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Joe Biden delays his vice presidential pick by TWO WEEKS

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joe biden delays his vice presidential pick by two weeks

Joe Biden has delayed naming his vice presidential pick by two weeks amid worries the process has become a mess that has pitted women against woman.

Biden said last week he would announce his running mate the first week of August but that appears unlikely to happen this week as he hasn’t narrowed down his pick amid pressure to name a black woman.

But now that’s been moved back by two weeks, The Washington Post reported, amid worries from Biden supporters that the process has become ‘messier than it should be,’ pitting women – and especially black women – against one another. 

The delay indicates there is no clear favorite among Biden or his allies to be his running mate. 

Joe Biden has delayed naming his vice presidential pick by two weeks after saying he would name the person the first week in August

Joe Biden has delayed naming his vice presidential pick by two weeks after saying he would name the person the first week in August

Joe Biden has delayed naming his vice presidential pick by two weeks after saying he would name the person the first week in August

Former National Security Adviser Susan Rice

Former National Security Adviser Susan Rice

Congresswoman Karen Bass

Congresswoman Karen Bass

Final contenders for the vice presidential spot on the Democratic ticket include Senator Kamala Harris, Senator Elizabeth Warren, Former National Security Adviser Susan Rice and Congresswoman Karen Bass

The former vice president is reportedly going to speak to five or six contenders instead of having the traditional short list of three names.  

And allies of all the contenders are lobbying the former vice president and his campaign to pick the running mate of their choice. 

The presumptive Democratic nominee joked last week he would have to escape the TV camera crews that are parked outside of his Wilmington, Delaware, home so he could meet his pick without being caught.

‘I’m going to try to figure out how to trick you all so we can meet in person. I’ve got crews outside my house. I don’t think it matters actually. What I said is I’m going to have a choice in the first week in August, and I promise I’ll let you know when I do,’ he said at a press conference on Tuesday. 

At least nearly a dozen women have been named as potential partners for Biden after he vowed to put a woman on the ticket with him. But, in the wake of the demonstrations that sprung up after the death of George Floyd, pressure has increased for him to name a black woman.

And, with that pressure, came an increased scrutiny on the potential female candidates with reports California Senator Kamala Harris is too ‘ambitious’ to be picked and pressure on Congresswoman Karen Bass to explain her past praise for Scientology and Fidel Castro. 

‘It’s been relentless. It’s been unfortunate. But I must say it’s been predictable,’ Donna Brazile, a former interim chair of the Democratic National Committee, told The Post. ‘It’s extremely disappointing, because many of these attacks . . . are being made by Democratic men who should know better.’ 

‘I would hope that in this selection process, we are mindful that Black women — and women of color — deserve respect,’ she noted. 

The finalists are thought to include Harris, former national security adviser Susan Rice, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Karen Bass. And, of course, the pick could end being someone else.

Harris and Warren have already gone through some level of national vetting thanks to their presidential campaigns. Warren, a favorite of the progressives, would appease the left flank of the party if she joined the ticket but she is white when the pressure is on Biden to pick a black woman.

Harris has strong qualifications for the job but a report in Politico last week saw several Biden allies question how loyal the California senator would be to Biden given her attack on Biden in the July 2019 primary debate when she questioned his opposition to a busing program in the 1970s that she used to attend a better school.

Those Biden allies – both on the record and without using their names – indicated their concern Harris would be more consumed with a future presidential bid of her own.

Harris pushed back at the talk of her ‘ambition.’

‘There will be a resistance to your ambition,’ she told young black women on Friday during a  Black Girls Lead 2020 conference. ‘There will be people who say to you, ‘You are out of your lane,’ because they are burdened by only having the capacity to see what has always been instead of what can be. But don’t you let that burden you.’

And she was defended by Biden’s campaign manager, Jennifer O’Malley Dillon, who tweeted: ‘Ambitious women make history, change the world, and win.’

Biden is said to be comfortable with Rice, who worked with him in the Obama administration, and is said to envision with her the kind of partnership he had with Obama. While she is an expert on foreign policy, she has no previous political experience. 

The former vice president is said to want a running mate who would have a similar relationship with him that he enjoyed with President Barack Obama.  

Bass took the Sunday shows this weekend to push back on comments she made in 2016 praising Fidel Castro and calling his death a loss to the Cuban people.

