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Melbourne brothers awarded payout after dad Fernando Paulino stabbed mother to death 

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melbourne brothers awarded payout after dad fernando paulino stabbed mother to death

An evil father who stabbed his wife to death in a frenzied knife attack in a garage has been ordered to pay their sons nearly $300,000 in damages.

Fernando Paulino murdered his ex-wife Teresa Mancuso, 46, by stabbing her at least 16 times at her elderly parents’ Reservoir home in Melbourne‘s north in July 2013.

Her sons Daniel and Luke, 27 and 30, were on Thursday awarded a combined $280,000 after suing their father in Victoria’s Supreme Court.

‘Fernando has shattered the bounds of trust that are inherent in a parent-child relationship, and this is further compounded by Fernando’s apparent lack of remorse,’ Justice James Elliott said.

Teresa Mancuso (centre) was fatally stabbed by her ex-husband, Fernando Paulino – the father of Daniel and Luke. The pair have been awarded nearly $300,000 in damages against their father following the brutal attack in 2013

Teresa Mancuso (centre) was fatally stabbed by her ex-husband, Fernando Paulino – the father of Daniel and Luke. The pair have been awarded nearly $300,000 in damages against their father following the brutal attack in 2013

Teresa Mancuso (centre) was fatally stabbed by her ex-husband, Fernando Paulino – the father of Daniel and Luke. The pair have been awarded nearly $300,000 in damages against their father following the brutal attack in 2013

Daniel and Luke have become known as the YiaYia Next Door brothers after they formed a special bond with their Greek next-door neighbour Nina – who would give them meals over the fence following their mother’s death. 

Paulino is serving a 30-year jail sentence after being convicted of murder – but is seeking for an appeal against the ruling in the High Court.

An inmate who was housed in the same wing as Paulino told Daily Mail Australia in 2018 he wanted his children to know their father was a ‘gutless coward’ who plans to ‘kill himself’ if he is not released and forced to rot in jail. 

Paulino killed out of jealousy, hatred and a determination to punish Ms Mancuso for moving on with life without him.

On December 20, 2017, Paulino (pictured) was sentenced to spend at least 25-years in jail for Ms Mancuso's murder

On December 20, 2017, Paulino (pictured) was sentenced to spend at least 25-years in jail for Ms Mancuso's murder

On December 20, 2017, Paulino (pictured) was sentenced to spend at least 25-years in jail for Ms Mancuso’s murder 

A loving mother: Teresa Mancuso and a young Daniel. Ms Mancuso, 46, was stabbed by her ex-husband at least 16 times in the garage of her elderly parents' Reservoir home

A loving mother: Teresa Mancuso and a young Daniel. Ms Mancuso, 46, was stabbed by her ex-husband at least 16 times in the garage of her elderly parents' Reservoir home

A loving mother: Teresa Mancuso and a young Daniel. Ms Mancuso, 46, was stabbed by her ex-husband at least 16 times in the garage of her elderly parents’ Reservoir home

‘From that moment, Fernando has deprived his sons, Daniel and Luke, of a life with their mother, of the ability to share her 50th birthday with them, and of the chance for her to be there as they celebrate their respective milestones,’ Justice Elliott said.

With their father jailed, the young men took him to court. Each sought $350,000 for loss and suffering, including post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.

Justice Elliott said the figure was significantly more than compensation granted in similar cases. He ordered Daniel, now 30, receive $137,500 and 27-year-old Luke $142,500.

Ms Mancuso’s brother, Patrick, sought $100,000 but received $42,500. He was angry and frustrated because he believed the murder could have been prevented.

