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Just ONE new local coronavirus cases is reported in New South Wales

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just one new local coronavirus cases is reported in new south wales

New South Wales is preparing to ease coronavirus restriction after reporting just one new locally transmitted case. 

The state had just five new COVID-19 cases on Friday, four of which were in hotel quarantine.

The one new locally acquired case is a household contact of a previously reported case linked to the Lakemba cluster. 

The new cases come as the state prepares for looser rules around dining.

From Friday venues will be allowed to serve more customers outdoors.

New South Wales is preparing to ease coronavirus restriction after reporting just one new locally transmitted case (pictured, restaurant on October 4)

New South Wales is preparing to ease coronavirus restriction after reporting just one new locally transmitted case (pictured, restaurant on October 4)

New South Wales is preparing to ease coronavirus restriction after reporting just one new locally transmitted case (pictured, restaurant on October 4)

A woman is seen being tested at a coronavirus testing facility at Bondi Beach in Sydney, on Thursday

A woman is seen being tested at a coronavirus testing facility at Bondi Beach in Sydney, on Thursday

A woman is seen being tested at a coronavirus testing facility at Bondi Beach in Sydney, on Thursday

The current four-square-metre social distancing rule, which determined how many people can be seated in a certain space, will be reduced.

The new two-square-metre rule for outdoor venues will mean more people will be able to cram into areas such as rooftop bars and outdoor eateries.

Up to 500 people are now allowed seated at outdoor events – an increase on the current limit of just 20 people. 

There was also promising results coming from Victoria with the state recording its lowest infection figure in three months. 

Victoria had just two new coronavirus cases found across the entire state and no deaths on Friday. 

Health Minister Brad Hazzard has urged NSW residents to be honest health officials to ensure they can track the chain of transmission.

Health Minister Brad Hazzard said people have continued to withhold information from public health officials

Health Minister Brad Hazzard said people have continued to withhold information from public health officials

Health Minister Brad Hazzard said people have continued to withhold information from public health officials

‘One of the ongoing problems that public health has had in NSW and also in Victoria is that people are not necessarily telling us the whole truth and nothing but the truth,’ Mr Hazzard said.

‘Whether it’s deliberate, whether its overlooked, you need to make sure it’s neither of those things.

‘Public health officials need to be able to track the chains of transmission and that’s impossible if people don’t give us the full picture of where they’ve been.’

More to come 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Celebrity hairdresser reveals the common mistakes people make when wearing extensions

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celebrity hairdresser reveals the common mistakes people make when wearing

 A celebrity hair extensions expert has revealed the common mistakes made by people when trying to lengthen their hair – and the best ways to avoid damage while using extensions.

Speaking exclusively to FEMAIL, Louise Bailey, who works in the Harrods Salon and also runs  Hair Extensions London,  a salon based in Fitzrovia, revealed the common misconceptions around hair extensions, including why you should always consult a professional before attaching any hair.

Louise, who has a roster of A-listers in her client book, specialises in natural looking extensions and says getting hair from a reputable company is key.

Speaking exclusively to FEMAIL, Louise Bailey, who has runs Hair Extensions London, salon based in Fitzrovia, revealed the common misconceptions around hair extensions, including why you should always consult a professional before attaching any hair

Speaking exclusively to FEMAIL, Louise Bailey, who has runs Hair Extensions London, salon based in Fitzrovia, revealed the common misconceptions around hair extensions, including why you should always consult a professional before attaching any hair

Speaking exclusively to FEMAIL, Louise Bailey, who has runs Hair Extensions London, salon based in Fitzrovia, revealed the common misconceptions around hair extensions, including why you should always consult a professional before attaching any hair

‘Extensions are like designer handbags these days , everyone has them,’ she explained to FEMAIL.

‘But celebs are often paid to promote brands and given free hair, this doesn’t mean their good ones. My top tip would be to always consults a professional and don’t go for a Z-list endorsed brand.

Here, she explains her top tips for those looking for Rapunzel-esque locks.

PICK A BRAND TO MATCH YOUR HAIR TYPE

Louise specialises in tape hair extensions,  which are attached to the hair using a special adhesive tape. 

‘The hair is reusable and can be removed from the hair easily with zero damage to the natural hair.

She recommends using Hair Dreams, which shes describe as ‘a reputable brand within the hair extension industry’. 

The brand uses natural Indian hair, and their tape hair extension can last up to nine months if maintenance it carried out correctly and the hair is looked after well once attached.

