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Missing campers had been in a secret relationship for years when they vanished without trace

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missing campers had been in a secret relationship for years when they vanished without trace

Russell Hill and his beauty queen ‘camping buddy’ Carol Clay had been in a secret relationship for years before they vanished without a trace in the Victorian wilderness. 

Mr Hill, 74, went camping with Ms Clay, 73, in the remote ­Wonnangatta Valley in Victoria’s Gippsland region on March 19 and have not been heard from since.  

Daily Mail Australia can reveal the pair had been carrying out a secret affair for years behind the back of Mr Hill’s wife Robyn, who has described Ms Clay as a ‘long time family friend’.  

Russell Hill

Russell Hill

Carol Clay

Carol Clay

Mr Hill’s wife Robyn, 71, said her husband (pictured, left) had been friendly with Carol Clay (right) for decades but had no idea they were travelling together when he went missing

Mr Hill's white Toyota Landcruiser was found with minor fire damage at their burnt campsite near Dry River Creek Track in the valley on March 21

Mr Hill's white Toyota Landcruiser was found with minor fire damage at their burnt campsite near Dry River Creek Track in the valley on March 21

Mr Hill’s white Toyota Landcruiser was found with minor fire damage at their burnt campsite near Dry River Creek Track in the valley on March 21

Months of searches have found no trace of the pair. Detective Stamper believes if the pair were still in the valley, searchers would have found some evidence

Months of searches have found no trace of the pair. Detective Stamper believes if the pair were still in the valley, searchers would have found some evidence

Months of searches have found no trace of the pair. Detective Stamper believes if the pair were still in the valley, searchers would have found some evidence

While the relationship was largely hidden from Mr Hill’s devastated wife, it has been well known to police since the pair were reported missing by Mrs Hill days after her husband last made contact via radio. 

When questioned about the couple’s relationship in April, Victoria Police Missing Persons Squad Detective Inspector Andrew Stamper skirted around the question.  

‘It is delicate and we are being very respectful of both families wishes and concerns here,’ he said at the time.

‘Both of these people have large and loving families who are grieving at the moment, and they want answers about where their loved ones are.’

While detectives probed the couple’s relationship, it was quickly ruled out as a likely reason for their mysterious disappearance. 

Police are confident the pair did not fake their own deaths and do not believe it’s case of murder suicide. 

The key to unlocking the case may have gone up in flames in a fire that destroyed their campsite. 

Mr Hill’s Toyota four-wheel-drive had been found by local police next to his burnt-out tent, but the pair were gone without a trace.

The vehicle itself had also sustained damage in the fire, but was still able to be driven away from the scene. 

At the time, police had believed the fire was probably started by a dodgy phone charger and that the couple had simply been lost in the forest. 

Victorians were about to be placed into a COVID-19 lockdown that would continue for months on end. 

Victoria Police spokeswoman Natalie Webster told Daily Mail Australia that police remained open minded about exactly what had happened to the pair. 

Last month, bizarre new details emerged of an ‘oddball loner’ living in the Victorian Alps, who has been questioned over a number of mysterious disappearances.

Victoria Police Missing Persons Squad Detective Inspector Andrew Stamper is leading the investigation into the mystery

Victoria Police Missing Persons Squad Detective Inspector Andrew Stamper is leading the investigation into the mystery

Victoria Police Missing Persons Squad Detective Inspector Andrew Stamper is leading the investigation into the mystery 

The pair went missing in the Wonnangatta Valley, more than 200km north east of Melbourne

The pair went missing in the Wonnangatta Valley, more than 200km north east of Melbourne

The pair went missing in the Wonnangatta Valley, more than 200km north east of Melbourne

Personal belongings (circled) were left in Russell Hill's vehicle, which sustained fire damage when his tent went up in flames

Personal belongings (circled) were left in Russell Hill's vehicle, which sustained fire damage when his tent went up in flames

Personal belongings (circled) were left in Russell Hill’s vehicle, which sustained fire damage when his tent went up in flames

Known as ‘Buttons’ or ominously, ‘the Button Man’, the expert bushman became a person of interest after concerns about his odd behaviour was raised by locals.

He is understood to have earned his nickname due to his hobby of using deer antlers to make buttons – which he then uses as large ear piercings. 

‘Being creepy is not illegal,’ a police source has told Daily Mail Australia.  

Ms Webster confirmed there was nothing to indicate the mysterious loner had killed the couple, but what happened to them remains unknown. 

‘We don’t think they’re in Queensland living their best life. They’re too old really to drop off the grid and why would they?’ she said. 

Police believe it is more likely than not that the pair met with foul play while out in the remote wilderness. 

The area itself is considered an ideal spot to commit murder. 

Phone reception is practically nil and unlike some other areas popular with hikers, the remote ­Wonnangatta Valley does not see a lot of foot or road traffic. 

Mr Hill had left his Drouin home on March 19 for a camping trip along the Dargo River in Victoria’s northeast and planned to leave the region on March 26. 

