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Freed paedophile killer Michael Guider secretly living in suburbs

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freed paedophile killer michael guider secretly living in suburbs
Michael Guider sexually abused perhaps dozens of children and killed nine-year-old schoolgirl Samantha Knight in 1986

Michael Guider sexually abused perhaps dozens of children and killed nine-year-old schoolgirl Samantha Knight in 1986

Michael Guider sexually abused perhaps dozens of children and killed nine-year-old schoolgirl Samantha Knight in 1986

Child killer Michael Guider has been moved out of a jail-run halfway house and is back living in the community at a secret location authorities will not even reveal to his victims. 

Guider, who kidnapped and killed Sydney schoolgirl Samantha Knight in 1986 and preyed upon other children across two decades, was released from prison in September last year. 

For the first six months of his freedom the 69-year-old was holed-up in a secure facility attached to the Long Bay prison complex along with other offenders too problematic to return to society. 

But in March the loathed paedophile was quietly moved out of the Nunyara Community Offender Support Program centre at Malabar and placed in new permanent accommodation.

That has angered and frustrated some of Guider’s surviving victims who say authorities have refused to reveal where their tormentor is now living. 

In recent months social media users have claimed to have spotted Guider walking around suburbs in Sydney’s south-east including La Perouse.  

‘I just saw him walking up to Little Bay – not a care in the world, he has lost a huge amount of weight and has white hair and beard,’ one wrote.

While those alleged sightings have not been verified, the fact Guider’s whereabouts are a secret disturbs Chantelle Daly, who as a child was abused by him.

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Child killer Michael Guider has been moved to a secret location after being holed-up in halfway house following his release from prison last year. Those how know Guider best say he will have changed his appearance since leaving leaving Long Bay jail on September 5, 2019 (pictured)

Michael Guider kidnapped, drugged and killed nine-year-old school girl Samantha Knight in 1986. She was snatched from near her home at Bondi and her remains have never been found

Michael Guider kidnapped, drugged and killed nine-year-old school girl Samantha Knight in 1986. She was snatched from near her home at Bondi and her remains have never been found

Michael Guider kidnapped, drugged and killed nine-year-old school girl Samantha Knight in 1986. She was snatched from near her home at Bondi and her remains have never been found 

Michael Guider is pictured here at Long Bay jail on Christmas Day, 1986, four months after he killed Samantha

Michael Guider is pictured here at Long Bay jail on Christmas Day, 1986, four months after he killed Samantha

Guider is pictured clutching a Kodak film packet and developed photographs in 1984, the year he began molesting Samantha

Guider is pictured clutching a Kodak film packet and developed photographs in 1984, the year he began molesting Samantha

Michael Guider is pictured left on Christmas Day, 1986, four months  after he killed Samantha. He is pictured right clutching a Kodak film packet and developed photographs in 1984, the year he began molesting Samantha

Ms Daly was six years old when Guider drugged, molested and photographed her and a friend while he was supposed to babysitting the pair. 

‘I think the fact he’s got any right to privacy or this second chance at being an unknown man is completely ridiculous,’ she said. 

‘Ultimately that’s what they do with paedophiles – they want them to be able to just slink back into society quietly without anyone kicking up a fuss.

‘They don’t want any more attention brought to the fact that he’s now moved and we don’t know where he is.’ 

Ms Daly said she and other victims were given an opportunity to nominate suburbs where they did not want Guider to be able to go or live. 

‘That’s all well and good but if we travel we don’t actually know if we’re travelling to where he’s currently living,’ she said.

‘I could not imagine walking around, going about my daily life, and seeing him smack bang in the middle of the street. 

Lisa Giles, who was molested by Michael Guider as a child, says she was told her abuser had been moved out of a prison halfway house but not where he was now living. Ms Giles is pictured outside the Supreme Court after unsuccessfully trying to keep Guider in jail last year

Lisa Giles, who was molested by Michael Guider as a child, says she was told her abuser had been moved out of a prison halfway house but not where he was now living. Ms Giles is pictured outside the Supreme Court after unsuccessfully trying to keep Guider in jail last year

Lisa Giles, who was molested by Michael Guider as a child, says she was told her abuser had been moved out of a prison halfway house but not where he was now living. Ms Giles is pictured outside the Supreme Court after unsuccessfully trying to keep Guider in jail last year 

'I think the fact he's got any right to privacy or this second chance at being an unknown man is completely ridiculous,' Guider's victim Chantelle Daly said.

'I think the fact he's got any right to privacy or this second chance at being an unknown man is completely ridiculous,' Guider's victim Chantelle Daly said.

Chantelle Daly (pictured) was six years old when Guider drugged, molested and photographed her and a friend when he was supposed to babysitting the pair

Chantelle Daly (pictured) was six years old when Guider drugged, molested and photographed her and a friend when he was supposed to babysitting the pair

Chantelle Daly (left and right) was six when Guider drugged, molested and photographed her and a friend when he was supposed to babysitting the pair. ‘I think the fact he’s got any right to privacy or this second chance at being an unknown man is completely ridiculous,’ she said

‘It’s always at the back of your mind. Every corner you turn, you’re like, are they going to be there? It’s just constant and it’s exhausting. 

‘I honestly do not know how any victim could handle that. It doesn’t matter how much time has gone. It’s horrific. It should not be a possibility.’ 

Lisa Giles was preyed upon by ‘Uncle Mick’ from age five to 11 and like Ms Daly fought hard last year to keep Guider in prison when his 17-year sentence for killing Samantha finished.

‘The current structure can’t possibly put the community’s minds to rest because the threat has not dissipated,’ Ms Giles said. 

‘This is an openly unrepentant criminal, and according to psychiatric reports heard in court, has not been rehabilitated, in spite of completing the full arsenal of courses available to him in jail. 

‘There has been a systemic, cumulative build-up of loopholes and leniency available to Guider, and he has been largely protected throughout his incarceration.’ 

Ms Giles, who made a powerful submission to the Supreme Court last August objecting to Guider’s release, described then how he coaxed his way into her family.

‘I was one of his conquests,’ she said. ‘Michael is the psychotic bad guy you see in the movies … narcissistic and delusional.’

Michael Guider was housed at the Nunyara Community Offender Support Program Centre in Sydney's Long Bay prison complex until March. Nunyara is a non-custodial facility providing interim accommodation for up to 36 recently released medium to high-risk male offenders

Michael Guider was housed at the Nunyara Community Offender Support Program Centre in Sydney's Long Bay prison complex until March. Nunyara is a non-custodial facility providing interim accommodation for up to 36 recently released medium to high-risk male offenders

Michael Guider was housed at the Nunyara Community Offender Support Program Centre in Sydney’s Long Bay prison complex until March. Nunyara is a non-custodial facility providing interim accommodation for up to 36 recently released medium to high-risk male offenders

Regardless of how strict the conditions placed on Guider after his release, once he was back in the community ‘our children are not safe and our minds are not safe’, she said.

‘If Michael Guider is free, given an inch, he will take a mile. He will take a child’s innocence, relish it in his hands and drink it like a fine wine.’

Ms Giles was informed by NSW Corrective Services’ Victims Support Unit that Guider had been moved out of Nunyara but they could not tell her where he was now living. 

Michael Guider has never shown any remorse for killing Samantha Knight in 1986

Michael Guider has never shown any remorse for killing Samantha Knight in 1986

Michael Guider has never shown any remorse for killing Samantha Knight in 1986 

‘Maintaining the confidentiality of an offender’s location might make the supervision teams job easier, but it makes living life harder for those of us who have to live alongside our trauma,’ Ms Giles said. 

