Connect with us

Australia

Eve Black slammed as dumb after refusing to tell Melbourne police where she was going at checkpoint

Published

on

eve black slammed as dumb after refusing to tell melbourne police where she was going at checkpoint

A driver has been branded ‘dumb and disrespectful’ after footage surfaced of her refusing to tell police where she was going at a checkpoint in Melbourne.

Eve Black, from Melbourne, shared footage on Thursday of herself driving past an officer at a COVID-19 police barricade. 

When a police officer asked her where she was headed and why she was attempting to leave, Ms Black simply told him she didn’t need to share that information.

The frustrated officer eventually waved her through as she sped off with a grin on her face. 

Former Treasurer Wayne Swan unleashed on the driver for arguing with police, adding she wouldn’t be smiling if she ended up in ICU.

Eve Black, from Melbourne, shared footage on Thursday of herself driving past an officer at a COVID-19 police barricade

Eve Black, from Melbourne, shared footage on Thursday of herself driving past an officer at a COVID-19 police barricade

Eve Black, from Melbourne, shared footage on Thursday of herself driving past an officer at a COVID-19 police barricade

‘It makes me angry watching that, it’s dumb and disrespectful,’ he said on The Today Show on Friday morning.

‘At the end she says she feels good. Well, she won’t feel too good in ICU.’

Mr Swan said 99 per cent of Australians were following the rules but there were a few who refused to protect their own safety.  

‘There are some people who don’t get it and some people who think they’re in some weird television show,’ he said.

‘But they are playing with people’s lives. People like that should have the book thrown at them.’

ALP National President Wayne Swan, (pictured) said Ms Black was putting everyone's lives at risk for acting so 'dumb and disrespectful'

ALP National President Wayne Swan, (pictured) said Ms Black was putting everyone's lives at risk for acting so 'dumb and disrespectful'

ALP National President Wayne Swan, (pictured) said Ms Black was putting everyone’s lives at risk for acting so ‘dumb and disrespectful’ 

2GB Radio’s Chris Smith also weighed in on the video, speculating that Ms Black would be yet to get tested for the deadly virus. 

‘These laws are in place not only to protect the vulnerable or those with pre-existing conditions, but people like her, how dumb has she got to be to not understand that?’ he said.

‘And by becoming a self-proclaimed reality television star she is encouraging others to spread the virus into other areas where we’ve got to start tracing and try and stop another spread of the virus.

‘We want to get over this. Doesn’t she understand we want to abate all of this to get on with our normal lives?’

In the viral video, Ms Black asks the officer whether she’d ‘disturbed the peace’ by trying to leave her suburb.

‘No,’ the officer responded. ‘I just asked what your reason for leaving today is.’

Ms Black responded: ‘I don’t need to tell you that. I don’t know you.’

Initially, the officer persisted. ‘Where have you come from,’ he asked again.

When a police officer asked her where she was headed and why she was attempting to leave, Ms Black simply told him she didn't need to share that information

When a police officer asked her where she was headed and why she was attempting to leave, Ms Black simply told him she didn't need to share that information

When a police officer asked her where she was headed and why she was attempting to leave, Ms Black simply told him she didn’t need to share that information

‘I don’t need to answer your questions. Have I committed a crime? Have I committed a crime?’ she asked twice.

Instead of answering her question, the officer waved Ms Black through the checkpoint.

‘Just keep going,’ he said as he let her and her passenger drive past.

Ms Black admitted she was ‘nervous as heck’ as she approached the checkpoint, but encouraged her friends and family to ‘know their rights’ during lockdown.

‘I just read from the sheet and he could obviously see it wasn’t worth the trouble,’ she explained.