Ms Clay, meanwhile, had told friends she was going away for a few days and expected to be home by March 28 or 29.

Carol Clay, 73, who was once the President of the Country Women's Association of Victoria, had been in a relationship with Russell Hill for many years in the lead up to their disappearance

Carol Clay, 73, who was once the President of the Country Women's Association of Victoria, had been in a relationship with Russell Hill for many years in the lead up to their disappearance

Carol Clay, 73, who was once the President of the Country Women’s Association of Victoria, had been in a relationship with Russell Hill for many years in the lead up to their disappearance

A new image of Mr Hill's white Toyota Landcruiser. It was found with minor fire damage at their burnt campsite near Dry River Creek Track in the valley on March 21

A new image of Mr Hill's white Toyota Landcruiser. It was found with minor fire damage at their burnt campsite near Dry River Creek Track in the valley on March 21

A new image of Mr Hill’s white Toyota Landcruiser. It was found with minor fire damage at their burnt campsite near Dry River Creek Track in the valley on March 21

Russell Hill and Carol Clay were last heard from on March 20, with Mr Hill's wife unaware he was travelling with another woman

Russell Hill and Carol Clay were last heard from on March 20, with Mr Hill's wife unaware he was travelling with another woman

Russell Hill and Carol Clay were last heard from on March 20, with Mr Hill’s wife unaware he was travelling with another woman

Mr Hill had been a keen amateur radio enthusiast and made his last broadcast from the bush in the days before his disappearance.

‘This place is in the middle of nowhere,’ Ms Webster said. ‘It’s just problematic in the extreme.’ 

Ms Webster said while cold-blooded murder was an avenue of investigation, detectives were open to all kinds of scenarios.

‘There are a lot of people who go up there and do illegal stuff. Like people who go hunting in the national park and ride motorcycles. Has he had a dispute with one of them that turned bad?’ she said. 

Police initially believed that perhaps the couple had died after Mr Hill lost his drone in the bush and the pair tried to retrieve it. 

Russell Hill hangs onto a drone that he had with him when he went missing. The drone has not been found despite an extensive search of the area

Russell Hill hangs onto a drone that he had with him when he went missing. The drone has not been found despite an extensive search of the area

Russell Hill hangs onto a drone that he had with him when he went missing. The drone has not been found despite an extensive search of the area 

A drone similar to the one that remains missing

A drone similar to the one that remains missing

A drone similar to the one that remains missing

The drone remains missing despite an extensive search that ended on April 6 without anyone finding a trace of them. 

If wild dogs had found the pair before police, remains would have likely been found in the days and weeks after. 

Ms Webster said despite the delay in the Missing Person Squad being brought into investigate the case, the fire ravaged camp site was thoroughly investigated at the time. 

‘Missing Persons had oversight of it fairly quickly even though we didn’t come out for a while and say that they had it,’ she said. ‘So there wasn’t a massive delay in picking it up … the car would have been looked at already.’

Police are desperate for people who may have been in the area at the time to let them know so that they can be ruled out of the investigation. 

Detectives are also keen to learn if anyone may be hanging onto dash cam footage that could help identify other leads. 

Ms Webster said the case remained ‘very wide open’. 

‘It’s a genuine mystery,’ she said. 

  Anyone with information is urged to contact CrimeStoppers on 1800 333 00

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Australia

Anti-lockown protesters in Melbourne threaten to cause another huge COVID-19 outbreak

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anti lockown protesters in melbourne threaten to cause another huge covid 19 outbreak

Anti-lockdown protesters in Melbourne are threatening to cause another COVID-19 outbreak as the city teeters on the brink of a third explosion and cases surge in the southeast.    

Public health authorities are racing to stop infections growing in the Casey and Dandenong council areas on the Melbourne’s southeast rim, which now has 90 active cases.

Five households in Clyde, Cranbourne North, Hallam and Narre Warren South are linked to 34 active cases.

Daniel Andrews urged covidiots on Saturday not to gather at planned protests across the city or ‘do anything to undermine’ its progress with tackling COVID-19.

It comes as Victoria recorded 21 new cases of COVID-19, the lowest daily increase since June, and a further seven deaths.  

Metropolitan Melbourne’s 14-day average has plummeted and now sits at 39.3 as the state moves to a COVID normal. In regional Victoria, the 14-day average is at just 1.9. 

33359848 8749511 image a 3 1600472892472

33359848 8749511 image a 3 1600472892472

Daniel Andrews (pictured) urged covidiots on Saturday not to gather at planned protests across the city or ‘do anything to undermine’ its progress with tackling COVID-19

A heavy Police presence is seen in Dandenong following an anti-lockdown protest on August 28

A heavy Police presence is seen in Dandenong following an anti-lockdown protest on August 28

A heavy Police presence is seen in Dandenong following an anti-lockdown protest on August 28

This is the ninth day in a row Victoria has recorded a daily infections increase below 50. 