‘How can this be an equitable solution for those whose lives we are trying to restore? Enough is enough. We need more transparency from NSW Corrections.’

Ms Giles said unchecked speculation on social media about where Guider was living created further anxiety for his victims.

‘For the direct survivors this means our incoming information is always unreliable, unregulated, with no fact checking,’ she said. 

‘Negotiating this environment is exhausting. We need more information about this perpetrator’s movements than the little we have.’

Guider’s younger brother Tim has previously warned his sibling would use his time in Nunyara preparing himself to commit sex crimes on prepubescent girls again.  

After his initial release Guider refused to receive letters, phone calls or visits from anyone, including Tim. 

‘His minders have said to me he doesn’t want contact with anybody from the outside world,’ Tim said last year. 

Tim Guider (pictured) predicted his brother would drastically alter his appearance before he left the halfway house he was staying in, including removing the long beard he grew last year. 'He's going to make himself look like Mr Average,' Tim said

Tim Guider (pictured) predicted his brother would drastically alter his appearance before he left the halfway house he was staying in, including removing the long beard he grew last year. 'He's going to make himself look like Mr Average,' Tim said

Tim Guider (pictured) predicted his brother would drastically alter his appearance before he left the halfway house he was staying in, including removing the long beard he grew last year. ‘He’s going to make himself look like Mr Average,’ Tim said

‘He’s trying to keep his secrets basically. He doesn’t want anyone to know where he is or what he’s doing.’ 

Tim predicted Guider, who turns 70 on Tuesday, would have altered his appearance before he left Nunyara, including removing the long grey beard he grew last year. 

‘He grew a kind of a bikie beard, so he could walk out looking mean,’ Tim said. ‘That’ll go and then people won’t recognise him.’

‘He’s going to make himself look like Mr Average. They don’t want people to recognise him in the community because people will want to kill him.’

Ms Daly agreed. ‘No one knows what he looks like now,’ she said. ‘When he came out of jail he had this huge thing hanging off his gut and he looked like a bushman. 

‘That’s not what he looked like when he abused us and that’s not what he’s going to look like now, I can guarantee it. 

‘Everyone’s looking for this big, scary bogeyman and that’s just not what he looks like anymore.’

Guider was held at Nunyara with other former inmates for whom it is hard to locate a suitable new home. Finding a permanent home for a serial child molester such as Guider can be harder than placing a murderer in accommodation. He is pictured leaving prison on September 5

Guider was held at Nunyara with other former inmates for whom it is hard to locate a suitable new home. Finding a permanent home for a serial child molester such as Guider can be harder than placing a murderer in accommodation. He is pictured leaving prison on September 5

Guider was held at Nunyara with other former inmates for whom it is hard to locate a suitable new home. Finding a permanent home for a serial child molester such as Guider can be harder than placing a murderer in accommodation. He is pictured leaving prison on September 5

Tim said his brother would do whatever was necessary ‘so that he can operate again as a paedophile.’ 

‘He is worse than he was 20 years ago, not better,’ Tim said. ‘Imagine what lengths he’ll go to now.’

When Guider was filmed leaving prison on September 5 his most distinctive features were the beard and a basketball-size hernia hanging from underneath his shirt which caused him to waddle when he walked. 

It was unclear whether Guider had undergone a procedure to have that unsightly growth removed before he left Nunyara and returned to the community.

Under the terms of his release Guider must seek permission to ‘significantly’ change his appearance but his brother said the public would not be alerted if he did.

‘He could shave his beard off and say, “Whoops!” What are they gonna say? He could shave the whole thing off and there’s nothing they can do about it.’ 

Guider was let go from the Metropolitan Special Programs Centre at Long Bay on September 5, 2019, after serving 17 years for killing Samantha Knight and a total of 23 years in prison. 

Serial paedophile Michael Guider's first home outside prison was a single room featuring a bed and a desk at the Nunyara facility (pictured) in the Long Bay prison complex

Serial paedophile Michael Guider's first home outside prison was a single room featuring a bed and a desk at the Nunyara facility (pictured) in the Long Bay prison complex

Serial paedophile Michael Guider’s first home outside prison was a single room featuring a bed and a desk at the Nunyara facility (pictured) in the Long Bay prison complex

Samantha’s body has never been found and Guider has shown no remorse for her manslaughter, which he once claimed was accidental and most recently said he had not committed. 

Guider had previously been jailed for sexually assaulting 13 children from 1980 to 1996. Police are aware of other victims still too traumatised to come forward.

His brother believed Michael, who is 13 months into a five-year extended supervision order, would find a way to return to his old ways once he was back in the community. 

‘He’s a hunter,’ Tim said. ‘And that’s what I think he’ll do. He’ll start out hunting. 

‘But he won’t be limping around or hunched over or looking surly. He’ll just walk around normally and he’ll talk to people. He’s a friendly, outgoing sort of guy. 

‘He’ll start to look for victims because honestly he can’t help himself.’

A Corrective Services NSW spokeswoman said Guider was only allowed to leave Nunyara when escorted by staff to essential appointments. In the meantime he would be helped into adapting to life outside prison, where Guider spent the 23 consecutive years

A Corrective Services NSW spokeswoman said Guider was only allowed to leave Nunyara when escorted by staff to essential appointments. In the meantime he would be helped into adapting to life outside prison, where Guider spent the 23 consecutive years

A Corrective Services NSW spokeswoman said Guider was only allowed to leave Nunyara when escorted by staff to essential appointments. In the meantime he would be helped into adapting to life outside prison, where Guider spent the 23 consecutive years

Tim believed his brother would remain a danger whilever he refused to reveal the extent of his offending, including what he did with Samantha’s body and how she was killed. 

‘He’s still a paedophile,’ Tim said. ‘He’s not rehabilitated at all – not one little bit – and he won’t be until he fesses up and gets it out.’ 

Tim spoke last year with the management team responsible for his brother and was told they could provide no information about his circumstances after leaving prison.

Guider has no other family and his brother said there was no one else from his past likely to contact him. ‘Everybody’s offside with him,’ Tim said.

‘He’s going to be completely on his own now, a complete loner. And everyone will be out for him.’ 

Finding a permanent home for a sex monster who drugged and molested perhaps dozens of children in the 1980s and 1990s and was still considered a high risk of re-offending proved difficult. 

Long-term prisoners such as Guider end up at Nunyara, a ‘non-custodial community-based service’, because they have nowhere else to go after being released.

That could be due to a lack of family and other support networks or even simply because of a short supply of boarding house rooms.

Recently released child sex offenders are considered even harder to place in outside accommodation than killers.

A pariah such as Guider would also attract media attention which was unwanted by the residents and operators of even church or charity-run housing. 

At least when Guider was housed at Nunyara the community knew where he was staying. 

While some of Guider’s fellow boarders could leave Nunyara during daylight hours, he was confined to the centre until suitable accommodation was found for him. 

Guider’s freedom is subject to 56 strict court-imposed conditions overseen by a Corrective Services department supervising officer (DSO) for the next five years.

His current address – and any address thereafter for the next four years – must be approved by his DSO and he must abide by a 10pm to 6am curfew.

No other person can enter and remain, or stay overnight, at his approved address without being cleared.

Guider must wear an electronic monitoring device and provide a weekly plan called a ‘schedule of movements’ three days before it is due to start.

He cannot go to any of the following places without approval: day care centres, pre-schools and schools, amusement parlours, amusement parks and theme parks, cinemas, libraries and museums.

He cannot enter camping grounds and caravan parks, children’s playgrounds, parks and any areas with play equipment provided for children.

