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Melbourne University axes 450 jobs after staff refused to take a 2 per cent pay cut

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melbourne university axes 450 jobs after staff refused to take a 2 per cent pay cut

The University of Melbourne has slashed 450 jobs after negotiations for staff to take a two per cent pay cut failed.   

Academics and other staff will be sacked as the university grapples with a $1billion revenue shortfall as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

Workers in casual and fixed-term positions will be impacted, with the university yet to announce which roles will be safe, according to The Age.

The University of Melbourne will slash 450 jobs from academic staff and other roles as the university struggles to fill a $1billion revenue shortfall as a result of the coronavirus pandemic

The University of Melbourne will slash 450 jobs from academic staff and other roles as the university struggles to fill a $1billion revenue shortfall as a result of the coronavirus pandemic

The University of Melbourne will slash 450 jobs from academic staff and other roles as the university struggles to fill a $1billion revenue shortfall as a result of the coronavirus pandemic

A spokesperson for Melbourne University said staff were given the opportunity to take the pay cut which would have saved 200 jobs. 

‘Staff were asked to vote on a proposal to forgo a 2.2 per cent pay increase, payable from 1 May,’ they said.

‘Staff rejected the proposal, which the University estimates would have saved around 200 jobs.’

Vice-Chancellor Duncan Maskell said on Monday job losses were necessary to cut down on expenditure after the pandemic stopped thousands of international students from travelling to Australia to study. 

‘The University is facing a loss of revenue of nearly $1 billion over the next three years. Our current rate of expenditure is not sustainable,’ he said. 

In its 2019 annual report, the university said it had $4.43 billion in reserves.

As international students are blocked from flying to Australia during the pandemic universities are struggling to make up for the income they bring . Pictures is the university grounds

As international students are blocked from flying to Australia during the pandemic universities are struggling to make up for the income they bring . Pictures is the university grounds

As international students are blocked from flying to Australia during the pandemic universities are struggling to make up for the income they bring . Pictures is the university grounds

Prof Maskell said the university was left with no choice but to cut jobs after cost-cutting measures introduced in the last six months proved ineffective. 

‘The global pandemic has meant many thousands of international students have not been able to join the University this year as a result of the border closures and the impact of this will continue to be felt for years to come,’ he said.

‘With fewer students, the University must be smaller and we will need fewer staff.’  

Professor Andrew Norton from Australian National University said in June the shortfall of international students would devastate the industry.

He said international students made up about 26 per cent of revenue for Australian universities in 2018. 

But Melbourne University relies on an even higher percentage of overseas enrolments – with 23,948 international students accounting for nearly half of its revenue in 2019.

The national average of international students is said to be around 26 per cent of the total population but Melbourne University (pictured) enrols far more

The national average of international students is said to be around 26 per cent of the total population but Melbourne University (pictured) enrols far more

The national average of international students is said to be around 26 per cent of the total population but Melbourne University (pictured) enrols far more

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The incredible winners of the 2020 Drone Photo Awards

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the incredible winners of the 2020 drone photo awards

It’s photography that hits dizzyingly high standards.

The winning and commending images in the Siena Awards Festival‘s 2020 Drone Photo Awards have been revealed – and one can only imagine the difficulties the judges had in sorting the shortlisted entries into podium places.

They’re all jaw-dropping.

In the end, the overall winner was declared to be an image by Australian photographer Jim Picot that shows a salmon school in Australia forming the shape of a heart – with a shark swimming ominously inside it.

It was selected as the overall best shot from among entries in nine categories – including nature, sports and urban architecture – submitted from 126 countries.

The 45 top-ranked pictures will be showcased in the ‘Above Us Only Sky’ exhibition, which runs from October 24 to November 29 at the Accademia dei Fisiocritici in Siena, one of the oldest Italian science museums.

Scroll down for MailOnline Travel’s pick of the most wow-some pictures set to go on display…

This breathtaking picture - called Bouncing Waves - was taken by Spanish photographer Ignacio Medem in the Asturias region in northwest Spain. This image was commended in the nature category

This breathtaking picture - called Bouncing Waves - was taken by Spanish photographer Ignacio Medem in the Asturias region in northwest Spain. This image was commended in the nature category

This breathtaking picture – called Bouncing Waves – was taken by Spanish photographer Ignacio Medem in the Asturias region in northwest Spain. This image was commended in the nature category

The overall winning image, by Australian photographer Jim Picot. It shows a salmon school in Australia forming the shape of a heart – with a shark swimming ominously inside it