Metropolitan Melbourne is under strict Stage Four lockdown – limiting Melburnians travelling more than 5km from their homes and enforcing a 9pm to 5am curfew. 

The premier did not comment on where Saturday demonstrations would be, with protesters taking caution when sharing information online.  

Multiple rallies have taken place in Melbourne the past few weekends.  

Victoria Police have responded with a heavy presence – handing out dozens of fines and making arrests. 

‘Let’s not lose sight of the fact that this week we have seen, day after day, not the 725 cases we had five and a half weeks ago – we have made very significant progress,’ Mr Andrews said.

‘We’ve got regional Victoria opening up. People should be positive and optimistic this strategy is working, and therefore, let’s not any of us do anything to undermine that.’  

The premier on Saturday did not comment on where Saturday demonstrations would be, with protesters taking caution when sharing information online. Pictured: Protesters rallying against lockdown regulations on Monday on September 13

The premier on Saturday did not comment on where Saturday demonstrations would be, with protesters taking caution when sharing information online. Pictured: Protesters rallying against lockdown regulations on Monday on September 13

The premier on Saturday did not comment on where Saturday demonstrations would be, with protesters taking caution when sharing information online. Pictured: Protesters rallying against lockdown regulations on Monday on September 13

Mr Andrews’ comments also followed trying to dissuade protesters on Friday by saying their intended actions would be selfish and irresponsible. 

His comments also followed information of a new cluster emerging in the southeast of Melbourne.  

A surge of cases in the Casey and Dandenong area has been linked back to five households in the Afghan community.

There are currently 101 active coronavirus cases in the Casey and Dandenong area with 34 infections linked to five households

There are currently 101 active coronavirus cases in the Casey and Dandenong area with 34 infections linked to five households

There are currently 101 active coronavirus cases in the Casey and Dandenong area with 34 infections linked to five households

Metropolitan Melbourne is under strict Stage Four lockdown - limiting Melburnians travelling more than 5km from their homes and enforcing a 9pm to 5am curfew. Pictured: A person walking through Melbourne's empty city

Metropolitan Melbourne is under strict Stage Four lockdown - limiting Melburnians travelling more than 5km from their homes and enforcing a 9pm to 5am curfew. Pictured: A person walking through Melbourne's empty city

Metropolitan Melbourne is under strict Stage Four lockdown – limiting Melburnians travelling more than 5km from their homes and enforcing a 9pm to 5am curfew. Pictured: A person walking through Melbourne’s empty city

As residents in the city are still under strict Stage Four lockdown, it is thought the infected group may have breached the stay-at-home orders. 

Health authorities are scrambling to track and trace the new surge in cases, and the Victorian government has begun a recruitment drive which sees retired officers re-enlisted to bolster the state’s frontline virus efforts. 

‘Members of those households visiting other households,’ Department of Health and Human Services COVID-19 testing commander Jeroen Weimar said.

‘It is that limited amount of contact, relatively infrequent contact between these five households that has now meant that we have 34 people in five houses experiencing or living with a very real threat of the coronavirus.’

The Victorian government has even began a new recruitment drive that will see retired officers re-enlisted to bolster the state's frontline virus efforts

The Victorian government has even began a new recruitment drive that will see retired officers re-enlisted to bolster the state's frontline virus efforts

The Victorian government has even began a new recruitment drive that will see retired officers re-enlisted to bolster the state’s frontline virus efforts

Police conducting checks on motorists at checkpoints - alongside the Australian Defence Force - to ensure Victorians are following state rules

Police conducting checks on motorists at checkpoints - alongside the Australian Defence Force - to ensure Victorians are following state rules

Police conducting checks on motorists at checkpoints – alongside the Australian Defence Force – to ensure Victorians are following state rules

The cluster – impacting five households in Hallam, Clyde, Narre Warren South and Cranbourne North – first emerged on September 4. 

Cases in the southeast have now spread to Dandenong Police Station and a number of industrial work sites. 

Premier Daniel Andrews on Friday said the actions of the family’s involved in the cluster was ‘disappointing’. 

The cluster which has impacted the five households in Hallam, Clyde, Narre Warren South and Cranbourne North, first emerged on September 4

The cluster which has impacted the five households in Hallam, Clyde, Narre Warren South and Cranbourne North, first emerged on September 4

The cluster which has impacted the five households in Hallam, Clyde, Narre Warren South and Cranbourne North, first emerged on September 4

‘Five kilometres is one thing and visiting others is the real issue here,’ he said. 

‘The rules are in place for a reason and anyone who undermines this, undermines the entire strategy and it means the rules will be on for longer.’ 

The Victorian leader, however, ruled out fines for the group, telling reporters it may discourage others from being completely honest with contact tracers. 

‘I know many Victorians, when you see examples of people not following the rules, that’s disappointing, it makes you angry,’ Mr Andrews said.

‘You need to look at the bigger picture here.