She told ‘Fox News Sunday’ her perspective on the late Cuban dictator was ‘developed over time’ and that she now understood that the Castro government ‘was a brutal regime.’ She said she would not make similar comments again.

Bass also had to defend remarks she made in 2010 praising the Church of Scientology. She spoke at Scientology ceremony when she was in the California state assembly.

‘Back in 2010, I attended the event knowing I was going to address a group of people with beliefs very different than my own, and spoke briefly about things I think most of us agree with, and on those things — respect for different views, equality, and fighting oppression — my views have not changed,’ she wrote on Twitter. ‘Since then, published first-hand accounts in books, interviews and documentaries have exposed this group.’

She also noted she worships at First New Christian Fellowship Baptist Church in South LA. 

Bass, who serves as chair of the Congressional Black Caucus, has a lot of support among Congressional Democrats, who have voiced that to Biden and his surrogates.

She has also privately reassured Biden allies she has no interest in the top spot and would be a loyal lieutenant, The New York Times reported. 

Biden, if he wins in November, would be almost 82 years old on inauguration day, meaning his choice of a running mate could be of even greater consequence. 

WHO’S ON BIDEN’S VP SHORTLIST

KAMALA HARRIS, 55. CALIFORNIA SENATOR 

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Following widespread protests over racial injustice and police brutality, pressure increased on Biden to choose a woman of color. Harris, the daughter of Jamaican and Indian parents, fits the bill.

Harris is widely viewed as a favorite to run alongside Biden. She is a battle-tested former presidential candidate and ex-prosecutor who has shown an ability to go on the attack – a valued asset for a running mate. A first-term senator from California, she has already been heavily vetted by the media and rival campaigns.

Harris endorsed Biden after dropping out of the race. But her criticism of him during a Democratic primary debate about his opposition to school busing rankled some people close to Biden, who worry about her ambition and loyalty.

Family life: Married to Douglas Emhoff, with two adult stepchildren. 

SUSAN RICE, 55. FORMER NATIONAL SECURITY ADVISOR 

Rice served as President Barack Obama’s national security adviser during his second term, where she worked hand in hand on foreign policy matters with Biden, who was Obama’s vice president.

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Prior to that, Rice served as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations under Obama and has advised several other Democratic presidential candidates on national security.

A Black woman, Rice could help drive the African-American vote, the Democratic Party´s most loyal constituency. But she has never run for public office, which means she would be untested on the campaign trail. Her involvement in the controversy over the 2012 attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya, could revive that incident as a campaign issue.

Family life: Married to former ABC News executive Ian Cameron with son and a daughter; son John is a Trump supporter

VAL DEMINGS, 63. FLORIDA CONGRESSWOMAN 

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Biden has said Demings, an African-American congresswoman from the election battleground state of Florida, is on the shortlist for running mate.

The former Orlando police chief served as one of the managers of the House of Representatives’ impeachment proceedings against Republican President Donald Trump but has a lower profile among voters nationally.

Demings’ background in law enforcement and her relatively unvetted past as police chief could be viewed as risk factors to a Biden campaign that wants to appeal to progressive voters.

Family life: Married to Jerry Demings, current mayor of Orange County, Florida, with three adult children 

KAREN BASS, 66. CALIFORNIA CONGRESSWOMAN 

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A late addition to Biden’s shortlist, Bass, a congresswoman from Southern California and chair of the Congressional Black Caucus, would add a progressive voice to the ticket.

Bass has an extensive background in police reform efforts and has spearheaded the legislative response in the House to the killing of George Floyd by police in May. But at 66, she may not offer the prospect of generational transition that Biden wants to show.

Family life: Lost her daughter and son-in-law in 2006 car crash; has four adult stepchildren from her former marriage

TAMMY DUCKWORTH, 52. ILLINOIS SENATOR 

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Duckworth has a compelling personal story and would help bolster the campaign’s national security credentials.

The senator from Illinois is a combat veteran who lost her legs when her helicopter was shot down in Iraq in 2004. She went on to become the first woman with a disability and the first Thai-American elected to Congress. Duckworth, however, has not been on the forefront of civil justice issues like Harris, Bass and others on Biden’s list.

