a Kalashnikov while another brandished a machete at him, his 20-year-old daughter and another photographer during a visit to the Omo Valley. Pictured: One of Mr Cole's images of the Suri tribe

Mr Cole captured an image of a Suri tribesperson with a painted face

Mr Cole captured an image of a Suri tribesperson with a painted face

Mr Cole said one tribesman pointed a Kalashnikov while another brandished a machete at him, his 20-year-old daughter and another photographer during a visit to the Omo Valley. Pictured: Some of Mr Cole’s images of the Suri tribe

Speaking about the inspiration behind his breathtaking photographs (pictured), Mr Cole explained: 'My photography, together with travel, have become two of my life's passions'

Speaking about the inspiration behind his breathtaking photographs (pictured), Mr Cole explained: 'My photography, together with travel, have become two of my life's passions'

Mr Cole said his photography 'focuses predominantly on culture and landscapes; images which reflect a spatial and temporal journey through life and which try to convey a need to live in a more sustainable world'

Mr Cole said his photography 'focuses predominantly on culture and landscapes; images which reflect a spatial and temporal journey through life and which try to convey a need to live in a more sustainable world'

Speaking about the inspiration behind his breathtaking photographs (pictured), Mr Cole explained: ‘My photography, together with travel, have become two of my life’s passions. It focuses predominantly on culture and landscapes; images which reflect a spatial and temporal journey through life and which try to convey a need to live in a more sustainable world’

Mr Cole captured an image of a Suri child with an intricate floral headpiece along with red and white spotted face paint

Mr Cole captured an image of a Suri child with an intricate floral headpiece along with red and white spotted face paint

Mr Cole captured an image of a Suri child with an intricate floral headpiece along with red and white spotted face paint

A woman with a lip plate decorated in the same pattern as her face paint was photographed

A woman with a lip plate decorated in the same pattern as her face paint was photographed

A young child was pictured staring into the camera

A young child was pictured staring into the camera

A woman with a lip plate decorated in the same pattern as her face paint was photographed (left). A young child was pictured staring into the camera (right)

Children wearing beautiful head pieces were photographed by Mr Cole

Children wearing beautiful head pieces were photographed by Mr Cole

A young boy with dotted face paint was photographed in Ethiopia

A young boy with dotted face paint was photographed in Ethiopia

Children wearing beautiful head pieces and intricate face paint were photographed by Mr Cole on his travels in Ethiopia

Mr Cole - who photographed this series of breathtaking images - said: 'I seek the moment and the light in whatever context I find myself and endeavour to use my photographic acumen to turn the ordinary into the extraordinary'

Mr Cole - who photographed this series of breathtaking images - said: 'I seek the moment and the light in whatever context I find myself and endeavour to use my photographic acumen to turn the ordinary into the extraordinary'

A man poses for a photograph in Omo Valley, Ethiopia

A man poses for a photograph in Omo Valley, Ethiopia

Mr Cole – who photographed this series of breathtaking images – said: ‘I seek the moment and the light in whatever context I find myself and endeavour to use my photographic acumen to turn the ordinary into the extraordinary’

A woman with a clay lip plate and floral head piece can be seen in Omo Valley

A woman with a clay lip plate and floral head piece can be seen in Omo Valley

A young man with white and black face paint looks into the camera

A young man with white and black face paint looks into the camera

A woman with a clay lip plate and floral head piece can be seen in Omo Valley (left). A young man with white and black face paint looks into the camera (right) 

Two people with face paint look into the camera in Omo Valley, Ethiopia

Two people with face paint look into the camera in Omo Valley, Ethiopia

Mr Cole describes his photography as 'quite diverse in the sense that I love to shoot images of nature but at the same time people'

Mr Cole describes his photography as 'quite diverse in the sense that I love to shoot images of nature but at the same time people'

Two people with face paint look into the camera in Omo Valley, Ethiopia. Mr Cole describes his photography as ‘quite diverse in the sense that I love to shoot images of nature but at the same time people’

Mr Cole said: 'I always like to think that humans are inextricably connected to their environment, hence I love to shoot people and landscapes'

Mr Cole said: 'I always like to think that humans are inextricably connected to their environment, hence I love to shoot people and landscapes'

The photographer added: 'People adapt to climates and landscapes, therefore they are a reflection of their natural habitats and this contributes to the immense diversity of humankind on this Earth'

The photographer added: 'People adapt to climates and landscapes, therefore they are a reflection of their natural habitats and this contributes to the immense diversity of humankind on this Earth'