COVID-19 checkpoints have been set up in and around Victoria in an attempt to stem the spread of the virus

COVID-19 checkpoints have been set up in and around Victoria in an attempt to stem the spread of the virus

COVID-19 checkpoints have been set up in and around Victoria in an attempt to stem the spread of the virus

COVID-19 checkpoints have been set up in and around Victoria in an attempt to stem the spread of the virus. Mr Bartolo argued they should not be legal and there was no consultation with the people before establishing them

COVID-19 checkpoints have been set up in and around Victoria in an attempt to stem the spread of the virus. Mr Bartolo argued they should not be legal and there was no consultation with the people before establishing them

COVID-19 checkpoints have been set up in and around Victoria in an attempt to stem the spread of the virus. Mr Bartolo argued they should not be legal and there was no consultation with the people before establishing them

The sheet in question explained the exact phrases people attempting to leave lockdown should use when stopped by officers. 

There are nine vehicle checkpoints and a number of mobile patrols set up by Victoria Police across key roads in Melbourne and Mitchell Shire in a bid to enforce the latest lockdown.   

Residents living in the locked-down areas are only allowed to leave their homes for four approved reasons – food, exercise, work or study, or medical care.

Those who breach orders will be hit with a $1,652 fine with 262 infringements already given out at checkpoints since July 8. 

Premier Daniel Andrews declared Victoria to be in a state of emergency.

This gives the state’s Chief Health Officer the powers to enforce restrictions such as on movement and wearing a mask.

Mr Bartolo (pictured) revealed he did not believe coronavirus was contagious and argued that it was a hoax

Mr Bartolo (pictured) revealed he did not believe coronavirus was contagious and argued that it was a hoax

Mr Bartolo (pictured) revealed he did not believe coronavirus was contagious and argued that it was a hoax

Ms Black’s video is one of many circulating on social media where drivers encourage people to challenge the lockdowns, which have been imposed to stem the spread of COVID-19.

A Victorian driver who was pulled over at a lockdown checkpoint argued with police for 20 minutes about the legality of the operation, before claiming COVID-19 was not contagious and refusing to hand over his licence.

James Bartolo shared footage of the altercation on Facebook on Sunday after he was pulled over at a routine checkpoint while travelling in an unregistered Mustang.

He refused to hand over his licence – which police later learned was suspended – and eventually told the officers that they’d pulled him over unlawfully by following ‘dopey Dan’s false legislation’, in reference to Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews.

Mr Bartolo revealed he did not believe coronavirus was contagious and argued that it was a hoax.

The deadly respiratory infection has killed 109 Australians – and at least 571,000 worldwide – and Victoria is currently grappling with a second outbreak.

Mr Andrews ordered metropolitan Melbourne and the Mitchell Shire back into a second lockdown in an attempt to stem the spread of the virus.

‘Who consented to that?’ Mr Bartolo asked the officers when they attempted to explain what it is they were doing. ‘Go arrest your Freemason scumbag leaders and politicians.’

‘Do your actual jobs rather than harassing innocent people like me. Stop being an embarrassment to society,’ he said. 

The leader of the 'Conscious Truth Network' told police they'd been encouraged to set up the checkpoints under 'false allegations' made by the nation's leaders in an extraordinary 20 minute debate

The leader of the 'Conscious Truth Network' told police they'd been encouraged to set up the checkpoints under 'false allegations' made by the nation's leaders in an extraordinary 20 minute debate

The leader of the ‘Conscious Truth Network’ told police they’d been encouraged to set up the checkpoints under ‘false allegations’ made by the nation’s leaders in an extraordinary 20 minute debate

Barricades have been installed along some of Coolangatta's streets to help stop people crossing the Queensland-NSW border without going through the appropriate checks

Barricades have been installed along some of Coolangatta's streets to help stop people crossing the Queensland-NSW border without going through the appropriate checks

Barricades have been installed along some of Coolangatta’s streets to help stop people crossing the Queensland-NSW border without going through the appropriate checks

‘You’ve pulled me over unlawfully and started to claim… that I’ve done something wrong. I’m not the one standing around with weapons and harassing people and pulling them over according to dopey Dan’s false legislation.’ 

Mr Bartolo went on to begin ranting about the officers’ role in facilitating the COVID-19 lockdown in Victoria. 

‘Do you know the virus isn’t actually contagious?’ he asked. ‘That has been scientifically proven.

