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Family vault beneath St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral in Manhattan is on sale for $7MILLION

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family vault beneath st patricks old cathedral in manhattan is on sale for 7million

A rare crypt nestled beneath The Basilica of St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral in Manhattan can be purchased for a whopping $7million.

A full six-person family vault located deep beneath Basilica of St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral is the last of its kind, according to the New York Post, and is at a prime SoHo location.

To reach the 205-year-old crypt, which was first unveiled to the public in 2017, visitors must creep past massive wooden doors and four-foot-thick stone walls.

Frank Alfieri, director of the centuries-old basilica’s cemetery and columbaria, told The Post that anyone who purchases the coveted burial spot ‘can be buried with the people that set the Catholic faith in motion in New York.’

The Basilica of St. Patrick's Old Cathedral's catacombs and crypts (pictured) were first opened to the public in 2017

The Basilica of St. Patrick's Old Cathedral's catacombs and crypts (pictured) were first opened to the public in 2017

The Basilica of St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral’s catacombs and crypts (pictured) were first opened to the public in 2017 

Pictured: a statue of Jesus Christ on the Crucifix was placed near two burial vessels underneath the church

Pictured: a statue of Jesus Christ on the Crucifix was placed near two burial vessels underneath the church

Pictured: a statue of Jesus Christ on the Crucifix was placed near two burial vessels underneath the church 

The Mulberry Street grounds is one of only a few burial spots left in Manhattan, where space is limited and prices are high. 

The $7millon cost might be a hard sell to some, but the exclusive crypt is surrounded by a host of notable neighbors.

Five priests, two bishops and 33 families have been buried inside the church’s catacombs, including Archbishop John H. Hughes, or ‘Dagger John,’ per The New York Times.

Others included Countess Annie Leary, a friend of the prominent Astor family; ‘Honest’ John Kelly, a 19th century New York Congressman and Tammany Hall boss; and the Delmonico family, who are credited with operating successful restaurants and introducing dishes like baked Alaska.

John Connolly, the first bishop of New York, was buried at the basilica in 1825. 

One family vault initially belonged to Gen. Thomas Eckert, who was an adviser to Abraham Lincoln. The former president wrote his draft of the Emancipation Proclamation in Eckert’s office.

The Basilica of St. Patrick's Old Cathedral catacombs and crypts were placed behind two massive wooden doors and thick stone walls (pictured)

The Basilica of St. Patrick's Old Cathedral catacombs and crypts were placed behind two massive wooden doors and thick stone walls (pictured)

The Basilica of St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral catacombs and crypts were placed behind two massive wooden doors and thick stone walls (pictured)

Pictured: visitors at  The Basilica of St. Patrick's Old Cathedral walk through the catacombs as part of a tour, which started up in 2017

Pictured: visitors at  The Basilica of St. Patrick's Old Cathedral walk through the catacombs as part of a tour, which started up in 2017

Pictured: visitors at  The Basilica of St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral walk through the catacombs as part of a tour, which started up in 2017

Gen. Thomas Eckert's family vault (pictured) was decorated with Guastavino tiles and original Thomas Edison light bulbs

Gen. Thomas Eckert's family vault (pictured) was decorated with Guastavino tiles and original Thomas Edison light bulbs

Gen. Thomas Eckert’s family vault (pictured) was decorated with Guastavino tiles and original Thomas Edison light bulbs

Pictured: a portrait of Jesus Christ was photographed inside The Basilica of St. Patrick's Old Cathedral, where a family vault was put on sale

Pictured: a portrait of Jesus Christ was photographed inside The Basilica of St. Patrick's Old Cathedral, where a family vault was put on sale

Pictured: a portrait of Jesus Christ was photographed inside The Basilica of St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral, where a family vault was put on sale 

The New York Times reported that Eckert’s vault was adorned with Guastavino tiles and original Thomas Edison light bulbs. The vault is sealed behind two solid brass doors. 

Alfieri explained that church officials opted to list the family vault for sale as a gesture to the community. 

‘We thought it would be better served if a Catholic family who wanted to be buried in New York had a place to go,’ he told the Post.

Part of St. Patrick’s appeal has been that it’s the only Catholic cemetery in Manhattan, with burials spanning all the way back to the 1700s.

