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Julie Walters reveals she’s giving up acting after it ’caused her cancer’

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julie walters reveals shes giving up acting after it caused her cancer

Julie Walters has revealed she wants to give up acting, believing the stress of it ’caused her cancer’.

The Golden Globe-winning star, 70, who was diagnosed with stage-three bowel cancer while filming The Secret Garden in Yorkshire in 2018, said she doesn’t want to perform again after getting the all-clear.

She added that finding out she was ill strangely came as a ‘huge relief’ because it meant she could stop working. 

Speaking to The Times’ Saturday Review, Birmingham-born Walters admitted: ‘Part of me was going, “Oh my God! I’ve got cancer! Oh my God!” And I’m dealing with the shock of that, and it’s all systems go to have it treated. 

Julie Walters has revealed she wants to give up acting, believing the stress of it 'caused her cancer'. Pictured in 2017

Julie Walters has revealed she wants to give up acting, believing the stress of it 'caused her cancer'. Pictured in 2017

Julie Walters has revealed she wants to give up acting, believing the stress of it ’caused her cancer’. Pictured in 2017

‘But there was also an element of going, “I don’t have to do any more work. I can actually get off this treadmill.” Because I had been working really hard and it seemed like a big excuse not to do anything. Cancer trumps everything. So there was a huge relief in it, which is strange. But I needed something to stop me.’

When asked by her oncologist what she thought had caused the cancer, she revealed the first thing that came to her mind was her job.

‘Acting caused it,’ Walters said. ‘Because of the way that I approach it. I have to be totally in it. Everything has to be just so. 

‘It’s very stressful. You’re immediately above the parapet. You’re being judged. It’s a stressful job and I don’t sleep when I’m working. It’s not good for me.’

Walters, 70, pictured in March last year, said finding out she was ill strangely came as a 'huge relief' because it meant she could stop working

Walters, 70, pictured in March last year, said finding out she was ill strangely came as a 'huge relief' because it meant she could stop working

Walters, 70, pictured in March last year, said finding out she was ill strangely came as a ‘huge relief’ because it meant she could stop working

Walters said she doesn't want to work again - but would consider doing a third Mamma Mia film (pictured with Christine Baranski in Mamma Mia 2)

Walters said she doesn't want to work again - but would consider doing a third Mamma Mia film (pictured with Christine Baranski in Mamma Mia 2)

Walters said she doesn’t want to work again – but would consider doing a third Mamma Mia film (pictured with Christine Baranski in Mamma Mia 2)

The actress publicly revealed her cancer ordeal in February during an interview with Victoria Derbyshire. 

She admitted that prior to her diagnosis she’d felt obliged to accept as many roles as she could because she was in her sixties.   

After she had an operation to remove 30cm of her lower intestine, followed by chemotherapy, Walters, who now lives in West Sussex with her husband Grant Roffey, said she began considering her future and felt something had to change. 

‘I thought, “I don’t want to work again”,’ she told the publication. ‘Unless it’s another Mamma Mia.’ 

She suggested that The Secret Garden, a new adaptation of the Frances Hodgson Burnett book in which she plays housekeeper Mrs Medlock, could be her last role.

The actress publicly revealed her cancer ordeal in February during an interview with Victoria Derbyshire

The actress publicly revealed her cancer ordeal in February during an interview with Victoria Derbyshire

The actress publicly revealed her cancer ordeal in February during an interview with Victoria Derbyshire

After her cancer treatment, Walters returned to filming a month later, but found it so draining that a number of her lines had to be cut and a body double was used for certain group scenes. 

Talking to Victoria Derbyshire, Walters said she thought doctors must have been mistaken when she first heard the news of her illness.

Dame Julie told how she had visited the doctor with indigestion and ‘slight discomfort’ a year earlier but later came back suffering with stomach pain, heartburn and vomiting but she didn’t have blood in her stools, which can be a common symptom.

Julie said: ‘I had some symptoms and not the others. My discomfort was really slight. Just go and make sure you get checked.’

Speaking in an interview with the Daily Telegraph magazine in April, Walters revealed she didn’t even tell her daughter Maisie, 32, about her cancer until she was in remission.

She said she couldn’t ‘bear the thought’ of her only child knowing what she was going through so told her she was going to have her appendix out. 