‘This whole COVID-19 is a f**king hoax. It’s a scam.’

Frustration mounted between both parties as another police officer joined the discussion and instructed Mr Bartolo to pull over to the side to let other cars behind him through. 

Following further discussions, the officer conceded. 

The cop explained to Mr Bartolo that he would be charged for further offences relating to hindering an officer in performing his job, but then allowed him to leave.  

Powered by: Daily Mail

Australia

Bunnings pulls inflatable axe-throwing Santa from shelves after it was deemed ‘inappropriate’

Published

on

By

bunnings pulls inflatable axe throwing santa from shelves after it was deemed inappropriate

Bunnings has pulled an axe-throwing Santa Claus decoration from shelves after it was deemed ‘inappropriate’ for Christmas.

Eyebrows were raised over the $129 outdoor inflatable, which features a smiling Saint Nick hurling weapons at a reindeer pinned to a rotating dartboard and looks more suitable for Halloween than the festive season.

And it seems the Australian hardware giant quickly took note of the response.

‘While we’re always looking for unique Christmas items, we decided this product wasn’t appropriate and we’ve withdrawn it from sale,’ Bunnings director of merchandise Mr Bishop told Daily Mail Australia on Tuesday.

Scroll down for video

Farewell, Father Christmas! Bunnings has pulled this $129 inflatable decoration from shelves after it was deemed 'inappropriate' for the festive season

Farewell, Father Christmas! Bunnings has pulled this $129 inflatable decoration from shelves after it was deemed 'inappropriate' for the festive season

Farewell, Father Christmas! Bunnings has pulled this $129 inflatable decoration from shelves after it was deemed ‘inappropriate’ for the festive season

Poll

Do you think the inflatable Santa was inappropriate?

  • Yes 4 votes
  • No 12 votes

Now share your opinion

Reactions to the unique fixture were mixed, with some shoppers branding it ‘peculiar’ while others praised its individuality.

At a store in Innaloo, nine kilometres from Perth CBD, a mother was overheard saying: ‘I’m horrified, but want one.’

‘It’s really cool, the target deflates after being ‘axed’ and pops back up again. There’s a few new ones in this year,’ one woman said on Facebook.

Another tagged her friend, writing: ‘Please get this for next year!’  

One customer saw the product withdrawal coming.

‘Here come the offended people demanding it be pulled from the shelves,’ he said.

In good news for those who missed out on the sadistic Saint Nick, Bunnings has plenty of other inflatable Santas engaging in a variety of activities which range from the traditional to the downright zany.

Options include Santa playing a saxophone, driving a forklift full of gifts, riding a shark and standing alone, watching the world go by.

They’re all part of Bunnings 2020 festive range which was released in August to brighten the mood amid the ongoing coronavirus crisis.

The collection – which is only available in select stores – also includes pink reindeer, LED and fibre optic trees and giant Nutcracker soldiers that tower over a metre high.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Australia

Popular children’s L.O.L dolls sold at Kmart are under scrutiny again

Published

on

By

popular childrens l o l dolls sold at kmart are under scrutiny again

A children’s doll company has copped even more backlash after a mother spotted a tiny penis on one of its popular toys.   

Bianca Stone, from Queensland, bought the L.O.L Surprise! doll from a local Coles for her daughter on Monday only to discover X-rated private parts. 

‘It was certainly a big (little) surprise when my five-year-old unwrapped her new L.O.L doll to find he was anatomically correct,’ she told 7News.

Ms Stone took a photo of the seemingly innocent doll wearing a t-shirt and pants, but after taking the toy’s clothes off a small penis could be seen.

Ms Stone took a photo of the seemingly innocent doll wearing a t-shirt and pants

Ms Stone took a photo of the seemingly innocent doll wearing a t-shirt and pants

After taking the toy's clothes off a small penis could be seen

After taking the toy's clothes off a small penis could be seen

Bianca Stone, from Queensland, bought the L.O.L Surprise! doll from a local Coles for her daughter on Monday only to discover anatomically correct private parts

Daily Mail Australia has contacted MGA Entertainment for comment.