Alferi argued that St. Patrick’s is the most historic church in the city for Catholics.  

‘A lot of people don’t realize what is just below their feet,’ he said. 

Pictured: St. Patrick's outdoor grave

Pictured: St. Patrick's outdoor grave

Pictured: St. Patrick's outdoor grave

Pictured: St. Patrick's outdoor grave

Msgr. Donald Sakano: ‘We have a long way to go in making the grounds the way we want them. The gravestones are deteriorating as we speak, the soft stone losing inscriptions’

The Basilica of St. Patrick's Old Cathedral (pictured) has begun building hundreds of cremation niches that sell between $10,000 and $15,000

The Basilica of St. Patrick's Old Cathedral (pictured) has begun building hundreds of cremation niches that sell between $10,000 and $15,000

The Basilica of St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral (pictured) has begun building hundreds of cremation niches that sell between $10,000 and $15,000

That sentiment likely pushed St. Patrick’s to bring catacombs and crypts into the 21st century.

The Times reports that the church has begun building hundreds of cremation niches that sell between $10,000 and $15,000. 

An outdoor cemetery with a brick walkway sits next to the church, and has done so since 1815.

‘We have a long way to go in making the grounds the way we want them,’ Msgr. Donald Sakano told the Times.

‘The gravestones are deteriorating as we speak, the soft stone losing inscriptions.’

St. Patrick's Old Cathedral is said to be the final resting place of 'the people that set the Catholic faith in motion in New York'

St. Patrick's Old Cathedral is said to be the final resting place of 'the people that set the Catholic faith in motion in New York'

St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral is said to be the final resting place of ‘the people that set the Catholic faith in motion in New York’

Some of the gravestones were reportedly damaged, piled atop one another and spread out over the grass plot.

Alferi admitted to the Times that St. Patrick’s struggled to pay bills, but hosting visitor tours has helped cover costs and boosted morale in the community.

‘It’s become a source of understanding the church and what it’s meant to this neighborhood for the past two centuries,’ he said. 

Monsignor Sakano added: ‘People from the neighborhood look over the wall longingly.

‘It’s almost like you want to stay in the neighborhood with your eternal affordable housing.’ 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Short video streaming service Quibi shuts down after just SIX MONTHS

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short video streaming service quibi shuts down after just six months

Quibi, the short video streaming service launched with great fanfare in April, is shutting down just six months later, according to multiple reports.

Quibi founder and former Disney CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg told investors in a call on Wednesday that the entertainment startup that raised $1.75 billion in capital is shutting itself down, the Wall Street Journal reported.

In recent weeks, Quibi hired a restructuring firm to evaluate its options, and a report submitted to the board this week included shuttering, sources said. 

The company, which had pitched a paid subscription service for short, 10 minute videos produced at a cost of $100,000 per minute, failed to gain traction despite a massive promotional push.  

Among the shows created for the service were the ‘true-crime fashion series’ Last Looks, and Chrissy’s Court, in which model Chrissy Tiegan presided as judge in real-life disputes.

Quibi founder and former Disney CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg (above) told investors in a call on Wednesday that the entertainment startup that raised $1.75 billion in capital is shutting down

Quibi founder and former Disney CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg (above) told investors in a call on Wednesday that the entertainment startup that raised $1.75 billion in capital is shutting down

Quibi founder and former Disney CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg (above) told investors in a call on Wednesday that the entertainment startup that raised $1.75 billion in capital is shutting down

Quibi shows included Chrissy's Court, in which model Chrissy Tiegan presided as judge in real-life disputes (above) and the 'true-crime fashion series' Last Looks

Quibi shows included Chrissy's Court, in which model Chrissy Tiegan presided as judge in real-life disputes (above) and the 'true-crime fashion series' Last Looks

Quibi shows included Chrissy’s Court, in which model Chrissy Tiegan presided as judge in real-life disputes (above) and the ‘true-crime fashion series’ Last Looks

Other series included 60 in 6, a six-minute version of the revered news-magazine show 60 Minutes, and Murder House Flip, in which a team renovates a house in which a murder has occurred and tries to sell it. 

The name ‘Quibi’ was an abbreviation of ‘quick bites,’ highlighting its video content designed to be viewed on-the-go from a mobile device.  