Pictured: Before hair extensions

Pictured: Before hair extensions

Pictured: After hair extensions

Pictured: After hair extensions

Pictured, natural hair (left) and right with extensions. The model wars balayage extensions from Hair Dreams, which is Indian hair

‘There’s three main types of hair sold, Russian, Chinese and Indian,’ she explained.

‘You should find the best hair for your ethnicity. Chinese hair is usually straight, while Indian hair is wavy.

‘But Chinese hair is often more heavily processed because it’s naturally darker, while Russian can be more sought after because it can be virgin and each strand is much finer.

A reputable brand is so important, and it’s always worth talking to a professional, as there’s no regulation within this industry of hair processing. 

‘But a reputable brand is so important, and it’s always worth talking to a professional, as there’s no regulation within this industry of hair processing.

‘There’s even been brands taken to court before after hair they claimed was Russian wasn’t.

‘We use Hair Dreams, which has a natural wave so it’s perfect with to style and blend easily with the natural hair making it easy to manage at home.

‘It means women can have a break from straightening and harsh heat styling, you can brush your hair and go.

‘It gives you an everlasting blow dry for a week, you can have a groomed hairstyle all the time.’

Louise specialises in tape hair extensions which are attached to the hair using a special adhesive tape. The hair is reusable and can be removed from the hair easily with zero damage to the natural hair

Louise specialises in tape hair extensions which are attached to the hair using a special adhesive tape. The hair is reusable and can be removed from the hair easily with zero damage to the natural hair

Louise specialises in tape hair extensions which are attached to the hair using a special adhesive tape. The hair is reusable and can be removed from the hair easily with zero damage to the natural hair

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR

While Louise works with a limited number of top brands, she recommends steering clear of extremely cheap ones as ‘you get what you pay for’.

‘A good way to to know about a brand is good, look for a hair extension company with years behind its belt,’ she said.

‘Look for a place with A-listers on board as top brands won’t give them away as the product is so expensive.

‘A good way to to know about a brand is good, look for a hair extension company with years behind its belt 

‘To get your hair in good condition while using extensions you have to make sure your colour process is not damaging the natural hair,’.

Louise’s works with a colour-expert and recommends making sure you have a full team on board to make sure both the hair extension and colour service protects the natural hair.

IT’S FOR ANYONE

While many see extensions as something for A-listers and influencers, many of Louise’s clients are over 50.

‘We get a lot of menopausal women come in, where there hair starts to thin and we fill out the hair and make them feel amazing again,’ she explained.

‘We get women that come to us of all ages that have had heavy bleach or even some highlights or the hair has just been over processed and it keeps breaking and doesn’t seem to grow.

‘We fill the gaps with the extensions, when hair is burned from colour we don’t want to burn it even more – we get them on a healthy hair routine allowing the hair to have rest while still looking thick shinny and groomed. 

‘We sort it so its not a wispy fluff anymore she added.

‘I’ve also had patients who have lost their hair from chemotherapy, as soon as hair is four inches, we can attach hair extensions, it saves people having to get wigs and makes them feel themselves again.

IT CAN PREVENT HAIR DAMAGE

‘We do a lot of Balayage extensions as it’s trendy and means you don’t have to colour your hair so much to achieve this look.

‘We get a lot of people that want a new colour and we can colour it all with tape hair extensions – it’s so easy to do.

We get a lot of people that want a new colour and we can do it  all with tape hair extensions – it’s so easy to do. 

‘With Balyage it places the colour properly, which you might not be able to do otherwise as dying it would take hours to do.

‘When applied right, it can prevent damage but you need to find someone really good to apply them, or it can make damage worse.

‘It’s also about them being cut properly and many hairdressers cut the natural hair away as they try to cut it, so make sure you go to a reputable place that uses good hair and knows how to cut extensions well so they don’t cut your natural hair away when trying to blend them. This is a skill in itself.

‘For a great set of hair extensions that don’t do any damage to your natural hair you need a great product and a hair extensions expert to apply and cut them.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Queensland election: Deb Frecklington concedes as Palaszczuk speaks

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queensland election deb frecklington concedes as palaszczuk speaks

A bizarre election day farce saw Liberal National Party leader Deb Frecklington time her concession speech right in the middle of Annastacia Palaszczuk’s victory announcement.