The overall winning image, by Australian photographer Jim Picot. It shows a salmon school in Australia forming the shape of a heart – with a shark swimming ominously inside it

The overall winning image, by Australian photographer Jim Picot. It shows a salmon school in Australia forming the shape of a heart – with a shark swimming ominously inside it

The spectacular island of Kalsoy in the Faroe Islands, captured by Polish-born landscape photographer Pawel Zygmunt. The white speck at the end is the Kallur Lighthouse. This image was highly commended in the nature category

The spectacular island of Kalsoy in the Faroe Islands, captured by Polish-born landscape photographer Pawel Zygmunt. The white speck at the end is the Kallur Lighthouse. This image was highly commended in the nature category

The spectacular island of Kalsoy in the Faroe Islands, captured by Polish-born landscape photographer Pawel Zygmunt. The white speck at the end is the Kallur Lighthouse. This image was highly commended in the nature category

This image of two treetop heron nests in Russia won first prize in the wildlife category. It was taken by Russian photographer Dmitrii Viliunov, who titled it simply - Where Herons Live

This image of two treetop heron nests in Russia won first prize in the wildlife category. It was taken by Russian photographer Dmitrii Viliunov, who titled it simply - Where Herons Live

This image of two treetop heron nests in Russia won first prize in the wildlife category. It was taken by Russian photographer Dmitrii Viliunov, who titled it simply – Where Herons Live

This image, called Ring of Crocodiles, was taken in Bangladesh by Bangladeshi snapper Adnan Asif - and commended in the wildlife category

This image, called Ring of Crocodiles, was taken in Bangladesh by Bangladeshi snapper Adnan Asif - and commended in the wildlife category

This image, called Ring of Crocodiles, was taken in Bangladesh by Bangladeshi snapper Adnan Asif – and commended in the wildlife category

Australian photographer Tony Hewitt is behind this picture, which earned him a commendation in the wildlife category. It's called Whale In Distress and was taken in Australia's Shark Bay

Australian photographer Tony Hewitt is behind this picture, which earned him a commendation in the wildlife category. It's called Whale In Distress and was taken in Australia's Shark Bay

Australian photographer Tony Hewitt is behind this picture, which earned him a commendation in the wildlife category. It’s called Whale In Distress and was taken in Australia’s Shark Bay

This mesmerising image shows water buffalos in and around a lake in Turkey - with a perfect rainbow in the background. It was taken by Turkish photographer Mehmet Aslan and highly commended in the wildlife category

This mesmerising image shows water buffalos in and around a lake in Turkey - with a perfect rainbow in the background. It was taken by Turkish photographer Mehmet Aslan and highly commended in the wildlife category

This mesmerising image shows water buffalos in and around a lake in Turkey – with a perfect rainbow in the background. It was taken by Turkish photographer Mehmet Aslan and highly commended in the wildlife category

Behold 'Grafarkirkja', Iceland's 'turf church'. It was taken by German photographer Deryk Baumgartner and commended in the urban category (because a category for turf churches we're guessing is a bit too niche)

Behold 'Grafarkirkja', Iceland's 'turf church'. It was taken by German photographer Deryk Baumgartner and commended in the urban category (because a category for turf churches we're guessing is a bit too niche)

Behold ‘Grafarkirkja’, Iceland’s ‘turf church’. It was taken by German photographer Deryk Baumgartner and commended in the urban category (because a category for turf churches we’re guessing is a bit too niche)

This amazing picture, highly commended in the urban category, was taken by architect and photographer Rex Zou, who lives in Shanghai. He said: 'At 4:30 in the morning, mysteriously shrouded in clouds, this is what the second tallest building in Shanghai [the 1,620ft-tall Shanghai World Financial Center] looks like'

This amazing picture, highly commended in the urban category, was taken by architect and photographer Rex Zou, who lives in Shanghai. He said: 'At 4:30 in the morning, mysteriously shrouded in clouds, this is what the second tallest building in Shanghai [the 1,620ft-tall Shanghai World Financial Center] looks like'

This amazing picture, highly commended in the urban category, was taken by architect and photographer Rex Zou, who lives in Shanghai. He said: ‘At 4:30 in the morning, mysteriously shrouded in clouds, this is what the second tallest building in Shanghai [the 1,620ft-tall Shanghai World Financial Center] looks like’

