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Is tracking down every super spreader the REAL key to beating Covid-19?

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is tracking down every super spreader the real key to beating covid 19

As Covid-19 outbreaks once again ignite like wildfires across Britain, it is a question that continues to trigger debate: just how is this infection spreading? Of course, we all know the basics. We need to be in close contact with others to catch corona – hence the need for social distancing.

The virus is carried in respiratory droplets that can remain on surfaces we touch, too, which is why we wash our hands.

But after this, things get harder to piece together.

We are told that clusters are ‘linked to household transmission’ in places such as Greater Manchester and ‘hospitality venues’ in Aberdeen – but, curiously, not primary schools.

There were dozens of protests over the past few months that drew crowds in their hundreds of thousands – and never led to spikes in cases, as it was feared they might.

Recent studies have suggested that only about one in every five people who catch Covid-19 actually gives it to someone else (pictured: people at London's Waterloo station)

Recent studies have suggested that only about one in every five people who catch Covid-19 actually gives it to someone else (pictured: people at London's Waterloo station)

Recent studies have suggested that only about one in every five people who catch Covid-19 actually gives it to someone else (pictured: people at London’s Waterloo station)

Meanwhile, packed flights have been operating between UK airports and Europe since August, causing few problems.

Yet a serious outbreak in Plymouth was linked back to ‘the Zante 30’, a group of teens who had just returned from a Greek holiday, then went on a night out. Why?

There are other high-profile paradoxes. When US President Donald Trump tested positive for Covid-19 at the start of this month, so too did more than 20 of his close circle – almost all of whom had been at an event at the White House a few days earlier.

However, when Scottish MP Margaret Ferrier appeared in Parliament while Covid-positive – in the very same week – and even attended church the day before, no one appeared to catch the virus from her.

Is it just a case of chance? Or could there be, as a growing band of public health experts believe, another factor in play?

Over the past few months, much has been said about the reproduction or R number, which is how many people, on average, every corona-positive person infects. This is a key metric that seems to be guiding official pandemic policy.

COVID FACT

Of those testing Covid-19 positive last week, just three per cent had visited a gym in the preceding seven days, while ten per cent had been to the pub

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But by it’s very nature – as an average – it masks differences between individuals and how the virus behaves.

For it is now known that not every person who catches the virus actually does pass it on.

Some don’t come into close enough contact with anyone, while others have multiple close contacts in a short space of time.

People can be ill with the virus but not that infectious. And there are those who don’t display symptoms, so carry on life as normal, yet spread the virus to others.

In fact, recent studies have suggested that only about one in every five people who catch Covid-19 actually gives it to someone else.

These ‘super-spreaders’, say some scientists, could be having a profound impact on the patterns of infections we are seeing across the UK, and the world. In fact, they could be behind 80 per cent of all new infections.

And if the theory holds true, it could mean the current tactic employed by NHS Test and Trace, of trying to track down the close contacts of every single person who tests positive, is at best a waste of resources – because the majority of these people won’t actually ever go on to infect another person anyway. Now, The Mail on Sunday has learned that some local environmental health teams are already quietly breaking with NHS protocol and employing a more targeted approach that aims to pinpoint the start of each outbreak, and the super-spreader likely to be at its heart.

Studies suggest this method, which is already used in other countries, could be twice as effective as the method currently endorsed by the Government.

If the theory holds true, it could mean the current tactic employed by NHS Test and Trace is at best a waste of resources (pictured: staff collect samples at a test centre in Leicester)

If the theory holds true, it could mean the current tactic employed by NHS Test and Trace is at best a waste of resources (pictured: staff collect samples at a test centre in Leicester)

If the theory holds true, it could mean the current tactic employed by NHS Test and Trace is at best a waste of resources (pictured: staff collect samples at a test centre in Leicester)

The first British corona super-spreader was identified back in early February.

Steve Walsh, a 53-year-old assistant Cub Scout leader, contracted the virus in Singapore at a conference, visited a ski resort in the French Alps where he infected 11 others, then returned to his home in Hove, East Sussex. At the time, all but two of the eight Covid cases in the UK were linked to Mr Walsh.

