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More than two million Australians smoke cannabis – and it’s costing the economy $4.5billion a year

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more than two million australians smoke cannabis and its costing the economy 4 5billion a year

Cannabis use is costing Australia $4.5billion a year, with more than half of the toll related to the criminal justice system.

More than two million Australians reported using cannabis in the 12 months to June 2016, a new study published by Curtin University’s National Drug Research Institute shows.

About 150,000 people met the criteria for cannabis dependence, a figure NDRI professor Steve Allsop described as significant.

Cannabis use is costing Australia $4.5billion a year, with more than half of the toll related to the criminal justice system (file picture)

Cannabis use is costing Australia $4.5billion a year, with more than half of the toll related to the criminal justice system (file picture)

Cannabis use is costing Australia $4.5billion a year, with more than half of the toll related to the criminal justice system (file picture)

The social and economic costs of cannabis use include more than $700million in increased demand on the healthcare system.

Worker absence and reduced productivity was estimated to cost about $560million.

But the greatest costs by far were related to crime including policing, prosecution and an estimated $1.1billion spend on imprisonment.

‘It could be people who are found in possession of small amounts for personal use,’ Professor Allsop told AAP.

‘Some people might be engaging in other risk behaviours or criminal activity where cannabis use is associated with it … someone who is completely dependent, who uses a lot of the substance, might resort to either selling the substance or might resort to property crime in order to continue to support the purchase.’

Prof Allsop said it could not be extrapolated from the data whether the costs to society would be lower if cannabis was decriminalised, as it has been in some jurisdictions around the world.

But while stressing the seriousness of crimes such as driving under the influence, he said non-punitive measures were more likely to be effective for minor possession charges.

‘I’ve worked in this field for 40 years … if someone’s found with small amounts of cannabis for personal use, we shouldn’t potentially do more harm,’ he said.

‘The evidence tells us we’re going to have a better chance of success if we have a health response as opposed to a criminal response as our first response.’

The study also quantified a further $100 million in intangible costs due to the premature death of 23 people, mostly through cannabis-related traffic accidents.

‘I think it’s important to recognise that those costs don’t just impact on the individual user,’ Prof Allsop said.

‘If somebody’s using cannabis and they’re driving a vehicle, they’re not just putting themselves at risk.’

Researchers from the University of Adelaide, UNSW, Flinders University and the University of Queensland contributed to the study led by the Perth-based NDRI.

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Amy Coney Barrett leaves her home in Indiana with her family ahead of Trump’s announcement 

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amy coney barrett leaves her home in indiana with her family ahead of trumps announcement

President Donald Trump‘s potential Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett left her home in Indiana with her husband and children on Saturday afternoon just hours before the president is expected to formally announce his decision. 

Six of Barrett’s children were with her, including the son and daughter she adopted from Haiti, as they got into their family car and left their home.

Trump is expected to announce the 48-year-old, mother of seven as his pick to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg during a ceremony at the White House starting at 5pm. 

While the president has not confirmed any name, on Friday Barrett emerged as the favorite. 

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Amy Coney Barrett leaving her home in Indiana with her husband and children on Saturday

Amy Coney Barrett leaving her home in Indiana with her husband and children on Saturday

Amy Coney Barrett leaving her home in Indiana with her husband and children on Saturday

A Special Air Mission military aircraft landed in South Bend from Maryland to pick the family up

A Special Air Mission military aircraft landed in South Bend from Maryland to pick the family up

A Special Air Mission military aircraft landed in South Bend from Maryland to pick the family up

Six of Barrett's children were seen with her as they left their home in Indiana

Six of Barrett's children were seen with her as they left their home in Indiana

Six of Barrett’s children were seen with her as they left their home in Indiana

One of Barrett’s daughters held her hand as the family left the house together. All were wearing formal attire with the boys dressed in suits. 

Another son held the hand of her youngest child who has Down Syndrome. 

According to the New York Times, a Special Air Mission military aircraft landed in South Bend from Maryland suggesting the administration sent a military jet to pick up the family. 

Aides say the president did not interview another candidate this week.  

President Trump is due to unveil his pick in the Rose Garden before heading to a campaign rally in Pennsylvania to celebrate the announcement.

Fans began to arrive at Harrisburg International Airport on Saturday afternoon and lined up for hours ahead of the event.  

Trump’s announcement will come before Ginsburg is buried beside her husband next week at Arlington National Cemetery. 

On Friday, she was the first woman to lie in state at the Capitol, and mourners flocked to the Supreme Court for two days before that to pay respects. 

Republican senators are already lining up for a swift confirmation of Barrett ahead of the November 3 election, as they aim to lock in conservative gains in the federal judiciary before a potential transition of power. 

Trump, meanwhile, is hoping the nomination will serve to galvanize his supporters as he looks to fend off Democrat Joe Biden. He believes Barrett to be the type of Supreme Court candidate who will secure the support of his conservative base. 

He had initially released two shortlists naming 45 people who he would consider for a Supreme Court vacancy but last week committed to choosing a woman. 

There still remained the chance the president would go in a different direction with hours before his planned announcement – with the pick having not only a long-term impact on the nation’s laws but also political impact on the presidential elections and control of Congress. 

The announcement will kick off a flurry of activity that must take place before the final confirmation vote, including public hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Barrett's adopted son from Haiti held the hand of her youngest child who has Down Syndrome

Barrett's adopted son from Haiti held the hand of her youngest child who has Down Syndrome

Barrett’s adopted son from Haiti held the hand of her youngest child who has Down Syndrome

Barret held one of her daughter's hands as she walked toward their car

Barret held one of her daughter's hands as she walked toward their car

Barret held one of her daughter’s hands as she walked toward their car

Barrett drove the car from their house as the family made their way to Washington D.C.

Barrett drove the car from their house as the family made their way to Washington D.C.

Barrett drove the car from their house as the family made their way to Washington D.C. 

White House staff prepare the Rose Garden before US President Donald Trump announces his Supreme Court nominee

White House staff prepare the Rose Garden before US President Donald Trump announces his Supreme Court nominee

White House staff prepare the Rose Garden before US President Donald Trump announces his Supreme Court nominee

The Rose Garden of the White House is decorated in US flags before President Trump announces his Supreme Court nominee

The Rose Garden of the White House is decorated in US flags before President Trump announces his Supreme Court nominee

The Rose Garden of the White House is decorated in US flags before President Trump announces his Supreme Court nominee

A White House source indicated the process will start right away, with the nominee on Tuesday beginning the traditional courtesy calls on individual senators in their offices, with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell up first. White House Counsel Pat Cipollone is expected to shepherd the nomination.

Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, who mounted an angry defense of Kavanaugh during tense confirmation hearings in 2018, has signaled he expects to have Barrett confirmed by the election.

Barrett would become the fifth woman ever to serve on the top U.S. judicial body and push its conservative majority to a commanding 6-3. 

Her appointment would mean that Roman Catholics hold six of the Supreme Court’s nine seats despite only accounting for 20 percent of the population.  

With Trump’s fellow Republicans controlling the Senate, confirmation appears certain, though Democrats may try to make the process as difficult as possible. 

Republicans hold a 53-47 Senate majority and only two Republican senators have opposed proceeding with the confirmation process.

Supporters of Trump arrive for a campaign rally at Harrisburg International Airport in Pennsylvania on Saturday evening

Supporters of Trump arrive for a campaign rally at Harrisburg International Airport in Pennsylvania on Saturday evening

Supporters of Trump arrive for a campaign rally at Harrisburg International Airport in Pennsylvania on Saturday evening  

Volunteer Terri Hinckley, left, of Loganville, Pennsylvania, takes the temperatures of attendees before a campaign rally for President Donald Trump on Saturday

Volunteer Terri Hinckley, left, of Loganville, Pennsylvania, takes the temperatures of attendees before a campaign rally for President Donald Trump on Saturday

Volunteer Terri Hinckley, left, of Loganville, Pennsylvania, takes the temperatures of attendees before a campaign rally for President Donald Trump on Saturday

Supporters lined up for hours ahead of the tally in Pennsylvania

Supporters lined up for hours ahead of the tally in Pennsylvania

Supporters lined up for hours ahead of the tally in Pennsylvania

Supporters decked out their cars with Trump flags as they waited for his campaign rally in Pennsylvania on Saturday

Supporters decked out their cars with Trump flags as they waited for his campaign rally in Pennsylvania on Saturday

Supporters decked out their cars with Trump flags as they waited for his campaign rally in Pennsylvania on Saturday

Jacqueline Faught, a supporter of Trump, holds an umbrella before a campaign rally at Harrisburg International Airport

Jacqueline Faught, a supporter of Trump, holds an umbrella before a campaign rally at Harrisburg International Airport

Jacqueline Faught, a supporter of Trump, holds an umbrella before a campaign rally at Harrisburg International Airport

Barrett and her husband, Jesse Barrett, a former federal prosecutor, both graduated from Notre Dame Law School. 

She would be the only justice on the current court not to have received her law degree from an Ivy League school. The eight current justices all attended either Harvard or Yale.

How her religious beliefs might guide her legal views became a focus for some Democrats during bruising confirmation hearings after Barrett’s nomination for the 7th Circuit. 

That prompted Republicans to accuse Democrats of seeking to impose a religious test on Barrett’s fitness for the job.

The judge wowed social conservatives during the confirmation hearings to serve on the court, however.

She defended her Catholic face when getting grilled by Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), who still serves at the top Democrat on the panel, in 2017.

After looking at her speeches, ‘the conclusion one draws is that the dogma lives loudly within you. And that’s of concern when you come to big issues that large numbers of people have fought for years in this country,’ Feinstein said, in comments that became a rallying cry for Catholic conservatives who compared it as a religious test.

Trump's potential Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is expected to be confirmed on Saturday

Trump's potential Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is expected to be confirmed on Saturday

Trump’s potential Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is expected to be confirmed on Saturday

Judge Barrett is a devout Catholic who teaches at Notre Dame law school professor.  

She is a member of a South Bend chapter of charismatic Christian community People of Praise that critics have compared to a cult.

The presumptive appointment has sparked criticism among civil rights groups. Alphonso David, president of the Human Rights Campaign – and LGBT advocacy group – said that if Barrett is confirmed she would ‘dismantle all that Ruth Bader Ginsburg fought for’. 

‘An appointment of this magnitude must be made by the president inaugurated in January. The Human Rights Campaign fervently opposes Coney Barret’s nomination and this sham process,’ he said. 

But other groups have supported the presumptive nomination, with Mat Staver, founder of Liberty Counsel – a Christian ministry – calling Barrett the ‘right choice’. 

‘She applies the intent and text of the Constitution to the statutes she reviews. A judge should be a neutral interpreter of the Constitution who knows what it means to interpret and apply the law rather than an activist legislator who tries to create the law,’ he said.  

At Notre Dame, where Barrett began teaching at 30, she often invoked God in articles and speeches. In a 2006 address, she encouraged graduating law students to see their careers as a means to ‘building the kingdom of God.’

She was considered a finalist in 2018 for the high court before Trump nominated Brett Kavanaugh for the seat that opened when Justice Anthony Kennedy retired. 

As it turns out, Trump and Barrett didn’t see eye-to-eye during their first meeting – because she was wearing sunglasses. 

The 48-year-old 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has become the leading contender to be Trump’s nominee to succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, whose body will lie in state at the Capitol Friday – a first for any woman in the nation’s history.

But Barrett, a conservative who Trump installed on the Appeals court, lost out to now Justice Brett Kavanaugh when she met with Trump one-on-one in 2018.

Their meeting did not go ‘particularly well,’ sources close to the process told NPR. The judge had conjunctivitis, which prompted her to wear dark glasses during her interview with the president. She was ‘not at hear best,’ reported Nina Totenberg, who wrote about her close friendship with Ginsburg after the 87-year-old’s passing. 

When Trump went with Kavanaugh instead, he told Barrett-backers he was ‘saving’ her for the Ginsburg seat, they recounted. 

Even some conservatives worried her sparse judicial record made it too hard to predict how she might rule, concerned she could end up like other seemingly conservatives who wound up more moderate.

Three years on, her record now includes around 100 opinions and dissents, in which she often illustrated Scali’s influence by delving deep into historical minutiae to glean the meaning of original texts.

A 2019 dissent in a gun-rights case argued a person convicted of a nonviolent felony shouldn´t be automatically barred from owning a gun. 

All but a few pages of her 37-page dissent were devoted to the history of gun rules for convicted criminals in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Barrett has twice joined dissenting opinions asking for abortion-related decisions to be thrown out and reheard by the full appeals court. 

Last year, after a three-judge panel blocked an Indiana law that would make it harder for a minor to have an abortion without her parents being notified, Barrett voted to have the case reheard by the full court.

She wrote a unanimous three-judge panel decision in 2019 making it easier for men alleged to have committed sexual assaults on campus to challenge the proceedings against them. 

