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Meet Australia’s hijabi Instagram influencers who cater to the country’s ‘modest fashion’ market

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meet australias hijabi instagram influencers who cater to the countrys modest fashion market

A group of young hijab-wearing women who began posting pictures on Instagram to connect with friends and family have become unexpected influencers catering to Australia’s ‘modest fashion’ market. 

Narwal Sari had been working multiple jobs when she began posting self-styled fashion snaps to the social media platform in 2014 after noticing a gap in the industry. 

‘I didn’t feel that there was somebody that I could relate to in the sense of fashion or having a Muslim sister that I could look up to,’ the 21-year old told the ABC

Narwal Sari (pictured) had been working multiple jobs when she began posting self-styled fashion snaps to the social media platform in 2014 after noticing a gap in the industry

Narwal Sari (pictured) had been working multiple jobs when she began posting self-styled fashion snaps to the social media platform in 2014 after noticing a gap in the industry

Narwal Sari (pictured) had been working multiple jobs when she began posting self-styled fashion snaps to the social media platform in 2014 after noticing a gap in the industry 

Sana Sayed (pictured) is another young women who has caught the eye of Australia's modest fashions labels after garnering a following of more than 130,000 people

Sana Sayed (pictured) is another young women who has caught the eye of Australia's modest fashions labels after garnering a following of more than 130,000 people

Sana Sayed (pictured) is another young women who has caught the eye of Australia’s modest fashions labels after garnering a following of more than 130,000 people 

Ms Sari, from Liverpool in western Sydney, said her account began getting a life of its own about 12 months ago and has continued growing.

Her followers have now ballooned to more than 180,000. 

She explained she has now ditched her other jobs and posting fashion shoots has become her full-time occupation. 

Her new job hardly involves sitting back as the money rolls in, however, with Ms Sari adding she has not had a single day off since with her time filled with with planning, shooting and posting her photos. 

‘I booked a few jobs like Nike and Supre, but it wasn’t until I got management that they really pitched for me and I really got my foot in the door of a market that I could never get in by myself,’ she said.   

She added she spends up to two hours setting up photoshoots herself. 

Also from Sydney, Sana Sayed, is another young woman who has caught the eye of Australia’s modest fashion labels after garnering a following of more than 130,000. 

Her story echoes Ms Sari’s, with the 20-year old signing up to Instagram in 2017 to post pictures for friends and family, but she too found a wider audience. 

While still a full-time university student she has managed to attract the attention of Grammy award winning singer Rihanna’s makeup business Fenty Beauty. 

‘I post fashion advice and I show different ways of how I style outfits and my Hijab, which I think inspires women,’ Ms Sayed explained. 

She revealed her payment for a sponsored post can begin at about $400 and then go up to anywhere as much as $4,000. 

'I didn't feel that there was somebody that I could relate to in the sense of fashion or having a Muslim sister that I could look up to,' 21-year old Ms Sari (pictured) said

'I didn't feel that there was somebody that I could relate to in the sense of fashion or having a Muslim sister that I could look up to,' 21-year old Ms Sari (pictured) said

‘I didn’t feel that there was somebody that I could relate to in the sense of fashion or having a Muslim sister that I could look up to,’ 21-year old Ms Sari (pictured) said 

Ms Sayed (pictured) explained she has now ditched her other jobs and posting fashion shoots has become her full-time occupation

Ms Sayed (pictured) explained she has now ditched her other jobs and posting fashion shoots has become her full-time occupation

Ms Sayed (pictured) explained she has now ditched her other jobs and posting fashion shoots has become her full-time occupation 

Longer sleeves, higher necklines, looser fits and opaque fabrics are the signatures of the fashion movement. 

The styles have been worn for years among women from a number of cultural and religious backgrounds – but the designs are also finding a wider audience among fashion trendsetters. 

The modest fashion industry in Australia is sizable – with a 2018 report estimating Muslim citizens, along with about 565,000 tourists, spent more than half a billion dollars on clothing in Australia that year. 

Globally the numbers are staggering with a 2016 report estimating the modest fashion industry was worth $250billion. 

By 2022 that number could rise to $373billion, according to The Washington Post. 