Guider claimed he had killed nine-year-old Samantha Knight (pictured) accidentally after he kidnapped the nine-year-old from near her Bondi home. Samantha's body has not been found

Guider claimed he had killed nine-year-old Samantha Knight (pictured) accidentally after he kidnapped the nine-year-old from near her Bondi home. Samantha's body has not been found

Guider claimed he had killed nine-year-old Samantha Knight (pictured) accidentally after he kidnapped the nine-year-old from near her Bondi home. Samantha’s body has not been found

He cannot go to pools, playing fields and sporting facilities, concerts, theatre shows, movies, events and activities intended for the entertainment of children.

And he cannot visit any residence where he knows that someone aged under 18 ordinarily lives.

Places used solely or mainly for the sale or display of sexually explicit material, or for providing sexual services or sexually explicit entertainment are also off limits.

Those conditions were not enough to satisfy Chantelle Daly or his other victims.

‘Paedophiles are given too many rights after hurting and abusing children,’ Ms Daly said. ‘It doesn’t make any sense to me. 

Michael Guider, 69, served 17 years for the manslaughter of schoolgirl Samantha Knight

Michael Guider, 69, served 17 years for the manslaughter of schoolgirl Samantha Knight

Michael Guider, 69, served 17 years for the manslaughter of schoolgirl Samantha Knight

‘It makes me feel physically sick that he can walk past children in the street. 

‘I’m not saying he’s going to go to a park – I don’t think he’s that dumb – but he can still go to beaches and to shopping centres.’

For the next four years Guider must not possess or use alcohol or illegal drugs and submit to testing for both.

He cannot enter any licensed premises including hotels, bars and clubs – but excluding cafes and restaurants – without approval.

Guider must not approach or have contact with anyone he knows or ‘reasonably should know’ is under 18, other than ‘incidental contact in a public place’ unless he is in the company of an approved person.

His supervisor can notify anyone Guider associates with who has children in their care of his criminal history and can stop him from seeing anyone he or she tells him not to.

If Guider wants to see a sex worker that can only be done with the approval of the supervisor, who also must be told if he starts a romantic relationship.

He will need permission to join any club or organisation and any social media network.

He cannot change his name from Michael Anthony Guider – which Daily Mail Australia has previously revealed might not even be his real name – without approval.

Michael Guider was molesting kids for years before and after he killed Bondi schoolgirl Samantha Knight 

Samantha Knight’s 1986 disappearance from near her mother’s home at Bondi in Sydney’s eastern suburbs remained a mystery for 15 years.

Michael Guider has never publicly expressed any remorse for killing the schoolgirl and her body has never been found.

She was one of perhaps dozens of children aged two to 16 who Guider molested over many years. His usual method of offending was to drug then molest pre-pubescent girls.

Guider first molested Samantha when she was living with her mother Tess at Manly in 1984 and 1985.

He snatched Samantha from near her home in Imperial Avenue, Bondi, after school on August 19, 1986.

The honey-blonde, green-eyed girl had been seen that afternoon walking the streets in her uniform. Within days Sydney was plastered with ‘Find our Sam’ posters which described her as intelligent, outgoing and well-spoken.

Guider later claimed he had drugged Samantha with the sleeping pill Normison and she died of an overdose on his lounge while he went out to the shops.

He has since claimed he had nothing to do with her death. 

Many of Guider’s victims were the daughters of mothers he had befriended and he sexually assaulted them during babysitting sessions.

Guider played a ‘game’ called statues with some victims in which he ordered them to stand still while he exposed himself and touched their genitals.

He took thousands of images of the children he violated while they were unconscious. Some of his victims have not been identified.

In 1996 Guider was sentenced to a minimum ten years and six months for 60 offences committed against 11 children between 1980 and 1986. 

Four years later he was convicted of further sex offences against children but his release date was extended by only six months. 

While in custody he was linked to Samantha Knight’s disappearance. 

Guider was charged with Samantha’s murder in February 2001 but pleaded guilty to manslaughter under the weight of damning evidence including a confession to his brother Tim.

He was sentenced to  17 years with a non-parole period of 12 years to date from June 2002. The maximum sentence expired last year.

Efforts to keep Guider in custody beyond his original sentence failed and he was released on an extended supervision order which will last for five years.  

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Australia

NXIVM founder Keith Raniere’s former ‘slaves’ attend his sentencing

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nxivm founder keith ranieres former slaves attend his sentencing

Fifteen of Keith Raniere’s former ‘slaves’ confronted him in court on Tuesday to eviscerate him as a ‘parasite’, ‘monster’ and ‘psychological terrorist’ before he was sentenced to spend the rest of  his life in prison. 

Raniere, 60, was sentenced to 120 years behind bars for running the cult from 1998, during which time he sexually enslaved women, brandished them and starved them. He maintains he is innocent and misunderstood. 

The court heard that he recruited 17,000 people to NXIVM in total. Fifteen of them spoke at the hearing. 

Among them was Toni Natalie, the girlfriend he was dating when he founded the cult, India Oxenberg, the daughter of Dynasty actress Catherine Oxenberg, and a woman who gave her name just as Camila. She was his first known victim and told the court how he raped her when she was 15 and he was 45 in 2005. 

Others include Angela Ucci and Barbara Bouchey. They are among a group known as the ‘NXIVM 9’ – some of the first to have been targeted by Raniere. 

Angela Ucci, Barbara Bouchey, an unnamed victimand Susan Dones all posed together outside the court after Raniere's sentencing

Angela Ucci, Barbara Bouchey, an unnamed victimand Susan Dones all posed together outside the court after Raniere's sentencing

Angela Ucci, Barbara Bouchey, an unnamed victimand Susan Dones all posed together outside the court after Raniere’s sentencing

Toni Natalie, Raniere's girlfriend when he started the cult, was also there. She spoke too

Toni Natalie, Raniere's girlfriend when he started the cult, was also there. She spoke too

Toni Natalie, Raniere’s girlfriend when he started the cult, was also there. She spoke too 

India Oxenberg, 29, the daughter of Dynasty actress Catherine Oxenberg, gave an impact statement

India Oxenberg, 29, the daughter of Dynasty actress Catherine Oxenberg, gave an impact statement

India Oxenberg, 29, the daughter of Dynasty actress Catherine Oxenberg, gave an impact statement

India looked directly at Raniere as she delivered her statement from the witness stand

India looked directly at Raniere as she delivered her statement from the witness stand

India looked directly at Raniere as she delivered her statement from the witness stand

Those women posed together in solidarity outside the courtroom after Raniere was sentenced. 

Ucci described the day as the ‘finale’ to his reign of terror. Catherine Oxenberg spoke to GMA on Wednesday morning to call Raniere a ‘vile monster’. She tried for years to extract her daughter from the cult.  

Raniere had been facing a maximum sentence of life in prison after being convicted of sex trafficking of children, conspiracy, and conspiracy to commit forced labor in June 2019.

As the founder of NXIVM, the court had heard how the cult-like group kept women on starvation diets, branded them with his initials, and ordered them to have sex with him. 

India's mother Catherine on Wednesday called Raniere a 'vile monster' whose reign had come to an end

India's mother Catherine on Wednesday called Raniere a 'vile monster' whose reign had come to an end

India’s mother Catherine on Wednesday called Raniere a ‘vile monster’ whose reign had come to an end

His sentencing was delayed on Tuesday because so many people had shown up to attend it. India Oxenberg, the daughter of Dynasty actress Catherine Oxenberg, was one of those who spoke. 

She said Raniere treated her like his ‘human science experiment’, calling him an ‘entitled little princess’ and a sexual predator. She lamented that she ‘may have to spend the rest of my life with Keith Raneire’s initials seared into me.’   