And she was in dissent in June when her two colleagues on a 7th Circuit panel put on hold, just in Chicago, the Trump administration policy that could jeopardize permanent resident status for immigrants who use food stamps, Medicaid and housing vouchers. 

Barrett and her husband Jesse are members of People of Praise, a small religious group where members have to agree to a covenant to each other. The group has been criticized by some for its strict practices

Barrett and her husband Jesse are members of People of Praise, a small religious group where members have to agree to a covenant to each other. The group has been criticized by some for its strict practices

Barrett and her husband Jesse are members of People of Praise, a small religious group where members have to agree to a covenant to each other. The group has been criticized by some for its strict practices

Amy Coney Barrett, United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit judge, speaks during the University of Notre Dame's Law School commencement ceremony. She has taught at the university since she was 30 years old

Amy Coney Barrett, United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit judge, speaks during the University of Notre Dame's Law School commencement ceremony. She has taught at the university since she was 30 years old

Amy Coney Barrett, United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit judge, speaks during the University of Notre Dame’s Law School commencement ceremony. She has taught at the university since she was 30 years old

Amy Coney Barrett teaching a class at Notre Dame Law School in South Bend, Indiana, in 2013

Amy Coney Barrett teaching a class at Notre Dame Law School in South Bend, Indiana, in 2013

Amy Coney Barrett teaching a class at Notre Dame Law School in South Bend, Indiana, in 2013

Barrett is pictured second from right with her parents and her siblings

Barrett is pictured second from right with her parents and her siblings

Barrett is pictured second from right with her parents and her siblings

Barrett would assume the court seat with already substantial wealth, and her financial disclosures show close ties to a number of conservative groups. Barrett and her husband have investments worth between $845,000 and $2.8 million, according to her 2019 financial disclosure report. 

Judges report the value of their investments in ranges. Their money is invested mostly in mutual funds, some of which are for retirement and their children´s education.

When she was nominated to the appeals court in 2017, Barrett reported assets of just over $2 million, including her home in Indiana worth nearly $425,000, and a mortgage on the property with a balance of $175,000.

In the two previous years, Barrett received $4,200 in two equal payments from Alliance Defending Freedom, a conservative Christian law firm, her financial report shows. 

In 2018 and 2019, she participated in 10 events sponsored by the Federalist Society, which paid for her transportation, meals and lodging in New York, New Orleans, Washington and other cities. Several events took place at leading law schools.

Barrett was raised in New Orleans and was the eldest child of a lawyer for Shell Oil Co. She earned her undergraduate degree in English literature in 1994 at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee.

She also served as a law clerk for Laurence Silberman for a year at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Between clerkships and entering academia, she worked from 1999 to 2001 at a law firm in Washington, Miller, Cassidy, Larroca & Lewin.

Like Trump’s two other appointees, Neil Gorsuch in 2017 and Brett Kavanaugh in 2018, Barrett is young enough that she could serve for decades. 

Barrett would be the youngest Supreme Court nominee since conservative Clarence Thomas was 43 in 1991. 

Trump has said he wants his nominee confirmed before the election so she would be able participate in any election-related cases that reach the justices, potentially casting a key vote in his favor. 

A U.S. presidential election’s outcome only once has been determined by the Supreme Court, in 2000 when it clinched Republican George W. Bush’s victory over Democrat Al Gore.

Trump has repeatedly without evidence said voting by mail, a regular feature of American elections, will lead to voter fraud. He also has refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of power should he lose the election.

This marks the first time since 1956 that a U.S. president has moved to fill a Supreme Court vacancy so close to an election. 

In that year, President Dwight Eisenhower three weeks before winning re-election placed William Brennan on the court using a procedure called a ‘recess appointment’ that bypassed the Senate, a tactic no longer available for installing justices. 

An emboldened Supreme Court conservative majority could shift the United States to the right on hot-button issues by, among other things, curbing abortion rights, expanding religious rights, striking down gun control laws, and endorsing new restrictions on voting rights.

Another top pick, Judge Barbara Lagoa, remains as a finalist on Trump’s list, although Trump planned no meeting with her this week. 

He confirmed they didn’t meet when he landed at Joint Base Andrews Friday night before a planned campaign fundraiser at his Washington Trump hotel. 

Trump spent the night at his Doral golf club, where he held a ‘Latinos for Trump’ event Friday morning. 

Lagoa is Cuban American, and was confirmed to the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on a bipartisan vote after Trump nominated her. Trump loyalist Ron DeSantis put her on the Florida Supreme Court in 2019. Lagoa, 52, represented relatives of Elian Gonzalez during the emotional standoff over his immigration status in 1999.  

According to the Times, Trump ignored advice on making Lagoa his choice. 

The daughter of Cuban exiles would appeal to the Latino voters the president needs and she was previously confirmed with a bi partisan vote.  

Newly sworn-in Gov. Ron DeSantis stands behind Barbara Lagoa as she speaks after he named her to the Florida Supreme Court on January 09, 2019 in Miami, Florida. She was among the finalists for Trump's Supreme Court pick

Newly sworn-in Gov. Ron DeSantis stands behind Barbara Lagoa as she speaks after he named her to the Florida Supreme Court on January 09, 2019 in Miami, Florida. She was among the finalists for Trump's Supreme Court pick

Newly sworn-in Gov. Ron DeSantis stands behind Barbara Lagoa as she speaks after he named her to the Florida Supreme Court on January 09, 2019 in Miami, Florida. She was among the finalists for Trump’s Supreme Court pick

Who is Amy Coney Barrett? 

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33383750 8776221 image a 72 1601148770622

On Saturday afternoon, Trump named Amy Coney Barrett, 48, of the Chicago-based 7th Circuit and Barbara Lagoa, 52, of the Atlanta-based 11th Circuit as possible nominees.

Emerging as the favorite is Barrett, 48, a mother of seven children, including two adopted from Haiti and one with special needs.

 Her involvement in a cult-like Catholic group where members are assigned a ‘handmaiden’ has caused concern in Barret’s nomination to other courts and is set to come under fierce review again if she is Trump’s pick.

The group was the one which helped inspire ‘The Handmaids Tale’, book’s author Margaret Atwood has said. 

Barrett emerges now as a front runner after she was already shortlisted for the nomination in 2018 which eventually went to Brett Kavanaugh.

Trump called the federal appellate court judge ‘very highly respected’ when questioned about her Saturday. 