Stores such as H&M have released modest fashion lines while global giant Nike waded into the movement in 2017 releasing an athletic-wear hijab followed by modest swimwear in 2019. 

Nike in 2017 launched a specially-designed hijab, pictured, aimed at helping more Muslim women 'embrace sport'

Nike in 2017 launched a specially-designed hijab, pictured, aimed at helping more Muslim women 'embrace sport'

Nike in 2017 launched a specially-designed hijab, pictured, aimed at helping more Muslim women ’embrace sport’ 

The Nike Swim Hijab, pictured, features an integrated mesh pocket that holds hair in place throughout underwater movement. Shown with the Performance Nike Victory Tunic

The Nike Swim Hijab, pictured, features an integrated mesh pocket that holds hair in place throughout underwater movement. Shown with the Performance Nike Victory Tunic

The Nike Swim Hijab, pictured, features an integrated mesh pocket that holds hair in place throughout underwater movement. Shown with the Performance Nike Victory Tunic 

Natalie Giddings, managing director of The Remarkables Group, says influencers have increasingly become a major focus for brands because they are able to directly reach a large audience. 

Ms Giddings pioneered influencer marketing in Australia with the Sydney based agency in 2012 and now calls a number of Australia’s largest companies her clients. 

She says shoppers are more likely to trust recommendations from Instagrammers they follow because they feel they have a personal connection with them, as though they are following a friend. 

Not to mention the numbers of followers are also impressive – causing marketers to shift towards a new style of promoting products over traditional publications. 

Ms Giddings explains a magazine such as Vogue would sell about 55,000 copies each month, while some of the people her business works with would have hundreds of thousands of people receiving each post.  

Ms Sari (pictured), from Liverpool in western Sydney, said her account began getting a life of its own about 12-months ago and has continued growing - to the stage now where her followers have ballooned to more than 180,000 people

Ms Sari (pictured), from Liverpool in western Sydney, said her account began getting a life of its own about 12-months ago and has continued growing - to the stage now where her followers have ballooned to more than 180,000 people

Ms Sari (pictured), from Liverpool in western Sydney, said her account began getting a life of its own about 12-months ago and has continued growing – to the stage now where her followers have ballooned to more than 180,000 people 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Australia

Dietitian Lyndi Cohen reveals the reasons why you’re still hungry after eating and how to stay full

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dietitian lyndi cohen reveals the reasons why youre still hungry after eating and how to stay full

A lack of balance in your meals, not eating enough and incorporating no new flavours are three of the reasons why you might feel hungry after eating, a dietitian has claimed.

Lyndi Cohen, from Sydney, said feeling hungry or dissatisfied after finishing a meal is much more common than you think, but there are ways to tackle it.

One of Lyndi’s tried-and-tested approaches to ensure you’re full after a meal-time is making sure you follow the ‘hat trick’ ratio.

‘Every single plate you serve up should have a serving of healthy fat like avocado, some slow-burning carbs like sweet potatoes and some lean protein,’ Lyndi wrote on her website.

‘This humble hat-trick will help keep you feeling satisfied for a lot longer than avoiding carbs or fats altogether – and it’ll also make sure you’re getting the nutrients your body needs to be healthy.’

A lack of balance in your meals, not eating enough and incorporating no new flavours are three of the reasons why you feel hungry after eating, a dietitian has claimed (Lyndi Cohen pictured)

A lack of balance in your meals, not eating enough and incorporating no new flavours are three of the reasons why you feel hungry after eating, a dietitian has claimed (Lyndi Cohen pictured)

A lack of balance in your meals, not eating enough and incorporating no new flavours are three of the reasons why you feel hungry after eating, a dietitian has claimed (Lyndi Cohen pictured)

The first reason why you might think you're hungry after a meal is because you crave new flavours and you might be repeating meals too much

The first reason why you might think you're hungry after a meal is because you crave new flavours and you might be repeating meals too much

The first reason why you might think you’re hungry after a meal is because you crave new flavours and you might be repeating meals too much

1. You crave new flavours

The first reason why you might think you’re hungry after a meal is because you crave new flavours.

‘There’s something called sensory-specific satiety – and it may have something to do with why you always have “room for dessert”,’ Lyndi said.