Targeted strongly at Millennials and Gen Z, Quibi hoped to position itself as a hip, mobile-first alternative to established streaming giants Netflix, Amazon Prime, and Disney+.

Instead, the troubled service has been plagued by worries, including anemic subscription numbers, disappointing viewership, and a patent infringement lawsuit financed by powerful hedge fund Elliot Management. 

With a shutdown imminent, Quibi’s many financial backers now face a total loss of their investments. 

A show called 'Couples on Quibi' saw celebrity couples open up about their relationships

A show called 'Couples on Quibi' saw celebrity couples open up about their relationships

A show called ‘Couples on Quibi’ saw celebrity couples open up about their relationships

Partial list of Quibi’s investors

  • The Walt Disney Company 
  • 21st Century Fox
  • NBCUniversal
  • Sony Pictures
  • Time Warner
  • Viacom 
  • Lionsgate
  • MGM 
  • Goldman Sachs
  • JPMorgan Chase
  • Alibaba Group
  • BBC Studios 
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In a last ditch effort to save the business, Katzenberg had tried to sell its catalog of programming to several companies including to NBCUniversal and Facebook – both of which declined, according to The Information.

Katzenberg ‘has told people in the industry that he may have to shut down the company’ if a buyer could not be found quickly, the news site said, citing a person who spoke to him.

Quibi did not immediately respond to multiple requests for comment from DailyMail.com on Wednesday.

Quibi opened for business in the United States and Canada six months ago as the effects of the novel coronavirus pandemic began to set in.

Its goal was to shake up the video content industry by providing 10-minute original Hollywood-quality programs delivered to smartphones and mobile devices.

Thanks to Kazenberg’s reputation and the billions of dollars promised, the project won over big-name movie and TV personalities to produce films and series, including the likes of Steven Spielberg, Guillermo del Toro, Jennifer Lopez and Reese Witherspoon.

According to The Information, Katzenberg contacted Eddy Cue, an Apple vice president and WarnerMedia CEO Jason Kilar, as well as Facebook and NBCUniversal. There was no interest, the site reported.

Quibi bet big, with 50 programs available from day one.

Quibi was paying $100,000 a minute for feature films -- a rate comparable to big productions by Netflix, Amazon, HBO Max or Disney+, Quibi CEO Meg Whitman (above) has said

Quibi was paying $100,000 a minute for feature films -- a rate comparable to big productions by Netflix, Amazon, HBO Max or Disney+, Quibi CEO Meg Whitman (above) has said

Quibi was paying $100,000 a minute for feature films — a rate comparable to big productions by Netflix, Amazon, HBO Max or Disney+, Quibi CEO Meg Whitman (above) has said

Jeffrey Katzenberg, chairman and founder of Quibi, stands in front of the photos of celebrities who were attached to the streaming service startup

Jeffrey Katzenberg, chairman and founder of Quibi, stands in front of the photos of celebrities who were attached to the streaming service startup

Jeffrey Katzenberg, chairman and founder of Quibi, stands in front of the photos of celebrities who were attached to the streaming service startup

The company was paying $100,000 a minute for feature films — a rate comparable to big productions by Netflix, Amazon, HBO Max or Disney+, Quibi CEO Meg Whitman has said.

Quibi also wanted to offer daily news reports, sports programs and entertainment shows, content difficult to produce while under pandemic lockdown.

Seeking to attract more customers, Quibi increased its trial offer from two weeks to 90 days, while the subscription price – $5 per month with advertising or $8 without — was comparable to the Disney+ service.

However, the strategy does not seem to have worked.

Quibi had reportedly been counting on several million subscribers by April 2021, but six months after its launch it has only a few hundred thousand, including those who have the service for free via their operator. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Inside the court of the Thai king Maha Vajiralongkorn

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inside the court of the thai king maha vajiralongkorn

There are many reasons why King Maha Vajiralongkorn of Thailand may not inspire unwavering respect from his 70 million subjects.

To begin with, there is his penchant for wearing teeny-weeny crop tops, very low-slung jeans and enormous fake tattoos.

Then there is his messy love life — the 68-year-old is on his fourth wife, whose company he shares with his official concubine, recently back in favour after a brief and brutal hiatus. 