Born in New Orleans in 1972, she was the first and only woman to occupy an Indiana seat on the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals. 

Married to Jesse M. Barrett, a partner at SouthBank Legal in South Bend and former Assistant United States Attorney for the Northern District of Indiana, the couple have five biological and two adopted children. 

Their youngest biological child has Down Syndrome.

Friends say she is a devoted mother – and say with just an hour to go until she was voted into the 7th District Court of Appeals by the U.S. Senate in 2017, Barrett was outside trick-or-treating with her kids. 

Barrett’s strong Christian ideology makes her a favorite of the right but her involvement in a religious group sometimes branded as a ‘cult’ is set to be harshly criticized.    

In 2017, her affiliation to the small, tightly knit Christian group called People of Praise caused concern while she was a nominee for a seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. 

The New York Times reported that the practices of the group would surprise even other Catholics with members of the group swearing a lifelong oath of loyalty, called a covenant, to one another. 

They are also assigned and held accountable to a personal adviser, known until recently as a ‘head’ for men and a ‘handmaid’ for women and believe in prophecy, speaking in tongues and divine healings. 

Members are also encouraged to confess personal sins, financial information and other sensitive disclosures to these advisors. 

Advisors are allowed to report these admissions to group leadership if necessary, according to an account of one former member. 

The organization itself says that the term ‘handmaid’ was a reference to Jesus’s mother Mary’s description of herself as a ‘handmaid of the Lord.’

They said they recently stopped using the term due to cultural shifts and now use the name ‘women leaders.’ 

The group deems that husbands are the heads of their wives and should take authority over the family while ‘the heads and handmaids give direction on important decisions, including whom to date or marry, where to live, whether to take a job or buy a home, and how to raise children,’ the Times reported. 

Unmarried members are placed living with married couples members often look to buy or rent homes near other members. 

Founded in 1971, People of Praise was part of the era’s ‘great emergence of lay ministries and lay movements in the Catholic Church,’ founder Bishop Peter Smith told the Catholic News Agency. 

Beginning with just 29 members, it now has an estimated 2,000. 

According to CNA, some former members of the People of Praise allege that leaders exerted undue influence over family decision-making, or pressured the children of members to commit to the group. 

At least 10 members of Barrett’s family, not including their children, also belong to the group. 

Barrett’s father, Mike Coney, serves on the People of Praise’s powerful 11-member board of governors, described as the group’s ‘highest authority.’ 

Her mother Linda served as a handmaiden.  

The group’s ultra-conservative religious tenets helped spur author Margaret Atwood to publish The Handmaid’s Tale, a story about a religious takeover of the U.S. government, according to a 1986 interview with the writer.

The book has since been made into a hit TV series. 

According to legal experts, loyalty oaths such at the one Barrett would have taken to People of Praise could raise legitimate questions about a judicial nominee’s independence and impartiality. 

‘These groups can become so absorbing that it’s difficult for a person to retain individual judgment,’ said Sarah Barringer Gordon, a professor of constitutional law and history at the University of Pennsylvania. 

‘I don’t think it’s discriminatory or hostile to religion to want to learn more’ about her relationship with the group.

‘We don’t try to control people,’ said Craig S. Lent. ‘And there’s never any guarantee that the leader is always right. You have to discern and act in the Lord. 

‘If and when members hold political offices, or judicial offices, or administrative offices, we would certainly not tell them how to discharge their responsibilities.’

During her professional career, Barrett spent two decades as a law professor at the University of Notre Dame, from which she holds her bachelor’s and law degrees.

She was named ‘Distinguished Professor of the Year’ three separate years, a title decided by students. 

A former clerk for late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, she was nominated by Trump to serve on the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in 2017 and confirmed in a 55-43 vote by the Senate later that year.

At the time, three Democratic senators supported her nomination: Joe Donnelly (Ind.), who subsequently lost his 2018 reelection bid, Tim Kaine (Va.) and Joe Manchin (W.Va.), according to the Hill.

She was backed by every GOP senator at the time, but she did not disclose her relationship with People of Praise which led to later criticism of her appointment. 

Barret is well-regarded by the religious right because of this devout faith.

Yet these beliefs are certain to cause problems with her conformation and stand in opposition to the beliefs of Ginsburg, who she would be replacing.

Axios reported in 2019 that Trump told aides he was ‘saving’ Barrett to replace Ginsburg.

Her deep Catholic faith was cited by Democrats as a large disadvantage during her 2017 confirmation hearing for a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit.

‘If you’re asking whether I take my faith seriously and I’m a faithful Catholic, I am,’ Barrett responded during that hearing, ‘although I would stress that my personal church affiliation or my religious belief would not bear in the discharge of my duties as a judge.’

Republicans now believe that she performed well in her defense during this hearing, leaving her potentially capable of doing the same if facing the Senate Judiciary Committee.

She is a former member of the Notre Dame’s ‘Faculty for Life’ and in 2015 signed a letter to the Catholic Church affirming the ‘teachings of the Church as truth.’

Among those teachings were the ‘value of human life from conception to natural death’ and marriage-family values ‘founded on the indissoluble commitment of a man and a woman’.

She has previously written that Supreme Court precedents are not sacrosanct. Liberals have taken these comments as a threat to the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion nationwide.

Barrett wrote that she agrees ‘with those who say that a justice’s duty is to the Constitution and that it is thus more legitimate for her to enforce her best understanding of the Constitution rather than a precedent she thinks clearly in conflict with it’.

Among the other statements that have cause concern for liberal are her declaration that ObamaCare’s birth control mandate is ‘grave violation of religious freedom.’

LGBTQ organizations also voiced their concern about her when she was first named on the shortlist.  

She has also sided with Trump on immigration. 

In a case from June 2020, IndyStar reports that she was the sole voice on a three-judge panel that supported allowing federal enforcement of Trump’s public charge immigration law in Illinois, 

The law would have prevented immigrants from getting legal residency in the United States if they rely on public benefits like food stamps or housing vouchers.  

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How Dean Jones’ son reacted when he found out the cricket great had died

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how dean jones son reacted when he found out the cricket great had died

The mother of Dean Jones’ young son knew that the cricket great ‘loved him’, and has revealed her own ‘heartbreak’ over his shock death.  

Koby Dean Hamilton, 11, is Jones’ son to Kerri-Anne Hamilton – the cricket star’s well documented former mistress. 

Ms Hamilton met Jones when she was working at a golf day in the late 1990s and the pair began an affair.

The married father-of-two would regularly travel from Melbourne to Sydney to see her and the couple enjoyed overseas holidays together.