The X-rated surprise comes a month after Big W removed a series of L.O.L surprise dolls from their shelves in response to a series of complaints after a mother exposed the toys’ ‘hidden feature’ online. 

Kate Worsfold, from Brisbane, went viral in August after uploading a Facebook video demonstrating how the popular toys changed into lingerie and bondage clothing when dunked in cold water.  

The brand, made by American company MGA Entertainment, is sold at toy stores across Australia, including Target, Kmart, and Big W. 

Big W, owned by Woolworths group, told Daily Mail Australia that one range would be stripped after customers expressed concern. 

Brisbane mum Kate Worsfold (pictured) went viral in August after sharing a video on Facebook urging parents to avoid LOL Surprise Dolls after discovering  hidden 'sexualised' outfits on her daughter's toys

Brisbane mum Kate Worsfold (pictured) went viral in August after sharing a video on Facebook urging parents to avoid LOL Surprise Dolls after discovering  hidden 'sexualised' outfits on her daughter's toys

Brisbane mum Kate Worsfold (pictured) went viral in August after sharing a video on Facebook urging parents to avoid LOL Surprise Dolls after discovering  hidden ‘sexualised’ outfits on her daughter’s toys

‘We have listened to our customers’ concerns and have made the decision to remove the range of LOL Surprise #hairvibes dolls from our shelves,’ a Big W spokesperson said. 

‘We continue to work closely with our supplier to ensure that future ranges of LOL Surprise at BIG W are consistent with our customer’s feedback.’

The line, marketed for children aged six and up, features little girl figurines that are stylised to look like adults. 

Disturbing sexualised outfits appear on dolls bodies once dipped into icy water, including shackles around the wrists, nipple coverings, skimpy underwear, tattoos, suspenders, long black boots and body nets.  

One doll when chilled had the word ‘caution’ scrawled over her private parts. 

While Ms Worsfold welcomed Big W’s change, she said removing only one range of the dolls was not ‘good enough’.  

L.O.L. Surprise dolls are figurines of little girls made by US company MGA Entertainment and sold in Kmart, Big W and Target stores across Australia

L.O.L. Surprise dolls are figurines of little girls made by US company MGA Entertainment and sold in Kmart, Big W and Target stores across Australia

L.O.L. Surprise dolls are figurines of little girls made by US company MGA Entertainment and sold in Kmart, Big W and Target stores across Australia

Some dolls' secret outfits include body nets, tattoos, nipple coverings, long black boots and suspenders

Some dolls' secret outfits include body nets, tattoos, nipple coverings, long black boots and suspenders

Some dolls’ secret outfits include body nets, tattoos, nipple coverings, long black boots and suspenders

‘As far as I’m concerned you don’t just pull one weed out, you pull them all out, one does not make a difference,’ she told Daily Mail Australia.

‘It is like they are pulling just one range to keep customers quiet. It falls under their accountability. Silence is consent.’  

Louise Newman, Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Melbourne, said the dolls fall into a longstanding culture in marketing practices of sexualising young children. 

However, she said campaigns have alarmingly shifted towards hiding messaging compared to past advertisements which were more transparent in their goals to sell adult products to children. 

‘There is a lot of concern about what is being marketed to children and how it models adult sexualisation,’ she said.  

‘There is a subliminal message that being sexy and flirty when they are young is appropriate. Children need to be learning about sexual behaviour in the context of growing up.’ 

The #hairvibes range (pictured) is marketed for children aged six and up, and sold at Myers, Target, and Kmart

The #hairvibes range (pictured) is marketed for children aged six and up, and sold at Myers, Target, and Kmart

The #hairvibes range (pictured) is marketed for children aged six and up, and sold at Myers, Target, and Kmart

Parents from across the world have been flocking to online forums to share photos of the hidden outfits they have discovered on their daughters' dolls

Parents from across the world have been flocking to online forums to share photos of the hidden outfits they have discovered on their daughters' dolls

Parents from across the world have been flocking to online forums to share photos of the hidden outfits they have discovered on their daughters’ dolls

She said the practice is dangerous as it can de-sensitive children to adult sexuality, potentially making them more vulnerable to predators. 

