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Ex New Zealand Bandidos president Hamish Hiroki reveals why he turned on a life of crime

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ex new zealand bandidos president hamish hiroki reveals why he turned on a life of crime

A formerbikie boss has revealed why he threw in his patch and turned his back on a life of crime while urging teenagers not to join gangs.

Hamish Hiroki was the president of the New Zealand chapter of the notorious Bandidos outlaw motorcycle gang, but left the club last year.

Since his departure Mr Hiroki has posted a series of YouTube videos explaining his reasons for leaving and telling teenagers they can do better things with their lives.   

Since his departure Mr Hiroki (pictured with his wife) has posted a series of YouTube videos explaining his reasons for leaving and tells teenagers they can do better things with their life

Since his departure Mr Hiroki (pictured with his wife) has posted a series of YouTube videos explaining his reasons for leaving and tells teenagers they can do better things with their life

Since his departure Mr Hiroki (pictured with his wife) has posted a series of YouTube videos explaining his reasons for leaving and tells teenagers they can do better things with their life

Hamish Hiroki was the president of the New Zealand chapter of the notorious Bandidos motorcycle gang, but left the club last year

Hamish Hiroki was the president of the New Zealand chapter of the notorious Bandidos motorcycle gang, but left the club last year

Hamish Hiroki was the president of the New Zealand chapter of the notorious Bandidos motorcycle gang, but left the club last year 

‘I know there’s a lot of young followers that are joining clubs now and I think they feel the need to join clubs because everyone else is doing it,’ he said in a video posted in May.

‘The reason I joined the club was a sense of brotherhood and a sense of belonging to something.’

The former president left the gang after falling into a negative head space and not wanting his son to follow in his footsteps. 

Mr Hiroki explained that at the time he had moved to Christchurch and didn’t know many people.

‘I wanted to join it since I was a young fella, because they were always guys I had looked up to, but plain and simple, I didn’t really know what I was getting myself into really, I thought I did,’ Mr Hiroki said.

He said he ‘lost himself along the way’ because he was just following what others were doing around him.

Mr Hiroki quickly climbed the ranks and became the boss of the first chapter he had ever joined.

The former president left the gang after falling into a negative head space and not wanting his son to follow in his footsteps

The former president left the gang after falling into a negative head space and not wanting his son to follow in his footsteps

The former president left the gang after falling into a negative head space and not wanting his son to follow in his footsteps

'I know there's a lot of young followers that are joining clubs now and I think they feel the need to join clubs because everyone else is doing it,' he said in a video posted in May

'I know there's a lot of young followers that are joining clubs now and I think they feel the need to join clubs because everyone else is doing it,' he said in a video posted in May

Mr Hiroki's YouTube video

Mr Hiroki's YouTube video

‘I know there’s a lot of young followers that are joining clubs now and I think they feel the need to join clubs because everyone else is doing it,’ he said in a video posted in May

He was deported from Australia on gun charges in 2011, and said he’d had enough of the baggage that comes with leading a motorcycle gang. 

The former president said his first moment of clarity was when he visited his grandmother and she ‘noticed a change’.

‘She noticed that I certainly got a lot harder on the exterior and I couldn’t see that because you can’t see the changes when you’re with yourself every day,’ he said. 

Mr Hiroki attempted suicide while in the Bandidos, and since leaving the gang has embraced positive thinking to change his head space.

He runs a weekly support group in Christchurch challenging men to do the same.

Mr Hiroki left the Bandidos after falling into a negative head space and not wanting his son to follow in his footsteps

Mr Hiroki left the Bandidos after falling into a negative head space and not wanting his son to follow in his footsteps

Mr Hiroki left the Bandidos after falling into a negative head space and not wanting his son to follow in his footsteps

He was deported from Australia on gun charges in 2011, and said he'd had enough of the baggage that comes with leading a motorcycle gang

He was deported from Australia on gun charges in 2011, and said he'd had enough of the baggage that comes with leading a motorcycle gang

He was deported from Australia on gun charges in 2011, and said he’d had enough of the baggage that comes with leading a motorcycle gang

In his videos Mr Hiroki urges teenagers to look past joining clubs as there is no sense of brotherhood in a gang.

‘I’ve had guys turn on me that were my best mates… it’s not a brotherhood,’ he said.

‘It’s a false sense of belonging to something, then at the drop of a hat everyone can turn on you.’

Mr Hiroki said teenagers need to ‘think carefully’ about joining a club because it’s hard to leave once inside. 

‘If you’re man enough to join that club you be man enough to leave that club,’ he said.

‘You came in the front door you go out the front door.’   