The gold-medal winner in the urban category is this illuminating picture of the 1,482ft-tall Petronas Twin Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Called Alien Structure on Earth, it was taken by Polish photographer Tomasz Kowalski. He said: 'Sometimes we need to change the perspective to feel the strength of the structure'

The gold-medal winner in the urban category is this illuminating picture of the 1,482ft-tall Petronas Twin Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Called Alien Structure on Earth, it was taken by Polish photographer Tomasz Kowalski. He said: 'Sometimes we need to change the perspective to feel the strength of the structure'

The gold-medal winner in the urban category is this illuminating picture of the 1,482ft-tall Petronas Twin Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Called Alien Structure on Earth, it was taken by Polish photographer Tomasz Kowalski. He said: ‘Sometimes we need to change the perspective to feel the strength of the structure’

Italian photographer Carmine Chiriaco took this striking image of Dubai Marina - and it earned him the runner-up accolade in the urban category

Italian photographer Carmine Chiriaco took this striking image of Dubai Marina - and it earned him the runner-up accolade in the urban category

Italian photographer Carmine Chiriaco took this striking image of Dubai Marina – and it earned him the runner-up accolade in the urban category

This incredible picture of a surfer in the jaws of a huge wave was taken in Western Australia by Sagi Roitfarb, who's based in Zambia. The judges ranked it as commended in the sport category

This incredible picture of a surfer in the jaws of a huge wave was taken in Western Australia by Sagi Roitfarb, who's based in Zambia. The judges ranked it as commended in the sport category

This incredible picture of a surfer in the jaws of a huge wave was taken in Western Australia by Sagi Roitfarb, who’s based in Zambia. The judges ranked it as commended in the sport category

Jim Picot also picked up a commended award in the sport category for this astonishing picture of a surfer on Injidup Beach, Western Australia

Jim Picot also picked up a commended award in the sport category for this astonishing picture of a surfer on Injidup Beach, Western Australia

Jim Picot also picked up a commended award in the sport category for this astonishing picture of a surfer on Injidup Beach, Western Australia

This picture, by Romanian-born Stefan Emanuel, is called Time is the Only Witness. It was commended in the urban category and was taken in the province of Treviso in Italy, the country Stefan has lived in since the age of nine

This picture, by Romanian-born Stefan Emanuel, is called Time is the Only Witness. It was commended in the urban category and was taken in the province of Treviso in Italy, the country Stefan has lived in since the age of nine

This picture, by Romanian-born Stefan Emanuel, is called Time is the Only Witness. It was commended in the urban category and was taken in the province of Treviso in Italy, the country Stefan has lived in since the age of nine

Taiwanese landscape photographer Hong Jen Chiang snagged a highly commended award in the nature category with this incredible picture, which was taken in Iceland and named The Lonely Road

Taiwanese landscape photographer Hong Jen Chiang snagged a highly commended award in the nature category with this incredible picture, which was taken in Iceland and named The Lonely Road

Taiwanese landscape photographer Hong Jen Chiang snagged a highly commended award in the nature category with this incredible picture, which was taken in Iceland and named The Lonely Road

This remarkable image was taken near the village of Pitstone in Buckinghamshire and earned Polish-born Milosz Kuss a highly commended in the urban category. Kuss, who now lives and works in the UK, called the image A Drop of Water on a Blade of Grass, because 'this path of greenery contrasts beautifully with the surrounding field and from the sky looks like a drop of water on a blade of grass'

This remarkable image was taken near the village of Pitstone in Buckinghamshire and earned Polish-born Milosz Kuss a highly commended in the urban category. Kuss, who now lives and works in the UK, called the image A Drop of Water on a Blade of Grass, because 'this path of greenery contrasts beautifully with the surrounding field and from the sky looks like a drop of water on a blade of grass'

This remarkable image was taken near the village of Pitstone in Buckinghamshire and earned Polish-born Milosz Kuss a highly commended in the urban category. Kuss, who now lives and works in the UK, called the image A Drop of Water on a Blade of Grass, because ‘this path of greenery contrasts beautifully with the surrounding field and from the sky looks like a drop of water on a blade of grass’

The judges deemed this picture - of a Soviet-era radar array in Chernobyl, Ukraine - worthy of a commendation in the urban category. It was taken by Italian photographer Franco Cappellari

The judges deemed this picture - of a Soviet-era radar array in Chernobyl, Ukraine - worthy of a commendation in the urban category. It was taken by Italian photographer Franco Cappellari

The judges deemed this picture – of a Soviet-era radar array in Chernobyl, Ukraine – worthy of a commendation in the urban category. It was taken by Italian photographer Franco Cappellari

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Heir to the Spanish throne Princess Leonor tests negative to Covid-19

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heir to the spanish throne princess leonor tests negative to covid 19

Heir to the Spanish throne Princess Leonor and her sister Princess Sofia have tested negative for Covid-19 after going into quarantine when it was revealed that a classmate at their school tested positive for the deadly illness.