And there have been other so-called ‘super-spreading events’ identified since then. In early September, Swansea University said one student had been responsible for 32 cases of Covid-19 after attending a house party.

COVID FACT

Japan tests fewer people than most European countries but has seen 0.5 deaths per 100,000 people, compared to 65 per 100,000 in Britain

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In the same month, a holidaymaker returning from Spain went to a number of bars in Bolton – instead of self-isolating – and was blamed by local officials for the town’s ‘extreme spike’ in coronavirus cases.

The unnamed man was subsequently found to be Covid-positive, and cases climbed from 12 per 100,000 to 212 less than three weeks after his ill-advised pub crawl.

But can you track down these super-spreaders before they cause too much damage?

Perhaps not. But you can pretty much identify where one has been, if you use the right method: it’s called backwards-tracing, a technique that has been used by local public health officials for years.

Normally, as we have said, NHS Test and Trace simply asks each newly diagnosed Covid case to hand over the numbers of every person they’ve been in close contact with over the past two days, calls them up, and asks them to quarantine for two weeks. But backwards-tracing works differently. Local health teams first look for clusters of infections in a specific area – and focus their attention on these.

They interview the people involved and ask them where they have been over the past 14 days.

These lists are then compared, to see whether specific locations crop up more than others.

‘If there are repeat locations, say a coffee shop and bingo hall, and the time and date of the visits match, then the tracers will take the decision that a super-spreader has been there,’ says Professor Jackie Cassell, an expert in public health at Brighton and Sussex Medical School.

Some local environmental health teams are already employing a more targeted approach that aims to pinpoint the start of each outbreak (pictured: passengers at Canning Town Station)

Some local environmental health teams are already employing a more targeted approach that aims to pinpoint the start of each outbreak (pictured: passengers at Canning Town Station)

Some local environmental health teams are already employing a more targeted approach that aims to pinpoint the start of each outbreak (pictured: passengers at Canning Town Station)

They then contact the venue and try to find everyone else who visited at that time. And these are the people who are contacted and advised to isolate, or get a test.

‘In the process, it’s likely we’ll end up quarantining the super-spreader,’ adds Prof Cassell.

Dr Muge Cevik, an infectious diseases expert at the University of St Andrews, argues that the current system employed by Test and Trace risks allowing super-spreaders to slip through the net. She says: ‘Covid-19 spreads in clusters. We need to be focusing on the environments where these clusters are occurring.’

Backwards-tracing has been the main method used in Japan, one of the few nations not to enter any form of lockdown, from the beginning.

Covid Q&A: Can you get Covid twice and can I wear a scarf as a face cover?

Q Can you catch the virus twice?

A Yes, but it’s unlikely. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), there have been roughly 25 cases of Covid-19 patients recovering from the virus, then testing positive some weeks later. But that’s out of a total of 38 million cases worldwide.

The issue hit the headlines again last week when a 25-year-old, otherwise healthy man from the US was reported to have caught the virus twice in little over six weeks, with the second infection much more severe than the first.

Previously, scientists had assumed that the fighter cells and proteins released by the immune system in response to the first infection would ward off a second bout.

But there may be reasons behind the second infection. For instance, the patient may have encountered a relatively small dose of the virus first time round – enough to trigger symptoms but only a weak immune response.

A second possible explanation is something called antibody-dependent enhancement, a very rare reaction where instead of attacking and destroying the virus, antibodies released by the immune system help it.

Until more is known about the risks of reinfection, even those who have recovered from Covid-19 are advised to follow guidance on social distancing, use of face masks and handwashing.

Q Does wearing a scarf over my face offer the same protection as a face mask?

A It will offer some, but not as much as a proper mask. The WHO says face coverings should have three layers: the first absorbs moisture from your mouth, a middle one traps droplets and an external layer repels droplets in the air.

‘A scarf will offer much less protection to those around you than a decent face mask if you are carrying the coronavirus,’ says Dr Simon Clarke, associate professor of cellular microbiology at Reading University. ‘It’s unlikely to fit tightly and more likely to be made of loosely woven fabric with thicker fibres. This means there are more gaps that droplets could pass easily through.’

