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Golf legend Jack Newton reveals secret health battle after walking into a plane’s propeller

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golf legend jack newton reveals secret health battle after walking into a planes propeller

Australian golf icon Jack Newton has revealed he is suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and has taken up a healthy lifestyle to fight the illness.

The 70-year-old has abstained from drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes for 18 months while exercising and taking medication in an effort to battle the disease.

The 1978 Buick-Goodwrench Open PGA Tour champion was in July 2019 diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, which took his father Jack Snr’s life.

Newton’s family say he is up to the challenge and won’t back down.

Golf icon Jack Newton (pictured at the Jack Newton celebrity Golf Classic on the Sunshine Coast in 2001) was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in July 2019

Golf icon Jack Newton (pictured at the Jack Newton celebrity Golf Classic on the Sunshine Coast in 2001) was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in July 2019

Golf icon Jack Newton (pictured at the Jack Newton celebrity Golf Classic on the Sunshine Coast in 2001) was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in July 2019

‘He’s been a drinker and a smoker since his late teens. To give it all away cold turkey is incredible. This is his new challenge,’ Newton’s son Clint told The Daily Telegraph.

Newton famously survived after walking into a Cessna airplane propeller in a rain storm at Sydney Airport in 1983, losing his right arm, eye and part of his abdomen.

He was in a coma for several days after the incident and spent eight weeks in intensive care, where doctors gave him a 50 per cent chance of survival.

Newton’s family said he is channelling the same grit and determination from the accident in his fight with Alzheimer’s and is making healthy lifestyle changes to give him the best chance of survival.

The 70-year-old (pictured during the US Masters at Augusta in 1980) has made healthy lifestyle changes in an effort to fight the disease

The 70-year-old (pictured during the US Masters at Augusta in 1980) has made healthy lifestyle changes in an effort to fight the disease

The 70-year-old (pictured during the US Masters at Augusta in 1980) has made healthy lifestyle changes in an effort to fight the disease

‘Alzheimer’s has been thrust upon him but he’s up for the fight. The perception of dad was always a character and a bloke who enjoyed a beer and a smoke. That’s not him anymore. He still wants to be the best he can be for mum and his grandchildren,’ Clint said.

Newton and his wife Jacky are selling their acreage near Newcastle named Augusta to move to Merewether for treatment of the disease.

He is suffering from short term memory loss and struggles to complete some sentences.

Clint has taken over as chairman of the Jack Newton Junior Golf Foundation and said his father’s fight is far from over.

‘I can guarantee one thing – he won’t give up,’ he said.

Newton lost his right arm and eye after walking into an airplane propeller in 1983. Pictured: Newton in action at the 1980 US Masters at Augusta National in Georgia

Newton lost his right arm and eye after walking into an airplane propeller in 1983. Pictured: Newton in action at the 1980 US Masters at Augusta National in Georgia

Newton lost his right arm and eye after walking into an airplane propeller in 1983. Pictured: Newton in action at the 1980 US Masters at Augusta National in Georgia

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Dan Andrews claims he won’t be watching the AFL Grand Final

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dan andrews claims he wont be watching the afl grand final

Daniel Andrews claims he won’t be watching most the AFL grand final on Saturday night because he will ‘be in meetings’ and is too busy. 

Speaking at a press conference on Friday, Andrews said he won’t get to watch any of the lead-up coverage or first half of the game because he will be focused on work. 

‘I think I’ll get to watch the second half. The first half I will be in meetings determining what I will be announcing to you on Sunday,’ Andrews said. 

Richmond Tigers star Dustin Martin (pictured training on the Gold Coast) is expected to be a particular danger to Geelong's attempt to secure a Grand Final win on Saturday

Richmond Tigers star Dustin Martin (pictured training on the Gold Coast) is expected to be a particular danger to Geelong's attempt to secure a Grand Final win on Saturday

Richmond Tigers star Dustin Martin (pictured training on the Gold Coast) is expected to be a particular danger to Geelong’s attempt to secure a Grand Final win on Saturday 

Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews (pictured) speaks to the media on Friday at the daily briefing

Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews (pictured) speaks to the media on Friday at the daily briefing

Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews (pictured) speaks to the media on Friday at the daily briefing

Speaking at the same press conference, Andrews announced there was just one new COVID-19 case in Victoria in the previous 24 hours and no reported deaths. 

Coronavirus numbers in Melbourne have plunged since a strict Stage Four lockdown was introduced in August. 

As the state slowly moves through the roadmap out of lockdown, an announcement is scheduled on Sunday with a number of restrictions expected to be eased. 

AFL GRAND FINAL KICKOFF

AWST: 4.30pm – WA

ACST: 6pm – NT

AEST (local): 6.30pm – QLD

ACDT: 7pm – SA

AEDT: 7.30pm – VIC, NSW, TAS, ACT

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When asked if he had a tip for who would win the Geelong versus Richmond match, Andrews predicted it would be down to the wire with a one goal difference.  