Ms Frecklington conceded defeat on Saturday night as the Labor leader secured a majority government before thanking her party and addressing the state. 

Analysts and viewers were left gobsmacked after Ms Frecklington chose to make her concession speech at the exact time Ms Palaszczuk spoke in front of a cheering crowd.

Sky News host Alan Jones took aim at the LNP and said it was being run ‘by three stooges’ after the timing blunder.

‘They’ve lost. Will someone tell her they’ve lost. I just found that extraordinary,’ Mr Jones said.

Mr Jones pointed out that the opposition leader traditionally concedes defeat before the victorious party leader presents their victory speech.

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A bizarre election day farce saw Liberal National Party leader Deb Frecklington time her concession speech right in the middle of Annastacia Palaszczuk's victory lap (pictured, in the bottom left-hand corner)

A bizarre election day farce saw Liberal National Party leader Deb Frecklington time her concession speech right in the middle of Annastacia Palaszczuk's victory lap (pictured, in the bottom left-hand corner)

A bizarre election day farce saw Liberal National Party leader Deb Frecklington time her concession speech right in the middle of Annastacia Palaszczuk’s victory lap (pictured, in the bottom left-hand corner)

Ms Frecklington (pictured) conceded defeat on Saturday night as the Labor leader secured majority government before thanking her party and addressing the state

Ms Frecklington (pictured) conceded defeat on Saturday night as the Labor leader secured majority government before thanking her party and addressing the state

Ms Frecklington (pictured) conceded defeat on Saturday night as the Labor leader secured majority government before thanking her party and addressing the state

 ‘Frecklington has been badly let down. I don’t know the lady, but she presents well, she speaks well, but it’s what she says that lets her down,’ he said.  

The timing error caused the speeches to air at the same time, meaning TV and blogging coverage had to switch between the two, or wait for one to end.

Political analysts were left shocked, saying they’d never seen it before and Ms Frecklington’s advisers must have failed her with the blunder.

Despite the awkward farce, Ms Frecklington told Liberal National Party followers she intends to remain in the job following the election loss. 

‘Queenslanders have made their decision, and I thank each and every one of them for voting and for upholding our democracy,’ the opposition leader told a function of LNP faithful in Brisbane late on Saturday.

‘This decision is respected by the Liberal National Party. And I am so proud of the campaign that we have fought.’

The LNP looked likely to retain at least 32 seats in the 93-seat parliament. In the last parliament the opposition had 38 seats.

The timing error caused the speeches to air at the same time (pictured), meaning TV and blogging coverage had to switch between the two, or wait for one to end

The timing error caused the speeches to air at the same time (pictured), meaning TV and blogging coverage had to switch between the two, or wait for one to end

The timing error caused the speeches to air at the same time (pictured), meaning TV and blogging coverage had to switch between the two, or wait for one to end

Political analysts were left shocked, saying they'd never seen it before and Ms Frecklington's advisers must have failed her (pictured, the badly timed speeches playing at once)

Political analysts were left shocked, saying they'd never seen it before and Ms Frecklington's advisers must have failed her (pictured, the badly timed speeches playing at once)

Political analysts were left shocked, saying they’d never seen it before and Ms Frecklington’s advisers must have failed her (pictured, the badly timed speeches playing at once)

‘I will continue to play my part in the Liberal National Party and I will continue as the leader of this great party,’ Ms Frecklington said.

‘The LNP is going to continue to hold the Palaszczuk government to account.

‘We will speak up for those who have been forgotten and left behind. We’re going to fight for the families of this great state because families mean more than anything.’

Following her speech Ms Frecklington insisted she wasn’t trying to spoil the premier’s speech.  

Viewers were outraged about the timing error, with many taking to social media to express their confusion.

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35077614 8900249 image a 2 1604161121387

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35077620 8900249 image a 17 1604154370321

Viewers were outraged about the timing error, with many taking to social media to express their confusion

Viewers were outraged about the timing error, with many taking to social media to express their confusion

Viewers were outraged about the timing error, with many taking to social media to express their confusion

‘It appears Deb Frecklington is not waiting for Annastacia Palaszczuk to finish her speech. She’s speaking now while the Premier is still speaking. Has this ever happened before?’ One user wrote on Twitter.

‘As usual Frecklington can’t read the room and has got her timing wrong. Why is she giving her speech while the PREMIER OF QUEENSLAND is speaking,’ another said.