And there is his bizarre obsession with his late poodle Foo Foo, whom he liked to dress in full Royal Thai Air Force regalia, including ‘paw mitts’, and seat at official dinners.

Maha also regularly insists that courtiers crawl on their knees towards him, orders anyone out of his favour to have their head shaved, and once made a wife eat out of Foo Foo’s dog bowl while she was semi-naked. 

A Royal Household Bureau handout photo shows Thai King Maha Vajiralongkorn Bodindradebayavarangkun wearing a crown during the coronation ceremony at the Grand Palace in Bangkok, Thailand, 04 May 2019

A Royal Household Bureau handout photo shows Thai King Maha Vajiralongkorn Bodindradebayavarangkun wearing a crown during the coronation ceremony at the Grand Palace in Bangkok, Thailand, 04 May 2019

A Royal Household Bureau handout photo shows Thai King Maha Vajiralongkorn Bodindradebayavarangkun wearing a crown during the coronation ceremony at the Grand Palace in Bangkok, Thailand, 04 May 2019

In this photo released by Bureau of the Royal Household, Thailand's King Bodindradebayavarangkun, right, presents a gift to Queen Suthida Vajiralongkorn Na Ayudhya at Ampornsan Throne Hall in Bangkok, Thailand, Wednesday, May 1, 2019

In this photo released by Bureau of the Royal Household, Thailand's King Bodindradebayavarangkun, right, presents a gift to Queen Suthida Vajiralongkorn Na Ayudhya at Ampornsan Throne Hall in Bangkok, Thailand, Wednesday, May 1, 2019

In this photo released by Bureau of the Royal Household, Thailand’s King Bodindradebayavarangkun, right, presents a gift to Queen Suthida Vajiralongkorn Na Ayudhya at Ampornsan Throne Hall in Bangkok, Thailand, Wednesday, May 1, 2019

There are many reasons why King Maha Vajiralongkorn of Thailand may not inspire unwavering respect from his 70 million subjects. To begin with, there is his penchant for wearing teeny-weeny crop tops, very low-slung jeans and enormous fake tattoos

There are many reasons why King Maha Vajiralongkorn of Thailand may not inspire unwavering respect from his 70 million subjects. To begin with, there is his penchant for wearing teeny-weeny crop tops, very low-slung jeans and enormous fake tattoos

There are many reasons why King Maha Vajiralongkorn of Thailand may not inspire unwavering respect from his 70 million subjects. To begin with, there is his penchant for wearing teeny-weeny crop tops, very low-slung jeans and enormous fake tattoos

Oh, and he has disowned at least four of his children, refusing to pay their school fees, despite sitting on a £30 billion fortune.

All of which has made him an international laughing stock: Prince ‘Bling Bling’, the bully playboy. But never at home.

Because in Thailand the laws of lèse-majesté (offending the dignity of a reigning monarch) ensure the royal family is held above criticism, let alone mockery.

There, the monarchy have godlike status. They are worshipped and idolised: saying one word against the king, queen, heir apparent or regent — or even their pets — has traditionally led to 15 years in prison.

Until now. Because a groundswell of unrest is surging in Thailand, where the vital tourism industry has been hammered by Covid. Thais are growing increasingly irritated, weary and embarrassed by King Maha.

Last week, things came to a head.

Maha, who had spent much of this year holed up in splendour with a vast entourage (including 20 ‘military-themed’ concubines) in a luxury hotel in Bavaria, Germany, found his European welcome cooling when the German government decided they could no longer continue to host him on their democratic soil.

A pro-democracy protester shout slogans against riot police during an anti-government demonstration in Bangkok, Thailand on October 16, 2020

A pro-democracy protester shout slogans against riot police during an anti-government demonstration in Bangkok, Thailand on October 16, 2020

A pro-democracy protester shout slogans against riot police during an anti-government demonstration in Bangkok, Thailand on October 16, 2020

So Maha left for home — no doubt in his personalised Boeing 737 — and is now ensconced in one of the Thai royal family’s many palaces, as increasingly outspoken and violent demonstrations take place in the streets.

Since he took the throne four years ago, Maha has steadily amassed power, taking personal control of crown property and all royal funds, assuming direct command of troops, meddling in the supposedly democratic process of government and even amending Thailand’s constitution to allow him to rule from abroad.