‘We don’t want a situation where people don’t have a sense of confidence and indeed, you know, the sense they’re obliged to tell us the full story as quickly as possible. That’s what we need.’ 

The success of Melbourne's ongoing lockdown could be at risk with a new cluster in the southeast of the city. Pictured: A coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

The success of Melbourne's ongoing lockdown could be at risk with a new cluster in the southeast of the city. Pictured: A coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

The success of Melbourne’s ongoing lockdown could be at risk with a new cluster in the southeast of the city. Pictured: A coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

The Casey and Dandenong cluster is testing the capacity of COVID-detectives. Pictured: Heath workers are seen at a coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

The Casey and Dandenong cluster is testing the capacity of COVID-detectives. Pictured: Heath workers are seen at a coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

The Casey and Dandenong cluster is testing the capacity of COVID-detectives. Pictured: Heath workers are seen at a coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

A health worker is pictured approaching a vehicle at a COVID-19 testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

A health worker is pictured approaching a vehicle at a COVID-19 testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

A health worker is pictured approaching a vehicle at a COVID-19 testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

Despite the new cluster, Victoria’s overall case numbers are continuing to decline. 

With contact tracers ‘painstakingly’ working around the clock to slow the spread of the virus and bringing the city out of lockdown, the Victorian government is set to introduce a controversial new policy seeing retired cops re-enlisted in the force.

The Department of Justice and Community Safety and the Department of Health and Human Services is behind the push which will see former cops given paid training before being assigned specific COVID-19 roles.

These roles include industry enforcement, testing support, door-knocking and the airport patrol. 

A man with a dog is seen being questioned by two police officers in the Dandenong area

A man with a dog is seen being questioned by two police officers in the Dandenong area

A man with a dog is seen being questioned by two police officers in the Dandenong area

However, not everybody is in favour of the move to bring back veteran police.     

‘Police veterans have a real contribution to make to the ongoing safety of the community but their use to issue infringements, detain people and conduct checks on private property is entirely inappropriate,’ Opposition Police and Community Safety spokesman David Southwick told the Herald Sun.   

Ivan Ray, who served in the Victorian Police Force for more than three decades, said it was a recipe for disaster for the veterans. 

‘It’s effectively a health department police force, and we know the Health Department is no good at enforcement, we saw that in the hotel quarantine operation,’ Mr Ray said.

‘Veterans can play a part and they can support policing, but it has to be by the police department.’

Health authorities are urging anyone in the southeast of Melbourne to diligently monitor their health and immediately get tested if feeling unwell. 

Health authorities are urging anyone in the southeast of Melbourne to diligently monitor their health and immediately get tested if feeling unwell

Health authorities are urging anyone in the southeast of Melbourne to diligently monitor their health and immediately get tested if feeling unwell

Health authorities are urging anyone in the southeast of Melbourne to diligently monitor their health and immediately get tested if feeling unwell

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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg DEAD

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justice ruth bader ginsburg dead

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died aged 87 after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer, the Supreme Court has announced. 

The judge, only the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court Justice, passed away surrounded by her family at her home in Washington D.C. following complications with her illness. 

Ginsburg, who served for almost 27 years on the highest court of the land, had battled several bouts of cancer after first being diagnosed in 2009.

Her death paves the way for Donald Trump to expand his conservative majority on the Supreme Court ahead of November’s election. 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured above in 2009, served for almost 27 years on the highest court of the land and was the second woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured above in 2009, served for almost 27 years on the highest court of the land and was the second woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured above in 2009, served for almost 27 years on the highest court of the land and was the second woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court

Ginsburg, the leader of the court’s four-member liberal wing, voiced concerns about the political impact of her passing in the days leading up to her death. 

‘My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed,’ the legal pioneer said in a statement dictated to her granddaughter Clara Spera days before her death.

Chief Justice John Roberts led tributes to his colleague Friday describing her as a ‘champion of justice’.

‘Our nation has lost a justice of historic stature,’ Roberts said in a statement. 

‘We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her, a tired and resolute champion of justice.’  

Ginsburg’s death gives Trump the opportunity to name her successor.

The president has already appointed two members of the Supreme Court, Justices Neil M. Gorsuch and Brett M. Kavanaugh, in a move that pushes the court increasingly right wing.

The replacement of Ginsburg by another Republican will leave the court Democrats outnumbered, with six Republicans to their three.   

Incredible life of the woman who became the Notorious RBG: How Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Brooklyn-born daughter of Russian Jewish migrants became a trailblazer, the second woman to serve as Supreme Court Justice and a feminist pop culture icon 

by Dusica Sue Malesevic for DailyMail.com

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court Justice, a legal pioneer who broke barriers for women in law, a feminist icon to many, and the recent pop culture phenomenon known as the ‘Notorious RBG’ has died. She was 87.

