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Keith Rogers, 62-year-old indigenous superstar who is still playing A-grade footty 

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keith rogers 62 year old indigenous superstar who is still playing a grade footty

A sprightly 62-year-old Indigenous man from the Northern Territory is still winning Aussie Rules Football matches against men in their twenties.

Keith Rogers doesn’t let his age stop him from making the 700 kilometre round trip to play A-grade matches for the Ngukurr Bulldogs in the NT’s Big Rivers League.

Mr Rogers, who has been playing footy since the 1970s, said the motivation for his age-defying enthusiasm is being a role model for future players.

‘To show the young fellas not to give up too early. Playing footy is very important to show your talent and put you in the spotlight,’ he told the ABC.

Keith Rogers (centre) doesn't let his age stop him from making the 700 kilometre round trip to play A-grade matches for the Ngukurr Bulldogs in the NT's Big Rivers League

Keith Rogers (centre) doesn't let his age stop him from making the 700 kilometre round trip to play A-grade matches for the Ngukurr Bulldogs in the NT's Big Rivers League

Keith Rogers (centre) doesn’t let his age stop him from making the 700 kilometre round trip to play A-grade matches for the Ngukurr Bulldogs in the NT’s Big Rivers League

Mr Rodgers said he has no trouble keeping up with his teammates, some of whom are a third of his age.

‘If there’s a position that needs to be filled, I can go there. They can put me anywhere. I can stick it to them. I can put up with any of these young fellas,’ he said.

Mr Rodgers’ passion for AFL has also taken him to Sydney, Adelaide, and Darwin. 

And he’s lived a colourful life off the footy field as well, having dabbled in radio and studied car mechanics. 

‘I love studying, reading writing, getting knowledge from other people,’ he said.

Before coronavirus was declared a pandemic in March, Mr Rodgers had been studying at Sydney’s Macquarie University. 

But the outbreak sent him back to the Top End, giving him a chance to hit the gym in the lead-up to the local footy season.

Mr Rogers has seen a lot of changes to the sport since he started playing in his late teens. 

‘You train harder, faster, you move the ball much quicker than usual. You’re not allowed to hang back anymore. When it bounces, it gets kicked in goal,’ he said. 

Mr Rodgers said as long as his legs work and he has air in his lungs, he will continue to play footy. 

The 62-year-old has lived a colourful life off the footy field as well, having dabbled in radio and studied car mechanics

The 62-year-old has lived a colourful life off the footy field as well, having dabbled in radio and studied car mechanics

The 62-year-old has lived a colourful life off the footy field as well, having dabbled in radio and studied car mechanics

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Why getting a cab could soon be different after a taxi driver caught coronavirus

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why getting a cab could soon be different after a taxi driver caught coronavirus

Catching taxi and Ubers is likely to be a very different experience for customers after one driver drove for several days around Sydney while infected with COVID-19

QR codes, already used by restaurants in New South Wales for patrons to check in, may soon be enforced for cabs and ride-sharing, meaning when and where customers travelled will be traceable by authorities. 

Health officials are currently urgently tracking the nine passengers who caught the infected driver’s cab between September 7 to 10 and 14 to 18. 

Catching taxi and Ubers is likely to be a very different experience for customers after one cab driver drove for several days around Sydney (pictured) while infected with COVID-19

Catching taxi and Ubers is likely to be a very different experience for customers after one cab driver drove for several days around Sydney (pictured) while infected with COVID-19

Catching taxi and Ubers is likely to be a very different experience for customers after one cab driver drove for several days around Sydney (pictured) while infected with COVID-19 

A woman (pictured) waits with her phone by the side of the street in Sydney wearing a mask as protection against COVID-19

A woman (pictured) waits with her phone by the side of the street in Sydney wearing a mask as protection against COVID-19

A woman (pictured) waits with her phone by the side of the street in Sydney wearing a mask as protection against COVID-19 

The passengers were driven around the areas of Moorebank, Bankstown, Chipping Norton, Liverpool, Lidcombe, Warwick Farm and Milperra in Sydney’s southwest, while the man also visited venues in Campbelltown and on the south coast. 

The state’s chief health officer Dr Kerry Chant said on Tuesday that while the man had the COVIDsafe app, the cab company’s booking and trip details had to be accessed to track down customers. 