In recent years, the UN has called on Thailand to amend its draconian lèse-majesté laws, but to little effect. Dissenters now risk being ‘disappeared’ altogether.

When Maha finally returned home last week, he was greeted by more than 10,000 protesters, who marched through Bangkok demanding a new constitution.

Dozens hurled abuse at Maha’s white Rolls-Royce and a state of emergency was declared. It was a shocking turnaround for a country where people are taught from birth to worship the monarch, plaster homes and public buildings with his image, celebrate Father’s Day on his birthday and leap to their feet for the national anthem.

A pro-democracy protester wears chains and make-up during a demonstration at a road intersection in Bangkok on October 15

A pro-democracy protester wears chains and make-up during a demonstration at a road intersection in Bangkok on October 15

A pro-democracy protester wears chains and make-up during a demonstration at a road intersection in Bangkok on October 15 

Because while technically, Thailand (like Britain) is a constitutional monarchy, in practice ancient structures still exist.

Under the rule of Maha’s late father King Bhumibol, who reigned from 1946 until his death in 2016, this was easier to swallow.

Bhumibol may have been the richest monarch in the world, with a lifestyle to match, but his people believed he was a good man and respected him all the more when, in 2005, he accepted that even he was not perfect.

‘I must also be criticised,’ he said. ‘I am not afraid if the criticism concerns what I do wrong … the king can do wrong.’

That has never been a sentiment embraced by his only son.

Thailand’s elites have long loathed Maha’s violent mood swings, odd fetishes and the scandals in which he became mired.

At school — he was educated at King’s Mead School in East Sussex and later boarded at Millfield in Somerset — he was a tubby bully, reportedly not liked and so spoilt that at the age of 12, he still couldn’t tie his own shoelaces because courtiers always did it for him.

But none of that held him back with the ladies. Even his mother likened him to Don Juan.

In 1977, after attending military school in Australia, he wed his cousin, Princess Soamsawali Kitiyakara, with whom he had a daughter. But the marriage ended in divorce — perhaps in part because, besides being unfaithful, Maha fathered four sons and a daughter with his mistress, actress Yuvadhida Polpraserth, whom he married in 1994.

Alas, that didn’t work out either and when, two years later, she fled to the UK, he disowned four of their five children and stopped paying their school fees.

Clashes break out between Thai riot officers and demonstrators in downtown Bangkok during a second day of protests on 15 October

Clashes break out between Thai riot officers and demonstrators in downtown Bangkok during a second day of protests on 15 October

Clashes break out between Thai riot officers and demonstrators in downtown Bangkok during a second day of protests on 15 October

It was with his third wife, Srirasmi Suwadee, a former waitress who had been in his service since 1992, that he bought Foo Foo, the white toy poodle that in 2007 — and by then elevated to Air Chief Marshal — was an official guest at a reception held by the U.S. Ambassador, Ralph Boyce.

In a leaked document, Mr Boyce said: ‘Foo Foo was present at the event, dressed in formal evening attire complete with paw mitts. At one point during the band’s second number, he jumped up onto the head table and began lapping from the guests’ water glasses, including my own.’

The pecking order at home was all too clear. In 2009, leaked images of Foo Foo’s birthday celebrations showed Maha’s wife Suwadee crouched on the floor, in little more than a G-string, apparently eating dog food as the king looked on (she was later stripped of her titles and family members were imprisoned).

When Foo Foo passed away in 2015, Maha gave the dog a lavish four-day funeral.

Life can’t have been easy for any of Maha’s wives, especially given his desire to base himself increasingly in Bavaria, where he sent one of his sons to school. They also had to compete with his extensive harem, most of whom were recruited from military units and organised into their own regiment.

Maha’s fourth wife, former air stewardess Suthida Tidjai, tied the knot with him in 2019. But only months later he elevated his favourite concubine, a former nurse, to the status of ‘royal noble consort’, the first woman to hold this title since Thailand became a constitutional monarchy in 1932. To mark the occasion, Maha released a glossy photo of her flying a plane while wearing a camouflage-pattern sports bra.