‘I think it will be a very close game and I think Geelong will win by a goal. That is my prediction but we will have to wait and see.’ he said. 

‘I think it will be a genuinely fantastic game of footy.’ 

Andrews has previously said he is a huge AFL fan and ‘passionate’ Essendon supporter.  

The grand final is the first in the AFL’s history to be held outside Melbourne, with Brisbane’s Gabba turf hosting the game.  

The contest is also the first grand final since 2011 featuring two Melbourne teams – with Richmond is aiming for their second consecutive premiership and third in four seasons. 

The AFL season was moved from Victoria to Queensland and Western Australian ‘bubbles’ in July. 

St Kilda, North Melbourne, Essendon, Western Bulldogs, Richmond and Carlton went to a Gold Coast based hub, while Geelong went to Perth. 

Also this weekend is the NRL grand final in Brisbane, with the Melbourne Storm and Penrith Panthers hitting the field at Suncorp Stadium. 

A mural (pictured) featuring Richmond legend Jack Riewoldt ahead of Saturday's AFL grand final versus Geelong

A mural (pictured) featuring Richmond legend Jack Riewoldt ahead of Saturday's AFL grand final versus Geelong

A mural (pictured) featuring Richmond legend Jack Riewoldt ahead of Saturday’s AFL grand final versus Geelong

Andrews has previously cautioned Victorians not to gather in groups to watch the AFL grand final and to still adhere to COVID-19 precautions.  

‘I know many people would normally spend time with family and friends to celebrate that day, whether their team is in the grand final or not … it is a big part of who we are,’ Mr Andrews said.

‘As important as it is, in a cultural sense and in a very passionate way, for every single football fan across our state it’s not worth risking all we have done, all that we have built.’ 

Restrictions on having guests over for group gatherings are not expected to be lifted in Melbourne until November.  

Healthcare workers (pictured in Melbourne on Thursday) remain busy at COVID-19 testing sites across the state

Healthcare workers (pictured in Melbourne on Thursday) remain busy at COVID-19 testing sites across the state

Healthcare workers (pictured in Melbourne on Thursday) remain busy at COVID-19 testing sites across the state

MELBOURNE’S ROADMAP OUT OF COVID-19 LOCKDOWN – WHAT YOU WILL BE ABLE TO DO AND WHEN:

Step one: Came into effect on September 14 

Step two: Came into effect on September 28 

Step three: When there is a daily statewide average of five new cases over the past 14 days. The original aim was for October 26, brought forward to October 19 after the 14-day average of new cases fell below initial expectations, but again put on hold after new case numbers plateaued.

This has now been revamped to be a series of ‘mini-steps’ and more gradual easings as the numbers proved difficult to shift.

Step four: The move to step four will come when there have been no new COVID-19 cases in the past 14 days. The aim is for this to come into place on November 23 

COVID Normal: After 28 days of no new COVID-19 cases, things will return to normal. 

FREEDOMS YOU GET AT EACH STEP OF EASING 

Step one – came into effect September 14 

Curfew has been eased to 9pm-5am

People can still only leave home for the four reasons (shopping, exercise, work and care or medical attention)

Public gatherings increased to two people, or a household, for a maximum of two hours

 Singles can have one nominated person to their home as part of the ‘singles social bubble’ 

Childcare and early educators to remain closed

Schools will continue to learn remotely unless they have exemptions

 Adult education to continue to be done remotely, unless they have exemption

 Only go to work if you are in a permitted industry 

– Cafes and restaurants will continue with take away only

– Retail businesses will remain open for essential shopping, with others only operating with click and collect

– Only one person per household can do the essential shopping 

Step two – came into effect September 28

 Melbourne’s curfew lifted

– Public gatherings increase again to five people from a maximum of two households

Childcare and early educators can re-open

Schools to continue with remote learning, but Prep to Grade Two and Year 11 and Year 12 students will gradually return to class in Term 4 

 There will be an increase to permitted workplaces

Step three – originally expected October 26, brought forward to October 19 

There are no restrictions on leaving home

Public gatherings increase to 10 people together outdoors

 A ‘household bubble’ will be introduced, so five people from one house can visit another 

Remote learning to continue, but Grades 3 to Year 11 can gradually return to class

– Adult education to continue to be done remotely, but hands on classes will see a phased return to onsite 

 Work from home is encouraged

– Up to 10 people can eat together at restaurants and cafes, with the majority of tables outdoor

– Retail shops to reopen, with hairdresses operating under safety measures but beauty stores to remain closed

– Real estate agents can conduct private inspections by appointment

– The one person per household limit on shopping is to be revoked 

Step four – expected in November, dependent on new case numbers:

Public gatherings to increase to 50 people outdoors

 Up to 20 visitors can attend a home at any one time

 All adult education will return to onsite with safety measures in place

– Groups limited to 20 indoors and a maximum of 50 patrons per venue

– All retail stores to reopen, while real estate agents can operate with safety measures and by keeping a record of attendants

Step five – COVID normal:

Public gatherings have no restriction

 There will also be no restriction on visitors to homes

– Phased return to onsite work for work from home workers

  Schools to reopen as normal

– Restrictions on hospitality removed, but venues to continue keeping records 

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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US Election 2020: Trumps finally wear masks for presidential debate

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us election 2020 trumps finally wear masks for presidential debate

Donald Trump‘s family finally added masks to their outfits for the final presidential debate, after being warned that they’d be kicked out if they took them off.  

The president’s entourage, including First Lady Melania and children Ivanka, Tiffany and Eric, entered the debate arena at Belmont University in Nashville minutes before the debate kicked off – each with their noses and mouths fully covered. 

Masks were a requirement for all attendees of the event, and the Commission on Presidential Debates warned that anyone who removed their mask would be escorted out. 

The Trump family faced fierce criticism when they failed to wear facial coverings during the first debate on September 29 and a massive coronavirus outbreak hit the White House days later.  

Donald Trump's family finally fully masked up for the final presidential debate, after they were ridiculed for forgoing the precaution at the first candidate face-off. Pictured: Ivanka, Tiffany and Lara Trump enter the debate arena Thursday night

Donald Trump's family finally fully masked up for the final presidential debate, after they were ridiculed for forgoing the precaution at the first candidate face-off. Pictured: Ivanka, Tiffany and Lara Trump enter the debate arena Thursday night

Donald Trump’s family finally fully masked up for the final presidential debate, after they were ridiculed for forgoing the precaution at the first candidate face-off. Pictured: Ivanka, Tiffany and Lara Trump enter the debate arena Thursday night 

First Lady Melania Trump arrives at the final presidential debate wearing a black mask to match her frock and shoes

First Lady Melania Trump arrives at the final presidential debate wearing a black mask to match her frock and shoes

First Lady Melania Trump arrives at the final presidential debate wearing a black mask to match her frock and shoes

Most of the Trump family opted for basic surgical masks as the entered the debate arena in Nashville

Most of the Trump family opted for basic surgical masks as the entered the debate arena in Nashville

Most of the Trump family opted for basic surgical masks as the entered the debate arena in Nashville 

Eric and Lara Trump enter the debate arena on Thursday behind Kimberly Guilfoyle

Eric and Lara Trump enter the debate arena on Thursday behind Kimberly Guilfoyle

Eric and Lara Trump enter the debate arena on Thursday behind Kimberly Guilfoyle 

Ivanka Trump sits with her mask still in place as the candidates took the stage

Ivanka Trump sits with her mask still in place as the candidates took the stage

Ivanka Trump sits with her mask still in place as the candidates took the stage

Siblings Tiffany and Eric Trump keep their masks on as they wait for the debate to start on Thursday night

Siblings Tiffany and Eric Trump keep their masks on as they wait for the debate to start on Thursday night

Siblings Tiffany and Eric Trump keep their masks on as they wait for the debate to start on Thursday night 

While most of the family members did enter the first debate with masks on, they were photographed without them as soon as they took their seats. 

Melania left her mask behind when she left her seat at the end of the debate to join her husband on stage – while Joe Biden and his wife Jill kept theirs on. 

This time all of the debate attendees will have to keep covered throughout the night, per rules set by the debate commission. 

The only people exempt from that rule are Trump, Biden and debate moderator Kristen Welker – who can take their masks off while on stage.   

Trump has often mocked his opponents mask habits, suggesting that he’s overly-cautious. Biden rejected that assertion early on in Thursday’s debate, saying that the federal government should have instituted a nationwide mask mandate months ago. 

The Trump family’s laissez faire attitudes toward masks backfired in the wake of the first debate, when dozens of people in the White House tested positive for coronavirus – including the president himself.  