Raniere’s lawyers asked that he be sentenced to 15 years. But after telling the judge he had ‘no remorse’ for the crimes because he ‘didn’t commit them’, Judge Nicholas Garaufis handed down the sentence that means he will spend the rest of his life in prison.    

Branding Raniere ‘ruthless and unyielding’ in crimes that were ‘particularly egregious’ because he targeted girls and young women, Judge Garaufis said: ‘To him, the brave victims… are liars. Mr. Raniere remains unmoved. … [He] has therefore failed to demonstrate remorse.’  

He handed down the unusually high sentence in federal court in Brooklyn after hearing anguished statements by victims of a sex-trafficking conspiracy that resulted in Raniere’s conviction last year, along with unrepentant remarks from the defendant himself.

‘I do believe I am innocent of the charges. … It is true I am not remorseful of the crimes I do not believe I committed at all,’ Raniere said. 

NXIVM cult leader Keith Raniere has been sentenced to 120 years behind bars after a dramatic hearing where he was confronted by 15 of his victims

NXIVM cult leader Keith Raniere has been sentenced to 120 years behind bars after a dramatic hearing where he was confronted by 15 of his victims

Raniere looks on during his sentencing Tuesday

Raniere looks on during his sentencing Tuesday

NXIVM cult leader Keith Raniere has been sentenced to 120 years behind bars after a dramatic hearing where he was confronted by 15 of his victims 

Because of social distancing rules, fewer people are allowed in courtrooms now than before. More than an hour after Raniere’s scheduled hearing time, court officials were trying to determine whether or not they should open a second courtroom for the overspill of media and victims who had shown up at Brooklyn Criminal Court on Tuesday. 

Eventually, it got underway with the statement of a woman who called herself Camila. Raniere moved her and her sister to the US from Mexico in 2005. She called him a ‘monster’.  

Fifteen women gave victim impact statements on Tuesday. Among them were former girlfriends of Raniere and former victims. They labeled him a ‘parasite’ and a ‘psychological terrorist’. 

‘He screwed with my mind for so long. It is difficult for me to utter his name, so I will only refer to him as ‘he’. 

‘I can still hear his voice in my head — it continues to be a daily struggle,’ Camila said. 

She also told the court that she was 15 and he was 45 when he raped her. He denies it. 

 ‘I can still hear his voice in my head — it continues to be a daily struggle
‘Camila’ – Raniere’s first victim who says he raped her in 2005 

‘He manipulated me for what he wanted. 

‘I became unreachable to my parents, my brother, my friends until I had nobody to worry about me. He knew the things that mattered most to me and what I feared and used that against me,’ she said 

Raniere was convicted of racketeering, racketeering conspiracy, wire fraud conspiracy, forced labor conspiracy, sex trafficking, sex trafficking conspiracy and attempted sex trafficking but not rape.  

‘He told me to keep it a secret, and he would ask me to sneak out of the home to meet in a place where we were isolated from everyone.  

‘He took naked pictures of me — the experience of being photographed is seared in my memory,’ she said. 

She also told the court that he forced her to weigh less than 100lbs and that he once made her get an abortion.  

The likelihood of leniency had seemed to dissipate with the recent sentencing of Clare Bronfman, 41, an heir to the Seagram’s liquor fortune, for her role in the cult. 

Bronfman was sentenced to nearly seven years in prison. Prosecutors had only sought five years. Ex-followers told the judge that Bronfman for years had used her wealth to try to silence NXIVM defectors. 

Former NXIVM member and supporter of Raniere, Marc Elliot, said: ‘We all should be fighting for due process no matter how much you don’t like it or how inconvenient it is. Because if someone or society ever turns on you, you better hope to God that due process and laws are still standing to protect you.’

Kristen Keefe gives a victim impact statement at the sentencing hearing in the sex trafficking and racketeering case against NXIVM cult leader Keith Raniere as Raniere listens

Kristen Keefe gives a victim impact statement at the sentencing hearing in the sex trafficking and racketeering case against NXIVM cult leader Keith Raniere as Raniere listens

Kristen Keefe gives a victim impact statement at the sentencing hearing in the sex trafficking and racketeering case against NXIVM cult leader Keith Raniere as Raniere listens

Supporter Marc Elliot speaks to reporters following the sentencing hearing Tuesday. Nicki Clyne, second left, is one of those who also stands by Raniere

Supporter Marc Elliot speaks to reporters following the sentencing hearing Tuesday. Nicki Clyne, second left, is one of those who also stands by Raniere

Supporter Marc Elliot speaks to reporters following the sentencing hearing Tuesday. Nicki Clyne, second left, is one of those who also stands by Raniere

Raniere’s ex-girlfriend, Toni Natalie – who he dated when in the 1990s – said he needed to be locked away for life ‘as they did Charles Manson.’ 

Raniere founded NXIVM in Albany, New York, in 1998 and between then and 2017, recruited more than 17,000 people to it, promising them self-help. 

You played doctor and I was your human science experiment  
India Oxenberg 

But within the secretive organization there was an even more clandestine sub-sect which he was the master of. 

Named DOS, the sub-sect involved women being his sexual slaves and submitting themselves entirely to his control. 

They were brandished with his initials, starved, sleep deprived and forced to engage in group sex and blackmailed with ‘collateral’ they had provided in the form of incriminating photos, videos or information about them or their families.  

Raniere also punished young women including a teenager who prosecutors said he held in a room for two years as punishment because she’d shown a romantic interest in another man. 

Supporters: Linda Chung, left, Nicki Clyne, center, and Michelle Hatchette leave Brooklyn federal court following the sentencing hearing for self-improvement guru Keith Raniere, Tuesday. Raniere himself maintains he has done nothing wrong and he still enjoys the support of some loyal followers. Fifty people wrote letter to the judge asking for leniency.

Supporters: Linda Chung, left, Nicki Clyne, center, and Michelle Hatchette leave Brooklyn federal court following the sentencing hearing for self-improvement guru Keith Raniere, Tuesday. Raniere himself maintains he has done nothing wrong and he still enjoys the support of some loyal followers. Fifty people wrote letter to the judge asking for leniency.

Supporters: Linda Chung, left, Nicki Clyne, center, and Michelle Hatchette leave Brooklyn federal court following the sentencing hearing for self-improvement guru Keith Raniere, Tuesday. Raniere himself maintains he has done nothing wrong and he still enjoys the support of some loyal followers. Fifty people wrote letter to the judge asking for leniency.

NXIVM supporter Nicki Clyne is one of those who stands by Raniere. She is shown outside court in Brooklyn on Tuesday waiting for the proceeding to get underway

NXIVM supporter Nicki Clyne is one of those who stands by Raniere. She is shown outside court in Brooklyn on Tuesday waiting for the proceeding to get underway

NXIVM supporter Nicki Clyne is one of those who stands by Raniere. She is shown outside court in Brooklyn on Tuesday waiting for the proceeding to get underway

NXIVM supporter Nicki Clyne is one of those who stands by Raniere. She is shown outside court in Brooklyn on Tuesday waiting for the proceeding to get underway

NXIVM supporter Nicki Clyne is one of those who stands by Raniere. She is shown outside court in Brooklyn on Tuesday waiting for the proceeding to get underway

Among others involved in the cult were actresses Allison Mack – who is in jail awaiting her own sentencing – and India Oxenberg, the daughter of Dynasty actress Catherine Oxenberg who escaped and cooperated with the authorities to convict Raniere. 

She previously told how she was brainwashed for seven years into thinking Raniere was helping her. 

‘What I thought I was learning was self-help and personal growth. What I was learning was the opposite. It was inhumane,’ she said in a recent interview. 

