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Mystery as pilot from Australia crashes light aircraft in Papua New Guinea and then vanishes

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mystery as pilot from australia crashes light aircraft in papua new guinea and then vanishes

The Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea suspects a mysterious Australian plane that crash-landed 30km outside the nation’s capital was being used for drug trafficking. 

The Cessna 420C twin-engine aircraft activated its emergency locator transmitter on Sunday evening over the village of Papa Lealea, northwest of Port Moresby, when it’s believed to have gone down.

Flight tracking websites revealed the plane left the Mareeba airport in Far North Queensland but was not cleared to enter the South Pacific country’s airspace.

PNG authorities suspect a mysterious Australian Cessna 420C twin-engine aircraft (pictured) that crashed near the nation's capital was being used to traffic drugs

PNG authorities suspect a mysterious Australian Cessna 420C twin-engine aircraft (pictured) that crashed near the nation's capital was being used to traffic drugs

PNG authorities suspect a mysterious Australian Cessna 420C twin-engine aircraft (pictured) that crashed near the nation’s capital was being used to traffic drugs

The plane activated its emergency locator transmitter on Sunday evening over the village of Papa Lealea, northwest of Port Moresby, when it's believed to have gone down

The plane activated its emergency locator transmitter on Sunday evening over the village of Papa Lealea, northwest of Port Moresby, when it's believed to have gone down

The plane activated its emergency locator transmitter on Sunday evening over the village of Papa Lealea, northwest of Port Moresby, when it’s believed to have gone down

When a team from the Accident Investigation Commission arrived on the scene Monday, they noticed a make-shift runway had been created in bush land where the smoldering aircraft was found.

However, there was no sign of the pilot or plane’s cargo.

The country’s leader James Marape is now demanding Australian law enforcement based in Port Moresby, assist PNG investigators.

‘The flight is suspicious and that is why I am asking the Australian Federal Police to assist local authorities to ascertain who owns the plane, who flew the plane and what the cargo was,’ Marape said.

Although early information is sketchy, PNG police have indicated the strong possibility the mysterious plane was used for drug trafficking.

A furious Mr Marape sent out a stark warning to Australians that may be involved in smuggling drugs to the tropical nation.

The country's leader James Marape (pictured) is now demanding Australian law enforcement based in Port Moresby, assist PNG investigators to solve the mystery

The country's leader James Marape (pictured) is now demanding Australian law enforcement based in Port Moresby, assist PNG investigators to solve the mystery

The country’s leader James Marape (pictured) is now demanding Australian law enforcement based in Port Moresby, assist PNG investigators to solve the mystery

‘We are not a banana republic where anyone can pick up a plane and just come into the country unannounced!’ he said.

‘There is no room for those who think they could peddle drugs in PNG.’

The plane’s registration holder is a PNG company named RAVENPOL NO. 69.

But in another bizarre twist, the sole director and shareholder of the firm, Geoffrey Paul Bull, was murdered in Port Moresby last year, the ABC reported.

The aircraft’s registered operator is Alice Springs-based aviation business AVLEASE.

But the company’s director Ian Scheyer said he has no idea why the plane is listed as belonging to AVLEASE.

‘I can put my hand on my heart and say we’ve never operated it,’ he said.

Mr Scheyer is now seeking an explanation from Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority.

The plane's registration holder is a PNG company named RAVENPOL NO. 69. But in another bizarre twist, the sole director and shareholder of the firm, Geoffrey Paul Bull, was murdered in Port Moresby last year

The plane's registration holder is a PNG company named RAVENPOL NO. 69. But in another bizarre twist, the sole director and shareholder of the firm, Geoffrey Paul Bull, was murdered in Port Moresby last year

The plane’s registration holder is a PNG company named RAVENPOL NO. 69. But in another bizarre twist, the sole director and shareholder of the firm, Geoffrey Paul Bull, was murdered in Port Moresby last year

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Hotel hissy fit as Victorian police minister Lisa Neville picked up the paper

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hotel hissy fit as victorian police minister lisa neville picked up the paper

Victoria’s police minister Lisa Neville chucked a hissy fit upon learning in the media that Australian Defence Force personnel were to be deployed at Melbourne quarantine hotels. 

Ms Neville told the public inquiry into the state’s disastrous hotel quarantine program that she was ‘pretty cranky’ upon opening a Melbourne newspaper and reading that hundreds of troops would be replacing private security guards. 

The minister had learned of the call for troops at midnight upon reading a front page newspaper report. 

Victoria's Minister for Police and Emergency Services was 'pretty cranky' upon reading an article containing information she believes she oyught have known about

Victoria's Minister for Police and Emergency Services was 'pretty cranky' upon reading an article containing information she believes she oyught have known about

Victoria’s Minister for Police and Emergency Services was ‘pretty cranky’ upon reading an article containing information she believes she oyught have known about 

An email exchange in June between police minister Lisa Neville (in grey) and Victoria Police and Emergency Management Commissioner Andrew Crisp

An email exchange in June between police minister Lisa Neville (in grey) and Victoria Police and Emergency Management Commissioner Andrew Crisp

An email exchange in June between police minister Lisa Neville (in grey) and Victoria Police and Emergency Management Commissioner Andrew Crisp

An email exchange in June between police minister Lisa Neville (in grey) and Victoria Police and Emergency Management Commissioner Andrew Crisp

An email exchange in June between police minister Lisa Neville (in grey) and Victoria Police and Emergency Management Commissioner Andrew Crisp

An email exchange in June between police minister Lisa Neville (in grey) and Victoria Police and Emergency Management Commissioner Andrew Crisp

The June 25 article had revealed up to 850 ADF personnel had been requested by Victoria Police and Emergency Management Commissioner Andrew Crisp as COVID-19 spread from the quarantine hotels. 