When you eat, the dietitian said a few things help you to decide when you’re full, including fullness, hunger and ‘how interesting’ you find the food. 

If you keep eating the same things, it’s likely your body will subtly tell you that it is now used to eating this flavour and you won’t necessarily recognise it as ‘new’ or ‘different’. 

The best way to get around this is to ensure your diet is filled with variety, and try not to eat the same meals too often, Lyndi said.

Even if you just have a mouthful of a new flavour, that should be enough.

When you eat, Lyndi (pictured) said a few things help you to decide when you're full, including fullness, hunger and 'how interesting' you find the food

When you eat, Lyndi (pictured) said a few things help you to decide when you're full, including fullness, hunger and 'how interesting' you find the food

When you eat, Lyndi (pictured) said a few things help you to decide when you’re full, including fullness, hunger and ‘how interesting’ you find the food

2. You feel deprived

The second reason why you might feel hungry after finishing a meal is because you’re depriving yourself of what your body really craves.

‘If at the back of your mind, you feel like you’re not allowed to eat a certain food (like pasta or peanut butter straight from the jar), it will always seem “interesting” to you,’ Lyndi said.

Instead, try to follow the ‘everything in moderation’ approach – and stop ‘forbidding’ yourself from eating certain things that might not be good for you.

Make sure every plate you eat follows the 'hat trick' ration of protein, complex carbs and healthy fats (pictured)

Make sure every plate you eat follows the 'hat trick' ration of protein, complex carbs and healthy fats (pictured)

Make sure every plate you eat follows the ‘hat trick’ ration of protein, complex carbs and healthy fats (pictured)

3. You need more balance

Lyndi said you’ll be far less hungry after dinner if your plate is perfectly balanced. 

Make sure every plate you eat follows the ‘hat trick’ ration of protein, complex carbs and healthy fats. 

One of the more obvious reasons why you're still hungry after eating is because you are not consuming enough, said Lyndi (pictured)

One of the more obvious reasons why you're still hungry after eating is because you are not consuming enough, said Lyndi (pictured)

One of the more obvious reasons why you’re still hungry after eating is because you are not consuming enough, said Lyndi (pictured)

4. You’re not eating enough 

One of the more obvious reasons why you’re still hungry after eating is because you aren’t consuming enough.

The Sydney dietitian explained that people often under-eat at breakfast or lunch, meaning they’re starving and far more likely to over-eat or binge at dinner. 

If you fall into this camp, Lyndi recommends you try and eat a far more nourishing breakfast and lunch.

This will stop you from running on empty and needing to fill up at dinner.

Often, hunger is mistaken for thirst, and Lyndi (pictured) said this is because the sensations are similar, especially after eating

Often, hunger is mistaken for thirst, and Lyndi (pictured) said this is because the sensations are similar, especially after eating

Often, hunger is mistaken for thirst, and Lyndi (pictured) said this is because the sensations are similar, especially after eating

5. You’re thirsty

Often, hunger is mistaken for thirst, and Lyndi said this is because the sensations are similar, especially after eating.

If you feel hungry but suspect you might be thirsty, Lyndi recommends you accompany every meal with a ‘large glass of water’.

Carrying a water bottle around with you during the day will also help, too. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Worth a shot! You can now buy Bundaberg RUM flavoured iced coffee for $3.40

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worth a shot you can now buy bundaberg rum flavoured iced coffee for 3 40

Ice Break and Bundaberg have teamed up to release a new spiced rum iced coffee flavour for Australian customers to enjoy.

The iced drink is available across the country after the product became a success in Queensland last year.

It’s sold in leading supermarkets including Coles and Woolworths for $3.40, as well as independent retailers and convenient stores.

The rum flavoured iced drink is available across the country after the product became a success in Queensland last year

The rum flavoured iced drink is available across the country after the product became a success in Queensland last year

The rum flavoured iced drink is available across the country after the product became a success in Queensland last year

While the iced coffee may taste strong, it replicates the flavour of rum and only contains 0.3 per cent alcohol.

It’s also made in Australia from at least 95 per cent Australian ingredients.

The partnership is brokered by Asembl Brands agency who say the product is likely to be popular among customers.  