‘One thing predators will count on is kids being vulnerable,’ she said.

‘This sort of marketing is a part of a culture of breeding that it is okay for children to be exposed to these messages, and people are not on the lookout for it like they should be.’ 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Australia

Girl, 17, with rare disease which causes her to suffer hundreds of broken bones  

Published

on

By

girl 17 with rare disease which causes her to suffer hundreds of broken bones

A teenage girl has been left almost paralysed after her head fell off her spine due to a rare bone disorder that has caused more than 100 broken bones since birth.  

At just 17 years old, Beth Cooper-Wares should be partying with friends and sitting her school exams in her hometown of Jiggi, near Byron Bay in northern New South Wales.

Instead, the teenager is stuck in a bed at Westmead Children’s Hospital in Sydney with a spine brace, known as a halo, drilled in to her skull following a catastrophic medical episode that began in August when her head separated from her neck. 

Beth, who has been wheelchair bound since she was a child, was born with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) Type III – a severe form of brittle bone disease which means simple tasks like walking and changing can leave her with broken bones. 

Her mother Katie Cooper-Wares opened up to Daily Mail Australia about her highly intelligent daughter’s struggles as she tries to regain movement in her arms to follow her dream of being a writer.

Beth Cooper-Wares, 17, (pictured) was born with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) Type III - a severe form of brittle bone disease

Beth Cooper-Wares, 17, (pictured) was born with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) Type III - a severe form of brittle bone disease

Beth Cooper-Wares, 17, (pictured) was born with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) Type III – a severe form of brittle bone disease

While the family knew Beth's (pictured, left) condition would worsen as she grew, her mother Katie (right) said reality hit when her daughter started getting severe headaches

While the family knew Beth's (pictured, left) condition would worsen as she grew, her mother Katie (right) said reality hit when her daughter started getting severe headaches

While the family knew Beth’s (pictured, left) condition would worsen as she grew, her mother Katie (right) said reality hit when her daughter started getting severe headaches

While the family knew Beth’s condition would worsen as she grew, the 37-year-old mum-of-one said reality hit when her daughter started getting severe headaches.

‘Her spine was moving up her skull and it was putting pressure on her brain,’ Ms Cooper-Wares said.

Despite an operation to relieve the debilitating pain in her head, the teen wound up in an ambulance five weeks later and was rushed into surgery.

‘During the operation the doctors realised her head had basically fallen off her spine,’ her mother explained.

Beth with her mother Katie when she was younger (pictured). The pair travelled the world together when she was 11

Beth with her mother Katie when she was younger (pictured). The pair travelled the world together when she was 11

Beth with her mother Katie when she was younger (pictured). The pair travelled the world together when she was 11

During their world trip, Katie drank coffee and Beth (pictured) ate croissants in Paris every morning before her condition detiorated

During their world trip, Katie drank coffee and Beth (pictured) ate croissants in Paris every morning before her condition detiorated

During their world trip, Katie drank coffee and Beth (pictured) ate croissants in Paris every morning before her condition detiorated

Doctors made the decision during surgery on September 18 to fuse her spine to her skull to keep it stabilised.

The teenager woke up on her 17th birthday to find that she not only had a halo drilled into her bones and a breathing tube down her throat rendering speech impossible, but she had lost the ability to move her body. 

‘Her upper body used to be really strong – she used to play the ukulele,’ her mother shared. 

Though she couldn’t speak with a breathing tube, Ms Cooper-Wares was able to figure out what her daughter wanted by lip reading. 

‘She was in so much pain and hadn’t eaten for days, but she’s a real foodie and just wanted me to keep talking about food.’