Princess Leonor, 14, arrived for her first day of term at Madrid’s Santa Maria de los Rosales’ school alongside her father King Felipe, 52, earlier this month, while her sister Princess Sofia, 13, joined her days later. 

However, by the end of the week, a classmate in Princess Leonor’s year tested positive for the virus and the royal sisters were asked to quarantine for 14 days as a preventive measure.

According to Hola, the sisters have tested negative but will now continue isolating for the two week period. 

It comes days after Spain became the first country in Western Europe to register 500,000 coronavirus infections, with a second surge in cases that coincided with schools reopening.  

Heir to the Spanish throne Princess Leonor, 14, and her sister Princess Sofia , 13, have tested negative for Covid-19 after going into quarantine when it was revealed that a classmate at their school tested positive for the deadly illness

Heir to the Spanish throne Princess Leonor, 14, and her sister Princess Sofia , 13, have tested negative for Covid-19 after going into quarantine when it was revealed that a classmate at their school tested positive for the deadly illness

Heir to the Spanish throne Princess Leonor, 14, and her sister Princess Sofia , 13, have tested negative for Covid-19 after going into quarantine when it was revealed that a classmate at their school tested positive for the deadly illness

The heir to the throne, who returned to school for the first day of term earlier this month, will continue to isolate for two weeks as a preventative measure. Pictured: Princess Leonor and Princess Sofia arriving at Santa Maria de los Rosales' School

The heir to the throne, who returned to school for the first day of term earlier this month, will continue to isolate for two weeks as a preventative measure. Pictured: Princess Leonor and Princess Sofia arriving at Santa Maria de los Rosales' School

The heir to the throne, who returned to school for the first day of term earlier this month, will continue to isolate for two weeks as a preventative measure. Pictured: Princess Leonor and Princess Sofia arriving at Santa Maria de los Rosales’ School

Although their daughters are quarantining at home, the King and Queen Letizia will continue their royal duties for the moment, a spokesman for the royal household said.

Princess Leonor arrived at school for the first day on Wednesday 9 September and was dropped off by her father King Felipe.

Both appeared relaxed as they arrived, before Princess Leonor stepped out of the vehicle and was temperature checked by a member of staff.  

She went on to accompany her younger sister for her first day days later.  

Princess Leonor (pictured) had appeared cheerful as she arrived at school in Madrid for her first day back earier this month amid the Covid-19 crisis

Princess Leonor (pictured) had appeared cheerful as she arrived at school in Madrid for her first day back earier this month amid the Covid-19 crisis

Princess Leonor (pictured) had appeared cheerful as she arrived at school in Madrid for her first day back earier this month amid the Covid-19 crisis 

It is believed that Princess Leonor started her fourth year of secondary education, while her younger sister Princess Sofia began her second year at the school.

It has been a challenging summer for the Spanish royal family, after runaway former King Juan Carlos caused shockwaves around the country in August by announcing he was leaving his homeland.

Princess Leonor has now been deemed by some as a saviour of the monarchy, with  The Times writing: ‘Attention must turn to the future if the Bourbon monarchy is to survive.

‘It is a responsibility that rests of the shoulders of Leonor, and the reigning king, Felipe VI, knows that, as he introduces her to the country while trying to modernise the monarchy.’ 

King Felipe, 52, accompanied his eldest daughter, who is heir to the throne (pictured), on the school run earlier this month

King Felipe, 52, accompanied his eldest daughter, who is heir to the throne (pictured), on the school run earlier this month

King Felipe, 52, accompanied his eldest daughter, who is heir to the throne (pictured), on the school run earlier this month

The publication went on to say the young princesses are ‘the future for a modernised monarchy.’

‘Leonor is still very young, but modern, well-educated and a woman — which is important as the feminist movement grows in Spain,’ a palace source reportedly said. ‘She is a great asset.’ 

Leonor made her public-speaking debut at at awards ceremony in Barcelona last November, where she gave comments in Spanish, Catalan, English and Arabic.

Meanwhile, she and Sofía read from Don Quixote on World Book Day in April, and addressed the nation in a video amid the coronaviurs pandemic. 