India was among those expected to give victim impact statements at Raniere’s sentencing on Tuesday morning. 

She said she’d been ‘paining’ over what to say to him when they came face to face. 

The 29-year-old was seen arriving at court wearing a mask. 

Raniere himself maintains he has done nothing wrong and he still enjoys the support of some loyal followers. 

Fifty people wrote letter to the judge asking for leniency. 

Nicki Clyne is one of those who stands by Raniere. She was seen standing outside the courtroom on Tuesday morning before proceedings got underway. 

Clyne is married to Smallville actress Allison Mack but authorities say it is a sham marriage to help Clyne, who is Canadian, circumvent immigration laws. 

Raniere brandished the women who were part of DOS - a sub sect of NXIVM - with his initials

Raniere brandished the women who were part of DOS - a sub sect of NXIVM - with his initials

Raniere brandished the women who were part of DOS – a sub sect of NXIVM – with his initials

Allison Mack has not yet been sentenced

Allison Mack has not yet been sentenced

Clare Bronfman has been sentenced to 81 months

Clare Bronfman has been sentenced to 81 months

Allison Mack (left) is yet to be sentenced.  Seagram heiress Clare Bronfman (right) has been sentenced to 81 months in federal prison

Mack and Oxenberg together in 2018 in Mack's Brooklyn home. Oxenberg ended up cooperating with prosecutors to put Mack and leader Keith Raniere behind bars

Mack and Oxenberg together in 2018 in Mack's Brooklyn home. Oxenberg ended up cooperating with prosecutors to put Mack and leader Keith Raniere behind bars

Mack and Oxenberg together in 2018 in Mack’s Brooklyn home. Oxenberg ended up cooperating with prosecutors to put Mack and leader Keith Raniere behind bars

She maintains that everyone involved in NXIVM consented to their participation. 

In a video project with other followers titled the ‘Dossier Project’, she said: ‘Hopefully anyone watching this will see that we’re all grown a** woman.’  

Bronfman and Mack were arrested in April 2018, a month after Raniere was taken into custody in Mexico. 

They both made bail then in April 2019, pleaded guilty to racketeering charges as part of plea deals to reduce their sentences. 

Bronfman was sentenced to 81 months in a federal prison but Mack has not yet been sentenced.

Raniere founded Nxivm with Nancy  Salzman, a psychiatric nurse.

It was designed to be a self-help group and was based out of Albany, New York.

Executive Success Programs, Inc., was another name for the courses. Raniere had, until then, tried and failed multiple times to launch his own business. 

He’d grown up in Suffern, New York, with divorced parents, one of whom worked in advertising. 

After graduating from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, upstate New York, in 1982 then tried his hand at marketing before launching Nxivm. 

At the time he founded the organization, he was in a relationship with Toni Natalie, the woman who introduced him to Salzman.

Natalie later recalled Salzman becoming enthralled with Raniere, as many other women who met him did.   

Raniere grew up in New York and tried his hand at marketing before launching the self-help programs in the late 1990s

Raniere grew up in New York and tried his hand at marketing before launching the self-help programs in the late 1990s

Raniere grew up in New York and tried his hand at marketing before launching the self-help programs in the late 1990s

Raniere receiving a white sash from the Dalai Lama in Albany, New York, in 2009

Raniere receiving a white sash from the Dalai Lama in Albany, New York, in 2009

Raniere receiving a white sash from the Dalai Lama in Albany, New York, in 2009

Fifteen women gave victim impact statements on Tuesday. Among them were former girlfriends of Raniere and former victims. They labeled him a 'parasite' and a 'psychological terrorist'

Fifteen women gave victim impact statements on Tuesday. Among them were former girlfriends of Raniere and former victims. They labeled him a 'parasite' and a 'psychological terrorist'

Fifteen women gave victim impact statements on Tuesday. Among them were former girlfriends of Raniere and former victims. They labeled him a ‘parasite’ and a ‘psychological terrorist’

A court sketch of Raniere in June 2019 when he was convicted of seven counts including child porn and sex trafficking

A court sketch of Raniere in June 2019 when he was convicted of seven counts including child porn and sex trafficking

A court sketch of Raniere in June 2019 when he was convicted of seven counts including child porn and sex trafficking

One of the turning points in the cult came in 2002 when Salzman and Raniere recruited members of the influential Bronfman family. 

The Bronfmans come from the Seagram liquor empire and are heiresses to billions. 

According to his indictment, Raniere tricked Clare Bronfman into giving him millions over the years. 

Her sister, Sara, was not as enthusiastically involved. It was through the Bronfman sisters that the first signs of trouble in Nxivm emerged. 

In 2003, Clare told their father that she’d loaned Nxivm $2million. He became suspicious and publicly accused Raniere of running a cult in a Forbes article. 

For the next several years, they tried to legitimize themselves with wholesome associations, all the while running the cult of sexual servitude to Raniere behind closed doors. 

In 2009, the Dalai Lama even appeared on stage with Raniere at an event in Albany, NY.   

Toni Natalie, Rainiere's ex-girlfriend, wrote this book

Toni Natalie, Rainiere's ex-girlfriend, wrote this book

Toni Natalie, Rainiere’s ex-girlfriend, wrote this book 

In 2011, actresses Allison Mack and India Oxenberg became some of the newest recruits to the group. 

Mack rose through the ranks quickly and grew close to Raniere, who was referred to as the ‘Vanguard’ to cult members

In 2015, DOS was created. It stands for ‘Dominus Obsequious Sororium’ – which translates to Master over Slave Women in Latin.

It was a sub-sect within the cult that involved women being branded with Raniere’s initials and having to perform sexual servitude. 

Oxenberg has told in the past how she was enslaved to Mack. 

Part of the ‘discipline’ training was controlling how many calories people ate.

She would have to ask permission for when she could eat, she has since revealed. 

Raniere’s indictment refers to DOS as the a ‘pyramid’. 

Almost all of the DOS recruits were ‘vulnerable’.  

‘When identifying prospective slaves, masters often targeted women who were currently experiencing difficulties in their lives, including dissatisfaction with the pace of their advancement in Nxivm. 

‘While avoiding the words ‘master’ and ‘slave’ in the initial recruiting pitch, a master would tell her prospective slave that the prospective slave had an opportunity to join an organization that would change her life,’ Raniere’s indictment reads. 

‘The master then told the prospective slave that, in order to learn more, she had to provide ‘collateral,’ which was meant to ensure that the prospective slave would keep what she was about to learn a secret. 

‘Collateral consisted of material or information that the prospective slave would not want revealed because it would be ruinous to the prospective slave herself and/or someone close to her.’

Toni Natalie, second from left, and India Oxenberg, right, arrive with their attorneys at Brooklyn federal court for the sentencing hearing

Toni Natalie, second from left, and India Oxenberg, right, arrive with their attorneys at Brooklyn federal court for the sentencing hearing

Toni Natalie, second from left, and India Oxenberg, right, arrive with their attorneys at Brooklyn federal court for the sentencing hearing

India Oxenberg gives a victim impact statement

India Oxenberg gives a victim impact statement

India Oxenberg gives a victim impact statement

Raniere was also charged with trafficking at least one young woman from Mexico. 

The woman, Daniela, had been awarded a scholarship at a prestigious school in Switzerland but she gave it up to travel to the US and join NXIVM. 

At Raniere’s trial, she testified that he kept her confined in a room for nearly two years because she’d shown romantic interest in another man. 

She said she was controlled by him after he sneaked her into the country illegally from Canada. 

‘Sex meant access when it came to Keith…I was without a doubt a captive from a moment I was illegal in the country. 