‘The industry may say that they’ve got another solution for us. I have found the QR codes personally very effective, and it may well be fit for purpose for Ubers and other taxis,’ she said. 

A raft of other recommendations are already in place for the taxi industry, such as the use of tap-and-go payments, and drivers told not to help with luggage, and required to clean the interior of their vehicles as well as exterior door handles at the end of each shift. 

Ms Chant also said customers should also be wary of their own safety and advised passengers ‘to sit in the back of the taxi seat diagonally opposite the driver, and also to wear a mask when you’re in cab.’ 

The nine passengers were in the cab for between six and 55 minutes. 

‘Every extra minute is extra risk,’ clinical epidemiologist and senior lecturer at the University of Sydney Fiona Stanaway told the ABC. 

She recommended considering splitting longer trips between cabs and other public transport.  

‘There’s almost no one on the trains at the moment so you are more spaced than you can be in a taxi,’ she said, adding that traffic can also affect the length of your trip on the roads. 

More than 6,500 business in NSW already use the QR check-in codes, with the majority of those being dine-in food or drink service venues. 

On Wednesday, New South Wales reported zero locally acquired cases of coronavirus for the second consecutive day, while six cases were found in returning travellers in hotel quarantine. 

The state's chief health officer Dr Kerry Chant (pictured) said on Tuesday that while the man had the COVIDsafe app, the cab company's booking and trip details had to be accessed to track down customers

The state's chief health officer Dr Kerry Chant (pictured) said on Tuesday that while the man had the COVIDsafe app, the cab company's booking and trip details had to be accessed to track down customers

The state’s chief health officer Dr Kerry Chant (pictured) said on Tuesday that while the man had the COVIDsafe app, the cab company’s booking and trip details had to be accessed to track down customers 

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‘Cult-like’ moment Australians in mandatory quarantine race around Brisbane hotel lobby

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cult like moment australians in mandatory quarantine race around brisbane hotel lobby

An Australian stuck in mandatory hotel quarantine has shared footage of guests racing around the lobby during their 30-minute fresh air break. 

The person took the video on September 21 to show how desperate travellers staying at the Brisbane hotel are to get out of their rooms. 

They described atmosphere in the lobby, where guests raced around the perimeter in face masks, as ‘almost cult-like’. 

The returned passengers (pictured) are all seen wearing face masks and walking around exercising in the hotel's lobby 'almost cult like'

The returned passengers (pictured) are all seen wearing face masks and walking around exercising in the hotel's lobby 'almost cult like'

The returned passengers (pictured) are all seen wearing face masks and walking around exercising in the hotel’s lobby ‘almost cult like’

‘As part of our mandatory 14 day hotel quarantine, we’re allowed downstairs in the hotel lobby for 30 minutes of fresh air,’ the individual told Newsflare.

The returned travellers are all seen with their faces covered and walking in a circle in single file. 

‘An interesting perspective of harsh Australian lockdown measures,’ they said.

To curb the spread of the deadly COVID-19, Australians returning from overseas must undertake 14-days of hotel quarantine.

NSW, QLD and WA will increase their traveller intake as the federal government changes the cap on how many Australians can return home.

Returned passengers at a Brisbane hotel were permitted only 30 minutes of free time

Returned passengers at a Brisbane hotel were permitted only 30 minutes of free time

Returned passengers at a Brisbane hotel were permitted only 30 minutes of free time

Australia recorded 21 new COVID-19 cases on Wednesday, 15 of them in Victoria and the six in NSW all from hotel quarantine.

There were also a further five deaths recorded from Victoria  taking the state’s death toll to 771 and the national figure to 859. 

The fatalities include two women in their 80s, a woman in her 100s, a man in his 70s and a man in his 90s, and all are linked to aged care 

The state’s 14-day rolling case average continues to decrease lower at 29.4 for Melbourne and 1.1 for regional Victoria.

Melbourne is on the verge of easing restrictions following weeks of strict Stage Four restrictions which only allowed residents to leave their homes for four permitted reasons. 

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Daniel Andrews attempts to stop you finding out why he imposed curfew

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daniel andrews attempts to stop you finding out why he imposed curfew

The Victorian government will try to keep secret the data it analysed before deciding to continue Melbourne’s strict curfew.