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The clever app helping thousands of tradies earn extra cash after being crushed by the pandemic

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the clever app helping thousands of tradies earn extra cash after being crushed by the pandemic

Tradesmen who have been forced out of work amid the coronavirus pandemic are turning to a clever new app to secure some extra cash. 

WorkApp was originally created to make life easier for tradesmen looking to hire casual workers in their area. 

But since the coronavirus pandemic hit Australia’s shore, the app has taken off, with  thousands of workers downloading it every day, hoping to use the free platform to find a job, or connect with buyers or sellers nearby.

Clare Horder, 24, was among the thousands of workers who saw their hours diminish as a result of the uncertainty of crisis.

The construction landscaper turned to WorkApp as a way of find new clients and managed to pick up extra odd jobs to help her out too.

‘When this coronavirus thing came up we sort of had to look for an alternative,’ she said.

Before COVID hit, Ms Horder relied on word of mouth to find work, but as that dried up she discovered the app which connected to a bigger pool of possible clients.

Clare Horder, 24, was among the thousands of workers who saw their hours diminish as a result of the uncertainty of crisis

Clare Horder, 24, was among the thousands of workers who saw their hours diminish as a result of the uncertainty of crisis

Clare Horder, 24, was among the thousands of workers who saw their hours diminish as a result of the uncertainty of crisis

The construction landscaper turned to WorkApp as a way of find new clients and managed to pick up extra odd jobs to help her out too

The construction landscaper turned to WorkApp as a way of find new clients and managed to pick up extra odd jobs to help her out too

The construction landscaper turned to WorkApp as a way of find new clients and managed to pick up extra odd jobs to help her out too

‘It covers more area or more people, it’s a lot quicker to get the word out, being an online community, it does make it a lot easier. 

‘We wake up with a notification letting us know someone wants a job or someone looking for a job and then connect with them. 

She said she has been ‘very busy’ since discovering the app and has been working about six days a week. 

Nathan Chamings, who owns building company AMB Homes, was forced to turn to the app when Victoria’s second wave struck.

Mr Chamings is based in Albury–Wodonga, on the New South Wales and Victoria border.

The border closure on July 8 put a lot of pressure on his business. 

‘That sent a bit of a shock-wave through the industry in this area. 

‘It hit us generally pretty hard in regards that people didn’t want to spend money. people weren’t sure how it was going to affect us,’ he told Daily Mail Australia.

Nathan Chamings, who owns building company AMB Homes, was forced to turn to the app when Victoria's second wave struck

Nathan Chamings, who owns building company AMB Homes, was forced to turn to the app when Victoria's second wave struck

Nathan Chamings, who owns building company AMB Homes, was forced to turn to the app when Victoria’s second wave struck

Construction workers build a new park in the central business district in Melbourne on August 6, before strict limits were imposed by the state government

Construction workers build a new park in the central business district in Melbourne on August 6, before strict limits were imposed by the state government

Construction workers build a new park in the central business district in Melbourne on August 6, before strict limits were imposed by the state government

‘It had everyone on standby, it was particularly tough being on a border town.’

Mr Chamings found himself in a tough spot, with his livelihood hanging on the line.

‘You’re trying to keep employees in business as well.’ 

How WorkApp works? 

WorkApp is a free platform that allows users to buy/sell/rent almost anything.

Workers or companies can post free ads, classifieds and promotions. 

The app uses a special ‘refresh’ technology which allows users to boost their listing to the top of search results with the press of a button. 

There is no commission, no cost for listings and no limit on the number of times listings can be refreshed. 

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He turned to WorkApp which helped him secure casual laborers to help with jobs  outside the border.

‘Trying to find trades when you don’t know the area is a bit more difficult. 

Looking forward he was cautiously optimistic about what the future holds. 

‘I think November/December next year could be slower…it is an unknown, we just take it day by day. What is in the future we don’t know.’

WorkApp founder Shane Wallace said the company has been helping the industry by providing financial relief to businesses that simply can’t afford to absorb the costs of job ads or commissions on sales as well as helping individuals keen to earn some extra cash.

‘The digital landscape continues to change the way we do almost everything, and it’s these platforms people turn to in turbulent times.

‘WorkApp takes buying, selling, connecting and communicating to a level playing field by removing the power to influence a ‘search’ from leading corporations and giving it to the people, at no cost.

‘It acknowledges that the best worker for your job could be just around the corner. There’s no expensive middle man. We connect people directly and then leave them to get on with business.’

The app uses a special ‘refresh’ technology which allows users to boost their listing to the top of search results with the press of a button. 

There is no commission, no cost for listings and no limit on the number of times listings can be refreshed.