But in early 2009, Ms Hamilton fell pregnant and by mid-2010 the affair had become public.

Kerri-Anne Hamilton, the former lover of cricket legend Dean Jones, said she is 'heartbroken' over his shock death

Kerri-Anne Hamilton, the former lover of cricket legend Dean Jones, said she is 'heartbroken' over his shock death

Kerri-Anne Hamilton, the former lover of cricket legend Dean Jones, said she is ‘heartbroken’ over his shock death

Jones, 59, died of a 'massive' heart attack at the Trident Hotel in Mumbai on Thursday

Jones, 59, died of a 'massive' heart attack at the Trident Hotel in Mumbai on Thursday

Jones, 59, died of a ‘massive’ heart attack at the Trident Hotel in Mumbai on Thursday

Jones, 59, died of a ‘massive’ heart attack at the Trident Hotel in Mumbai on Thursday, leaving the cricket world in shock and mourning the loss of one of the game’s legends.

Ms Hamilton told Sydney Morning Herald she decided to speak out about her former lover’s death for her son Koby.

‘It’s an awful time for his wife and his other kids. I’m not trying to step out of line. I want to speak to you for Koby,’ she said.

‘I don’t want Koby to go to school and for kids to say, ”we didn’t see you”. How do we know you were his son. He deserves acknowledgement.’

In the wake of Jones’ passing, Koby told Ms Hamilton: ‘It’s OK, Mum. I know my dad loved me.’ 

Ms Hamilton said the father and son spoke as recently as two days before Jones’ death. 

Koby Dean Hamilton, 11, is Jones' son to Kerri-Anne Hamilton - the cricket star's well documented former mistress

Koby Dean Hamilton, 11, is Jones' son to Kerri-Anne Hamilton - the cricket star's well documented former mistress

Koby Dean Hamilton, 11, is Jones’ son to Kerri-Anne Hamilton – the cricket star’s well documented former mistress 

Alongside Koby, Jones leaves behind his daughter's Augusta (right) and Phoebe (second from left) - who he had with his wife Jane (left)

Alongside Koby, Jones leaves behind his daughter's Augusta (right) and Phoebe (second from left) - who he had with his wife Jane (left)

Alongside Koby, Jones leaves behind his daughter’s Augusta (right) and Phoebe (second from left) – who he had with his wife Jane (left)

The former batsman took his son on a FaceTime tour of the studio he was working at.

Ms Hamilton said she was ‘heartbroken’ over Jones’ death.

Despite only meeting Koby after he was two years old, Ms Hamilton said Jones always checked to make sure the pair were okay.

He would video call his son daily and the duo would discuss all things sport. 

Ms Hamilton added Jones will always be her son’s hero. 

Ms Hamilton initially shared her tale on A Current Affair in 2010 and Jones confirmed the child was his.

‘Following an on-and-off relationship with a woman, a child was conceived and subsequently delivered,’ he said in a statement at the time.  

In early 2009 Ms Hamilton fell pregnant with Jones' child and by mid-2010 the story was out, with her sharing her tale to A Current Affair leading the former batsman to admit it was his

In early 2009 Ms Hamilton fell pregnant with Jones' child and by mid-2010 the story was out, with her sharing her tale to A Current Affair leading the former batsman to admit it was his

In early 2009 Ms Hamilton fell pregnant with Jones’ child and by mid-2010 the story was out, with her sharing her tale to A Current Affair leading the former batsman to admit it was his

Jones is seen batting during the 1987 World Cup match against India on October 9, 1987

Jones is seen batting during the 1987 World Cup match against India on October 9, 1987

Jones is seen batting during the 1987 World Cup match against India on October 9, 1987

After a preview for Ms Hamilton’s interview with A Current Affair in 2010 referenced a romance with a mystery ‘retired cricketer’, Jones came out to set the record straight.

‘I can confirm that I am the retired cricketer referred to in the A Current Affair preview last night (Friday),’ he said in a statement.

‘Following an on-and-off relationship with a women (sic), a child was conceived and subsequently delivered. I can also confirm I have supported the mother and child more generously than was agreed.

‘At no stage have I not met my obligations.

‘My immediate aim is to seek the forgiveness and understanding of family.’ 

News of Jones’ death at the Trident Hotel in Mumbai, India, late on Thursday night Australian time, has left the cricket world in shock and mourning the loss of one of the game’s legends.

Ms Hamilton (centre) was a model at the time she met Jones, before becoming an air hostess

Ms Hamilton (centre) was a model at the time she met Jones, before becoming an air hostess

Ms Hamilton (centre) was a model at the time she met Jones, before becoming an air hostess

Jones had been staying in the Mumbai hotel with Brian Lara (second from right), Graeme Swann, Scott Styris (right) and Brett Lee (second from left)

Jones had been staying in the Mumbai hotel with Brian Lara (second from right), Graeme Swann, Scott Styris (right) and Brett Lee (second from left)

Jones had been staying in the Mumbai hotel with Brian Lara (second from right), Graeme Swann, Scott Styris (right) and Brett Lee (second from left) 

Jones is pictured with wife Jane (left) and their two daughters, Augusta (right) and Phoebe (second from the left)

Jones is pictured with wife Jane (left) and their two daughters, Augusta (right) and Phoebe (second from the left)

Jones is pictured with wife Jane (left) and their two daughters, Augusta (right) and Phoebe (second from the left) 

The former flashy batsman and 1980s icon was in India commentating on the IPL T20 tournament alongside a host of other retired superstars of the game.

Former Australian bowler Brett Lee was in the hotel lobby with Jones at the time of his heart attack and desperately tried to save him with CPR and a defibrillator. 

Jones was rushed to hospital but couldn’t be saved.

The pair were in the city as part of Star India’s commentary team for the Indian Premier League, which is being played in the UAE because of coronavirus.  

Jones had been staying at the hotel with Styris, Lee, West Indies legend Brian Lara and former England spinner Graeme Swann. 

Alongside Koby, Jones leaves behind his daughter’s Augusta and Phoebe – who he had with his wife Jane.

Jones’ daughter Phoebe said her family is ‘broken’ in an Instagram post mourning the loss of her father. 

Jones' daughter Phoebe said her family is 'broken' in an Instagram post mourning the loss of her father

Jones' daughter Phoebe said her family is 'broken' in an Instagram post mourning the loss of her father

Jones’ daughter Phoebe said her family is ‘broken’ in an Instagram post mourning the loss of her father

The tribute post was accompanied by a happy snap from her childhood (pictured)

The tribute post was accompanied by a happy snap from her childhood (pictured)

The tribute post was accompanied by a happy snap from her childhood (pictured)

The tribute post was accompanied by a happy snap from her childhood. 