But, as Dr Julian Tang at Leicester University, points out, scarves are better than nothing.

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Having identified their first Covid-19 case back in January – and despite Tokyo being one of the most populous cities with more than 35 million residents – the trajectory of the pandemic has been dramatically different there.

There have been, to date, around 1,650 deaths from coronavirus, compared to the 43,429 here in the UK. Unlike most Western countries, their plan has never been to attempt to eliminate the virus – instead publicly stating this is ‘impossible’. They are also carrying out more than 20 times fewer tests than we are. ‘Japan isn’t testing everyone,’ says Dr Cevik. ‘Instead it’s trying to identify where people became infected.’

Hitoshi Oshitani, of Japan’s Covid-19 Cluster Taskforce, goes as far as to suggest attempting to catch every single case of Covid-19 simply stretches resources to breaking point. Their approach was to ‘tolerate some transmission’ to avoid ‘over-exertion’ while trying to focus containment measures on clusters – presumably containing highly infectious super-spreaders – when they appeared. If you try to test, track and trace every person who tests positive it becomes impossible to ‘see the wood for the trees’, he added.

Our own efforts at containment and suppression, it is becoming increasingly clear, are not working. This week, the Government’s own scientific advisory group Sage branded NHS Test and Trace as having a marginal impact on transmission.

‘It’s a failure,’ says Prof Cassell. ‘We could have been employing backwards-tracing from the beginning. It’s how public health teams have always dealt with outbreaks of meningitis and measles.

‘Local public health teams have an understanding of the area they work in – the family dynamics, what pubs people go to, where people work. Unfortunately, in the rush to centralise testing and tracing, these teams, and the vital work they do, were forgotten.’

Perhaps the tide may finally be turning. Last Monday, it was announced that £465 million in additional funding will be given to local councils to support their own tracing teams. But money is not the only obstacle. Currently councils say they are having to wait days to access the details of positive cases from NHS Test and Trace – often receiving contact information only after tracers have been unable to reach cases.

Even more concerning, local officials don’t have the legal authority to make people isolate.

One public health officer, who asked to remain anonymous, said: ‘We can only advise people they stay at home. We don’t have any way of making sure they actually do.’

She believes local councils are being treated as a last resort, which, says Prof Cassell, is a mistake.

Just this month, a local team in the Midlands identified a small cluster of cases in an office.

‘They then backwards-traced them and found they and other local cases had all attended a restaurant earlier in the week. They contacted everyone who had been at the restaurant on that evening and asked them to self-quarantine – and, it is presumed, isolated the ‘super-spreader’ who was the source of the infections along with them.

Even as strict Tier 3 lockdown measures begin to close pubs and restaurants across the country, backwards-tracing could still be invaluable.

When US President Donald Trump, pictured above, tested positive for Covid-19 at the start of this month, so too did more than 20 of his close circle (file photo)

When US President Donald Trump, pictured above, tested positive for Covid-19 at the start of this month, so too did more than 20 of his close circle (file photo)

When US President Donald Trump, pictured above, tested positive for Covid-19 at the start of this month, so too did more than 20 of his close circle (file photo)

The public health insider said: ‘It could be crucial in keeping schools open, as well as protecting care homes from suffering the same fate as the first time round. If care workers test positive, you want to know if the infection is coming from inside the care home or from the community at large.

‘That’s information you wouldn’t necessarily get from the current method.’ And, of course, unless testing and tracing becomes more efficient, there may be no end to the current situation.

Others though, stress that local councils don’t necessarily have all the answers.

Last week it was reported that Birmingham City Council workers accidentally delivered used testing swabs to residents awaiting a home test, potentially putting them at risk of infection.

However, the local officer says: ‘It’s all about finding a balance. We’ll always need the support of central Government when it comes to planning and finances. But until now they’ve been very slow to recognise the importance of the local systems.