While the iced coffee may taste strong, it replicates the flavour of rum and only contains 0.3 per cent of alcohol

While the iced coffee may taste strong, it replicates the flavour of rum and only contains 0.3 per cent of alcohol

While the iced coffee may taste strong, it replicates the flavour of rum and only contains 0.3 per cent of alcohol

Asembl managing director, Justin Watson, told FoodBev Media: ‘Last year’s launch of our first partnership between Diageo’s Bundaberg Rum and Ice Break was an incredible success in Bundaberg Rum’s home state, Queensland.

‘So popular was the range that we have continued our strategic licensing roll-out for the brand with this second product launch of Spiced which will see it available nationwide in petrol and convenience outlets as well as Coles and Woolworths supermarkets.

‘We are incredibly proud of this second product launch and are sure it will be a fan favourite when it launches just in time for summer.’

And this isn't the first brand crossover customers have seen, as in early October Oak milk released Redskins, Jaffas and Chokito flavoured drinks

And this isn't the first brand crossover customers have seen, as in early October Oak milk released Redskins, Jaffas and Chokito flavoured drinks

The brand, which is famous for their delicious chocolate milk variety, launched the dairy goods into Woolworths stores for just $3.05 a carton

The brand, which is famous for their delicious chocolate milk variety, launched the dairy goods into Woolworths stores for just $3.05 a carton

And this isn’t the first brand crossover customers have seen, as in early October Oak milk released Redskins, Jaffas and Chokito flavoured drinks

And this isn’t the first brand crossover customers have seen, as in early October Oak milk released Redskins, Jaffas and Chokito flavoured drinks to pay homage to some of Australia’s most iconic lollies.

The brand, which is famous for their delicious chocolate milk variety, launched the dairy goods into Woolworths stores for just $3.05 a carton.

Redskins are a red, raspberry-flavoured chewy confectionery that comes in the shape of a log. It used to be marketed alongside Milko Sticks because they looked so similar, only Milkos are white.

Meanwhile Jaffas are small round sweets that have soft chocolate centre with a hard covering of orange flavoured, red coloured lolly.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Australia

Woman stabbed her partner to death with a hunting knife she called Kitty

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woman stabbed her partner to death with a hunting knife she called kitty

A Queensland woman used a hunting knife she named Kitty to stab her partner to death after an argument over home-brewed rum, a court has been told.

Renee Helen Blockey, 43, pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the Brisbane Supreme Court on Tuesday over the killing of John Windle on Macleay Island off southeast Queensland.

The pair argued after getting home-brewed rum from a friend about 10am on April 23, 2018.

Renee Helen Blockey, 43, pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the Brisbane Supreme Court on Tuesday over the killing of John Windle on Macleay Island off southeast Queensland

Renee Helen Blockey, 43, pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the Brisbane Supreme Court on Tuesday over the killing of John Windle on Macleay Island off southeast Queensland

Renee Helen Blockey, 43, pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the Brisbane Supreme Court on Tuesday over the killing of John Windle on Macleay Island off southeast Queensland

Neighbours heard yelling from Blockey’s house where the two had returned after drinking for about half an hour.

A postman delivering mail about 12.10pm told police he saw Blockey covered in blood in the doorway, calling frantically for an ambulance as someone was ‘bleeding out’, crown prosecutor Caroline Marco told the court.

Inside the postman saw Mr Windle lying on the floor in a pool of blood. He was moaning while Blockey was crying and holding him.

Asked what happened, she told the postman: ‘I stabbed him.’

Mr Windle died from a 16cm stab wound below his left collar bone.

Officers found a clean, wet hunting knife in the bottom of a shower in the house.

Mr Windle died from a 16cm stab wound below his left collar bone

Mr Windle died from a 16cm stab wound below his left collar bone

Mr Windle died from a 16cm stab wound below his left collar bone

Blockey later told police Mr Windle had angrily accused her of drinking all the home-brew and of being unfaithful. He has also hit her in the face, the court heard.

Ms Marco said the pair had a ‘volatile’ relationship.

She said Blockey told police she owned a hunting knife she called Kitty which she kept in her bedside table because Mr Windle scared her.

But she didn’t remember arming herself with the weapon or stabbing him.

Justice John Bond will hand down his decision on a later date.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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