Happier times: Ms Mancuso enjoys a special moment with her young sons during their childhood

Happier times: Ms Mancuso enjoys a special moment with her young sons during their childhood

Happier times: Ms Mancuso enjoys a special moment with her young sons during their childhood

Teresa Mancuso clowns about with her son Daniel (left). She was killed by her ex-husband out of jealousy and to punish her for moving on with life without him

Teresa Mancuso clowns about with her son Daniel (left). She was killed by her ex-husband out of jealousy and to punish her for moving on with life without him

Teresa Mancuso clowns about with her son Daniel (left). She was killed by her ex-husband out of jealousy and to punish her for moving on with life without him

Before she died, Ms Mancuso expressed fears Fernando would ‘kill her one day’.

‘It is clear that Teresa was a much loved person, and that she had close and loving relationships with Daniel, Luke and Patrick, and with the rest of her immediate and extended family, and friends,’ Justice Elliott said.

‘No award of compensation will ever fill the deep sadness, hurt and trauma that will remain with not only Daniel, Luke and Patrick, but the rest of Ms Mancuso’s family and friends as well, for the rest of their lives.’ 

The bond between the brothers and their ‘Yiayia’ was forged after the murder.  

No one had lived in the property for years until the brothers decided to move into the house to honour their mum.

Pictured are Daniel (left) and Luke Mancuso (right). They have formed a close bond with their neighbour Nina - a relationship popularised by an Instagram account they manage - who gives them cooked meals across the fence

Pictured are Daniel (left) and Luke Mancuso (right). They have formed a close bond with their neighbour Nina - a relationship popularised by an Instagram account they manage - who gives them cooked meals across the fence

Pictured are Daniel (left) and Luke Mancuso (right). They have formed a close bond with their neighbour Nina – a relationship popularised by an Instagram account they manage – who gives them cooked meals across the fence

The garage has since been turned into a games room filled with their childhood toys.

Nina has since cooked meals for the brothers, including traditional Greek food, homemade bread, chicken and their favourite spinach pie, Spanakopita. 

Last year, the grandmother and her husband Petros discovered they would fly home to visit her family in Greece after Daniel and Luke surprised her with a travel voucher.

‘To see my sister and my brother. That’s a big, big deal for me,’ Nina told the men, who she refers to as ‘my grandkids’.

Nina’s sister had suffered a stroke and Flight Centre donated a $4,000 travel voucher for the grandmother to be reunited with her and her brother.

Daniel and Luke surprised Nina with the voucher and celebrated by popping open a bottle of champagne. 

Daniel and Luke last year surprised their neighbour with a travel voucher so she could visit her family and celebrated by popping open a bottle of champagne

Daniel and Luke last year surprised their neighbour with a travel voucher so she could visit her family and celebrated by popping open a bottle of champagne

Daniel and Luke last year surprised their neighbour with a travel voucher so she could visit her family and celebrated by popping open a bottle of champagne

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Australia

Elderly woman is charged with murdering her autistic son more than 50 years ago

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elderly woman is charged with murdering her autistic son more than 50 years ago

An elderly woman has been charged with the murder of her autistic son five decades after his death. 

Maureen Anne Enright, 76, was arrested by homicide detectives at her Inala home, in Brisbane‘s south west, on Wednesday evening.   

Police will allege she murdered her son Peter John Enright who went missing sometime between 1968 and 1969 when he was aged three to four years old.

Homicide Detective Inspector Damien Hansen said Peter was born on June 17, 1965 and was one of 11 children to Maureen and Michael Enright, who passed away 2018.

Maureen Anne Enright (left), 76, was arrested by homicide detectives at her Inala home, in Brisbane's south west, on Wednesday evening

Maureen Anne Enright (left), 76, was arrested by homicide detectives at her Inala home, in Brisbane's south west, on Wednesday evening

Maureen Anne Enright (left), 76, was arrested by homicide detectives at her Inala home, in Brisbane’s south west, on Wednesday evening

He said Peter was never reported missing but a murder investigation was launched following a tip-off to police in August.

Number 35 Polaris Street has been declared a crime scene and detectives are using ground penetrating radar to search for Peter’s remains. The family have lived at the residence since 1966. 