She is wearing Jones’ cricket cap and sitting on his shoulders grinning, as he looks up at her in awe.

‘Our family is eternally grateful to Brett Lee for doing everything he could,’ she said.

Phoebe thanked cricket fans across the world who put their bats out in honour of ‘Deano’.

‘We are overwhelmed with your outpouring of kind words, support and tributes,’ she said. 

‘His legacy will live on in every life he touched. 

‘I just keep staring at my phone waiting for him to call and tell me this is just a bad dream.’ 

Jones' daughter Augusta opened up about her heartbreak with a post on Instagram on Friday

Jones' daughter Augusta opened up about her heartbreak with a post on Instagram on Friday

Jones’ daughter Augusta opened up about her heartbreak with a post on Instagram on Friday

The world has been left rocked by the death of cricket legend Dean Jones. His daughter Augusta shared a heartfelt post asking: 'How will I do this without you?'

The world has been left rocked by the death of cricket legend Dean Jones. His daughter Augusta shared a heartfelt post asking: 'How will I do this without you?'

The world has been left rocked by the death of cricket legend Dean Jones. His daughter Augusta shared a heartfelt post asking: ‘How will I do this without you?’

His other daughter, Augusta shared a series of pictures with her dad as a tribute.  

‘I cannot believe I am writing this. My heart is broken, My Dad. My Hero. The sweetest and most caring person you could ever meet,’ she wrote.

‘If only you could see now how many lives you touched. If only you could see now how loved you were.

‘You held my hand through the toughest times this year, how will I do this without you?

‘The heavens have opened their gates for another angel. Wait for me dad. Everything I do is for you. I love you Dad.’  

Mourners have offered their condolences to the Jones family (pictured), following the shock death of the cricketing legend

Mourners have offered their condolences to the Jones family (pictured), following the shock death of the cricketing legend

Mourners have offered their condolences to the Jones family (pictured), following the shock death of the cricketing legend 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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BLM protesters confront gun-toting storeowner in Louisville as they press him to voice his support

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blm protesters confront gun toting storeowner in louisville as they press him to voice his support

A group of Black Lives Matter protesters were filmed in a tense confrontation with a Louisville storeowner after they pressed him to voice his support for the movement during a third night of Breonna Taylor demonstrations in the city.  

Footage of the incident, shared on Twitter by a reporter for conservative news site Daily Caller, shows a small crowd of BLM activists grilling business owner Fadi Faouri, as he stands outside his store holding a rifle. 

During the encounter, the group gangs up on Faouri for several minutes as they challenge his views on the BLM movement and the police shooting of Breonna Taylor after he refuses to say he supports the cause.  

The exchange kicks off after a man asks Faouri ‘do black lives matter?’ to which he replies: ‘If you’re a good person I will care about you, if you’re a bad person….’ before shrugging.

The man then asks if he thinks ‘Breonna Taylor matters’. Faouri hesitates for a few seconds before responding: ‘Does it matter? I don’t know.’

The conversations starts to get tense after a woman comes into frame questioning his response and more members of the crowd urge Faouri to explain what he means.  

‘Are you trying to intimidate me? I’m not playing that game,’ Faouri says, as he explains that he is trying to protect his business. 

An argument then ensues as the group starts to close in on the store owner and continue to demand he say whether or not he believes in their cause.  

Faouri turns his attention to the initial male protester, telling him he will not be forced to say anything he doesn’t believe in. ‘Nobody can intimidate me,’ he says. 

The two parties continue to argue for several seconds but Fauori refuses to engage in their debate and the protesters eventually disperse, with the exception of one woman claiming to be a documentary filmmaker. 

The woman approaches Faouri and criticizes him for his stance, or lackthereof, as she lectures him over the injustice surrounding Breonna Taylor’s death.  

‘That’s not my f**king business!’ Faouri replies.

‘It should be your business because all lives matter right?’ the woman says, as she starts to debate Faouri on racial disparities.’You can say that, but it’s the color black that is the issue,’ she adds.  

‘You have an issue with that, I don’t have an issue,’ Faouri says in response. ‘I don’t care, white or black bulls***t, I see you as a human being, that’s all that I care about.’   

The debate finally comes to an end after a fellow protester urges the woman to leave the area. 

Faouri had been reportedly defending his store on Friday night after a building he was leasing was ‘firebombed’ during another night of unrest in Louisville.  

LOS ANGELES: Footage was captured showing an LAPD deputy using his riot shield to slam a Black Lives Matter protester into the ground on Friday night

LOS ANGELES: Footage was captured showing an LAPD deputy using his riot shield to slam a Black Lives Matter protester into the ground on Friday night

LOS ANGELES: Footage was captured showing an LAPD deputy using his riot shield to slam a Black Lives Matter protester into the ground on Friday night

LOS ANGELES: Around 100 people were seen marching in the Hollywood area of Los Angeles on Friday evening

LOS ANGELES: Around 100 people were seen marching in the Hollywood area of Los Angeles on Friday evening

LOS ANGELES: Around 100 people were seen marching in the Hollywood area of Los Angeles on Friday evening

Protests continue to rock the city and other areas of across the country after a grand jury refused to charge Louisville police officers with Breonna Taylor’s murder.    

Violent clashes have broken out between police officers and demonstrators over the last week, as some activists have taken to the streets to target businesses and cause chaos. 

On Friday, footage emerged of a police officer with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s office using his riot shield to slam a BLM protester who was already lying on the ground. The footage showed  the deputy forcefully using their riot shield to subdue a protester. 

The incident took place in West Hollywood area of the city which saw more than 100 protesters gathered on Friday evening as they marched along Santa Monica Boulevard.     

Meanwhile, across the other side of the country, hundreds of Black Lives Matter staged a ‘sit-in’ on the Brooklyn Bridge in New York City

Hundreds of angry demonstrators marched through from the Barclays Center in Brooklyn to the Brooklyn Bridge where they sat and refused to move for more than hour. 

And in Oakland, California, police said more than 250 protesters became ‘immediately violent’ and threw bottles and cans at officers in the downtown area.