Family life: Married to Bryan Bowlsbey, also a veteran, with two daughters, Abigail, five and Maile, two, the first child born to a sitting female senator  

KEISHA LANCE BOTTOMS, 50. ATLANTA MAYOR

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Bottoms is the first-term mayor of a city that has been riven by protests over Floyd’s death and the shooting of another Black man, Rayshard Brooks, by Atlanta police in June. Atlanta also has been a hot spot in the coronavirus pandemic, putting Bottoms on the front lines of the country’s two largest challenges of the moment.

While Bottoms was an early supporter of Biden, her lack of experience on the federal level may doom her chances. Biden, who would be the oldest U.S. president, has insisted his No. 2 be ready to assume the presidency at any time.

Married to Home Depot executive Derek Bottoms, with four adopted children 

ELIZABETH WARREN, 71. MASSACHUSETTS SENATOR 

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Warren,has spoken with Biden regularly since dropping out of the Democratic nominating race and endorsing him. The senator from Massachusetts is seen by Biden advisers as a bridge between the former vice president and people skeptical of his commitment to progressive policy priorities.

The selection of Warren, however, could fuel allegations by the Trump campaign that Biden favors an overly leftist agenda, while potentially alienating moderate voters in battleground states that Biden is cultivating.

Family life: Married to Harvard professor Bruce Mann, with two adult children from her first marriage and three grandchildren

MICHELLE LUJAN GRISHAM, 60. NEW MEXICO GOVERNOR 

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31303776 8569877 image m 27 1595970570802

Lujan Grishambecame the first Latina Democratic governor of a state in 2018, after serving six years in Congress. 

Biden’s campaign has been pushed by allies to consider a running mate who could boost his support among Latino voters, potentially the largest minority voting bloc in the November election.

Family life: Husband Gregory Girsham died of a brain aneurysm in 2004. She has two daughters 

GRETCHEN WHITMER, 48. MICHIGAN GOVERNOR 

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Whitmer raised her profile as the governor of a battleground state hit hard by the coronavirus. 

But she came under fire earlier this year from some Michigan residents for a stay-at-home order that they viewed as too onerous.

Family life: Has two children from her first marriage and three stepchildren from her second marriage to Marc Mallory, a dentist

 

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BLM protesters confront gun-toting storeowner in Louisville as they press him to voice his support

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blm protesters confront gun toting storeowner in louisville as they press him to voice his support

A group of Black Lives Matter protesters were filmed in a tense confrontation with a Louisville storeowner after they pressed him to voice his support for the movement during a third night of Breonna Taylor demonstrations in the city.  

Footage of the incident, shared on Twitter by a reporter for conservative news site Daily Caller, shows a small crowd of BLM activists grilling business owner Fadi Faouri, as he stands outside his store holding a rifle. 

During the encounter, the group gangs up on Faouri for several minutes as they challenge his views on the BLM movement and the police shooting of Breonna Taylor after he refuses to say he supports the cause.  

The exchange kicks off after a man asks Faouri ‘do black lives matter?’ to which he replies: ‘If you’re a good person I will care about you, if you’re a bad person….’ before shrugging.

The man then asks if he thinks ‘Breonna Taylor matters’. Faouri hesitates for a few seconds before responding: ‘Does it matter? I don’t know.’

The conversations starts to get tense after a woman comes into frame questioning his response and more members of the crowd urge Faouri to explain what he means.  

‘Are you trying to intimidate me? I’m not playing that game,’ Faouri says, as he explains that he is trying to protect his business. 

An argument then ensues as the group starts to close in on the store owner and continue to demand he say whether or not he believes in their cause.  

Faouri turns his attention to the initial male protester, telling him he will not be forced to say anything he doesn’t believe in. ‘Nobody can intimidate me,’ he says. 

The two parties continue to argue for several seconds but Fauori refuses to engage in their debate and the protesters eventually disperse, with the exception of one woman claiming to be a documentary filmmaker. 

The woman approaches Faouri and criticizes him for his stance, or lackthereof, as she lectures him over the injustice surrounding Breonna Taylor’s death.  

‘That’s not my f**king business!’ Faouri replies.

‘It should be your business because all lives matter right?’ the woman says, as she starts to debate Faouri on racial disparities.’You can say that, but it’s the color black that is the issue,’ she adds.  