Doctors made the decision during surgery on September 18 to fuse Beth's spine to her skull to keep it stabilised

Doctors made the decision during surgery on September 18 to fuse Beth's spine to her skull to keep it stabilised

Doctors made the decision during surgery on September 18 to fuse Beth’s spine to her skull to keep it stabilised

The teenager (pictured) woke up on her 17th birthday to find that she not only had a halo drilled into her bones and a breathing tube down her throat

The teenager (pictured) woke up on her 17th birthday to find that she not only had a halo drilled into her bones and a breathing tube down her throat

The teenager (pictured) woke up on her 17th birthday to find that she not only had a halo drilled into her bones and a breathing tube down her throat

The devoted mother spent hours by her daughter’s hospital bed spouting everything she knew about food to keep her entertained. 

Once she exhausted her food knowledge, Ms Cooper-Wares asked her Facebook friends to give her more food facts to keep Beth distracted from her painful reality.

‘She would close her eyes and just listen.’

Ms Cooper-Wares also said Beth was on so much medication she swore she saw Pennywise – the killer clown from the Stephen King thriller, It – in the hospital.

Ten days on from spinal fusion surgery, Beth has regained some movement in her left foot and hand.

‘She’s happy about that because she writes with her left hand, but it’s very slow and we’re not sure how much strength she’ll regain.’

People with type three OI have a shorter life expectancy, with many surviving to their 30s.

People with type three OI have a shorter life expectancy, with many surviving to their 30s. Pictured: Beth with her passport as a child

People with type three OI have a shorter life expectancy, with many surviving to their 30s. Pictured: Beth with her passport as a child

People with type three OI have a shorter life expectancy, with many surviving to their 30s. Pictured: Beth with her passport as a child

‘They often die in their sleep,’ Ms Cooper-Wares. ‘That has happened to a lot of people with the condition.’

‘Sometimes, when she’s asleep, I go into her room and watch her breath. To make sure.’ 

Despite the prognosis, Ms Cooper-Wares said her daughter is ‘crazy resilient and strong’.

‘She’s so smart – she’s the top of all her classes and she has a lot of patience.’ 

‘I don’t think I would be able to deal with the things she’s dealt with in her life up to this point – she’s incredibly strong.’

To aid Beth’s recovery, the family created a Go Fund Me page to help ensure her mother can continue to care for her without worrying about how to pay the bills.

Despite the prognosis, Ms Cooper-Wares said her daughter is 'crazy resilient and strong' (pictured: Beth as a child)

Despite the prognosis, Ms Cooper-Wares said her daughter is 'crazy resilient and strong' (pictured: Beth as a child)

Despite the prognosis, Ms Cooper-Wares said her daughter is ‘crazy resilient and strong’ (pictured: Beth as a child)

The money will cover medical costs that aren’t part of the National Disability Insurance Scheme, along with a home set up to make Beth more comfortable – such as an electric bed.

‘She’ll also need to wear a medical and it’s made of sheep skin, so coming into summer, we’ll need to get air conditioning to make sure she’s cool.’

Beth plans on finishing school in 2021 and studying creative writing at university. 

At the age of 11 in 2015, Ms Cooper-Wares decided that her daughter needed a boost before facing the major surgery scheduled in her teenage years to help her mobility.

Beth dreamed of swimming with turtles, riding in a hot air balloon at sunset, seeing a show on Broadway, seeing elephants in the wild, having a mud bath in China and volunteering to teach English in India.

She came up with a plan to help Beth see the world and empower her for the future.

The got Beth a wheelchair and sold all their possessions, including the car, to make the trip happen.

Ms Cooper-Wares said the trip definitely made Beth more wordly and was a fantastic experience for her to have.  

What is Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type III?

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited bone disorder that is present at birth, also known as brittle bone disease. 

A child born with OI may have soft bones that break easily, bones that are not formed normally, and other problems. 

Type III is the most severe type in babies who don’t die as newborns. 

At birth, a baby may have slightly shorter arms and legs than normal and arm, leg, and rib fractures. 

A baby may also have a larger than normal head, a triangle-shaped face, a deformed chest and spine, and breathing and swallowing problems.

There is no known cure. 

Source: Hopkins Medicine 

<!—->Advertisement

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 DiazHub.