‘Backwards-tracing is a clear example of something we can do that they can’t.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Australia

Scott Morrison is not planning a snap election but doesn’t rule out calling for a vote next year

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scott morrison is not planning a snap election but doesnt rule out calling for a vote next year

Scott Morrison has indicated he won’t send voters to an early election in a post-budget rev up to his coalition troops.

While there has been speculation Australians could head to the polls in the second half of next year, the prime minister hinted he wouldn’t pull the trigger until 2022.

‘I’m a full termer. Elections are too hard to win,’ he told the joint coalition party room in Canberra on Tuesday.

‘I cherish every day. We’ll do it for the time we said we would.’

Prime Minister Scott Morrison (pictured) said there would not be a snap election in 2020, meaning the earliest an election can be held is August 7, 2021 and latest is May 21, 2022

Prime Minister Scott Morrison (pictured) said there would not be a snap election in 2020, meaning the earliest an election can be held is August 7, 2021 and latest is May 21, 2022

Prime Minister Scott Morrison (pictured) said there would not be a snap election in 2020, meaning the earliest an election can be held is August 7, 2021 and latest is May 21, 2022

Mr Morrison said he was asked about election timing in March, when the coronavirus pandemic was sweeping the globe.

‘It was the furthest thing from my mind then and it still is,’ he said.

The latest date for a simultaneous House of Representatives and half-Senate election is May 21, 2022, while the earliest is August 7 next year.

With the coalition maintaining a slight lead in most opinion polls, he urged MPs and senators to maintain discipline, unity and focus.

Labor leader Anthony Albanese (pictured) said the opposition was in 'third gear' as he addressed the caucus room

Labor leader Anthony Albanese (pictured) said the opposition was in 'third gear' as he addressed the caucus room

Labor leader Anthony Albanese (pictured) said the opposition was in ‘third gear’ as he addressed the caucus room

‘In political cycles there’s good times and bad times,’ Mr Morrison said.

‘When things are going well that’s when there’s a risk of complacency and disunity, of the work rate dropping off.’

Labor leader Anthony Albanese said the opposition was in ‘third gear’ as he addressed the caucus room.

‘Scott Morrison is addicted to announcements and retail politics but he’s allergic to the hard work of national leadership and actual delivery,’ he said.

He said leaked government talking points showed the coalition’s focus was on Labor even in budget week.

Mr Morrison and Mr Albanese during Question Time in Parliament on Tuesday. Mr Albanese accused Mr Morrison of being 'addicted to announcements and retail politics'

Mr Morrison and Mr Albanese during Question Time in Parliament on Tuesday. Mr Albanese accused Mr Morrison of being 'addicted to announcements and retail politics'

Mr Morrison and Mr Albanese during Question Time in Parliament on Tuesday. Mr Albanese accused Mr Morrison of being ‘addicted to announcements and retail politics’ 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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SAS Australia: Arabella Del Busso says faking pregnancy was a ‘white lie’ – leaving fans horrified

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sas australia arabella del busso says faking pregnancy was a white lie leaving fans horrified

SAS Australia viewers were left appalled on Tuesday night, after Arabella Del Busso spoke out about faking multiple pregnancies to her ex-boyfriend, Josh Reynolds.

The 30-year-old glamour model burst into tears during an interrogation about her romance with the NRL star, confessing she had claimed she was pregnant to try to ‘draw him back’ from ending their relationship.

But baffled fans were quick to question how the brunette was ‘even allowed on the show’, after she referred to her shocking dishonesty as nothing but a ‘little white lie’. 

Horrified: SAS Australia viewers were left appalled on Tuesday night, after Arabella Del Busso (pictured) spoke out about faking multiple pregnancies to a previous partner on the show

Horrified: SAS Australia viewers were left appalled on Tuesday night, after Arabella Del Busso (pictured) spoke out about faking multiple pregnancies to a previous partner on the show

Horrified: SAS Australia viewers were left appalled on Tuesday night, after Arabella Del Busso (pictured) spoke out about faking multiple pregnancies to a previous partner on the show 

‘I have told a lie, but the way that I see it, a little white lie here or there is not going to hurt anyone,’ she told the camera.