NEW YORK: Hundreds of angry demonstrators marched through from the Barclays Center in Brooklyn to the Brooklyn Bridge where they sat and refused to move for more than hour

NEW YORK: Hundreds of angry demonstrators marched through from the Barclays Center in Brooklyn to the Brooklyn Bridge where they sat and refused to move for more than hour

NEW YORK: Hundreds of angry demonstrators marched through from the Barclays Center in Brooklyn to the Brooklyn Bridge where they sat and refused to move for more than hour

NEW YORK: A woman holds a portrait of Breonna Taylor during the march for Breonna Taylor

NEW YORK: A woman holds a portrait of Breonna Taylor during the march for Breonna Taylor

NEW YORK: A woman holds a portrait of Breonna Taylor during the march for Breonna Taylor

NEW YORK: Hundreds of Black Lives Matter staged a 'sit-in' on the Brooklyn Bridge on Friday night

NEW YORK: Hundreds of Black Lives Matter staged a 'sit-in' on the Brooklyn Bridge on Friday night

NEW YORK: Hundreds of Black Lives Matter staged a ‘sit-in’ on the Brooklyn Bridge on Friday night 

NEW YORK: Protesters exit the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor in New York City

NEW YORK: Protesters exit the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor in New York City

NEW YORK: Protesters exit the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor in New York City

NEW YORK: People participate during the march for Breonna Taylor in New York City on the Brooklyn Bridge

NEW YORK: People participate during the march for Breonna Taylor in New York City on the Brooklyn Bridge

NEW YORK: People participate during the march for Breonna Taylor in New York City on the Brooklyn Bridge

Cops deployed smoke to counter the demonstrators, and a downtown Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station was closed. 

Friday’s rally was held in solidarity with protests taking place in Louisville, where large demonstrations are planned for the weekend. 

Several other demonstrations took place around the rest of the country including Boston and San Diego to protest a grand jury’s decision not to charge the Louisville, Kentucky, police officers in the death of Breonna Taylor

OAKLAND: Cops deployed smoke to counter the demonstrators, and a downtown Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station was closed

OAKLAND: Cops deployed smoke to counter the demonstrators, and a downtown Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station was closed

OAKLAND: Cops deployed smoke to counter the demonstrators, and a downtown Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station was closed

OAKLAND: Police said more than 250 protesters became 'immediately violent' and threw bottles and cans

OAKLAND: Police said more than 250 protesters became 'immediately violent' and threw bottles and cans

OAKLAND: Police said more than 250 protesters became ‘immediately violent’ and threw bottles and cans

NEW YORK: People are pictured protesting on the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor on Friday night

NEW YORK: People are pictured protesting on the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor on Friday night

NEW YORK: People are pictured protesting on the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor on Friday night

NEW YORK: A sign is seen on the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor along the Brooklyn Bridge

NEW YORK: A sign is seen on the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor along the Brooklyn Bridge

NEW YORK: A sign is seen on the Brooklyn Bridge during the march for Breonna Taylor along the Brooklyn Bridge

NEW YORK: Police wait at one end of the bridge as protesters attempt to leave the massive structure after the demonstration

NEW YORK: Police wait at one end of the bridge as protesters attempt to leave the massive structure after the demonstration

NEW YORK: Police wait at one end of the bridge as protesters attempt to leave the massive structure after the demonstration

NEW YORK: The march started off at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn and slowly moved towards the famous bridge

NEW YORK: The march started off at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn and slowly moved towards the famous bridge

NEW YORK: The march started off at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn and slowly moved towards the famous bridge

‘This is extremely traumatizing. I have been out here since June, almost every day on the streets, marching for my Black life to show people that I matter, that it could be me, it could be him, it could be him, it could be any Black face that you see in this crowd,’ protester Sophie Michel said to CBS2. 

‘I think we need to send a message that it’s unacceptable that no one was charged with Breonna Taylor’s death,’ said John Donahue to PIX11. 

Demonstrators have gathered across the country to express their anger after it was announced on Wednesday that the officers who shot the black woman in her Louisville, Kentucky apartment during a drug raid last March wouldn’t be charged with her death.

Taylor, an emergency medical worker, was shot multiple times by white officers in Louisville who entered her home during a narcotics investigation in March.  

‘I’m angry because this nation is learning that our Black women are dying at the hands of police officers,’ said Bianca Austin, ‘and this is not okay.’ 

‘I was reassured Wednesday of why I have no faith in the legal system, in the police, in the law that are not made to protect us Black and brown people,’ Austin read. 

BOSTON: A woman leaves a flower at an altar to Breonna Taylor at a 'Stand Against Racist Police Murders' demonstration

BOSTON: A woman leaves a flower at an altar to Breonna Taylor at a 'Stand Against Racist Police Murders' demonstration

BOSTON: A woman leaves a flower at an altar to Breonna Taylor at a ‘Stand Against Racist Police Murders’ demonstration

BOSTON: Demonstrators march past Boston Police headquarters during a 'Stand Against Racist Police Murders' demo

BOSTON: Demonstrators march past Boston Police headquarters during a 'Stand Against Racist Police Murders' demo

BOSTON: Demonstrators march past Boston Police headquarters during a ‘Stand Against Racist Police Murders’ demo

BOSTON: A protester gestures towards Boston Police headquarters as demonstrators march past on Friday night

BOSTON: A protester gestures towards Boston Police headquarters as demonstrators march past on Friday night

BOSTON: A protester gestures towards Boston Police headquarters as demonstrators march past on Friday night

BOSTON: The group then moved onto City Hall Plaza for a sit-in. The gathering appeared to be among the larger groups the city of Boston has seen in some time

BOSTON: The group then moved onto City Hall Plaza for a sit-in. The gathering appeared to be among the larger groups the city of Boston has seen in some time

BOSTON: The group then moved onto City Hall Plaza for a sit-in. The gathering appeared to be among the larger groups the city of Boston has seen in some time

BOSTON: Protesters could be seen gathered downtown with even large protests planned for Saturday

BOSTON: Protesters could be seen gathered downtown with even large protests planned for Saturday

BOSTON: Protesters could be seen gathered downtown with even large protests planned for Saturday

In Kentucky on Friday, a crowd surrounded Breonna Taylor’s family. Her aunt, Bianca Austin, wore Taylor’s emergency medical technician jacket while reading a message from Taylor’s mother, who was too distraught to speak. 

In Boston, demonstrators gathered in Nubian Square to at part of the nationwide protests. 

The protest remained peaceful as they marched to the Boston Police Headquarters later in the night. The group then moved onto City Hall Plaza for a sit-in.  

The gathering appeared to be among the larger groups the city of Boston has seen in some time. 