‘Today we’ve executed a crime scene warrant on the address here and we will be conducting a forensic examination on the dwelling and the yard,’ Det Insp Hansen said on Thursday.

‘There’s a number of scientific officers here, forensic scenes of crime officers and bone experts.

‘We’re optimistic at this stage but that will be dependant on a lot of environmental factors … time and acidity of soils.’

He said Maureen had given police ‘a number of versions’ of events and all family members were being questioned about the disappearance. 

Det Insp Hansen said police had obtained records of Peter’s existence and his siblings had heard stories about him.  

‘They were aware that Peter existed and they’ve given us versions for that,’ he said.

Number 35 Polaris Street (pictured) has been declared a crime scene and forensic teams are currently using ground penetrating radar to search for Peter's remains. The family have lived at the residence since 1966

Number 35 Polaris Street (pictured) has been declared a crime scene and forensic teams are currently using ground penetrating radar to search for Peter's remains. The family have lived at the residence since 1966

Number 35 Polaris Street (pictured) has been declared a crime scene and forensic teams are currently using ground penetrating radar to search for Peter’s remains. The family have lived at the residence since 1966

‘It’s just a shocking thing that these things can happen but processes back in the 60s were obviously very different to what they are today.

‘This is the first time I’ve come across something like this.’ 

Detectives have urged anyone who lived on Polaris Street in Inala in the 1960s and 70s to contact police if they have information.  

‘They were quite well known, some of the neighbours have been here for a long time too,’ Det Insp Hansen said. 

The grandmother appeared briefly before the Richlands Magistrates Court on Thursday morning, where her case was adjourned for a committal mention on December 11, The Courier Mail reported. 

The frail elderly woman was accompanied by three women there to offer support and required the assistance of a corrections officer to step into the dock. 

Ms Enright (pictured), 76,  appeared briefly before the Richlands Magistrates Court on Thursday morning

Ms Enright (pictured), 76,  appeared briefly before the Richlands Magistrates Court on Thursday morning

Ms Enright (pictured), 76,  appeared briefly before the Richlands Magistrates Court on Thursday morning

Police have until November 27 to tender their brief to the court and Ms Enright is not required to appear in court for the December hearing.  

Defence lawyer Jyoti Pant told reporters outside court her client would apply for bail in the Supreme Court.

‘She is frail, she is vulnerable and so understandably her family is very concerned, she’s concerned, we’re concerned,’ Ms Pant said.

‘Our primary concern at the moment is to get her out on bail and back home with her family.

‘We’ve just been provided material in relation to the charge and we’ll be going through that later today.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Australia

Covid-19: Aussies could be reunited by Christmas as state borders come down

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The PM: Scott Morrison pictured on Thursday wearing a new mask with the Aussie flag

The PM: Scott Morrison pictured on Thursday wearing a new mask with the Aussie flag

The PM: Scott Morrison pictured on Thursday wearing a new mask with the Aussie flag

Thousands of Australians could be re-united for Christmas as Scott Morrison prepares to meet state and territory leaders on Friday to discuss removing the country’s internal borders.

The National Cabinet meeting comes as a new report reveals Australia is losing $10billion per month due to domestic and international travel restrictions introduced to slow the spread of coronavirus.

State and territory border restrictions have been in place since April, keeping thousands of Aussies separated from their friends and family in other parts of the country.  

Last month the prime minister announced he would work with every state except Western Australia to remove internal borders by December.

WA premier Mark McGowan, who faces an election in March and has gained popularity with his hard border closure, refused to take part in the plan. 

A federal source told Daily Mail Australia that opening the borders is on the agenda for Friday’s meeting.

‘There will be continued discussions about plans for re-opening,’ the source said.

In early September, the prime minister gave a speech urging premiers to open up, saying he feared they were forgetting the federation and ‘retreating into provincialism.’

‘Australia was not built to have internal borders. In fact the very point of federation was not to have them. That was the point of Australia,’ he said.