‘I’m sure we all do it! I’m not the only person in the whole of Australia who has told a white lie here or there.’

Repulsed viewers took to Twitter to share their disgust at her choice of words, with one writing: ‘There’s little white lies and then there’s pretending you’re pregnant with someone’s baby when you’re not. That’s called cruelty #SASAustralia.’

‘A little white lie here and there won’t hurt anyone’ HAHAHAHAHA Arabella Del Busso. You’re a f****d up individual,’ another wrote. 

‘Faking a pregnancy to trick your partner into staying with you is not a ‘little white lie’ – especially if you go to the extent of producing fake scans,’ a third added.

A fourth chimed in: ‘Why was Arabella even allowed on the show in the first place? That departure was just embarrassing.’

Bad romance: After meeting rugby league footballer Josh Reynolds on Instagram in December 2018, Arabella enjoyed a one-night-stand with the sports star before claiming she was pregnant with twins

Bad romance: After meeting rugby league footballer Josh Reynolds on Instagram in December 2018, Arabella enjoyed a one-night-stand with the sports star before claiming she was pregnant with twins

Bad romance: After meeting rugby league footballer Josh Reynolds on Instagram in December 2018, Arabella enjoyed a one-night-stand with the sports star before claiming she was pregnant with twins

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'Why was Arabella even allowed on the show?' Viewers were quick to voice their opinions on the glamour model as she opened up about her shocking past

'Why was Arabella even allowed on the show?' Viewers were quick to voice their opinions on the glamour model as she opened up about her shocking past

‘Why was Arabella even allowed on the show?’ Viewers were quick to voice their opinions on the glamour model as she opened up about her shocking past

‘The whole of Australia didn’t trick their bf into thinking that they’re pregnant #SASAustralia,’ another added.

As tears streamed down her cheeks, Arabella spoke about her ill-fated relationship with rugby league footballer Josh and the ‘scrutiny’ she’s faced since their split late last year.

After meeting Josh, 31, on Instagram in December 2018, Arabella enjoyed a one-night-stand with the sports star before claiming she was pregnant with twins.

She later told him she’d miscarried, before claiming she was pregnant again in March 2019, only to miscarry again.

Arabella claimed to have been pregnant once again in June, sending her beau a series of 12-week scans.

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Horrified: Viewers couldn't believe she referred to the horror scandal as a 'white lie'

Horrified: Viewers couldn't believe she referred to the horror scandal as a 'white lie'

Horrified: Viewers couldn’t believe she referred to the horror scandal as a ‘white lie’ 

Speaking out: As tears streamed down her cheeks, Arabella spoke about her ill-fated relationship with rugby league footballer Josh Reynolds and the 'scrutiny' she's faced since their split late last year

Speaking out: As tears streamed down her cheeks, Arabella spoke about her ill-fated relationship with rugby league footballer Josh Reynolds and the 'scrutiny' she's faced since their split late last year

Speaking out: As tears streamed down her cheeks, Arabella spoke about her ill-fated relationship with rugby league footballer Josh Reynolds and the ‘scrutiny’ she’s faced since their split late last year

‘I told my partner that I had a pregnancy scare, and I showed it to him and said it was ours, when in fact, it wasn’t our scan at all,’ she confessed, after being pressed for the truth.

The directing staff asked her what prompted her to lie about the pregnancy, and Arabella admitted the relationship was ‘coming to an end’.

‘I didn’t know how to deal with losing someone…’ she continued.

After being asked if her plan was to ‘cheat the person into staying with you’, Arabella said she just wanted ‘to try and draw him back in’.

Tell-all: After being called in for interrogation during Tuesday's episode of SAS Australia, Arabella Del Busso broke down as she spoke about faking her pregnancy, before then quitting the show

Tell-all: After being called in for interrogation during Tuesday's episode of SAS Australia, Arabella Del Busso broke down as she spoke about faking her pregnancy, before then quitting the show

Tell-all: After being called in for interrogation during Tuesday’s episode of SAS Australia, Arabella Del Busso broke down as she spoke about faking her pregnancy, before then quitting the show

She then started to sob uncontrollably, as she confessed that she ‘hates’ talking about the scandal. 