Mr Cole said: ‘I always like to think that humans are inextricably connected to their environment, hence I love to shoot people and landscapes. People adapt to climates and landscapes, therefore they are a reflection of their natural habitats and this contributes to the immense diversity of humankind on this Earth’

Mr Cole said: 'Sadly, globalisation is reducing diversity and homogenising culture. I love to travel to more remote areas to see people in their true environmental contexts.' Pictured: One of the photographer's images of the Suri tribe

Mr Cole said: 'Sadly, globalisation is reducing diversity and homogenising culture. I love to travel to more remote areas to see people in their true environmental contexts.' Pictured: One of the photographer's images of the Suri tribe

Pictured: One of the photographer's images of a Suri tribesperson

Pictured: One of the photographer's images of a Suri tribesperson

Mr Cole said: ‘Sadly, globalisation is reducing diversity and homogenising culture. I love to travel to more remote areas to see people in their true environmental contexts.’ Pictured: Some of the photographer’s images of the Suri tribe

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South Australia will open its borders to New South Wales TOMORROW

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south australia will open its borders to new south wales tomorrow

South Australia will open its border to New South Wales from midnight on Wednesday. 

Premier Steven Marshall made the announcement on Tuesday despite concerns a Sydney taxi driver may have spread coronavirus across the city.

NSW Health is urgently contacting anyone who took trips with a Silver Service taxi driver who tested positive on Saturday and worked in Sydney’s west and southwest.

Anyone who rode in his taxi between September 8 and 18 should monitor for symptoms, isolate for 14 days and get tested for coronavirus.

More to come 

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Five-year-old boy riding his scooter to a skate park is struck by a car in a horror hit and run 

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five year old boy riding his scooter to a skate park is struck by a car in a horror hit and run

A five-year-old boy has been struck by a car in a horror hit and run while riding a scooter to a skate park. 

Emergency services were called to Leanyer, in Darwin’s northern suburbs, on Monday at 5.25pm to reports a young child had been hit by a vehicle on a pedestrian crossing.  

The driver continued north on Vanderlin Drive, failing to stop and render assistance.

Bystanders provided first aid before St John Ambulance arrived and rushed the child to Royal Darwin Hospital where he is in a stable condition. 

Emergency services were called to Leanyer, in Darwin's northern suburbs, after a boy was struck by a car riding his scooter to a skate park (pictured)

Emergency services were called to Leanyer, in Darwin's northern suburbs, after a boy was struck by a car riding his scooter to a skate park (pictured)

Emergency services were called to Leanyer, in Darwin’s northern suburbs, after a boy was struck by a car riding his scooter to a skate park (pictured) 

Police believe the car involved was a silver or grey sedan, and have urged the driver to come forward. 

‘With assistance from the public, it really is only a matter of time until we identify your vehicle,’ said Officer in Charge of Major Crash Investigation Unit Brendan Lindner. 

‘If you were the driver involved, I urge you to do the right thing and notify police.’ 

Anyone who can assist police with identifying the vehicle or the driver involved is urged to contact them.

The boy suffered non-life threatening injuries and was rushed to Royal Darwin Hospital where he is in a stable condition (stock image)

The boy suffered non-life threatening injuries and was rushed to Royal Darwin Hospital where he is in a stable condition (stock image)

The boy suffered non-life threatening injuries and was rushed to Royal Darwin Hospital where he is in a stable condition (stock image)

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Jeff Kennett unleashes on Daniel Andrews for not taking responsibility for the second wave COVID-19

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jeff kennett unleashes on daniel andrews for not taking responsibility for the second wave covid 19

Former Victorian Premier Jeff Kennett has attacked Daniel Andrews and the Victorian government for failing to take responsibility for the state’s deadly second wave of COVID-19.

Victoria’s hotel quarantine inquiry revealed the current premier’s right-hand man Chris Eccles ‘can’t recall’ who ordered security guards to stand at the entrance to hotels for returned travellers.

Mr Kennett exploded during an appearance on Tuesday’s Today Show where he described the revelations as ‘extraordinary’. 

‘We are in this strange position here in Victoria where no-one knows anything,’ he said. 

‘No politician will accept responsibility. It is the most extraordinary situation and bear in mind, the failure at those quarantine hotels led to the second wave here which to date has taken over 750 lives.’

Two woman wearing facemasks carry their shopping during lockdown in Melbourne

Two woman wearing facemasks carry their shopping during lockdown in Melbourne

Two woman wearing facemasks carry their shopping during lockdown in Melbourne

Nearly two thirds of Victorians believe Premier Daniel Andrews (pictured) has handled the coronavirus crisis well

Nearly two thirds of Victorians believe Premier Daniel Andrews (pictured) has handled the coronavirus crisis well

Nearly two thirds of Victorians believe Premier Daniel Andrews (pictured) has handled the coronavirus crisis well

Mr Andrews is due to give evidence during the inquiry on Friday but Mr Kennett assumed he will also claim to ‘not know anything’.