On 16 October Australia removed quarantine requirements for travellers entering the country from New Zealand. Pictured: A family is reunited at Sydney Airport

On 16 October Australia removed quarantine requirements for travellers entering the country from New Zealand. Pictured: A family is reunited at Sydney Airport

On 16 October Australia removed quarantine requirements for travellers entering the country from New Zealand. Pictured: A family is reunited at Sydney Airport

‘We must be one and indivisible as a nation. We must be Australians first and we must not allow this crisis to force us to retreat into provincialism. That’s not the answer.’

On Thursday an EY study commissioned by the Business Council of Australia found the nation lost $78 billion from air travel restrictions due to the coronavirus pandemic.

What are the border restrictions?

New South Wales: Exemption required if coming from VIC

Victoria: No restrictions

Queensland: Exemption required if coming from NSW and VIC. Due to open to NSW on 1 November

South Australia: Exemption required if coming from VIC

Tasmania: Will open to SA, WA, QLD, the NT and the ACT on 26 October and to NSW on 2 November. Exemption required if coming from VIC

Western Australia: Exemption required from anywhere

ACT: Exemption required if coming from VIC

Northern Territory: Victorians must quarantine at their own expense 

Australia: Only people who have been in New Zealand for 14 days can enter without hotel quarantine

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The domestic aviation shutdown over the past seven months had cost $17 billion, while the figure for international flights was $61 billion.

‘State border closures have seen passenger numbers on Australia’s busiest air routes plummet 91 per cent since March, crippling the aviation sector and causing harmful knock-on effects in tourism and hospitality,’ Business Council of Australia chief executive Jennifer Westacott said.

‘Every day flights remain grounded costs Australia $69 million or $2.1 billion a month.

‘When you add in international aviation losses at $250 million a day or $7.6 billion per month we are talking about an enormous hit to our economy.’

About 34,000 people have been affected by job losses and furloughed positions, with the nation’s two major carriers laying off around 11,500 employees.

Ms Westacott said the economic recovery would be stronger and faster if agreement could be reached on a national timetable and transparent protocols for removing domestic travel restrictions.

‘We are not asking for a free-for-all – we need a highly-targeted, careful and gradual reopening of the economy based on health advice with robust nationally consistent systems in place for departures and arrivals, quarantining, local containment, and digital tracking and tracing.’

The first steps towards international travel have already begun with New Zealanders allowed into Australia under a one-way arrangement.

Asked whether the travel bubble could be extended to other countries, Tourism Minister Simon Birmingham said: ‘Let’s crawl before we walk.’

‘I know Pacific island nations are keen to do so with us,’ he told the ABC.

‘But none of it will be done in a way that compromises the safety of Australians.

‘Because what we have shown is by having the strongest or amongst the strongest (health) outcomes in the world, we also enjoy the strongest economic outcomes in the world, and we want to preserve those outcomes.’

He said the ‘next big step’ in terms of creating capacity to safely return more than 32,000 Australians home was in the hands of Victorian authorities.

Adam Draper and his partner Stacey Brown kiss as she arrives from New Zealand after quarantine requirements were removed on 16 October

Adam Draper and his partner Stacey Brown kiss as she arrives from New Zealand after quarantine requirements were removed on 16 October

Adam Draper and his partner Stacey Brown kiss as she arrives from New Zealand after quarantine requirements were removed on 16 October

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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How to make the perfect barbecue: Masterchef winner Adam Liaw shares his golden rules

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how to make the perfect barbecue masterchef winner adam liaw shares his golden rules

Masterchef Australia winner Adam Liaw has shared his golden rules for the perfect summer barbecue, and why you should always rest the meat before returning it to the barbecue for a few seconds to make it extra delicious.

The Sydney foodie explained that the perfect barbecue is a work of art, and there are a few things to do that will ensure your next chargrilled meal is a success.

The first thing Adam said you need to think about when you barbecue is what type of barbecue you go for.