The DS then told Arabella that she’d never be able to move forward with her life if she couldn’t be honest, before having her escorted back to the camp.

But the interrogation left her feeling exposed and vulnerable, and the following morning, Arabella announced she was leaving the series.

SAS Australia continues Monday at 7.30pm on Channel Seven

Backfired: After being asked if her plan was to 'cheat the person into staying with you', Arabella said she just wanted 'to try and draw him back in'

Backfired: After being asked if her plan was to 'cheat the person into staying with you', Arabella said she just wanted 'to try and draw him back in'

Backfired: After being asked if her plan was to ‘cheat the person into staying with you’, Arabella said she just wanted ‘to try and draw him back in’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Bride, 30, turned away from a dress boutique for being ‘too fat’ loses over 50 KILOS

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A bride who was turned away from a boutique dress shop for being ‘too fat’ has lost more than 50 kilos in a show of pure determination, exercising six times a week and radically altering her diet in the process. 

DJ Jarman, 30, from Hamilton, New Zealand, weighed 120 kilos when she walked into a bridal store in Sydney in 2012 and asked to view the brand’s range of dresses for her upcoming nuptials. 

‘I was told by the attendant “we definitely won’t have anything in your size here, you’ll need to get a dress specially made,”‘ the media and communications administrator said.

‘After ten years of being overweight I’d had enough.’

DJ Jarman, 30, from Hamilton, New Zealand, weighed 120 kilos when she walked into a bridal store in Sydney in 2012 and asked to view the brand's range of dresses for her upcoming nuptials

DJ Jarman, 30, from Hamilton, New Zealand, weighed 120 kilos when she walked into a bridal store in Sydney in 2012 and asked to view the brand's range of dresses for her upcoming nuptials

DJ Jarman, 30, from Hamilton, New Zealand, weighed 120 kilos when she walked into a bridal store in Sydney in 2012 and asked to view the brand’s range of dresses for her upcoming nuptials

Her transformation: 'I was told by the attendant "we definitely won't have anything in your size here, you'll need to get a dress specially made,"' the media and communications administrator said

Her transformation: 'I was told by the attendant "we definitely won't have anything in your size here, you'll need to get a dress specially made,"' the media and communications administrator said

Her transformation: ‘I was told by the attendant “we definitely won’t have anything in your size here, you’ll need to get a dress specially made,”‘ the media and communications administrator said

But it still took a number of years for Mrs Jarman to decide on the best course to lose weight safely.

She tried intermittent fasting, keto and plant-based diets to shift the extra kilos but with no success, so in 2019 she underwent vertical gastric sleeve surgery.

‘I went under the knife in April 2019 and my life hasn’t been the same since,’ the now size eight Mrs Jarman said. 

Growing up in a family that ‘loved food’ but had little money to spend on good quality ingredients originally propelled Mrs Jarman into a decade-long binge on chips, fizzy drinks, lollies and chocolate.

‘Once I left home and started making my own money, I developed an unhealthy relationship with food, fast foods, easy foods,’ she said of that time.  

She would normally skip breakfast and then indulge in a huge lunch of pies and chips, chicken rolls and snacks including chips and chocolate. 

'After ten years of being overweight, trying every single diet out there, losing weight and then gaining it all back plus some, I'd had enough,' she said (pictured on her wedding day)

'After ten years of being overweight, trying every single diet out there, losing weight and then gaining it all back plus some, I'd had enough,' she said (pictured on her wedding day)

‘After ten years of being overweight, trying every single diet out there, losing weight and then gaining it all back plus some, I’d had enough,’ she said (pictured on her wedding day)

Before and after: Growing up in a family that 'loved food' but had little money to spend on good quality ingredients propelled Mrs Jarman into a decade-long binge on chips, fizzy drinks, lollies and chocolate

Before and after: Growing up in a family that 'loved food' but had little money to spend on good quality ingredients propelled Mrs Jarman into a decade-long binge on chips, fizzy drinks, lollies and chocolate

Before and after: Growing up in a family that ‘loved food’ but had little money to spend on good quality ingredients propelled Mrs Jarman into a decade-long binge on chips, fizzy drinks, lollies and chocolate

For dinner Mrs Jarman would usually have a takeaway, with an extra-large McDonald’s meal being her favourite. Her exercise routine was non-existent.  