Maisie herself had cancer as a child, being diagnosed with lymphoblastic leukaemia at the age of two. She was given the all-clear not long after her sixth birthday.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Australia

Steve ‘Commando’ Willis wins AVO against former client after series of bizarre incidents

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steve commando willis wins avo against former client after series of bizarre incidents

Steve ‘Commando’ Willis has won an apprehended violence order against a former longtime client, after a magistrate found he had ‘reasonable fear’ of her stalking him.   

A court on Friday heard of a series of incidents involving Jun ‘Margaret’ Yue including her showing up near Willis’ home on Christmas Eve, meeting him at parks where he trained and turning up at the airport when he returned from overseas. 

Magistrate Jennifer Price told the Downing Centre Local Court that Yue called Willis ‘shifu’ – a term in Mandarin that means ‘master’ – and that they trained together more than 120 times. 

But Willis told the court he became ‘anxious and distressed’ by Yue’s behaviour over the course of 2019 and 2020, with the magistrate recalling the facts of a series of up to seven alleged incidents.

Jun 'Margaret' Yue was a longtime client of Biggest Loser star Steve 'Commando' Willis (above, during a boot camp in Perth) but on Friday he was granted an apprehended violence order against Ms Yue, a magistrate finding he had reasonable fear of being stalked

Jun 'Margaret' Yue was a longtime client of Biggest Loser star Steve 'Commando' Willis (above, during a boot camp in Perth) but on Friday he was granted an apprehended violence order against Ms Yue, a magistrate finding he had reasonable fear of being stalked

Jun ‘Margaret’ Yue was a longtime client of Biggest Loser star Steve ‘Commando’ Willis (above, during a boot camp in Perth) but on Friday he was granted an apprehended violence order against Ms Yue, a magistrate finding he had reasonable fear of being stalked

The magistrate said she did not find Ms Yue's (above) evidence to be persuasive, noting her inability to recall details when they were 'inconvenient'

The magistrate said she did not find Ms Yue's (above) evidence to be persuasive, noting her inability to recall details when they were 'inconvenient'

The magistrate said she did not find Ms Yue’s (above) evidence to be persuasive, noting her inability to recall details when they were ‘inconvenient’

Those included Ms Yue, who lived near Sydney International Airport, attending the Sydney International Airport uninvited in November 2019. 

Willis was returning home from a boot camp in Tahiti that Yue had wanted to go to but couldn’t afford to attend. 

At a hearing, Ms Yue agreed that she attended the airport ‘in case Willis required a lift home’.

She claimed she lived 10 minutes from there, was nearby due to personal business and had a copy of the itinerary of the bootcamp. 

Ms Yue didn’t agree that it was strange behaviour to turn up to the airport to give the PT an unsolicited lift. 

The court heard she texted Willis to notify him that she was there and he replied saying he had an appointment and there was ‘no need’ for her to be waiting or contacting him. 

Another incident occurred on Christmas Eve last year, when she allegedly came to his then-home in Sydney’s east where he lived with his now former partner Michelle Bridges. 

Mr Willis said Ms Yue allegedly claimed in messages that she wanted to give him presents, had been waiting outside his home ‘for an hour’, complained she could be spending time with her own family and referenced his partner Bridges being home cooking dinner. 

Ms Yue claimed in court that she had attended his home because his gym was in the garage and that he cancelled a training session without notice.

She said she ‘could not recall’ a message about Bridges cooking dinner.  

Willis on the beach with his new girlfriend Harika Vancuylenberg, above, recently. Vancuylenberg was originally a party to the AVO

Willis on the beach with his new girlfriend Harika Vancuylenberg, above, recently. Vancuylenberg was originally a party to the AVO

Willis on the beach with his new girlfriend Harika Vancuylenberg, above, recently. Vancuylenberg was originally a party to the AVO

Ballet dancer and taekwondo black belt Jun 'Margaret' Yue fought the AVO application - even tapping a barrister to represent her - however the effort fell short

Ballet dancer and taekwondo black belt Jun 'Margaret' Yue fought the AVO application - even tapping a barrister to represent her - however the effort fell short

Ballet dancer and taekwondo black belt Jun ‘Margaret’ Yue fought the AVO application – even tapping a barrister to represent her – however the effort fell short

Other incidents referenced in the case included her turning up at a park in Kirribilli and Willis claiming she told him she had been turning up for a week to see him.