Masterchef Australia winner Adam Liaw (pictured) has shared his golden rules for the perfect summer barbecue

Masterchef Australia winner Adam Liaw (pictured) has shared his golden rules for the perfect summer barbecue

Masterchef Australia winner Adam Liaw (pictured) has shared his golden rules for the perfect summer barbecue

Adam said coals will always give more flavour with a barbecue, but if you're in a rush gas is a good shout (stock image)

Adam said coals will always give more flavour with a barbecue, but if you're in a rush gas is a good shout (stock image)

Adam said coals will always give more flavour with a barbecue, but if you’re in a rush gas is a good shout (stock image)

REMEMBER CHARCOALS GIVE MORE FLAVOUR

Adam told Good Food that it’s important to think about your priorities when you buy a new barbecue, as while gas is more convenient, charcoal has far superior flavour.

‘I hedge my bets with a gas barbecue for my ordinary weeknight steak, and break out the charcoal barbecue or smaller konro for bigger occasions when it’s worth getting the coals going,’ he told the publication.

If you do go for gas, the Masterchef winner recommends you throw a piece of wood onto the open grill where the food goes and then just let it burn.

This will add a specific ‘wood smokiness’ taste to your food. 

SET UP A BBQ STATION

Adam’s second rule is that you should set up a barbecue station close to your grill so that everything you need for cooking is within arm’s reach. 

‘Put a tray of barbecue essentials within arm’s reach – that same salt and pepper, olive oil, a small bowl of butter and a basting brush, perhaps some lemon wedges and even some fresh herbs that can be thrown right onto the grill,’ he said.

Adam also includes a chopping board and knife in his home barbecue station. 

REMEMBER YOU CAN USE PANS 

Even though you might think it’s best to just throw things onto the barbecue, Adam revealed it’s worth remembering that saucepans and frying pans on your open flame ‘can really increase your food options’.

‘Keep sauces warm, braise onions, dip grilled chicken in a simmering teriyaki sauce, or melt butter for drizzling over scallops or whole fish – anything that needs a bit of liquid might struggle on a flat barbecue, but will be fine in a pot,’ he said. 

Just remember that the handle could be hot if it is kept too close to the heat.

Adam said you should take your meat (pictured) off the barbecue and rest it for half the amount of time it took to cook it, before putting it back on the barbecue for a few seconds

Adam said you should take your meat (pictured) off the barbecue and rest it for half the amount of time it took to cook it, before putting it back on the barbecue for a few seconds

Adam said you should take your meat (pictured) off the barbecue and rest it for half the amount of time it took to cook it, before putting it back on the barbecue for a few seconds

REST AND RETURN FOOD TO THE HEAT

Adam said you should never simply serve food straight off the barbecue, as this will mean it isn’t being served in its best capacity. 

Instead, he said you should take it off the heat and rest it for half of the amount of time it took to cook it, before putting it back on the barbecue for a few seconds after it’s rested.

The reason why this trick works so well is because Adam said it will ‘bring the sear back and warm the outside of the meat’.

Doing this trick may mean slightly longer between cooking and eating, but it’s worth it in the long run.  

The Masterchef winner (pictured) said cleaning your barbecue is as important as cooking on it, and for this you need to leave it on for 10 minutes to allow residue to turn to black

The Masterchef winner (pictured) said cleaning your barbecue is as important as cooking on it, and for this you need to leave it on for 10 minutes to allow residue to turn to black

The Masterchef winner (pictured) said cleaning your barbecue is as important as cooking on it, and for this you need to leave it on for 10 minutes to allow residue to turn to black

CLEAN IT CORRECTLY 

Finally, the Masterchef winner explained that cleaning your barbecue is as important as cooking on it. 

But the good thing about this is Adam said they don’t need much cleaning and instead benefit from keeping the seasoning that develops on the metal over time. 

To clean your barbecue, keep the heat running for 10 minutes so that any residue burns to black, and then brush off any remaining residue with a wire brush. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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