‘My body had to work so hard every day just to get out of bed, to play with my kids, to do literally anything was the biggest struggle,’ she said.

‘I hid from the world a lot and would avoid busy places wherever possible. I really became invisible for almost a decade.’  

What does DJ Jarman eat now? 

Breakfast: Porridge oats, blueberries and sugar-free maple syrup.

Lunch: Wholemeal wrap with egg, salami and salad.

Dinner: Chicken or steak with salad for dinner. 

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She had tried intermittent fasting, keto and plant-based diets to shift the extra kilos but with no success, so in 2019 she decided to undergo vertical gastric sleeve surgery

She had tried intermittent fasting, keto and plant-based diets to shift the extra kilos but with no success, so in 2019 she decided to undergo vertical gastric sleeve surgery

She had tried intermittent fasting, keto and plant-based diets to shift the extra kilos but with no success, so in 2019 she decided to undergo vertical gastric sleeve surgery

Now weighing 67 kilos she knows the surgery was her best course of action, and she can finally chase after Ella, seven, and Christian, three, with glee

Now weighing 67 kilos she knows the surgery was her best course of action, and she can finally chase after Ella, seven, and Christian, three, with glee

Now weighing 67 kilos she knows the surgery was her best course of action, and she can finally chase after Ella, seven, and Christian, three, with glee

Now weighing 67 kilos she knows the surgery was her best course of action, and she can finally chase after her children Ella, seven, and Christian, three, with glee.  

‘I work out every day except Sunday and I love a good cardio session, but also enjoy strength days,’ she said.

‘I get told everyday how amazing I look; it still makes me blush. I’m not very good at taking compliments.’ 

Since her dramatic weight loss Mrs Jarman will start the day with porridge oats, blueberries and sugar-free maple syrup, followed by a wholemeal wrap with egg, salami and salad for lunch and chicken or steak with salad for dinner. 

She does one hour of high intensity cardio and weight training six days a week. 

‘Most people are gobsmacked by my weight loss, especially the ones who haven’t seen me since before my operation,’ she said. 

Her heaviest weight was 120 kilos

Her heaviest weight was 120 kilos

Since her dramatic weight loss Mrs Jarman will start the day with porridge oats, blueberries and sugar-free maple syrup, followed by a wholemeal wrap with egg, salami and salad for lunch and chicken or steak with salad for dinner

Since her dramatic weight loss Mrs Jarman will start the day with porridge oats, blueberries and sugar-free maple syrup, followed by a wholemeal wrap with egg, salami and salad for lunch and chicken or steak with salad for dinner

Since her dramatic weight loss Mrs Jarman will start the day with porridge oats, blueberries and sugar-free maple syrup, followed by a wholemeal wrap with egg, salami and salad for lunch and chicken or steak with salad for dinner

'Most people are gobsmacked by my weight loss, especially the ones who haven't seen me since before my operation,' she said

'Most people are gobsmacked by my weight loss, especially the ones who haven't seen me since before my operation,' she said

‘Most people are gobsmacked by my weight loss, especially the ones who haven’t seen me since before my operation,’ she said

‘The best compliment for me, is when people compliment my hard work instead of my looks.

‘I love when people tell me I inspire them, or my workouts help them go harder in the gym.’ 

Her advice to those wanting to transform their own lives is to start small  

‘Cut out takeaways and fizzy drinks first, drink more water and eat at least one piece of fruit per day,’ she said.

‘Also, don’t be afraid of what people will say or think if you get surgical help. If you have tried everything and nothing has been successful, look into it.

‘Your life is only lived once, don’t waste it being unhappy and unhealthy. Do whatever it takes to make this life the best life ever.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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