She also turned up to a park in Rouse Hill where he held boot camps to pay him after a dispute over money and would not concede that was very far from Rosebery, where she lived.

Magistrate Price found Willis appeared to be truthful and ‘presented as very credible’ and, as the only prosecution case, the case hinged solely upon his evidence. Meanwhile, Ms Yue gave an impression of being ‘socially awkward’.

‘I did not find her evidence persuasive, noting her inability to explain certain details when they appeared inconvenient,’ the magistrate said.

‘I am satisfied as to the evidence has established on the balance of probabilities there are reasonable grounds to fear stalking by the defendant.’

Ms Yue spoke only three words in court – ‘yes, your honour’, in acknowledging she understood the terms of the order. 

The terms include not stalking, harassing or assaulting Willis or going within 200m of him and his places of work. 

The magistrate did however note there had never been any suggestion of violence or threats from Ms Yue, who had opposed the order, tapping a barrister. 

The order will be in place for up to two years. 

More to come 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Sydney is cocaine capital of Australia and Victorians prefer opioids, Wastewater Drug report reveals

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sydney is cocaine capital of australia and victorians prefer opioids wastewater drug report reveals

Sydney is still the cocaine capital of Australia, Melburnians prefer opioids and Brisbane has the highest levels of MDMA, according to a report from the Australian Crime and Intelligence Commission. 

There was record high consumption of cocaine, cannabis and nicotine in capital cities during the pandemic, the National Wastewater Drug Monitoring report released on Thursday said. 

The report, which tests sewage for traces of drugs, also found regional areas had record high consumption of methylamphetamine and heroin.  

ACIC CEO Mr Michael Phelan APM said there have been ‘some price increases, particularly at a wholesale level’ but this has not decreased demand. 

‘Even in locations where considerable price increases have been reported, consumption of some drugs has increased,’ he said.   

People go out in Sydney after the city reopened. Sydney is still the cocaine capital of Australia as it recorded the second highest consumption levels of the drug in history in June

People go out in Sydney after the city reopened. Sydney is still the cocaine capital of Australia as it recorded the second highest consumption levels of the drug in history in June

People go out in Sydney after the city reopened. Sydney is still the cocaine capital of Australia as it recorded the second highest consumption levels of the drug in history in June

New South Wales

Sydney is still the cocaine capital of Australia as it recorded the second highest consumption levels of the drug in history in June. 

By contrast, regional NSW saw a large decrease in cocaine use between December 2019 and April 2020. 

Sydneysiders also recorded a major spike in cannabis use in June despite a steady decline in demand since October, 2019.

Alcohol consumption dropped in both Sydney and regional areas in April as the COVID-19 pandemic shut down pubs and clubs. When pubs reopened a month later, alcohol use skyrocketed to just under pre-COVID levels. 

Nicotine use increased significantly in data recorded in February and June in Sydney.

After a major spike in heroin use in February, the drug has declined in popularity in Sydney since then. 

Victoria

Melburnians relied heavily on cocaine in June during the city’s strict lockdown while the drug decreased in popularity in regional Victoria.

There was also a small spike in MDMA use between April and June in Melbourne but the levels overall remained low. 

Unlike every other state, Victoria recorded an increase in heroin use at the start of COVID-19 pandemic, when it was declining in other capital cities. 

Regional Victorians, like Tasmanians, are the highest users of oxycodone. 

Researchers say a ‘long-term pattern’ is methalyphetamine use, which also increased from April to June in regional Victoria. 

A 'postponed' notice sits across a live music acts list outside a pub in the Fitzroy suburb of Melbourne. Melburnians heavily used cocaine in June during the city's strict lockdown while the drug decreased in popularity in regional Victoria

A 'postponed' notice sits across a live music acts list outside a pub in the Fitzroy suburb of Melbourne. Melburnians heavily used cocaine in June during the city's strict lockdown while the drug decreased in popularity in regional Victoria

A ‘postponed’ notice sits across a live music acts list outside a pub in the Fitzroy suburb of Melbourne. Melburnians heavily used cocaine in June during the city’s strict lockdown while the drug decreased in popularity in regional Victoria

Queensland

Brisbane had the highest levels of MDA use in the country, along with Hobart. MDA is a derivative of MDMA with similar effects.   