‘You have an issue with that, I don’t have an issue,’ Faouri says in response. ‘I don’t care, white or black bulls***t, I see you as a human being, that’s all that I care about.’   

The debate finally comes to an end after a fellow protester urges the woman to leave the area. 

Faouri had been reportedly defending his store on Friday night after a building he was leasing was ‘firebombed’ during another night of unrest in Louisville.  

LOS ANGELES: Footage was captured showing an LAPD deputy using his riot shield to slam a Black Lives Matter protester into the ground on Friday night

LOS ANGELES: Footage was captured showing an LAPD deputy using his riot shield to slam a Black Lives Matter protester into the ground on Friday night

LOS ANGELES: Footage was captured showing an LAPD deputy using his riot shield to slam a Black Lives Matter protester into the ground on Friday night

LOS ANGELES: Around 100 people were seen marching in the Hollywood area of Los Angeles on Friday evening

LOS ANGELES: Around 100 people were seen marching in the Hollywood area of Los Angeles on Friday evening

LOS ANGELES: Around 100 people were seen marching in the Hollywood area of Los Angeles on Friday evening

Protests continue to rock the city and other areas of across the country after a grand jury refused to charge Louisville police officers with Breonna Taylor’s murder.    

Violent clashes have broken out between police officers and demonstrators over the last week, as some activists have taken to the streets to target businesses and cause chaos. 

On Friday, footage emerged of a police officer with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s office using his riot shield to slam a BLM protester who was already lying on the ground. The footage showed  the deputy forcefully using their riot shield to subdue a protester. 

The incident took place in West Hollywood area of the city which saw more than 100 protesters gathered on Friday evening as they marched along Santa Monica Boulevard.     

Meanwhile, across the other side of the country, hundreds of Black Lives Matter staged a ‘sit-in’ on the Brooklyn Bridge in New York City

Hundreds of angry demonstrators marched through from the Barclays Center in Brooklyn to the Brooklyn Bridge where they sat and refused to move for more than hour. 

And in Oakland, California, police said more than 250 protesters became ‘immediately violent’ and threw bottles and cans at officers in the downtown area.

NEW YORK: Hundreds of angry demonstrators marched through from the Barclays Center in Brooklyn to the Brooklyn Bridge where they sat and refused to move for more than hour

NEW YORK: Hundreds of angry demonstrators marched through from the Barclays Center in Brooklyn to the Brooklyn Bridge where they sat and refused to move for more than hour

NEW YORK: Hundreds of angry demonstrators marched through from the Barclays Center in Brooklyn to the Brooklyn Bridge where they sat and refused to move for more than hour

NEW YORK: A woman holds a portrait of Breonna Taylor during the march for Breonna Taylor

NEW YORK: A woman holds a portrait of Breonna Taylor during the march for Breonna Taylor

NEW YORK: A woman holds a portrait of Breonna Taylor during the march for Breonna Taylor

NEW YORK: Hundreds of Black Lives Matter staged a 'sit-in' on the Brooklyn Bridge on Friday night

NEW YORK: Hundreds of Black Lives Matter staged a 'sit-in' on the Brooklyn Bridge on Friday night

NEW YORK: Hundreds of Black Lives Matter staged a ‘sit-in’ on the Brooklyn Bridge on Friday night 

NEW YORK: Protesters exit the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor in New York City

NEW YORK: Protesters exit the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor in New York City

NEW YORK: Protesters exit the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor in New York City

NEW YORK: People participate during the march for Breonna Taylor in New York City on the Brooklyn Bridge

NEW YORK: People participate during the march for Breonna Taylor in New York City on the Brooklyn Bridge

NEW YORK: People participate during the march for Breonna Taylor in New York City on the Brooklyn Bridge

Cops deployed smoke to counter the demonstrators, and a downtown Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station was closed. 

Friday’s rally was held in solidarity with protests taking place in Louisville, where large demonstrations are planned for the weekend. 