The collar-wearing octogenarian captured the public’s imagination – especially for those on the left who offered everything from kale to protective bubbles to later on wearing masks on social media to safeguard her continued tenure on the highest court in the land. The list of things that Ginsburg inspired is long: two films, memes that range from the ribald to inspirational, mountains of memorabilia from t-shirts to totes, cocktails, a book on her workout, and even tattoos.

But beyond the persona of the ‘Notorious RBG’ and her groundbreaking law career, Ginsburg was a mother of two, had two grandchildren, and was married to her husband Martin D. Ginsburg for 56 years until his death in 2010. She blazed a path for women in the legal profession, and at five-foot-one had become a towering figure in Washington, D.C. 

Ginsburg battled several bouts of cancer after being first diagnosed in 2009. 

Above, Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) at Fort Sill, Oklahoma in 1954. They were married for 56 years and met while they both attended Cornell University. After graduating, the couple moved to Fort Sill so Martin could do his military service

Above, Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) at Fort Sill, Oklahoma in 1954. They were married for 56 years and met while they both attended Cornell University. After graduating, the couple moved to Fort Sill so Martin could do his military service

Above, Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) at Fort Sill, Oklahoma in 1954. They were married for 56 years and met while they both attended Cornell University. After graduating, the couple moved to Fort Sill so Martin could do his military service

It was love at first Charles Dickens. Ruth Bader Ginsburg, (left), pictured here with her husband of 56 years, Martin D. Ginsburg (right). They met while college students at Cornell University during the 1950s. Ruth was impressed by Martin's answer to a quiz question during a literature class taught by famous novelist Vladimir Nabokov, according to the biography called ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life’ by Jane Sherron De Hart

It was love at first Charles Dickens. Ruth Bader Ginsburg, (left), pictured here with her husband of 56 years, Martin D. Ginsburg (right). They met while college students at Cornell University during the 1950s. Ruth was impressed by Martin's answer to a quiz question during a literature class taught by famous novelist Vladimir Nabokov, according to the biography called ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life’ by Jane Sherron De Hart

It was love at first Charles Dickens. Ruth Bader Ginsburg, (left), pictured here with her husband of 56 years, Martin D. Ginsburg (right). They met while college students at Cornell University during the 1950s. Ruth was impressed by Martin’s answer to a quiz question during a literature class taught by famous novelist Vladimir Nabokov, according to the biography called ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life’ by Jane Sherron De Hart

The Ginsburg family, above, in a photo taken in 1958. Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) with their daughter Jane C. Ginsburg (center). Jane C. Ginsburg followed in her mother's steps and became a lawyer after graduating from Harvard Law School, and currently teaches at Columbia Law School

The Ginsburg family, above, in a photo taken in 1958. Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) with their daughter Jane C. Ginsburg (center). Jane C. Ginsburg followed in her mother's steps and became a lawyer after graduating from Harvard Law School, and currently teaches at Columbia Law School

The Ginsburg family, above, in a photo taken in 1958. Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) with their daughter Jane C. Ginsburg (center). Jane C. Ginsburg followed in her mother’s steps and became a lawyer after graduating from Harvard Law School, and currently teaches at Columbia Law School

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (center) and Martin D. Ginsburg (standing behind her) married in 1954 after she graduated at the top of her class at Cornell. Their first child, Jane C. Ginsburg, was born in  1955, and their second child, James S. Ginsburg, in 1965. Shown here on Oct. 21, 1993 at the Supreme Court, are from left, son-in-law George T. Spera Jr and her daughter Jane C. Ginsburg, her husband Martin, and her son James S. Ginsburg. The judge's grandchildren Clara Spera (left) and Paul Spera (right) are in front

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (center) and Martin D. Ginsburg (standing behind her) married in 1954 after she graduated at the top of her class at Cornell. Their first child, Jane C. Ginsburg, was born in  1955, and their second child, James S. Ginsburg, in 1965. Shown here on Oct. 21, 1993 at the Supreme Court, are from left, son-in-law George T. Spera Jr and her daughter Jane C. Ginsburg, her husband Martin, and her son James S. Ginsburg. The judge's grandchildren Clara Spera (left) and Paul Spera (right) are in front

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (center) and Martin D. Ginsburg (standing behind her) married in 1954 after she graduated at the top of her class at Cornell. Their first child, Jane C. Ginsburg, was born in  1955, and their second child, James S. Ginsburg, in 1965. Shown here on Oct. 21, 1993 at the Supreme Court, are from left, son-in-law George T. Spera Jr and her daughter Jane C. Ginsburg, her husband Martin, and her son James S. Ginsburg. The judge’s grandchildren Clara Spera (left) and Paul Spera (right) are in front

A 2018 biography emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s during a time where some women went to college to get their ‘MRS degree,’ meaning that it was a means to an end to find a spouse. Ginsburg said Martin was the ‘the only young man I dated who cared that I had a brain,’ and they had a long-lasting marriage until Martin died in 2010 from cancer at the age of 78. They are pictured here at a gala opening night dinner after a Washington Opera performance on October 21, 2000