‘As time progressed it was clear to me I could not leave,’ she told his trial.

She said she first had sex with him on ‘dingy’ sheets when she was 18 but that her younger sister slept with him when she was just 16.

A TIMELINE OF NXIVM 

1998: NXIVM is founded

Raniere founded Nxivm with Nancy  Salzman, a psychiatric nurse. It was designed to be a self-help group and was based out of Albany, New York.

Executive Success Programs, Inc., was another name for the courses. Raniere had, until then, tried and failed multiple times to launch his own business. 

He’d grown up in Suffern, New York, with divorced parents, one of whom worked in advertising. 

After graduating from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, upstate New York, in 1982 then tried his hand at marketing before launching Nxivm. 

At the time he founded the organization, he was in a relationship with Toni Natalie, the woman who introduced him to Salzman. Natalie later recalled Salzman becoming enthralled with Raniere, as many other women who met him did. 

2002 Bronfmans recruited 

One of the turning points in the cult came in 2002 when Salzman and Raniere recruited members of the influential Bronfman family. 

The Bronfmans come from the Seagram liquor empire and are heiresses to billions. 

According to his indictment, Raniere tricked Clare Bronfman into giving him millions over the years. 

Her sister, Sara, was not as enthusiastically involved. It was through the Bronfman sisters that the first signs of trouble in Nxivm emerged. 

In 2003, Clare told their father that she’d loaned Nxivm $2million. He became suspicious and publicly accused Raniere of running a cult in a Forbes article. 

For the next several years, they tried to legitimize themselves with wholesome associations, all the while running the cult of sexual servitude to Raniere behind closed doors. 

In 2009, the Dalai Lama even appeared on stage with Raniere at an event in Albany, NY.  

2011 – Allison Mack and India Oxenberg recruited 

In 2011, actresses Allison Mack and India Oxenberg became some of the newest recruits to the group. 

Mack rose through the ranks quickly and grew close to Raniere, who was referred to as the ‘Vanguard’ to cult members. 

2015 – DOS is created 

DOS was the name given to the secret, sub-sect within the cult that involved women being branded with Raniere’s initials and having to perform sexual servitude. 

Oxenberg has told in the past how she was enslaved to Mack. Part of the ‘discipline’ training was controlling how many calories people ate.

She would have to ask permission for when she could eat, she has since revealed. 

Raniere’s indictment refers to DOS as the a ‘pyramid’. 

‘DOS operates as a pyramid with levels of ‘slaves’ headed by ‘masters.’ Slaves are expected to recruit slaves of their own (thus becoming masters themselves), who in tum owe service not only to their own masters but also to masters above them in the DOS pyramid. 

‘Raniere alone forms the top of the pyramid as the highest master. Other than Raniere, all participants in DOS are women. Raniere’s status as head of the pyramid was concealed from all newly recruited slaves, other than those directly under Raniere,’ it reads.

2017 – Investigation launched after former members speak out 

The Department of Justice started probing Raniere in 2017 after some of its former members made contact to share information about DOS. 

He moved from Albany, NY, to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico

March 2018: Raniere is arrested in his villa in Mexico 

April 2018: Allison Mack is arrested in Brooklyn 

July 2018: Clare Bronfman is arrested in New York City 

April 2019: Bronfman and Mack both plead guilty to racketeering. Bronfman has been sentenced but Mack has not yet  

June 2019: Raniere is found guilty on all counts 

October 2020: Raniere is sentenced

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Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk is ‘clear winner’ in election debate

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Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk has won the first leaders’ debate after defending her state border closures and attacking the Liberal National Party over election costings.

Undecided voters in the audience said Ms Palaszczuk was the ‘clear winner’ at Wednesday’s People’s Forum, according to the Courier Mail.

Ms Palaszczuk received 53 per cent of the vote, while LNP leader Deb Frecklington received 30 per cent. Seventeen per cent were undecided.

The premier used the debate to lay into Ms Frecklington about election costings, which she has promised to release on Thursday.

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk (pictured) has won the first leaders' debate after defending her state border closures and attacking the Liberal National Party over election costings

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk (pictured) has won the first leaders' debate after defending her state border closures and attacking the Liberal National Party over election costings

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk (pictured) has won the first leaders’ debate after defending her state border closures and attacking the Liberal National Party over election costings

‘Every Queenslander needs to know tonight – how is Deb Frecklington going to pay for all of these commitments she’s been talking about during the election?’ Ms Palaszczuk said.

The LNP leader shot back with a joke: ‘Premier, if you’re waiting to see whether you want to vote for us or not, just wait until after tomorrow.’

‘That’s a definite no,’ Ms Palaszczuk said, causing Ms Frecklington to chuckle.

The premier told the audience the opposition would cut public service jobs like the former Newman government.

But Ms Frecklington distanced herself from the LNP government that lost power in 2015, and in which she was a junior minister.

‘Queenslanders have had their say on that government. I’m a new leader in a new team.’

The Labor leader was pressed over the border closures, with a number of audience members asking her about the issue.

She said it was too risky for Queensland to be the test case for an international travel bubble and COVID-19 would be a long-term problem.

‘Everyone is concerned about it and people say to me when are we going to get past COVID,’ Ms Palaszczuk said.

‘We are not until we get a vaccine. That is the reality.

‘And what we need to do is make sure that we are focused on looking after Queenslanders, supporting Queenslanders and growing jobs in Queensland.’

Ms Frecklington needled her rival about the economy, which she said was in bad shape before COVID.

The LNP said Queensland had the highest unemployment rate in the nation for four years, the lowest business confidence and the highest number of bankruptcies.

‘These are shocking statistics, all because we’ve had a government that has been more focused on themselves instead of you, the Queenslander,’ she said.

Ms Palaszczuk received 53 per cent of the vote, while LNP leader Deb Frecklington (pictured) received 30 per cent. Seventeen per cent were undecided

Ms Palaszczuk received 53 per cent of the vote, while LNP leader Deb Frecklington (pictured) received 30 per cent. Seventeen per cent were undecided

Ms Palaszczuk received 53 per cent of the vote, while LNP leader Deb Frecklington (pictured) received 30 per cent. Seventeen per cent were undecided

Ms Palaszczuk hit back at the LNP leader, saying things would have been worse under a Frecklington government.

‘You would have opened the borders and decimated this economy,’ she said.

‘We would have been like Victoria, there would be no one working.’

Ms Palaszczuk dodged a question about Labor’s support for the thermal coal industry, while the LNP sidestepped a question about maintaining a 50 per cent renewable energy target.

Neither leader could say how they would support the arts industry. They also tried to one-up each other on the number of police they would put on in Townsville.

One audience member was disqualified from voting when online viewers identified her as LNP women’s executive member Marilyn Wilson.

Another, Aiden from the Maiwar electorate, was displeased about the answers of both leaders to his question about planning laws and left the room.

The leaders will go head to head again at the Queensland Media Club debate on Friday.

Queenslanders polling day is October 31.

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Claremont Serial Killer ‘snapped’ after separation from first wife

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Bradley Robert Edwards (pictured)

Bradley Robert Edwards (pictured)

Bradley Robert Edwards (pictured)

The man responsible for murdering two women, tearing their families apart and sparking two decades of terror snapped after learning his wife was having an affair with his former flatmate.

Bradley Robert Edwards was identified as the infamous Claremont Killer in 2016, two decades after wreaking havoc on you women in Perth.

Edwards, now 51, was convicted for the murders of Jane Rimmer, 23, and Ciara Glennon, 27, in September after a marathon seven-month trial in the WA Supreme Court.