Several other demonstrations took place around the rest of the country including Boston and San Diego to protest a grand jury’s decision not to charge the Louisville, Kentucky, police officers in the death of Breonna Taylor

OAKLAND: Cops deployed smoke to counter the demonstrators, and a downtown Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station was closed

OAKLAND: Cops deployed smoke to counter the demonstrators, and a downtown Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station was closed

OAKLAND: Cops deployed smoke to counter the demonstrators, and a downtown Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station was closed

OAKLAND: Police said more than 250 protesters became 'immediately violent' and threw bottles and cans

OAKLAND: Police said more than 250 protesters became 'immediately violent' and threw bottles and cans

OAKLAND: Police said more than 250 protesters became ‘immediately violent’ and threw bottles and cans

NEW YORK: People are pictured protesting on the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor on Friday night

NEW YORK: People are pictured protesting on the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor on Friday night

NEW YORK: People are pictured protesting on the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor on Friday night

NEW YORK: A sign is seen on the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor along the Brooklyn Bridge

NEW YORK: A sign is seen on the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor along the Brooklyn Bridge

NEW YORK: A sign is seen on the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor along the Brooklyn Bridge

NEW YORK: Police wait at one end of the bridge as protesters attempt to leave the massive structure after the demonstration

NEW YORK: Police wait at one end of the bridge as protesters attempt to leave the massive structure after the demonstration

NEW YORK: Police wait at one end of the bridge as protesters attempt to leave the massive structure after the demonstration

NEW YORK: The march started off at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn and slowly moved towards the famous bridge

NEW YORK: The march started off at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn and slowly moved towards the famous bridge

NEW YORK: The march started off at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn and slowly moved towards the famous bridge

‘This is extremely traumatizing. I have been out here since June, almost every day on the streets, marching for my Black life to show people that I matter, that it could be me, it could be him, it could be him, it could be any Black face that you see in this crowd,’ protester Sophie Michel said to CBS2. 

‘I think we need to send a message that it’s unacceptable that no one was charged with Breonna Taylor’s death,’ said John Donahue to PIX11. 

Demonstrators have gathered across the country to express their anger after it was announced on Wednesday that the officers who shot the black woman in her Louisville, Kentucky apartment during a drug raid last March wouldn’t be charged with her death.

Taylor, an emergency medical worker, was shot multiple times by white officers in Louisville who entered her home during a narcotics investigation in March.  

‘I’m angry because this nation is learning that our Black women are dying at the hands of police officers,’ said Bianca Austin, ‘and this is not okay.’ 

‘I was reassured Wednesday of why I have no faith in the legal system, in the police, in the law that are not made to protect us Black and brown people,’ Austin read. 

BOSTON: A woman leaves a flower at an altar to Breonna Taylor at a 'Stand Against Racist Police Murders' demonstration

BOSTON: A woman leaves a flower at an altar to Breonna Taylor at a 'Stand Against Racist Police Murders' demonstration

BOSTON: A woman leaves a flower at an altar to Breonna Taylor at a ‘Stand Against Racist Police Murders’ demonstration

BOSTON: Demonstrators march past Boston Police headquarters during a 'Stand Against Racist Police Murders' demo

BOSTON: Demonstrators march past Boston Police headquarters during a 'Stand Against Racist Police Murders' demo

BOSTON: Demonstrators march past Boston Police headquarters during a ‘Stand Against Racist Police Murders’ demo

BOSTON: A protester gestures towards Boston Police headquarters as demonstrators march past on Friday night

BOSTON: A protester gestures towards Boston Police headquarters as demonstrators march past on Friday night

BOSTON: A protester gestures towards Boston Police headquarters as demonstrators march past on Friday night

BOSTON: The group then moved onto City Hall Plaza for a sit-in. The gathering appeared to be among the larger groups the city of Boston has seen in some time

BOSTON: The group then moved onto City Hall Plaza for a sit-in. The gathering appeared to be among the larger groups the city of Boston has seen in some time

BOSTON: The group then moved onto City Hall Plaza for a sit-in. The gathering appeared to be among the larger groups the city of Boston has seen in some time

BOSTON: Protesters could be seen gathered downtown with even large protests planned for Saturday

BOSTON: Protesters could be seen gathered downtown with even large protests planned for Saturday

BOSTON: Protesters could be seen gathered downtown with even large protests planned for Saturday

In Kentucky on Friday, a crowd surrounded Breonna Taylor’s family. Her aunt, Bianca Austin, wore Taylor’s emergency medical technician jacket while reading a message from Taylor’s mother, who was too distraught to speak. 

In Boston, demonstrators gathered in Nubian Square to at part of the nationwide protests. 

The protest remained peaceful as they marched to the Boston Police Headquarters later in the night. The group then moved onto City Hall Plaza for a sit-in.  