‘Deb Frecklington doing her concession speech when no one is listening is a metaphor for the entire election campaign,’ one user tweeted.

Another wrote: ‘Wow! How ungracious by Frecklington, giving her concession speech whilst Palaszczuk is giving her thank you speech. No class!’ 

The LNP copped flack from within its own stable throughout the election.

Former LNP premier Campbell Newman reprimanded his own party, saying COVID-19 was not an excuse for their failure to win a majority.

This was also Australia's first ever state election contest between two female leaders, with opposition leader Deb Frecklington conceding defeat (pictured) at exactly the same time as the premier claimed victory - breaking convention

This was also Australia's first ever state election contest between two female leaders, with opposition leader Deb Frecklington conceding defeat (pictured) at exactly the same time as the premier claimed victory - breaking convention

This was also Australia’s first ever state election contest between two female leaders, with opposition leader Deb Frecklington conceding defeat (pictured) at exactly the same time as the premier claimed victory – breaking convention

Wearing pink, Ms Palaszczuk had a message for critics of Queensland's border closure, from her New South Wales Liberal counterpart Gladys Berejiklian to Prime Minister Scott Morrison (pictured in her Inala electorate in Brisbane's south with her mother Laurel)

Wearing pink, Ms Palaszczuk had a message for critics of Queensland's border closure, from her New South Wales Liberal counterpart Gladys Berejiklian to Prime Minister Scott Morrison (pictured in her Inala electorate in Brisbane's south with her mother Laurel)

 Wearing pink, Ms Palaszczuk had a message for critics of Queensland’s border closure, from her New South Wales Liberal counterpart Gladys Berejiklian to Prime Minister Scott Morrison (pictured in her Inala electorate in Brisbane’s south with her mother Laurel)

‘The LNP primary vote was 36 per cent a year ago. We had a problem prior to the pandemic,’ he tweeted.

Deputy opposition leader Tim Mander defended the LNP’s performance in a ‘tough election’.

‘I’m not going to take any advice off Campbell Newman that’s for sure,’ he said.

‘No doubt it’s a very disappointing result for us. We were very hopeful about a number of those seats that it looks like we’re not going to win.’

Mr Mander refused to lay any blame at the feet of Ms Frecklington.

‘I have absolutely zero criticism of Deb. She’s done a great job under the circumstances,’ he told ABC TV.

‘She’s been full of energy. She’s got better as the campaign went on. There’ll be a lot of learning from this. The last thing I’m thinking about is those type of issues.’

‘We have to go away now and lick our wounds,’ Mr Mander said.

Ms Frecklington was sure to retain her seat of Nanango.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Muslims protest against Emmanuel Macron in Iraq, India and Pakistan

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muslims protest against emmanuel macron in iraq india and pakistan

French President Emmanuel Macron has said it’s ‘our duty to protect our freedoms’ as furious protests continue to rage across the Muslim world against his comments over the Charlie Hebdo cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed.   

Macron gave a long interview setting out his vision to Qatar-based TV channel Al-Jazeera today. 

‘I can understand that people could be shocked by the caricatures but I will never accept that violence can be justified,’ he said.

‘I consider it our duty to protect our freedoms and our rights,’ he added in an extract of the interview to be broadcast from 1600 GMT. 

Fury against French President Emmanuel Macron continues to rage across the Muslim world as protests were held today in India, Pakistan and Iraq over the premier’s stance on Charlie Hebdo cartoons.  

Macron has become the focal point of Islamic fury after defending Charlie Hebdo cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed which were used as justification for a teacher’s murder in the Paris suburbs two weeks ago.  

After three people were murdered in Nice Thursday in the latest in a long line of terror attacks in France, Macron said that France will not ‘give up on our values’ despite fury at the caricatures. 

Protests are being staged across the Muslim world, with demonstrations seen this morning in Iraq, Pakistan, Yemen, and India.  