A 2018 biography emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s during a time where some women went to college to get their ‘MRS degree,’ meaning that it was a means to an end to find a spouse. Ginsburg said Martin was the ‘the only young man I dated who cared that I had a brain,’ and they had a long-lasting marriage until Martin died in 2010 from cancer at the age of 78. They are pictured here at a gala opening night dinner after a Washington Opera performance on October 21, 2000

A 2018 biography emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s during a time where some women went to college to get their ‘MRS degree,’ meaning that it was a means to an end to find a spouse. Ginsburg said Martin was the ‘the only young man I dated who cared that I had a brain,’ and they had a long-lasting marriage until Martin died in 2010 from cancer at the age of 78. They are pictured here at a gala opening night dinner after a Washington Opera performance on October 21, 2000

Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her engagement photo taken in December 1953 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her engagement photo taken in December 1953 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her engagement photo taken in December 1953 

Born on March 15, 1933 in Brooklyn, Joan Ruth Bader was the second daughter of Russian Jewish immigrants, Celia and Nathan Bader. Her older sister, who would later die at aged six from meningitis, nicknamed her ‘Kiki’ for apparently being ‘a kicky baby.’ Her mother, Celia, a garment factory worker, would encourage Ruth – she went by her middle name to distinguish herself from the other Joans in her Brooklyn class – to attain a higher level of education than she did. 

‘My mother told me two things constantly. One was to be a lady, and the other was to be independent. The study of law was unusual for women of my generation. For most girls growing up in the ’40s, the most important degree was not your BA, but your MRS,’ she recalled to the ACLU, referring to the idea that women went to college to land a man, get married and become a missus – not to get a bachelor’s degree. 

Her mother died from cancer right before Ginsburg graduated from high school.

In 1950, Ginsburg started attending Cornell University where she would meet her husband, Martin D. Ginsburg, during a literature class taught by famous novelist Vladimir Nabokov, according to the biography called ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life’ by Jane Sherron De Hart.

Martin was able to answer Nabokov’s quiz question about Charles Dickens, and Ginsburg was smitten, later saying that Martin was the ‘the only young man I dated who cared that I had a brain.’

‘Meeting Marty was by far the most fortunate thing that ever happened to me,’ Ginsburg said in one of the films about her, the documentary ‘RBG.’ ‘Marty was a man blessed with a wonderful sense of humor. I tend to be rather sober.’

At aged 21, Ginsburg, who majored in government, graduated at the top of her class in 1954 at Cornell and married Martin soon after. Their first child, Jane C. Ginsburg, was born on July 21, 1955. Due to Martin’s military service, they moved to Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

‘After dinner, the newlyweds often spent their evenings reading aloud to each other from Pepys, Tolstoy, Dickens and even Spinoza, although the philosopher was tougher fare,’ De Hart wrote, according to a Washington Post article about the biography.

De Hart emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s, and the couple decided they both would pursue careers. After two years in Oklahoma, Ginsburg and Martin went to Harvard Law School in 1956. Women had only started being admitted to the law school six years earlier, and Ginsburg was one of nine women in a class of about 500.

Martin graduated from Harvard in 1958 and practiced tax law in New York. Ginsburg switched schools, attending Columbia Law School to be close to her husband. In 1959, she graduated with her law degree, a Juris Doctor, from Columbia, and was tied for first in her class.

A young Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured here in 1977, who broke barriers in the legal profession to become the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court justice

A young Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured here in 1977, who broke barriers in the legal profession to become the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court justice

A young Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured here in 1977, who broke barriers in the legal profession to become the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court justice

Despite the credentials, Ginsburg, now 26, was still a woman and she had a hard time finding a place at a law firm after graduation.

‘You think about what would have happened… Suppose I had gotten a job as a permanent associate. Probably I would have climbed up the ladder and today I would be a retired partner. So often in life, things that you regard as an impediment turn out to be great good fortune,’ Ginsburg said during the documentary series, ‘Makers: Women Who Make America.’

Ginsburg was also rejected for a Supreme Court clerkship due to being a woman. But there were successes as well: she was the first female member of the Harvard Law Review and was elected to the Columbia Law Review as well. Eventually, Ginsburg landed a clerkship for a judge of the US District Court for the Southern District of New York.

After two years with the Southern District, Ginsburg was a research associate and associate director for the Project of International Procedure at Columbia Law School. She also learned Swedish, and conducted research in Sweden for a book that she co-authored on civil procedure in the country. 