The gathering appeared to be among the larger groups the city of Boston has seen in some time. 

Some carried signs with messages such as ‘Justice 4 Breonna,’ ‘Black Lives Matter,’ and ‘Let Black women dream.’ 

The demonstration was largely peaceful with no arrests had been reported as of 10:45pm.

‘I feel like that message being sent that cops can do whatever they want and not be held accountable so this is just an attempt to reenergize the city and reenergize anyone that sees this to get back out on the streets to fight and increase the antiracist movement because this is not ok,’ organizer Ernest Jacques Jr. said to WHDH.

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row Friday

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row Friday

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row Friday

LOUISVILLE: Protesters marched to First Unitarian Church and stayed there past the cities 9pm curfew. Pictured is protest organizer in front of the First Unitarian Church

LOUISVILLE: Protesters marched to First Unitarian Church and stayed there past the cities 9pm curfew. Pictured is protest organizer in front of the First Unitarian Church

LOUISVILLE: Protesters marched to First Unitarian Church and stayed there past the cities 9pm curfew. Pictured is protest organizer in front of the First Unitarian Church

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row Friday. Pictured are protesters marching down Market Street in the city

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row Friday. Pictured are protesters marching down Market Street in the city

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row Friday. Pictured are protesters marching down Market Street in the city

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row. Pictured is a woman holding a BLM flag in front of the First Unitarian Church

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row. Pictured is a woman holding a BLM flag in front of the First Unitarian Church

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row. Pictured is a woman holding a BLM flag in front of the First Unitarian Church

The mayor of Boston Marty Walsh urged calm and asked demonstrators to respect the city ahead of the protest.   

‘I’m asking people planning to demonstrate in Boston tonight and over the weekend to respect the city and respect each other,’ he said. ‘I’m asking you to keep it peaceful, I’m asking you to keep it powerful. People are deeply upset, but we cannot turn to violence to express our pain.’

‘We want to maintain law and order and at the same time protect everyone’s ability to peacefully assembler and make their voices heard. So in case, there is a need for us we’re a little bit closer than we were perhaps in May,’ Lt. Colonel Bryan Pillai said. 

‘Start charging police officers for murder. You in your house sleeping, you ain’t safe. Usually the rebuttal is don’t fight the police, cooperate. How the hell do you do that sleeping?’ community activist Monica Cannon-Grant said to NBC Boston.  

LOUISVILLE: A woman holds a BLM flag in front of the Breonna Taylor memorial at Jackson Square Park

LOUISVILLE: A woman holds a BLM flag in front of the Breonna Taylor memorial at Jackson Square Park

LOUISVILLE: A woman holds a BLM flag in front of the Breonna Taylor memorial at Jackson Square Park

LOUISVILLE: A woman wearing a protective mask holds a portrait of Breonna Taylor during the march

LOUISVILLE: A woman wearing a protective mask holds a portrait of Breonna Taylor during the march

LOUISVILLE: A woman wearing a protective mask holds a portrait of Breonna Taylor during the march 

ALBUQUERQUE: A car drove into a group of protesters near UNM Friday night. No one appeared to be hurt. Police have not said whether the driver was arrested. Protesters claim the driver was disparaging them before driving through the crowd

ALBUQUERQUE: A car drove into a group of protesters near UNM Friday night. No one appeared to be hurt. Police have not said whether the driver was arrested. Protesters claim the driver was disparaging them before driving through the crowd

ALBUQUERQUE: A car drove into a group of protesters near UNM Friday night. No one appeared to be hurt. Police have not said whether the driver was arrested. Protesters claim the driver was disparaging them before driving through the crowd

On the west coast, protesters returned to the streets of Hollywood on Friday evening just a day after at least one person was injured as two separate vehicles rammed through crowds demanding racial justice.

At 6pm on Friday evening, a group of about 75 demonstrators walked down Santa Monica Boulevard.

The group swelled to more than 100 people as the march made its way toward The Grove shopping mall.

In San Diego, demonstrators took to the streets of downtown to protest the grand jury’s decision not to indict police officers on criminal charges directly related to Breonna Taylor’s death.

A group of about 40 to 50 demonstrators were organizing in front of the superior court in downtown at around 7:30pm San Diego Police said.