People chant slogans as they set fire to France's flag during a protest against the cartoon publications of Prophet Mohammad in France and comments by the French President Emmanuel Macron, in Karachi, Pakistan today

People chant slogans as they set fire to France's flag during a protest against the cartoon publications of Prophet Mohammad in France and comments by the French President Emmanuel Macron, in Karachi, Pakistan today

People chant slogans as they set fire to France’s flag during a protest against the cartoon publications of Prophet Mohammad in France and comments by the French President Emmanuel Macron, in Karachi, Pakistan today 

Protesters burn effigy of French President Emmanuel Macron during an anti-French protest in Karachi today

Protesters burn effigy of French President Emmanuel Macron during an anti-French protest in Karachi today

Protesters burn effigy of French President Emmanuel Macron during an anti-French protest in Karachi today 

People burn a picture of French President Emmanuel Macron during a protest against his comments about Prophet Muhammad caricatures, in Peshawar, Pakistan today

People burn a picture of French President Emmanuel Macron during a protest against his comments about Prophet Muhammad caricatures, in Peshawar, Pakistan today

People burn a picture of French President Emmanuel Macron during a protest against his comments about Prophet Muhammad caricatures, in Peshawar, Pakistan today 

Demonstrators chant slogans as they march with a large banner calling for a boycott of French products and depicting French President Emmanuel Macron with the nose and ears of a pig, during a rally protesting against the comments of Macron over Prophet Mohammed cartoons in Yemen's country's third-city of Taez today

Demonstrators chant slogans as they march with a large banner calling for a boycott of French products and depicting French President Emmanuel Macron with the nose and ears of a pig, during a rally protesting against the comments of Macron over Prophet Mohammed cartoons in Yemen's country's third-city of Taez today

Demonstrators chant slogans as they march with a large banner calling for a boycott of French products and depicting French President Emmanuel Macron with the nose and ears of a pig, during a rally protesting against the comments of Macron over Prophet Mohammed cartoons in Yemen’s country’s third-city of Taez today 

Iraqis protest against comments by French President Emmanuel Macron defending cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in Halabja, Iraq today

Iraqis protest against comments by French President Emmanuel Macron defending cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in Halabja, Iraq today

Iraqis protest against comments by French President Emmanuel Macron defending cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in Halabja, Iraq today 

Muslim demonstrators hold a placard with a picture of French President Emmanuel Macron Macron with a footprint over his face during an anti-France protest near the French consulate in Kolkata today

Muslim demonstrators hold a placard with a picture of French President Emmanuel Macron Macron with a footprint over his face during an anti-France protest near the French consulate in Kolkata today

Muslim demonstrators hold a placard with a picture of French President Emmanuel Macron Macron with a footprint over his face during an anti-France protest near the French consulate in Kolkata today 

In Dhaka, hundreds of Bangladeshi Muslims took to the streets of the capital for a third consecutive day of protests, chanting slogans such as ‘Boycott French products’ and burning effigies of Macron, who they described as an enemy of Islam. 

At a much larger protest on Tuesday in Dhaka thousands had turned out for a protest carrying banners such as ‘Stop Islamophobia’, ‘Boycott France’ and ‘Lay siege to the French Embassy in Dhaka’. 

In the Somalian capital Mogadishu, hundreds of mostly youthful demonstrators gathered at K4, a busy junction leading to the airport and started chanting anti-French slogans and burning French flags. 

They were responding to calls by clerics in various Somali regions to come out and condemn France and boycott French products.

‘We are going to use our muscles to defend Islam,’ a middle-aged man, Mohamed Ahmed, who was at the demonstration, told Reuters when asked why he was participating. 

A protester carries an effigy of French President Emmanuel Macron during an anti-French protest in Karachi on October 31, 2020

A protester carries an effigy of French President Emmanuel Macron during an anti-French protest in Karachi on October 31, 2020

A protester carries an effigy of French President Emmanuel Macron during an anti-French protest in Karachi on October 31, 2020

A protester jumps on an effigy of French President Emmanuel Macron during an anti-French protest in Karachi today

A protester jumps on an effigy of French President Emmanuel Macron during an anti-French protest in Karachi today

A protester jumps on an effigy of French President Emmanuel Macron during an anti-French protest in Karachi today 

Protesters throw an effigy of French President Emmanuel Macron during an anti-French protest in Karachi today

Protesters throw an effigy of French President Emmanuel Macron during an anti-French protest in Karachi today

Protesters throw an effigy of French President Emmanuel Macron during an anti-French protest in Karachi today 

Protesters hold a placard and banner depicting French President Emmanuel Macron during a protest against Macron's comments considered insulting to Muslims, in Makassar, South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia today

Protesters hold a placard and banner depicting French President Emmanuel Macron during a protest against Macron's comments considered insulting to Muslims, in Makassar, South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia today

Protesters hold a placard and banner depicting French President Emmanuel Macron during a protest against Macron’s comments considered insulting to Muslims, in Makassar, South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia today 