Meanwhile Queen Letizia drove Princess Leonor, 13, (pictured) to school for her first day of term 10 days ago

Meanwhile Queen Letizia drove Princess Leonor, 13, (pictured) to school for her first day of term 10 days ago

Meanwhile Queen Letizia drove Princess Leonor, 13, (pictured) to school for her first day of term 10 days ago 

Spain continues to struggle to control a recent spike in infections amid schools reopening across the country.

Recent infections have been more common among younger people who often develop no symptoms thanks to their stronger immune systems, and the death rate remains far below the March-April peak when daily fatalities routinely exceeded 800.

Despite the unwanted milestone, unlike then, hospitals have enough beds to treat Covid-19 patients.

Despite their daughters quarantining for 14 days, King Felipe and Queen Letizia will continue to perform royal duties (pictured, together in November 2019)

Despite their daughters quarantining for 14 days, King Felipe and Queen Letizia will continue to perform royal duties (pictured, together in November 2019)

Despite their daughters quarantining for 14 days, King Felipe and Queen Letizia will continue to perform royal duties (pictured, together in November 2019) 

After a first wave in spring that ravaged Spain’s elderly population and overwhelmed the hospital system, authorities brought the outbreak under control with the help of one of the world’s toughest lockdowns.

But as restrictions on movement were lifted and mass testing began in late June, infections rose from a few hundred a day to a new peak of over 10,000 around 10 days ago, outstripping other hard-hit nations such as France, Britain and Italy.

The overall mortality rate since the pandemic first struck is around 6% in Spain, lower than in Italy, Britain and France.

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Mazda is savaged over ‘hard to watch’ online advertisement

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mazda is savaged over hard to watch online advertisement

A promotional video for a Mazda dealership in Queensland has been ridiculed after copying TikTok‘s viral ‘Savage’ dance.  

Grand Prix Mazda Aspley, in Brisbane, posted the ad to social media on September 17 and declared ‘September’s Savage’ would be a month packed with savings.  

The video showed three staff members performing the choreographed dance routine while one of them promoted the sale. 

But the ad was immediately slammed by perplexed social media viewers, who declared the marketing idea missed the mark.  

‘Omg I don’t know what’s worse, that the company think this marketing works or the fact these people actually did this,’ one Facebook user wrote.  

A cringeworthy advertisement from Grand Prix Mazda Aspley (pictured) has been ridiculed online after copying TikTok's viral 'Savage' dance

A cringeworthy advertisement from Grand Prix Mazda Aspley (pictured) has been ridiculed online after copying TikTok's viral 'Savage' dance

A cringeworthy advertisement from Grand Prix Mazda Aspley (pictured) has been ridiculed online after copying TikTok’s viral ‘Savage’ dance

Another said: ‘Why do I feel like a middle aged man named Greg thought this would be a good idea? 

‘Probably saw his niece watching it on TikTok and thought it was an excellent sales pitch.’ 

Some social media viewers said the footage turned them off Mazda vehicles forever.  

‘Is there a firing squad behind that camera? That is literally the only logical thing I could think of,’ an amused Facebook user wrote.

‘Unfortunately this ad has made me never want to buy a Mazda for as long as I live,’ another added.

Others went so far as to say they wanted to return or sell their cars.

‘Y’all just made me want to sell my Mazda,’ one customer joked.

‘Oh dear I bought my cars from these guys, I can’t even watch the whole thing,’ another replied.

In the video (pictured) three employees perform the choreographed dance while one of them touts the dealership's 'September Savage' sale

In the video (pictured) three employees perform the choreographed dance while one of them touts the dealership's 'September Savage' sale

In the video (pictured) three employees perform the choreographed dance while one of them touts the dealership’s ‘September Savage’ sale

It wasn’t all bad for the dealership, with some viewers throwing their support behind the creative advertising.

‘Marketing strategy is working, as funny and awkward these ads are, they are actually working,’ one Facebook user wrote. 

The video has been shared almost 2,000 times and has received more than 6,000 comments. 

The ‘Savage Challenge’ swept video-sharing platform TikTok at the beginning of the year, with users performing the viral dance to Megan Thee Stallion’s single Savage.  

The 'Savage Challenge' swept video-sharing platform TikTok at the beginning of the year

The 'Savage Challenge' swept video-sharing platform TikTok at the beginning of the year

The ‘Savage Challenge’ swept video-sharing platform TikTok at the beginning of the year 

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