The group then started marching on downtown streets chanting, ‘No Justice, No Peace,’ and chanting Breonna Taylor’s name.

In Albuquerqu, a car drove into a group of protesters near the University of New Mexico campus. 

Nobody appeared to be hurt and police have not said whether the driver was arrested.

Protesters claim the driver was disparaging them before driving through the crowd.

‘It’s sad that we have to come out here and fear for our safety by the citizens of our state. We’re supposed to be better than that. We’re supposed to be loving one another, and people are out here basically trying to kill people,’ an organizer of the protest said to KOB.

SAN DIEGO: Demonstrators took to the streets of downtown to protest the grand jury's decision not to indict police officers on criminal charges directly related to Breonna Taylor's death

SAN DIEGO: Demonstrators took to the streets of downtown to protest the grand jury's decision not to indict police officers on criminal charges directly related to Breonna Taylor's death

SAN DIEGO: Demonstrators took to the streets of downtown to protest the grand jury’s decision not to indict police officers on criminal charges directly related to Breonna Taylor’s death

SAN DIEGO: A group of about 40 to 50 demonstrators were organizing in front of the superior court in downtown at around 7:30pm San Diego Police said

SAN DIEGO: A group of about 40 to 50 demonstrators were organizing in front of the superior court in downtown at around 7:30pm San Diego Police said

SAN DIEGO: A group of about 40 to 50 demonstrators were organizing in front of the superior court in downtown at around 7:30pm San Diego Police said

SAN DIEGO: The group then started marching on downtown streets chanting, 'No Justice, No Peace,' and chanting Breonna Taylor's name

SAN DIEGO: The group then started marching on downtown streets chanting, 'No Justice, No Peace,' and chanting Breonna Taylor's name

SAN DIEGO: The group then started marching on downtown streets chanting, ‘No Justice, No Peace,’ and chanting Breonna Taylor’s name

In Louisville, the city’s police chief is urging armed militia to stay away from this weekend’s protest.

‘Many of them say they are coming to help us. Let me be clear, that is not help we need. That is not help we want,’ said Rob Schroeder, interim police chief of the LMPD. 

‘America at large will not stand by and allow a Black woman to be murdered and have no consequences,’ protester Kimberly Bernard said.

When asked if he would release the grand jury’s report and transcript, the Kentucky Attorney General said he would revisit the question after the FBI finishes its independent investigation.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Tributes have been paid after a six-year-old girl died after a tree fell on her at school

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tributes have been paid after a six year old girl died after a tree fell on her at school

Tributes have been paid to a six-year-old pupil who died after being hit by a falling tree.

The pupil at Gosforth Park First School was tragically killed following the incident on Friday.

The youngster was taken to the Royal Victoria Infirmary by road with a Great North Air Ambulance doctor on board. 

Northumbria Police confirmed that the youngster died as a result of the accident on Saturday morning.

Police were called to Gosforth Park First School following the death of a youngster

Police were called to Gosforth Park First School following the death of a youngster

Police were called to Gosforth Park First School following the death of a youngster

The school has put extra help in place for staff and students following the fatality.

Headteacher Leanne Lamb said: ‘Our entire school community has been shocked  and devastated by the tragic news that one of our pupils passed away during the night, as a result of injuries suffered from a falling tree in the school grounds.

‘First and foremost, our thoughts and prayers are with the child’s family and friends as they come to terms with this tragic loss.

A six-year-old pupil was killed by a falling tree at Gosforth Park first School

A six-year-old pupil was killed by a falling tree at Gosforth Park first School

A six-year-old pupil was killed by a falling tree at Gosforth Park first School

Staff and pupils at the Newcastle school have been offered support

Staff and pupils at the Newcastle school have been offered support

Staff and pupils at the Newcastle school have been offered support

‘As a school and community, we will take the time to mourn and are putting in place extra support for the staff and pupils who are devastated by this incident.

‘We would ask that people respect the privacy of the grieving family and the school as we work to understand exactly how this happened.’

A spokesperson for Northumbria Police confirmed that an investigation was under way saying: ‘Our officers are continuing to support her family and our thoughts are with them at this incredibly difficult time.