The Trump family faced fierce criticism when they failed to wear facial coverings to the last debate on September 29 (pictured) and a massive coronavirus outbreak hit the White House days later

The Trump family faced fierce criticism when they failed to wear facial coverings to the last debate on September 29 (pictured) and a massive coronavirus outbreak hit the White House days later

The Trump family faced fierce criticism when they failed to wear facial coverings to the last debate on September 29 (pictured) and a massive coronavirus outbreak hit the White House days later

While most of the family members did enter the first debate with masks on (pictured), they were photographed without them as soon as they took their seats

While most of the family members did enter the first debate with masks on (pictured), they were photographed without them as soon as they took their seats

While most of the family members did enter the first debate with masks on (pictured), they were photographed without them as soon as they took their seats

Melania left her mask behind when she left her seat at the end of the first debate to join her husband on stage (pictured)

Melania left her mask behind when she left her seat at the end of the first debate to join her husband on stage (pictured)

Melania left her mask behind when she left her seat at the end of the first debate to join her husband on stage (pictured)

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Qantas CEO Alan Joyce predicts flying kangaroo will have 70 per cent share of domestic flights

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qantas ceo alan joyce predicts flying kangaroo will have 70 per cent share of domestic flights

Qantas boss Alan Joyce has hinted his flying kangaroo airline will be a position to charge customers more as its rival Virgin Australia shrinks to survive.

Queensland is expected to reopen its borders to New South Wales before Christmas – nine months after sealing Coolangatta on the Gold Coast from Tweed Heads.

As Western Australia and Tasmania reopened to the rest of Australia in 2021, Mr Joyce boasted Qantas would have more than two-thirds of Australia’s domestic airline market.

Qantas boss Alan Joyce has hinted his flying kangaroo airline will be a position to charge customers more as its rival Virgin Australia shrinks to survive

Qantas boss Alan Joyce has hinted his flying kangaroo airline will be a position to charge customers more as its rival Virgin Australia shrinks to survive

Qantas boss Alan Joyce has hinted his flying kangaroo airline will be a position to charge customers more as its rival Virgin Australia shrinks to survive

‘In fact, over time, our domestic market share is likely to increase organically from around 60 per cent to around 70 per cent, as our main competitor changes its strategy,’ he told the Qantas annual general meeting on Friday.

Qantas shares surged 2.6 per cent to $4.54 as Mr Joyce bragged to shareholders, even though the broader Australian Securities Exchange was slipping.

The 100-year-old airline’s share price has more than doubled since bottoming out at $2.14 in March as Australia closed its border to foreign tourists.

Jayne Hrdlicka, the former boss of Qantas budget carrier Jetstar, is the new chief executive of Virgin Australia tasked with slashing costs, under new American private equity owner Bain Capital. 

Jayne Hrdlicka, the former boss of Qantas budget carrier Jetstar, is the new chief executive of Virgin Australia who will be charged with slashing costs, under new American private equity owner Bain Capital. She is pictured with Alan Joyce in October 2013

Jayne Hrdlicka, the former boss of Qantas budget carrier Jetstar, is the new chief executive of Virgin Australia who will be charged with slashing costs, under new American private equity owner Bain Capital. She is pictured with Alan Joyce in October 2013

Jayne Hrdlicka, the former boss of Qantas budget carrier Jetstar, is the new chief executive of Virgin Australia who will be charged with slashing costs, under new American private equity owner Bain Capital. She is pictured with Alan Joyce in October 2013

Mr Joyce, who was previously Ms Hrdlicka’s boss, is expecting demand for domestic flights to surge as Australia continued to stop its citizens from leaving and banned non-citizens and non-residents from arriving.

‘With most international travel off limits for a while, we’re expecting to see a boom in domestic tourism once more borders open up,’ he said.

‘The group is very well positioned to make the most of that opportunity.’

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission will be busy ensuring customers aren’t ripped off as Qantas maintains a stranglehold over the domestic airline sector. 

As Western Australia and Tasmania reopened to the rest of Australia in 2021, Mr Joyce boasted Qantas would have 70 per cent of Australia's domestic airline market. Pictured is a Qantas Boeing 737-800 parked at Sydney's International Airport

As Western Australia and Tasmania reopened to the rest of Australia in 2021, Mr Joyce boasted Qantas would have 70 per cent of Australia's domestic airline market. Pictured is a Qantas Boeing 737-800 parked at Sydney's International Airport

As Western Australia and Tasmania reopened to the rest of Australia in 2021, Mr Joyce boasted Qantas would have 70 per cent of Australia’s domestic airline market. Pictured is a Qantas Boeing 737-800 parked at Sydney’s International Airport

Greg Smith, the head of research with funds manager and share market advisory group Fat Prophets, said the border closures had given Qantas the chance to grow its domestic market share.

Before the pandemic, Qantas already had a 60 per cent market share, despite Virgin making losses during eight of the previous ten financial years in a bid to have a bigger slice of the air travel dollar.

‘Virgin is going to be a smaller airline than it was – that provides an opportunity for Qantas to grow domestic market share,’ Mr Smith told Daily Mail Australia. 

‘They might get up towards 70 per cent once domestic capacity opens up completely.’

While 2020 has been an ‘unprecedentedly traumatic’ time for airlines, Mr Smith said the eventual opening up of travel to New Zealand would leave Qantas much better placed than Virgin to capitalise on the resumption of international flights.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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