What with all that going on, and somehow finding time to indulge his passion for mountain-biking and driving fast cars, perhaps it’s little wonder that, when his father died, Maha asked for ‘time to mourn his loss with the people’ before finally taking up the reins in 2019 with a three-day, £23 million coronation involving a gold crown weighing over 15lb.

King Bling’s ostentation is matched only by the aggression with which he pursues anyone who criticises him.

In 2017, a man was sentenced to 35 years in jail for posting critical comments online about the Thai royal family. Just this summer, a young man who wore a T-shirt with an anti-royal message was sent to a secure psychiatric unit. Many others have disappeared.

Even Facebook was forced to shut down a group with a million members that had been set up to discuss the monarchy — but the internet giant has since sued the Thai government, calling the move a contravention of international human rights law.

Now, with crowds baying in the streets, King Maha might do well to step back and reconsider his golden furniture, lackeys and harem. Or he could risk losing his crown altogether.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Surveillance video captures armed home invasion in Florida

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surveillance video captures armed home invasion in florida

This is the moment a woman, wearing nothing but her panties and a t-shirt, was forced to defend her family and her home from two armed intruders who broke in over the weekend.  

The incident took place at around 11pm on Saturday at a home near Northwest 86th Avenue and 182nd Street in the Miami suburb of Hialeah, Florida.

The husband said he had invited a group of friends over to watch a basketball game on TV.

Suddenly two men, armed with Uzis, burst in and pointed guns at the group, which included a seven-year-old girl.

Scroll down for video 

Two armed men were caught on surveillance video forcing their way into a Hialeah, Florida, home on Saturday night and shooting at a woman

Two armed men were caught on surveillance video forcing their way into a Hialeah, Florida, home on Saturday night and shooting at a woman

Two armed men were caught on surveillance video forcing their way into a Hialeah, Florida, home on Saturday night and shooting at a woman

Home surveillance video shows a gunman pointing a firearm at people cowering on the living room floor during the home invasion

Home surveillance video shows a gunman pointing a firearm at people cowering on the living room floor during the home invasion

A 7-year-old girl was said to be present at the home

A 7-year-old girl was said to be present at the home

Home surveillance video shows a gunman pointing a firearm at people cowering on the living room floor during the home invasion. A 7-year-old girl was said to be present at the home

One of the thugs is seen pinning a victim with his foot, with a woman laying face down on the floor nearby (pictured)

One of the thugs is seen pinning a victim with his foot, with a woman laying face down on the floor nearby (pictured)

One of the thugs is seen pinning a victim with his foot, with a woman laying face down on the floor nearby (pictured) 

Surveillance footage that was provided to NBC6 shows the moment the burglars forced their way into the home with guns drawn.

In the video, one of the perpetrators points a firearm at two people cowering on the living room floor as screams of terror echo through the house.

The wife, who was in a bedroom wearing nothing but a white T-shirt and panties, heard the commotion, grabbed the family’s gun and pointed it at the burglars, who shot four or five times at her.

The homeowner's wife (pictured in a white shirt and panties) grabbed a gun from the bedroom and pointed it at the burglars, who shot at her

The homeowner's wife (pictured in a white shirt and panties) grabbed a gun from the bedroom and pointed it at the burglars, who shot at her

The woman is seen pointing her gun at the intruders

The woman is seen pointing her gun at the intruders

The homeowner’s wife (pictured in a white shirt and panties) grabbed a gun from the bedroom and pointed it at the burglars, who shot at her 

The unnamed homeowner (pictured) said he grabbed the family's gun and returned fire, possibly hitting the perpetrators' getaway car as they fled

The unnamed homeowner (pictured) said he grabbed the family's gun and returned fire, possibly hitting the perpetrators' getaway car as they fled

The unnamed homeowner (pictured) said he grabbed the family’s gun and returned fire, possibly hitting the perpetrators’ getaway car as they fled 

As seen in the video, the husband then ran to his wife, grabbed the gun from her hands and fired several shots at the suspects as they ran out of the house.

The homeowner, who was not named, said he believes he struck the criminals’ getaway vehicle.

No injuries were reported in connection to the armed home invasion.

DailyMail.com on Wednesday reached out to the Hialeah Police Department seeking to obtain additional information on the home invasion and was awaiting a response.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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