‘An investigation has been launched with police working in conjunction with the health and safety executive.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Minnesota mom charged with murdering disabled daughter by ‘silencing alarm on her medical device’ 

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minnesota mom charged with murdering disabled daughter by silencing alarm on her medical device

A Minnesota mom has been charged with murdering her disabled 13-year-old daughter after allegedly depriving her of care and silencing the alarm on her medical device.

Elise Nelson, 35, of Paynesville was charged Wednesday over the death of her child Kylie Larson back in June. 

Kylie had several medical conditions from a loss of oxygen at birth including cerebral palsy, respiratory failure and developmental delay.  

She required around-the-clock care, including the use of a pulse oximeter device that monitored her oxygen level and pulse rate and sounded an alarm if they dropped below a certain level. 

Police said Nelson deliberately tampered with the medical device and allowed her child to die.

Minnesota mom Elise Nelson, 35, has been charged with murdering her disabled 13-year-old daughter after allegedly depriving her of care and silencing the alarm on her medical device

Minnesota mom Elise Nelson, 35, has been charged with murdering her disabled 13-year-old daughter after allegedly depriving her of care and silencing the alarm on her medical device

Minnesota mom Elise Nelson, 35, has been charged with murdering her disabled 13-year-old daughter after allegedly depriving her of care and silencing the alarm on her medical device

Nelson was the only person home with Kylie when she died on June 21.

The mom had been caring for her daughter alone for four days between June 18 to June 21, while her husband was on a fishing trip and her other daughter was staying with a family friend.

Authorities believe that, during the four-day period, Nelson tampered with Kylie’s pulse oximeter device, silencing its alarm before ultimately turning it off. 

The device can be tampered with to manually change the level at which the the alarm will sound. 

Nelson allegedly altered the medical equipment so the alarm would not sound when her daughter’s oxygen and pulse levels dropped below 90 percent.

Then, on the morning of June 21, she allegedly raised the level from 74 percent back to 90 percent before turning the alarm off altogether, according to data from the machine. 

When the family friend tried to drop off Nelson’s other daughter, they could not get hold of her, says the criminal complaint. 

Nelson was charged Wednesday over the death of Kylie Larson, 13, (pictured) back in June. Kylie had several medical conditions from a loss of oxygen at birth including cerebral palsy, respiratory failure and developmental delay

Nelson was charged Wednesday over the death of Kylie Larson, 13, (pictured) back in June. Kylie had several medical conditions from a loss of oxygen at birth including cerebral palsy, respiratory failure and developmental delay

Nelson was charged Wednesday over the death of Kylie Larson, 13, (pictured) back in June. Kylie had several medical conditions from a loss of oxygen at birth including cerebral palsy, respiratory failure and developmental delay

Nelson texted the friend hours later saying she had been giving Kylie CPR for an hour and was waiting for emergency services to arrive. 

But the mom didn’t call 911 for another 20 minutes after sending the text, accordinf to authorities. 

Police arrived at the home to find Kylie lying on the living room floor. 

Nelson allegedly told police her daughter had flatlined after her oxygen levels fell to 86 percent. 

The teen was rushed to hospital and was pronounced dead.

An autopsy revealed Kylie died as a result of both complications during birth and being deprived of care by Nelson.  

Kylie required around-the-clock care, including the use of a pulse oximeter device

Kylie required around-the-clock care, including the use of a pulse oximeter device

Police said Nelson deliberately tampered with the device and allowed her to die

Police said Nelson deliberately tampered with the device and allowed her to die

Kylie required around-the-clock care, including the use of a pulse oximeter device that monitored her oxygen level and pulse rate and sounded an alarm if they dropped below a certain level. Police said Nelson deliberately tampered with the device and allowed her to die

Her death was ruled a homicide and Nelson was charged with second-degree intentional murder and manslaughter in Stearns County District Court. 

She was booked into jail Wednesday where she is being held on $500,000 bail without conditions or $350,000 with conditions. 

She is scheduled to appear in court on October 8. 

Kylie’s devastated family paid tribute to the teen in an online obituary where they described her as a ‘gift from God’ and a ‘sweet soul’. 

‘Kylie enjoyed being outside and moving around, whether it be spinning around in her chair, going for walks with friends and family, or traveling to new places. She loved spending time with her family and going for boat rides,’ her family wrote. 

‘Her fellow schoolmates looked forward to pushing her around in the halls and laughing with her. You saw her sweet soul and smile in her eyes.’      

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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