Mornington Peninsula cafe owner Michelle Loielo is suing the government, claiming Covid-19 restrictions have caused a 99 per cent drop in her revenue.

The case will go to trial in the Supreme Court on Monday and Ms Loielo’s lawyers argue that data which informed the government’s decision-making should be made public.

Michelle Loielo (right) filed a suit in Victoria's Supreme Court on Tuesday, saying she has lost 99 per cent of business under the tough restrictions

Michelle Loielo (right) filed a suit in Victoria's Supreme Court on Tuesday, saying she has lost 99 per cent of business under the tough restrictions

Michelle Loielo (right) filed a suit in Victoria’s Supreme Court on Tuesday, saying she has lost 99 per cent of business under the tough restrictions

Earlier this month Premier Daniel Andrews (pictured) said he decided to bring in the unprecedented 8pm curfew even though it was not recommended by scientists

Earlier this month Premier Daniel Andrews (pictured) said he decided to bring in the unprecedented 8pm curfew even though it was not recommended by scientists

Earlier this month Premier Daniel Andrews (pictured) said he decided to bring in the unprecedented 8pm curfew even though it was not recommended by scientists

But the state will try to keep the data secret under a public interest immunity claim to be made next week, reported the Herald Sun.

Victoria’s Deputy Public Health Commander Michelle Giles, who approved the extension of the lockdown and curfew on 14 September, said in court documents submitted on Tuesday that her decision was informed by government data.

Professor Giles claimed the data showed ‘a clear and direct correlation’ between stage four restrictions lower Covid-19 case numbers.

Ms Loielo’s lawyer Vanessa Plain said: ‘It is critical that data be produced and is before the court so we may test the way in which Dr Giles reached the conclusion the orders were rational.’ 

Earlier this month Premier Daniel Andrews said he decided to bring in the unprecedented 8pm curfew even though it was not recommended by scientists.  

‘That’s a decision that I’ve made,’ he said on 10 September, adding that governments are ‘free to go beyond’ advice given to them by doctors. 

The previous day Victoria’s chief health officer Brett Sutton said he did not recommend the curfew.  

Ms Loielo, a Liberal Party supporter, claims the curfew violates her rights to freedom.

She says her business in Capel Sound used to bring in up to $20,000 a week in earnings.

33510886 8762775 image a 26 1600842311391

33510886 8762775 image a 26 1600842311391

The curfew, which affects metropolitan Melbourne, originally required people to stay home between 8pm and 5am, but was pushed back to 9pm from Monday

‘Last week I made $400,’ she wrote in a court document supporting her claim last week.

‘This situation troubles me greatly, as I am the sole financial provider for my three children and I am genuinely concerned that I am not going to be able to provide for my children if this situation continues. I am afraid that I will lose my house.’

Ms Loielo said the business was running at a loss, and trying to keep it afloat while caring for her children had taken a significant toll on her health.

In a post on her restaurant website on August 8, Ms Loielo said the industry had taken an ‘absolute beating’ in 2020 and she had had to remodel, reshuffle and rethink everything to do with her business.

‘To this end, I have become heavily involved in local politics and discussions and am even taking a crack at being preselected to run for the next state election in the seat of Nepean for the Liberal Party,’ she wrote.

Court documents, filed by Marcus Clarke QC, argue the curfew direction is invalid on grounds of irrationality and illogicality.

Mr Clarke has previously provided expert advice to Victoria’s state opposition over the legality of changes to Victoria’s state of emergency, which has been extended.

In an originating motion he says the curfew is not reasonably proportionate, and not based on relevant and reliable evidence in line with public health laws.

It says Victoria’s Deputy Public Health Commander, Associate Professor Michelle Giles, ‘failed to give any real independent consideration to whether it was appropriate to make the curfew’.

Ms Loielo, the DHHS and shadow attorney-general Edward O’Donohue have been contacted for comment.

Police arrest a protester during an anti-lockdown protest in Melbourne on Sunday

Police arrest a protester during an anti-lockdown protest in Melbourne on Sunday

Police arrest a protester during an anti-lockdown protest in Melbourne on Sunday

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