Some carried signs with messages such as ‘Justice 4 Breonna,’ ‘Black Lives Matter,’ and ‘Let Black women dream.’ 

The demonstration was largely peaceful with no arrests had been reported as of 10:45pm.

‘I feel like that message being sent that cops can do whatever they want and not be held accountable so this is just an attempt to reenergize the city and reenergize anyone that sees this to get back out on the streets to fight and increase the antiracist movement because this is not ok,’ organizer Ernest Jacques Jr. said to WHDH.

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row Friday

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row Friday

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row Friday

LOUISVILLE: Protesters marched to First Unitarian Church and stayed there past the cities 9pm curfew. Pictured is protest organizer in front of the First Unitarian Church

LOUISVILLE: Protesters marched to First Unitarian Church and stayed there past the cities 9pm curfew. Pictured is protest organizer in front of the First Unitarian Church

LOUISVILLE: Protesters marched to First Unitarian Church and stayed there past the cities 9pm curfew. Pictured is protest organizer in front of the First Unitarian Church

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row Friday. Pictured are protesters marching down Market Street in the city

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row Friday. Pictured are protesters marching down Market Street in the city

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row Friday. Pictured are protesters marching down Market Street in the city

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row. Pictured is a woman holding a BLM flag in front of the First Unitarian Church

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row. Pictured is a woman holding a BLM flag in front of the First Unitarian Church

LOUISVILLE: Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued for the third day in a row. Pictured is a woman holding a BLM flag in front of the First Unitarian Church

The mayor of Boston Marty Walsh urged calm and asked demonstrators to respect the city ahead of the protest.   

‘I’m asking people planning to demonstrate in Boston tonight and over the weekend to respect the city and respect each other,’ he said. ‘I’m asking you to keep it peaceful, I’m asking you to keep it powerful. People are deeply upset, but we cannot turn to violence to express our pain.’

‘We want to maintain law and order and at the same time protect everyone’s ability to peacefully assembler and make their voices heard. So in case, there is a need for us we’re a little bit closer than we were perhaps in May,’ Lt. Colonel Bryan Pillai said. 

‘Start charging police officers for murder. You in your house sleeping, you ain’t safe. Usually the rebuttal is don’t fight the police, cooperate. How the hell do you do that sleeping?’ community activist Monica Cannon-Grant said to NBC Boston.  

LOUISVILLE: A woman holds a BLM flag in front of the Breonna Taylor memorial at Jackson Square Park

LOUISVILLE: A woman holds a BLM flag in front of the Breonna Taylor memorial at Jackson Square Park

LOUISVILLE: A woman holds a BLM flag in front of the Breonna Taylor memorial at Jackson Square Park

LOUISVILLE: A woman wearing a protective mask holds a portrait of Breonna Taylor during the march

LOUISVILLE: A woman wearing a protective mask holds a portrait of Breonna Taylor during the march

LOUISVILLE: A woman wearing a protective mask holds a portrait of Breonna Taylor during the march 

ALBUQUERQUE: A car drove into a group of protesters near UNM Friday night. No one appeared to be hurt. Police have not said whether the driver was arrested. Protesters claim the driver was disparaging them before driving through the crowd

ALBUQUERQUE: A car drove into a group of protesters near UNM Friday night. No one appeared to be hurt. Police have not said whether the driver was arrested. Protesters claim the driver was disparaging them before driving through the crowd

ALBUQUERQUE: A car drove into a group of protesters near UNM Friday night. No one appeared to be hurt. Police have not said whether the driver was arrested. Protesters claim the driver was disparaging them before driving through the crowd

On the west coast, protesters returned to the streets of Hollywood on Friday evening just a day after at least one person was injured as two separate vehicles rammed through crowds demanding racial justice.

At 6pm on Friday evening, a group of about 75 demonstrators walked down Santa Monica Boulevard.

The group swelled to more than 100 people as the march made its way toward The Grove shopping mall.

In San Diego, demonstrators took to the streets of downtown to protest the grand jury’s decision not to indict police officers on criminal charges directly related to Breonna Taylor’s death.

A group of about 40 to 50 demonstrators were organizing in front of the superior court in downtown at around 7:30pm San Diego Police said.

The group then started marching on downtown streets chanting, ‘No Justice, No Peace,’ and chanting Breonna Taylor’s name.

In Albuquerqu, a car drove into a group of protesters near the University of New Mexico campus. 

Nobody appeared to be hurt and police have not said whether the driver was arrested.

Protesters claim the driver was disparaging them before driving through the crowd.

‘It’s sad that we have to come out here and fear for our safety by the citizens of our state. We’re supposed to be better than that. We’re supposed to be loving one another, and people are out here basically trying to kill people,’ an organizer of the protest said to KOB.

SAN DIEGO: Demonstrators took to the streets of downtown to protest the grand jury's decision not to indict police officers on criminal charges directly related to Breonna Taylor's death

SAN DIEGO: Demonstrators took to the streets of downtown to protest the grand jury's decision not to indict police officers on criminal charges directly related to Breonna Taylor's death

SAN DIEGO: Demonstrators took to the streets of downtown to protest the grand jury’s decision not to indict police officers on criminal charges directly related to Breonna Taylor’s death

SAN DIEGO: A group of about 40 to 50 demonstrators were organizing in front of the superior court in downtown at around 7:30pm San Diego Police said

SAN DIEGO: A group of about 40 to 50 demonstrators were organizing in front of the superior court in downtown at around 7:30pm San Diego Police said

SAN DIEGO: A group of about 40 to 50 demonstrators were organizing in front of the superior court in downtown at around 7:30pm San Diego Police said

SAN DIEGO: The group then started marching on downtown streets chanting, 'No Justice, No Peace,' and chanting Breonna Taylor's name

SAN DIEGO: The group then started marching on downtown streets chanting, 'No Justice, No Peace,' and chanting Breonna Taylor's name

SAN DIEGO: The group then started marching on downtown streets chanting, ‘No Justice, No Peace,’ and chanting Breonna Taylor’s name

In Louisville, the city’s police chief is urging armed militia to stay away from this weekend’s protest.

‘Many of them say they are coming to help us. Let me be clear, that is not help we need. That is not help we want,’ said Rob Schroeder, interim police chief of the LMPD. 

‘America at large will not stand by and allow a Black woman to be murdered and have no consequences,’ protester Kimberly Bernard said.

When asked if he would release the grand jury’s report and transcript, the Kentucky Attorney General said he would revisit the question after the FBI finishes its independent investigation.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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