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35073612 8900097 image a 42 1604145001092

Iraqis protest against comments by French President Emmanuel Macron defending cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in Halabja, Iraq today 

Demonstrators stand on defaced posters of France's President Emmanuel Macron on a road during a protest against the publications of a cartoon of Prophet Mohammad in France and Macron's comments, outside a French consulate in Kolkata today

Demonstrators stand on defaced posters of France's President Emmanuel Macron on a road during a protest against the publications of a cartoon of Prophet Mohammad in France and Macron's comments, outside a French consulate in Kolkata today

Demonstrators stand on defaced posters of France’s President Emmanuel Macron on a road during a protest against the publications of a cartoon of Prophet Mohammad in France and Macron’s comments, outside a French consulate in Kolkata today 

Demonstrators chant slogans as they march with banners during a rally protesting against the comments of French President Emmanuel Macron in Taez today

Demonstrators chant slogans as they march with banners during a rally protesting against the comments of French President Emmanuel Macron in Taez today

Demonstrators chant slogans as they march with banners during a rally protesting against the comments of French President Emmanuel Macron in Taez today 

‘We ask people to burn every product of France they come across.’  

Turkish President Erdogan said Wednesday that Western countries mocking Islam wanted to ‘relaunch the Crusades’, heightening a confrontation with France over cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad that have stirred anger in Muslim-majority countries.

In a speech to lawmakers of his AK Party in parliament, President Tayyip Erdogan also said that standing against attacks on the Prophet was ‘an issue of honour for us’, suggesting Ankara may be digging in for a prolonged standoff.

The row with France flared after a French teacher who showed pupils cartoons of the Prophet published in the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo was beheaded in France this month. 

The caricatures are considered blasphemous by Muslims.

In a sign of spreading anger at France’s defence of the right to publish the cartoons, demonstrators denounced France in street protests in several Muslim-majority countries.

Demonstrators chant slogans as they march with banners during a rally protesting against the comments of French President Emmanuel Macron over Prophet Mohammed cartoons in Yemen's third-city of Taez today

Demonstrators chant slogans as they march with banners during a rally protesting against the comments of French President Emmanuel Macron over Prophet Mohammed cartoons in Yemen's third-city of Taez today

Demonstrators chant slogans as they march with banners during a rally protesting against the comments of French President Emmanuel Macron over Prophet Mohammed cartoons in Yemen’s third-city of Taez today 

A placard and banner depicting French President Emmanuel Macron are seen during a protest against Macron's comments considered insulting to Muslims, in Makassar, South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia today

A placard and banner depicting French President Emmanuel Macron are seen during a protest against Macron's comments considered insulting to Muslims, in Makassar, South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia today

A placard and banner depicting French President Emmanuel Macron are seen during a protest against Macron’s comments considered insulting to Muslims, in Makassar, South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia today 

Protesters hold placards during a protest against comments of French President Emmanuel Macron considered insulting to Muslims, in Yogyakarta, Indonesia today

Protesters hold placards during a protest against comments of French President Emmanuel Macron considered insulting to Muslims, in Yogyakarta, Indonesia today

Protesters hold placards during a protest against comments of French President Emmanuel Macron considered insulting to Muslims, in Yogyakarta, Indonesia today 

Placards reading "The yellow Devil is in Paris" hang in a window as a mark of a protest against the publications of a cartoon of Prophet Mohammad in France and French President Emmanuel Macron's comments, in Almaty, Kazakhstan today

Placards reading "The yellow Devil is in Paris" hang in a window as a mark of a protest against the publications of a cartoon of Prophet Mohammad in France and French President Emmanuel Macron's comments, in Almaty, Kazakhstan today

Placards reading ‘The yellow Devil is in Paris’ hang in a window as a mark of a protest against the publications of a cartoon of Prophet Mohammad in France and French President Emmanuel Macron’s comments, in Almaty, Kazakhstan today 

‘France down, it insulted our Prophet,’ shouted protesters in the Somali capital Mogadishu.

Erdogan sharply criticised Macron at the weekend, saying the French leader needed a mental health check, prompting France to recall its ambassador from Ankara. On Monday, Erdogan urged a boycott of French products.

The Turkish leader again questioned Macron’s state of mind on Wednesday and, in remarks addressed to ‘the West’, described colonial powers as ‘murderers’ for their record in Africa and the Middle east.