He was found not guilty of murdering Sarah Spiers, 18, whose body has never been found, as the judge ruled there was insufficient evidence to remove reasonable doubt.

Ms Rimmer’s older sister Lee said Edwards deserves to spend the rest of his life behind bars.

‘Don’t ever let him out so that he can’t hurt anybody else,’ she told Nine News Perth this week in an interview that aired for the rest of Australia on Wednesday night. 

When he was first convicted, Lee admitted she felt a sense of ‘closure’ but said justice had not been served. 

‘I think you get some closure but it’s always gonna be the same. No-one’s ever going to bring her back,’ she said at the time. 

Lee and her sister had always been close despite their six year age gap, and it was ‘gut wrenching’ for her when police recovered Ms Rimmer’s body two months after she went missing in 1996.

‘I think my dad just crumbled inside,’ she recalled in the Nine News interview. ‘That was his little baby girl.’ 

Edwards was found not guilty of murdering Sarah Spiers (pictured), 18, saying there was not enough evidence to convince him beyond reasonable doubt. Ms Spiers' body has never been found

Edwards was found not guilty of murdering Sarah Spiers (pictured), 18, saying there was not enough evidence to convince him beyond reasonable doubt. Ms Spiers' body has never been found

Jane Rimmer, 23, disappeared from Claremont on June 6, 1996 and was the second alleged victim of Bradley Robert Edwards

Jane Rimmer, 23, disappeared from Claremont on June 6, 1996 and was the second alleged victim of Bradley Robert Edwards

Edwards was found not guilty of murdering Sarah Spiers (left), 18, but guilty of murdering 23-year-old Jane Rimmer (right) 

Ms Rimmer’s father was diagnosed with cancer within a year of his daughter’s death. 

She turned to drinking to cope, and spent the two decades afterwards battling the habit. 

It wasn’t until Edwards was arrested in 2016 that Lee decided to give up the drink for good.

‘I just stopped, just like that,’ she said. ‘Because I wanted to have clarity if it was the right person so I could know what was going on.’

When Edwards was finally caught and captured almost two decades later, police initially struggled to find his motive. 

They later learned his first wife had left him for another man, his former housemate.

Just before the 1996 disappearance of 18-year-old secretary Sarah Spiers, Edwards’ marriage broke down.

And around the same time that Ms Rimmer disappeared, he had recently learned his wife was pregnant with his housemate’s child. 

Ms Glennon’s disappearance came weeks after the couple’s home was sold.  

Ciara Glennon, 27, was the last victim of the Claremont serial killer. She disappeared after a night out in Perth on March 15, 1997 and her body was found in bushland 40km away

Ciara Glennon, 27, was the last victim of the Claremont serial killer. She disappeared after a night out in Perth on March 15, 1997 and her body was found in bushland 40km away

Ciara Glennon, 27, was the last victim of the Claremont serial killer. She disappeared after a night out in Perth on March 15, 1997 and her body was found in bushland 40km away

Bradley Robert Edwards is pictured at the back of a van while he was married to his first wife, who gave evidence the couple had separated in late 1995 or early 1996

Bradley Robert Edwards is pictured at the back of a van while he was married to his first wife, who gave evidence the couple had separated in late 1995 or early 1996

Bradley Robert Edwards is pictured at the back of a van while he was married to his first wife, who gave evidence the couple had separated in late 1995 or early 1996

Prosecutors determined it was these life changing developments which progressed Edwards from a cross-dressing rapist into a murderer, Nine News reported. 

The housemate, who cannot be identified for legal reasons, told the program Edwards threatened to kill him after learning of the affair.

‘That was the first sign of emotion I ever saw come out of him… He had tears,’ the man revealed. 

He said the wife ‘instigated’ what he called ‘the game’ and said he was simply ‘stupid enough to go along with it’.

‘He’s just, no expression. Nothing… It’s the fear that what he had under the bed and he’s caught me kissing his wife,’ he said.

‘He said, ”I know where you live and I’ll come and kill you”,’ the man revealed.

Bradley Robert Edwards was found guilty of the serial killings of two women in Claremont, Western Australia, across 1996 and 1997

Bradley Robert Edwards was found guilty of the serial killings of two women in Claremont, Western Australia, across 1996 and 1997

Bradley Robert Edwards was found guilty of the serial killings of two women in Claremont, Western Australia, across 1996 and 1997 

Another woman, Katrina Jones, recalled a lonely night in the beachside suburb of Cottesloe in December 1995 when she was approached by Edwards as she made her way home from a night out.

He was driving a white, nondescript van and offered her a lift home. 

Initially, he appeared friendly and told her he worked in the telecommunications industry. 

She told the program that she asked him ‘where he was headed’ and he admitted to ‘driving around looking for damsels in distress like yourself’.

The comment gave Ms Jones ‘flutters’ in her stomach, but she allowed him to drive her to his car regardless.

‘Next minute, he’s on me, grabbing my arm, leaning down as if to try to kiss me,’ she said.

Ms Jones was trained in self defense and managed to escape. She reported the incident to WA Police but thought nothing more of it until she saw his arrest on television.

‘I saw the Claremont Serial Killers and my knees went and I just thought, ”I knew it”, I just felt it all this time.’

‘They should’ve been acted on, they really should’ve. I know we’re all human and trying to do the best we can… but that could’ve saved someone.’  

Addressing the media after the guilty verdict was handed down, Denis Glennon spoke of his daughter’s ‘great courage and determination to survive’.

‘As she fought to save her life, she left us the vital DNA clues,’ Mr Glennon said.

Another woman, Katrina Jones (pictured), recalled a lonely night in Cottisloe in December 1995 when she was approached by Edwards as she made her way home from a night out.

Another woman, Katrina Jones (pictured), recalled a lonely night in Cottisloe in December 1995 when she was approached by Edwards as she made her way home from a night out.

Another woman, Katrina Jones (pictured), recalled a lonely night in Cottisloe in December 1995 when she was approached by Edwards as she made her way home from a night out.

Police accused Edwards of murdering all three of these women, but he was only convicted of murdering Ms Rimmer (left) and Ms Glennon (right)

Police accused Edwards of murdering all three of these women, but he was only convicted of murdering Ms Rimmer (left) and Ms Glennon (right)

Police accused Edwards of murdering all three of these women, but he was only convicted of murdering Ms Rimmer (left) and Ms Glennon (right)

‘Ciara was strong in spirit, had courage, great courage but yet as she fought to save her life she could not save herself because of the brutal assault by her murderer.’

The 27-year-old lawyer was the third woman to vanish from the streets of Claremont in Western Australia in the mid-1990s.

Days after her disappearance in March 1997, her father pleaded for help to find her, adamant that she was still alive.

‘The way she’s been brought up, she will fight,’ he said the time.

Ms Glennon’s body was found in remote bushland in Eglinton, 40km north of Perth.

Two decades on, prosecutors relied on DNA evidence to have Edwards convicted.

The DNA was collected from under Ms Glennon’s fingertips after she scratched and fought desperately for her life.

The samples were sent to Britain and eventually matched to a report made by a teenager detailing a terrifying sexual assault in the region.

The Claremont serial killer case is WA’s biggest, longest-running and most expensive criminal investigation.

Edwards, a Telstra technician, was arrested in 2016 and has remained in custody ever since awaiting what was eventually a judge-alone trial.