New figures show the construction industry plunged by almost seven per cent during the second wave. Pictured: construction workers in Melbourne in August

New figures show the construction industry plunged by almost seven per cent during the second wave. Pictured: construction workers in Melbourne in August

New figures show the construction industry plunged by almost seven per cent during the second wave. Pictured: construction workers in Melbourne in August

Initial restrictions only allowed workers to visit one construction site per week during lockdowns. Pictured: A construction worker wearing a face mask on July 22 in Melbourne

Initial restrictions only allowed workers to visit one construction site per week during lockdowns. Pictured: A construction worker wearing a face mask on July 22 in Melbourne

Initial restrictions only allowed workers to visit one construction site per week during lockdowns. Pictured: A construction worker wearing a face mask on July 22 in Melbourne

For example, if someone is looking for some casual work or jobs, they can refresh their profile each morning and go to the top of the list for anyone looking to hire in their area.

A report released by consulting firm Taylor Fry revealed that employment levels across all industries in Victoria had fallen by 7.7 per cent since March when the pandemic began in Australia. 

Construction held up comparatively well during the initial lockdown, with employment dropping by 4.5 per cent.

But new figures show the industry plunged by almost seven per cent during the second wave, with Victoria now under draconian restrictions that have severely cut activity on building sites. 

Taylor Fry principal Alan Greenfield told the Australian Financial Review  the nosedive was due to tougher restrictions.

‘Pre-pandemic, construction jobs accounted for about nine per cent of all jobs in Victoria, making it the state’s fourth-largest employer,’ Mr Greenfield said. 

‘The closure of hardware stores and restriction on the number of workers allowed on work sites is taking its toll.’

The capacity restrictions were imposed in early August, leaving tradesmen across the state fearful about their mortgages and providing for their families.

‘I’ve got no job on Monday, we’ll see how it goes… I’ve got a mortgage, kids, the whole lot’ one tradie told A Current Affair.

‘The big dog upstairs [Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews] just letting us down once again, he’s useless.’ 

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Outrage as father is fined $112 for parking their car outside their home with the windows down

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outrage as father is fined 112 for parking their car outside their home with the windows down

A Sydney family have been fined $112 for parking their car outside their house with their car windows wound down.

Richelle Amey’s husband Nick copped a road infringement while doing landscape work in the front yard outside his home in Caringbah in Sydney’s south on August 4.

The 34-year-old said her husband parked his ute across the road from their house with the windows wound down slightly when a policeman approached the car.

‘A cop yelled out to him while he was working saying “who’s car is this?”‘ Mrs Amey told Daily Mail Australia.

‘Nick said “it’s mine” then the cop yelled “I’m going to fine you for having your windows down” and Nick said “are you serious?”

A Sydney family have been fined (pictured) for parking their car across the road from their house with their windows wound down

A Sydney family have been fined (pictured) for parking their car across the road from their house with their windows wound down

A Sydney family have been fined (pictured) for parking their car across the road from their house with their windows wound down

Mrs Amey said the policeman questioned her husband about what would have happened if he had left his wallet in the car.

‘Nick said “well, there’s not” and the cop said “I’m still going to fine you anyway”. 

‘We got the fine in the mail and I was like “what the hell?” I couldn’t believe it.’

It wasn’t until after her husband was fined that Mrs Amey realised he had committed an offence.

NSW Road Rules state a driver can be fined for not ‘making a motor vehicle secure’ if they are more than three metres away from their car with their doors unlocked or windows down by as little as two centimetres. 

Police and traffic officers have the ability to fine drivers if their car is unattended with the windows down by as little as two centimetres

Police and traffic officers have the ability to fine drivers if their car is unattended with the windows down by as little as two centimetres

Police and traffic officers have the ability to fine drivers if their car is unattended with the windows down by as little as two centimetres

Mrs Amey said while her husband’s ute was in eyesight of where he was working, it didn’t stop them from escaping the law.

‘You have to be within three metres. You can’t even go to pay for petrol,’ she said.

Mrs Amey said there was no point in fighting the fine based on the ruling, but hoped to draw attention to the little known road rule.

‘A lot of people would do this without knowing,’ she said. ‘I’m merely warning people because I think it’s ridiculous.’

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Curtis Scott arrest: NSW Police commissioner Mick Fuller defends cops who tasered the NRL player

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curtis scott arrest nsw police commissioner mick fuller defends cops who tasered the nrl player

NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller says he is ‘sympathetic to police who turn up to deal with drunken idiots every night’ after officers were slammed for tasering an NRL player who was sleeping off a boozy night out under a tree.

Canberra Raiders centre Curtis Scott, 22, was found asleep in Sydney’s Moore Park following Australia Day celebrations on January 27.

Police body cam footage shows Scott crying out in agony after being pepper sprayed and tasered by police who tried to move him. 