‘No-one knows. This has just happened. I’m surprised anyone knows we have got coronavirus down here,’ Mr Kennett said. 

‘No politician has accepted any responsibility for any act that has occurred.’ 

Despite the negative criticism nearly two thirds of Victorians believe Premier Andrews has handled the coronavirus crisis well.  

Some 62 per cent said they were satisfied with his performance even though the virus escaped from hotel quarantine in late May and caused a deadly second wave.

Mr Kennett said he wasn’t surprised by the results, saying people under stress will ‘look to their leaders to actually be able to guide them to a safe place’.

He said:  ‘We are being guided because the government has failed and I’ve always said that the aftermath of the coronavirus is going to be a lot more serious than, in fact, the coronavirus itself.’

Former Victorian Premier Jeff Kennett has attacked Daniel Andrews and the Victorian government for failing to take responsibility for the state's deadly second wave of COVID-19

Former Victorian Premier Jeff Kennett has attacked Daniel Andrews and the Victorian government for failing to take responsibility for the state's deadly second wave of COVID-19

Former Victorian Premier Jeff Kennett has attacked Daniel Andrews and the Victorian government for failing to take responsibility for the state’s deadly second wave of COVID-19

The Newspoll for The Australian also found that 61 per cent of Victorians thought the state’s lockdown restrictions were ‘about right’. 

A quarter of people said they were too strict and 10 per cent said they were too lenient.  

Asked how Mr Andrews was handling his job, 62 per cent of voters were satisfied and 35 per cent were dissatisfied for a net satisfaction score of 27 per cent.

Poll

Should Melbourne end lockdown sooner than October 26?

  • Yes 389 votes
  • No 57 votes
  • Undecided 13 votes

Now share your opinion

The September net score was up from 20 per cent in July when the state’s second wave of infections began to emerge. In April, it was 58 per cent. 

Mr Andrews has been under constant criticism since he plunged Victoria back into lockdown on 8 July. The state’s second wave has caused 750 deaths, mostly in aged care homes. 

It began when hotel security guards and staff failed to adhere to social distancing requirements, caught the virus and spread it around Melbourne. 

The Andrews government has been criticised for using private security guards instead of soldiers and police to run the quarantine scheme.

The Newspoll also found Queenslanders back Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk’s handling of Covid-19, with 68 per cent saying she is doing a good job, although this was drop from 81 per cent in July.

Voters in both states endorsed Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s handling of the pandemic, with 77 per cent in Queensland and 71 per cent in Victoria saying he did ‘well’.

Mr Andrews encouraged anyone with a scratchy throat, runny nose or headache to get tested for the virus. Pictured: Melbourne residents on Saturday

Mr Andrews encouraged anyone with a scratchy throat, runny nose or headache to get tested for the virus. Pictured: Melbourne residents on Saturday

Mr Andrews encouraged anyone with a scratchy throat, runny nose or headache to get tested for the virus. Pictured: Melbourne residents on Saturday

On restrictions, 39 per cent of voters around the country are now more concerned about harm to the economy and mental wellbeing than the risk of higher infection, compared to 20 per cent who held that view in July.

But 56 per cent remain concerned that moves to ease restrictions were too quick, risking the virus spreading further.

On Queensland’s hard border closures, 53 per cent of voters across the country say the level of restrictions is about right while 37 per cent say they should be relaxed.

The Newspoll of 2,068 voters nationally was conducted between September 16 and 19. 

Victoria recorded 28 new cases on Tuesday, a jump from 11 on Monday – the lowest figure in three months.

Opposition Leader Michael O’Brien said Melburnians can’t afford to wait until October 26 when more onerous rules such as the 9pm-5am curfew are due to be repealed.

‘These numbers dictate a faster, safer reopening,’ Mr O’Brien said.

‘The epidemiologists back it, the modelling backs it. Daniel Andrews needs to start listening to the experts and stop being a one-man show.’

Opposition MPs want restrictions relaxed faster as the lockdown threatens to put up to 400,000 Victorians out of work by Christmas. Pictured: A Melbourne park on Saturday

Opposition MPs want restrictions relaxed faster as the lockdown threatens to put up to 400,000 Victorians out of work by Christmas. Pictured: A Melbourne park on Saturday

Opposition MPs want restrictions relaxed faster as the lockdown threatens to put up to 400,000 Victorians out of work by Christmas. Pictured: A Melbourne park on Saturday

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