‘They literally want to relaunch the Crusades. Since the Crusades, the seeds of evil and hatred have started falling on these (Muslim) lands and that’s when peace was disrupted.’

Turkish officials said separately Ankara would take legal and diplomatic steps in response to a caricature of Erdogan in Charlie Hebdo, which officials called a ‘disgusting effort’ to ‘spread its cultural racism and hatred’.

The cartoon on the cover of Charlie Hebdo showed Erdogan sitting in a white t-shirt and underpants, holding a canned drink and lifting the skirt of a woman wearing an Islamic hijab to reveal her naked bottom.

Muslim activists of different organizations stage a protest against French President Emmanuel Macron, near the French Consulate in Kolkata, India today

Muslim activists of different organizations stage a protest against French President Emmanuel Macron, near the French Consulate in Kolkata, India today

Muslim activists of different organizations stage a protest against French President Emmanuel Macron, near the French Consulate in Kolkata, India today 

Muslim activists from various organizations participate in a protest against France, near the French Consulate, in Kolkata, India today

Muslim activists from various organizations participate in a protest against France, near the French Consulate, in Kolkata, India today

Muslim activists from various organizations participate in a protest against France, near the French Consulate, in Kolkata, India today 

Muslim demonstrators shout slogans during an anti-France protest near the French consulate in Kolkata today

Muslim demonstrators shout slogans during an anti-France protest near the French consulate in Kolkata today

Muslim demonstrators shout slogans during an anti-France protest near the French consulate in Kolkata today 

‘Our battle against these rude, ill-intentioned and insulting steps will continue until the end, with reason but determination,’ Turkey’s Communications Directorate said.

State media reported that Turkish prosecutors had launched an investigation into Charlie Hebdo’s executives.

The row has its roots in a knife attack outside a French school on Oct. 16 in which a man of Chechen origin beheaded Samuel Paty, a teacher who had shown pupils cartoons of the Prophet in a civics lesson. 

The French government, backed by many citizens, saw the beheading as an attack on freedom of speech, and said it would defend the right to display the cartoons.

Macron has said he would redouble efforts to stop conservative Islamic beliefs subverting French values.

Students of Jamaat-e-Islami party shout slogans during an anti-France protest in Lahore today

Students of Jamaat-e-Islami party shout slogans during an anti-France protest in Lahore today

Students of Jamaat-e-Islami party shout slogans during an anti-France protest in Lahore today 

Students of Jamaat-e-Islami party shout slogans during an anti-France protest in Lahore today

Students of Jamaat-e-Islami party shout slogans during an anti-France protest in Lahore today

Students of Jamaat-e-Islami party shout slogans during an anti-France protest in Lahore today

Somalis march during a protest against the publications of a cartoon of Prophet Mohammad in France and French President Emmanuel Macron's comments, along the streets of Mogadishu, Somalia yesterday

Somalis march during a protest against the publications of a cartoon of Prophet Mohammad in France and French President Emmanuel Macron's comments, along the streets of Mogadishu, Somalia yesterday

Somalis march during a protest against the publications of a cartoon of Prophet Mohammad in France and French President Emmanuel Macron’s comments, along the streets of Mogadishu, Somalia yesterday 

France’s foreign ministry on Tuesday issued safety advice to French citizens in Indonesia, Turkey, Bangladesh, Iraq and Mauritania, advising them to exercise caution. They should stay away from any protests over the cartoons and avoid any public gatherings.

In Cairo, Egypt’s President Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi said freedom of expression should stop if it offended more than 1.5 billion people.

The Grand Imam of Egypt’s al-Azhar university, one of the world’s most eminent seats of Sunni Muslim learning, urged the international community to criminalise ‘anti-Muslim’ actions.

Indonesian president Joko Widodo today condemned what he called ‘terrorist’ attacks in France, but also warned that remarks by President Macron had ‘insulted Islam’ and ‘hurt the unity of Muslims everywhere.’

Conservative Islamic organizations in Indonesia, the world’s largest Muslim-majority country, have called for protests and boycotts against France, sharing an image of Macron as a red-eyed devilish snail.

‘Freedom of speech that injures the noble purity and sacred values and symbol of religion is so wrong, it shouldn’t be justified and it needs to stop,’ the Indonesian leader, who is known by his popular name Jokowi, said in a televised address.

He added, however, that ‘linking religion to acts of terrorism is a massive mistake. Terrorists are terrorists.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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