Queenslanders were drinking at regular levels throughout lockdown, although there was a slight decrease recorded in Brisbane during April. 

Cannabis use rose in both the capital city and regions during the same month.

Brisbane registered a record high in cocaine use during February before use of the party drug decreased significantly.  

Western Australia  

Perth had the highest levels of methylone use in the country. Methylone is a highly addictive synthetic drug that has similar effects to MDMA.  

MDMA use also increased in Western Australia, along with cannabis and cocaine consumption. 

The city still has high levels of heroin consumption but it declined from April to June.

WA, along with SA, recorded a drop in nicotine and alcohol use. Methylamphetamine use more than halved between April and June.  

South Australia 

Adelaide had the highest level of methylamphetamine use among Australian capital cities. 

Regional South Australia also had a dramatic increase in methylamphetamine use in April with levels exceeding Adelaide’s for the first time.

Adelaide also experienced a spike in cannabis use during the COVID-19 pandemic while use was also at record high levels in regional SA. 

Between February and April, MDMA use declined in Adelaide before returning to pre-COVID levels in June  

South Australia is one of two states (the other being WA) to report declining levels of nicotine and alcohol use.

A wide shot of the skyline in Perth, WA. Perth had the highest levels of methylone use in the country. Methylone is a highly addictive synthetic drug that has similar effects to MDMA

A wide shot of the skyline in Perth, WA. Perth had the highest levels of methylone use in the country. Methylone is a highly addictive synthetic drug that has similar effects to MDMA

A wide shot of the skyline in Perth, WA. Perth had the highest levels of methylone use in the country. Methylone is a highly addictive synthetic drug that has similar effects to MDMA

ACT 

Canberra and the ACT recorded the highest levels of cannabis and cocaine use on record in June. 

Unlike other states and territories, cannabis has been decriminalised in the ACT since January, meaning penalties for possession have been removed. 

Adults can possess up to 50 grams of dried cannabis, 150 grams of fresh cannabis, grow up to two cannabis plants per person with a maximum of four plants per household and use cannabis in their homes in Canberra. 

Nicotine consumption also increased in the ACT while heroin use fell sharply. 

Tasmania 

Hobart had the highest levels of cannabis, ocxycodone and fentanyl use in the country. It also had high levels of MDA use, along with Brisbane.   

Heroin use also increased in Hobart while cannabis was also popular in regional Tasmania.      

Alcohol and methylamphetamine intake declined steadily across the state.  

Northern Territory 

Darwin reported a record high consumption of cannabis in February followed by another spike in use in June while levels also remained high in regional areas. 

The NT is the only state or territory to experience a major spike in MDA, which is a derivative of MDMA, which was highly used in the Top End compared to other states

Nicotine consumption also increased in the NT while while methylamphetamine, cocaine and fentanyl usage is taking a downturn. 

A general view of Coolangatta beach in Queensland. Brisbane had the highest levels of MDA use in the country, along with Hobart. MDA is a derivative of MDMA with similar effects

A general view of Coolangatta beach in Queensland. Brisbane had the highest levels of MDA use in the country, along with Hobart. MDA is a derivative of MDMA with similar effects

A general view of Coolangatta beach in Queensland. Brisbane had the highest levels of MDA use in the country, along with Hobart. MDA is a derivative of MDMA with similar effects

The ACIC sampling covered around 56 per cent of the population, or more than 13 million people.

Some 55 wastewater treatment plants took part in the testing, which monitored the consumption of 13 substances.

Mr Phelan said despite the restrictions imposed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic criminal groups were operating on a ‘business as usual’ basis importing, manufacturing and trafficking illicit drugs.

‘Results from this report underline the resilience and variety of regional drug markets in Australia,’ he said.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Convenience store giant 7-Eleven is forced to fork out $173.6million after underpaying workers 

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convenience store giant 7 eleven is forced to fork out 173 6million after underpaying workers

Convenience store chain 7-Eleven has been forced to repay $173.6million after it was caught underpaying more than 4,000 workers.

An investigation by the Fair Work Ombudsmen found several Australian franchisees had been intentionally paying staff below legal wages and falsifying records to cover it up.

The chain forked out the cash to staff after reaching an agreement with the Ombudsmen in 2016.

More to come 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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