One officer then tells Scott that being pepper sprayed is ‘not that bad’ and laughs.

Mr Fuller said on Tuesday that Scott was ‘trespassing’ and police were left in ‘a very difficult situation’ with two options – for the player to comply or ‘to use force’. 

Canberra Raiders centre Curtis Scott (pictured), 22, was tasered and pepper sprayed by police who found him asleep under a tree in Sydney's Moore Park following Australia Day celebrations on January 27

Canberra Raiders centre Curtis Scott (pictured), 22, was tasered and pepper sprayed by police who found him asleep under a tree in Sydney's Moore Park following Australia Day celebrations on January 27

Canberra Raiders centre Curtis Scott (pictured), 22, was tasered and pepper sprayed by police who found him asleep under a tree in Sydney’s Moore Park following Australia Day celebrations on January 27

‘There were minutes and minutes where they were attempting to move him peacefully,’ Mr Fuller said on 2GB’s Ben Fordham Live.

‘Whether or not they used their powers lawfully, I can’t comment on that because it’s still subject to court proceedings and oversight.

‘But I am sympathetic to police who turn up to deal with drunken idiots every night.’

Host Ben Fordham asked: ‘He was asleep, he was drunk so it was hard for him to comply. So, are you saying it’s right for him to be tasered?’ 

‘What I’m saying is, I’m sympathetic to police who had to do something with him,’ Mr Fuller replied.

‘The other option is this — you put a baton under each of his arms, you squeeze it down and you put him in the back of the truck, now that is no less painful than being sprayed.’   

NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller (pictured centre) has defended cops who tasered Scott, saying he is 'sympathetic to police who turn up to deal with drunken idiots every night'

NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller (pictured centre) has defended cops who tasered Scott, saying he is 'sympathetic to police who turn up to deal with drunken idiots every night'

NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller (pictured centre) has defended cops who tasered Scott, saying he is ‘sympathetic to police who turn up to deal with drunken idiots every night’

Mr Fuller said police ‘had to go hands on’ to get Scott out of the public space. 

‘We couldn’t leave him there, because if we did and he went on and committed more crimes or he injured himself, the police are liable. He had to come with us,’ he said. 

Scott pleaded guilty to two counts of behaving in an offensive manner in a public place earlier this month. 

But prosecutors withdrew the two counts of assaulting a police officer, one of resisting an officer in execution of duty, one of behaving in an offensive manner and one of remaining on Trust lands after being requested to leave.  

‘I’d never assault a police officer and that was probably the hardest thing, sitting on that for nine months – knowing you haven’t done what they’ve said – and you’ve got the whole world coming down on your shoulders,’ Scott previously told Seven News.

‘Everybody on your back, making out that you’re some monster, a cop basher. In the back of my mind, I knew if one of these charges stuck I’d be digging holes for the rest of my life.’

Scott (pictured) pleaded guilty to two counts of behaving in an offensive manner in a public place but the prosecution withdrew a total of five counts against him, including two counts of assaulting a police officer and one of resisting an officer in execution of duty

Scott (pictured) pleaded guilty to two counts of behaving in an offensive manner in a public place but the prosecution withdrew a total of five counts against him, including two counts of assaulting a police officer and one of resisting an officer in execution of duty

Scott (pictured) pleaded guilty to two counts of behaving in an offensive manner in a public place but the prosecution withdrew a total of five counts against him, including two counts of assaulting a police officer and one of resisting an officer in execution of duty

Scott’s lawyer Sam Macedone said the NRL player had feared he may have jeopardised his future in the league following the arrest and also lost a Nike sponsorship deal. 

Mr Macedone said he and Scott would consider taking legal action against police after their case fell apart. 

The 22-year-old’s legal team have also called for police to cover more than $100,000 in legal fees – with Magistrate Giles due to return a decision on the matter on September 25. 

Mr Fuller said NSW Police would comply with any directives if the officers’ actions were found to be unlawful.  

‘What transpired is tested on two things. One is, were the actions of police lawful? And secondly, do they withstand public scrutiny?’ he said. 

‘If what they did was lawful or wasn’t lawful will be looked at by (police) oversight that have taken that matter and obviously, I’ll respect whatever advice and guidance they give after their investigation.’ 

Scott's lawyer Sam Macedone said he and Scott would consider taking legal action against police. Whether the officers' actions were unlawful remains to be seen

Scott's lawyer Sam Macedone said he and Scott would consider taking legal action against police. Whether the officers' actions were unlawful remains to be seen

Scott’s lawyer Sam Macedone said he and Scott would consider taking legal action against police. Whether the officers’ actions were unlawful remains to be seen

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