After serving as a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for 13 years, Ginsburg was nominated by President Bill Clinton to Supreme Court after Justice Byron White announced he was retiring. Clinton (left) is shaking Ginsburg's hand during the announcement in the Rose Garden at the White House on June 14, 1993

After serving as a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for 13 years, Ginsburg was nominated by President Bill Clinton to Supreme Court after Justice Byron White announced he was retiring. Clinton (left) is shaking Ginsburg's hand during the announcement in the Rose Garden at the White House on June 14, 1993

After serving as a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for 13 years, Ginsburg was nominated by President Bill Clinton to Supreme Court after Justice Byron White announced he was retiring. Clinton (left) is shaking Ginsburg’s hand during the announcement in the Rose Garden at the White House on June 14, 1993

'The announcement of this vacancy,' Clinton said on June 14, 1993, 'brought forth a unique outpouring of support for distinguished Americans on Judge Ginsburg’s behalf. What caused that outpouring is the essential quality of the judge herself: her deep respect for others and her willingness to subvert self-interest to the interest of our people and their institutions.' Ginsburg (pictured) at the announcement ceremony at the White House's Rose Garden

'The announcement of this vacancy,' Clinton said on June 14, 1993, 'brought forth a unique outpouring of support for distinguished Americans on Judge Ginsburg’s behalf. What caused that outpouring is the essential quality of the judge herself: her deep respect for others and her willingness to subvert self-interest to the interest of our people and their institutions.' Ginsburg (pictured) at the announcement ceremony at the White House's Rose Garden

‘The announcement of this vacancy,’ Clinton said on June 14, 1993, ‘brought forth a unique outpouring of support for distinguished Americans on Judge Ginsburg’s behalf. What caused that outpouring is the essential quality of the judge herself: her deep respect for others and her willingness to subvert self-interest to the interest of our people and their institutions.’ Ginsburg (pictured) at the announcement ceremony at the White House’s Rose Garden

In 1963, she started teaching at Rutgers University School of Law when there were few female law professors. Also during this time, she and Martin had their second child, James S. Ginsburg, on September 8, 1965. She taught at Rutgers until 1972 and then moved to Columbia Law School, where, at aged 39, she was the first woman put on a tenure track.

She taught at Columbia for eight years, co-authored a law school book, and also worked as general counsel for the ACLU, where she argued several hundred gender discrimination cases, six of which were before the Supreme Court. 

By 1980, Ginsburg, then 47, was selected to be a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, which is often a springboard to the Supreme Court. After thirteen years as a judge on that court, President Bill Clinton nominated the 60-year-old Ginsburg for the Supreme Court after Justice Byron White said he was retiring. 

‘The announcement of this vacancy,’ Clinton said on June 14, 1993, according to a YouTube video courtesy of the William J. Clinton Presidential Library, ‘brought forth a unique outpouring of support for distinguished Americans on Judge Ginsburg’s behalf. What caused that outpouring is the essential quality of the judge herself: her deep respect for others and her willingness to subvert self-interest to the interest of our people and their institutions.’

At the announcement, Ginsburg said: ‘Most closely, I have been aided by my life’s partner, Martin D. Ginsburg, who has been, since our teenage years, my best friend and biggest booster.’

On August 4, 1993, the US Senate confirmed her by a vote of 96 to 3, the New York Times reported. She was sworn in as a justice on August 10, 1993.

Later in October 1993, a photo shows Ginsburg and her family at the court. Her daughter, Jane C. Ginsburg, followed in her footsteps, graduating from Harvard Law School, and currently teaches at Columbia Law School. She married George T. Spera Jr and they have two children together: Paul Spera, who is an actor, and Clara Spera, who is also a lawyer and clerked for the US District of the Southern District of New York. 

With a vote of 96 to 3, the US Senate approved Ginsburg's nomination to the Supreme Court. She was confirmed, on August 3, 1993, to the position vacated by retiring Associate Justice Byron White. President Bill Clinton (left), who nominated Ginsburg (right), is seen here walking with her on the White House colonnade

With a vote of 96 to 3, the US Senate approved Ginsburg's nomination to the Supreme Court. She was confirmed, on August 3, 1993, to the position vacated by retiring Associate Justice Byron White. President Bill Clinton (left), who nominated Ginsburg (right), is seen here walking with her on the White House colonnade

With a vote of 96 to 3, the US Senate approved Ginsburg’s nomination to the Supreme Court. She was confirmed, on August 3, 1993, to the position vacated by retiring Associate Justice Byron White. President Bill Clinton (left), who nominated Ginsburg (right), is seen here walking with her on the White House colonnade

On August 10, 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was sworn in as a Supreme Court Justice - the second woman appointed to the court. Pictured above is Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist (right) swearing Ginsburg (with arm raised) in while her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (second from right) and President Bill Clinton (left) look on

On August 10, 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was sworn in as a Supreme Court Justice - the second woman appointed to the court. Pictured above is Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist (right) swearing Ginsburg (with arm raised) in while her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (second from right) and President Bill Clinton (left) look on

On August 10, 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was sworn in as a Supreme Court Justice – the second woman appointed to the court. Pictured above is Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist (right) swearing Ginsburg (with arm raised) in while her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (second from right) and President Bill Clinton (left) look on