Ms Rimmer's older sister Lee(pictured) said Edwards deserves to spend the rest of his life behind bars. 'Don't ever let him out so that he can't hurt anybody else,'

Ms Rimmer's older sister Lee(pictured) said Edwards deserves to spend the rest of his life behind bars. 'Don't ever let him out so that he can't hurt anybody else,'

Ms Rimmer’s older sister Lee(pictured) said Edwards deserves to spend the rest of his life behind bars. ‘Don’t ever let him out so that he can’t hurt anybody else,’

'Ciara was strong in spirit, had courage, great courage but yet as she fought to save her life she could not save herself because of the brutal assault by her murderer,' her father said after her death

'Ciara was strong in spirit, had courage, great courage but yet as she fought to save her life she could not save herself because of the brutal assault by her murderer,' her father said after her death

‘Ciara was strong in spirit, had courage, great courage but yet as she fought to save her life she could not save herself because of the brutal assault by her murderer,’ her father said after her death

He previously admitted to attacking two other women and raping a 17-year-old girl in 1995.

But he denied murdering secretary Ms Spiers and childcare worker Ms Rimmer in January and June 1996 respectively, and solicitor Ms Glennon  in March the following year.

Police had long had their sights on the now convicted killer – who called himself the ‘bogeyman’ online – but he repeatedly lied to them about his crimes.

Justice Hall took almost three months to consider all the evidence against Edwards, before handing down his verdict.  

Edwards was found not guilty of murdering Ms Spiers. 

The judge determined there was not enough evidence to convince him beyond reasonable doubt that Edwards was responsible for her presumed death.

Ms Spiers’ body has never been found.  

Edwards is scheduled to be sentenced over the two counts of murder on December 23. 

Edwards was found not guilty of murdering Ms Spiers. The judge determined there was not enough evidence to convince him beyond reasonable doubt that Edwards was responsible for her presumed death

Edwards was found not guilty of murdering Ms Spiers. The judge determined there was not enough evidence to convince him beyond reasonable doubt that Edwards was responsible for her presumed death

Edwards was found not guilty of murdering Ms Spiers. The judge determined there was not enough evidence to convince him beyond reasonable doubt that Edwards was responsible for her presumed death

The Claremont serial killer case has been described as is the state's biggest, longest-running, and most expensive criminal investigation and has received constant media coverage in Perth. Killer Bradley Robert Edwards is pictured during his first marriage in the 1990s

The Claremont serial killer case has been described as is the state's biggest, longest-running, and most expensive criminal investigation and has received constant media coverage in Perth. Killer Bradley Robert Edwards is pictured during his first marriage in the 1990s

The Claremont serial killer case has been described as is the state’s biggest, longest-running, and most expensive criminal investigation and has received constant media coverage in Perth. Killer Bradley Robert Edwards is pictured during his first marriage in the 1990s

WA Police Commissioner Chris Dawson praised Edwards’ rape victims for coming forward, and the ‘strength and resilience’ of the murdered girls’ families.

‘Bradley Edwards can now be called for what he is. A brutal rapist and a murderer,’ he said outside court after the verdict.

Commissioner Dawson vowed he would never stop looking for Ms Spiers’ body and the investigation would remain open.

‘The Claremont killings struck at the heart of our way of life, stretching [to] almost a quarter of a century,’ he said.

‘Three innocent young women were killed along with the hopes and dreams they never got to fulfill.

‘We will never give up trying to locate Sarah, and I have conveyed that to Don and Carol Spiers today and to Amanda. Sarah and her family deserve justice.’

Edwards was just 19 when he donned a woman’s nightie, crept into a bedroom and climbed on top of a sleeping 18-year-old woman. 

A silk kimono was left at the scene. 

A forensic police officer measures where tree branches have been torn off near the area where Ciara Glennon's body was dumped at Eglington, about 40km north of Perth, in 1997

A forensic police officer measures where tree branches have been torn off near the area where Ciara Glennon's body was dumped at Eglington, about 40km north of Perth, in 1997

A forensic police officer measures where tree branches have been torn off near the area where Ciara Glennon’s body was dumped at Eglington, about 40km north of Perth, in 1997

Edwards has admitted  twice raping a 17-year-old girl at Karrakatta Cemetery, (pictured) near Perth's central business district, on February 12, 1995. That teenager had been abducted from Claremont

Edwards has admitted  twice raping a 17-year-old girl at Karrakatta Cemetery, (pictured) near Perth's central business district, on February 12, 1995. That teenager had been abducted from Claremont

Edwards has admitted  twice raping a 17-year-old girl at Karrakatta Cemetery, (pictured) near Perth’s central business district, on February 12, 1995. That teenager had been abducted from Claremont

Bradley Robert Edwards (pictured) will not learn his fate for several months. His defense case finished this week and closing submissions are due to be heard next month

Bradley Robert Edwards (pictured) will not learn his fate for several months. His defense case finished this week and closing submissions are due to be heard next month

Bradley Robert Edwards (pictured) will not learn his fate for several months. His defense case finished this week and closing submissions are due to be heard next month

He admitted the attack on the 18-year-old as well as twice raping a 17-year-old girl at Karrakatta Cemetery, near Perth’s central business district, on February 12, 1995. That teenager had been abducted from Claremont. 

The girl he raped in the cemetery less than a year before Ms Spiers disappeared gave evidence against Edwards in four statements read out in the court.

‘I thought at the end of it all that he was going to kill me,’ she said.

On the night of the rape the girl had left Club Bayview at Claremont – the same venue where Ms Spiers was last seen – and was walking a few hundred metres to a friend’s house.

As she made her way through a dimly-lit park, she was grabbed from behind, pushed to the ground and straddled, then had a thick cloth like a sock shoved deep into her mouth.

‘I didn’t scream, I just froze,’ she said. It happened really quickly. He told me to shut up at one point.

‘I didn’t say anything to him. I was too frightened. I kept my eyes shut – I thought it would be better if he thought I couldn’t see him.’

Ciara Gleenon's father Denis Glennon is pictured arriving at the Supreme Court of Western Australia for the opening day of the trial of Bradley Robert Edwards on November 25 last year

Ciara Gleenon's father Denis Glennon is pictured arriving at the Supreme Court of Western Australia for the opening day of the trial of Bradley Robert Edwards on November 25 last year

Ciara Gleenon’s father Denis Glennon is pictured arriving at the Supreme Court of Western Australia for the opening day of the trial of Bradley Robert Edwards on November 25 last year

Edwards tied up the girl’s hands tightly with a restraint ‘as thick as a telephone cord’, carried her to his van, bound her ankles and covered her head with a cotton bag.

‘I was very frightened,’ she said. ‘I thought I was going to die.’

Edwards drove for about 30 minutes then carried and dragged the girl through Karrakatta Cemetery where he raped her twice.

‘I started to cry but not loudly,’ she said. ‘I remember repeating, ‘Oh my god, I can’t believe this is happening’. It was very painful. I remember my face lying against the dirt.’

Edwards flung the girl into scrub, then left. About two minutes later he returned and threw her into denser bushes.

After the girl heard him drive off she opened her eyes and ran to the cemetery’s nearest exit. Semi-naked, she fled to a care facility near the Hollywood Hospital where she dialled a phone at the front door with her chin and yelled for help.

A woman inside the hospital called police while the still-bound teenager ran off. She then called her father from a phone box and ran back to the hospital.

‘I said, ‘Dad can you come and get me?’ she recalled. ‘While I was crying I said I’d been raped.’

Jane Rimmer disappeared from Claremont on June 6, 1996 and her body was found in bushland about 40km south of Perth. This watch belonging to Ms Rimmer was found near her remains

Jane Rimmer disappeared from Claremont on June 6, 1996 and her body was found in bushland about 40km south of Perth. This watch belonging to Ms Rimmer was found near her remains

Jane Rimmer disappeared from Claremont on June 6, 1996 and her body was found in bushland about 40km south of Perth. This watch belonging to Ms Rimmer was found near her remains

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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