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (left) with her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (right). At the announcement for her nomination to the Supreme Court on on June 14, 1993, Ginsburg said: 'Most closely, I have been aided by my life’s partner, Martin D. Ginsburg, who has been, since our teenage years, my best friend and biggest booster'

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (left) with her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (right). At the announcement for her nomination to the Supreme Court on on June 14, 1993, Ginsburg said: 'Most closely, I have been aided by my life’s partner, Martin D. Ginsburg, who has been, since our teenage years, my best friend and biggest booster'

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (left) with her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (right). At the announcement for her nomination to the Supreme Court on on June 14, 1993, Ginsburg said: ‘Most closely, I have been aided by my life’s partner, Martin D. Ginsburg, who has been, since our teenage years, my best friend and biggest booster’

In her biography, ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life,’ Jane Sherron De emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s, and the couple decided they both would pursue careers. After two years in Oklahoma, Ginsburg and Martin went to Harvard Law School in 1956. Women had only started being admitted to the law school six years earlier, and Ginsburg was one of nine women in a class of about 500.

In her biography, ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life,’ Jane Sherron De emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s, and the couple decided they both would pursue careers. After two years in Oklahoma, Ginsburg and Martin went to Harvard Law School in 1956. Women had only started being admitted to the law school six years earlier, and Ginsburg was one of nine women in a class of about 500.

Jane Sherron De Hart, in her book, ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life,’ emphasized the ‘proto-feminism’ of Martin D. Ginsburg (left) in the 1950s, and the couple decided they both would pursue careers. Both Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) and Martin went to Harvard Law School in 1956. Women had only started being admitted to the law school six years earlier, and Ginsburg was one of nine women in a class of about 500

Ginsburg told the New Republic that her grandchildren loved the fact that she had become an Internet sensation. 

‘At my advanced age – I’m now an octogenarian – I’m constantly amazed by the number of people who want to take my picture,’ she said in 2014.

Not only did people want their photo taken, an interest in her workout also took hold. In her eighties, Ginsburg would do exercises such as a wall squat with a yoga ball. So much so that her trainer of many years, Bryant Johnson, wrote the book ‘The RBG Workout.’

When Ginsburg joined the court in 1993, Sandra Day O’Connor had already been on it since 1981. Sandra Day O’Connor became the first woman to serve on the Supreme Court, nominated by President Ronald Reagan. Ginsburg called O’Connor a mentor, and Ginsburg told The Washington Post that they ‘thought it would be appropriate if we included as part of our robe something typical of a woman.

‘So I have many, many collars.’

Fans of Ginsburg have parsed her collars, which were sometimes lace, gold embellished and beaded. One was dubbed ‘the dissenter.’

A feminist icon to many, Ginsburg told ‘Makers,’ the documentary series, that feminism is ‘that notion that we should each be free to develop our own talents, whatever they may be, and not be held back by artificial barriers – manmade barriers, certainly not heaven sent.’  

After O’Connor retired in early 2006, Ginsburg was the only woman on the court until Sonia Sotomayor was confirmed on August 8, 2009. Ginsburg was also close to conservative justice Antonin Scalia until his death in February 2016.

‘We care about this institution more than our individual egos and we are all devoted to keeping the Supreme Court in the place that it is, as a co-equal third branch of government and I think a model for the world in the collegiality and independence of judges,’ Ginsburg said on C-SPAN.

In 2015, Ginsburg told MSNBC how she would liked to be remembered.  

‘Someone who used whatever talent she had to do her work to the very best of her ability. And to help repair tears in her society, to make things a little better through the use of whatever ability she has. To do something, as my colleague David Souter would say, outside myself. ‘Cause I’ve gotten much more satisfaction for the things that I’ve done for which I was not paid.’  

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Victoria records 21 new coronavirus cases and seven deaths

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victoria records 21 new coronavirus cases and seven deaths

Victoria has recorded 21 new cases of COVID-19 in the lowest daily increase since June, and a further seven deaths. 

Metropolitan Melbourne’s 14-day average has plummeted and now sits at 39.3 as the state moves to a COVID normal. 

In regional Victoria, the 14-day average is at just 1.9.

Victoria recorded 21 new cases of COVID-19 and seven deaths on Saturday. Pictured: A resident walks along South Wharf in Melbourne as part of their permitted exercise on Wednesday

Victoria recorded 21 new cases of COVID-19 and seven deaths on Saturday. Pictured: A resident walks along South Wharf in Melbourne as part of their permitted exercise on Wednesday

Victoria recorded 21 new cases of COVID-19 and seven deaths on Saturday. Pictured: A resident walks along South Wharf in Melbourne as part of their permitted exercise on Wednesday

The daily update comes as disgruntled Melburnians revealed they are planning to take to the streets again in protest of the city’s Stage Four lockdown restrictions. 

Over the last two weekends protesters have clashed with police at the Shrine Of Remembrance, The Tan track and Queen Victoria Market.

Police arrested 74 people and issued at least 176 infringement notices during last Sunday’s protest at the market.  

More to come. 

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