Quarantine breaches involving private security guards seeded 99 per cent of Victoria’s deadly second wave of COVID infections, which in turn has led to more than 700 deaths of the elderly. 

More than 30 security guards ended up catching coronavirus from quarantined returned travellers while working in the hotels. 

After more than a month of sitting, the inquiry has heard not a single person can identify who made the decision to hire the private security guards. 

Mr Crisp withdrew his request for ADF support the same day and instead Corrections Victoria officers were brought into guard returned travellers.

A text message exchange between Ms Neville and Mr Crisp was produced to the inquiry.

‘The use of army in hotels? That was not agreed to at (Crisis Council) yesterday but is that we doing? And what will they be doing?’ Ms Neville texted.

‘Not sure what they do at hotels given no one leaves!! And they have no powers.’

Ms Neville told the inquiry she had been annoyed to learn of the proposal in the paper. 

‘So I think I, partly knowing how when I use two exclamation marks indicates that. I was still relatively annoyed about it,’ she said. 

ADF troops were not used to guard hotels housing returned travellers during the start of Victoria's COVID_19 pandemic

ADF troops were not used to guard hotels housing returned travellers during the start of Victoria's COVID_19 pandemic

ADF troops were not used to guard hotels housing returned travellers during the start of Victoria’s COVID_19 pandemic

Texts between Mr Crisp and another public servant indicate the ADF was on offer from as far back as March 27 and his minister (Lisa Neville) knew it

Texts between Mr Crisp and another public servant indicate the ADF was on offer from as far back as March 27 and his minister (Lisa Neville) knew it

Texts between Mr Crisp and another public servant indicate the ADF was on offer from as far back as March 27 and his minister (Lisa Neville) knew it

DHHS secretary Kym Peake sends off an email to the justice department in June.

DHHS secretary Kym Peake sends off an email to the justice department in June.

DHHS secretary Kym Peake sends off an email to the justice department in June. 

Ms Neville explained she was concerned from as far back as March 27 that ADF personnel had no powers to enforce hotel quarantine. 

The inquiry has heard former Victoria Police Commissioner Graham Ashton claimed he was not consulted about security arrangements at the hotels before learning the decision had already been made. 

Ms Neville said she had not been consulted either and was surprised when during a March 27 meeting with Mr Crisp the decision to employ private security appeared to have been set. 

At the time, the government’s jobs department had been in charge of the hotel quarantine scheme, before it was taken over by the health department. 

As the inquiry draws to its conclusion, the question over who made the initial decision to employ private security guards remains unanswered. 

Ms Neville said both herself and the commissioner should have been consulted. 

Notes of her meeting with Mr Crisp indicate the use of ADF troops had been on offer from before the hotel quarantine program began. 

A note scribbled by the police minister in March 27. It refers to private security and ADF

A note scribbled by the police minister in March 27. It refers to private security and ADF

A note scribbled by the police minister in March 27. It refers to private security and ADF 

Former Victoria Police Commissioner Graham Ashton appeared at the inquiry last week. He claims he was not asked for his opinion on private security before the decision was made

Former Victoria Police Commissioner Graham Ashton appeared at the inquiry last week. He claims he was not asked for his opinion on private security before the decision was made

 Former Victoria Police Commissioner Graham Ashton appeared at the inquiry last week. He claims he was not asked for his opinion on private security before the decision was made

Victoria Police and Emergency Management Commissioner Andrew Crisp annoyed the police minister when he failed to tell her what his plans for ADF personnel were

Victoria Police and Emergency Management Commissioner Andrew Crisp annoyed the police minister when he failed to tell her what his plans for ADF personnel were

Victoria Police and Emergency Management Commissioner Andrew Crisp annoyed the police minister when he failed to tell her what his plans for ADF personnel were 

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews, who will appear before the inquiry late Friday afternoon – in a move some believe was made to dodge media scrutiny –  continues to deny ADF help had been on offer. 

Ms Neville said she believed ADF personnel would have only been used to fill gaps in Victoria’s response to the pandemic and would needed to have ‘added value’ to existing efforts. 

She denied having knowledge of a possible ADF role on March 27, despite text messages from Mr Crisp to a colleague stating he was discussing it with her. 

Ms Neville maintained she had been unaware of ADF involvement until she read that article months later. 

The inquiry further heard Ms Neville never bothered to ask any of her colleagues interstate about their use of ADF at hotels because her department was not in control of the pandemic response – the health department was. 

Earlier, jobs minister Martin Pakula claimed he too did not know who made the decision to use private security rather than ADF or police.

Nor could he explain why security company Unified Security, which was not  endorsed by both the government or Trades Hall, received the lion’s share of the hotel security work. 

The minister said it was normal for the government to consult unions ahead of awarding contracts to ensure companies paid decent wages. 

Unified Security had just 89 permanent staff in March, but ended up employing 1759 people, almost all through subcontractors.  

Victorian jobs minister Martin Pakula fronted the hotel quarantine inquiry in Melbourne on Wednesday. Like most before him, he knew very little about the troubled system and where responsibility lies

Victorian jobs minister Martin Pakula fronted the hotel quarantine inquiry in Melbourne on Wednesday. Like most before him, he knew very little about the troubled system and where responsibility lies

Victorian jobs minister Martin Pakula fronted the hotel quarantine inquiry in Melbourne on Wednesday. Like most before him, he knew very little about the troubled system and where responsibility lies

A public servant within Mr Pakula's department pushes for Unified Security to be kept on at quarantine hotels beyond the initial weekend in March when the program was announced

A public servant within Mr Pakula's department pushes for Unified Security to be kept on at quarantine hotels beyond the initial weekend in March when the program was announced

A public servant within Mr Pakula’s department pushes for Unified Security to be kept on at quarantine hotels beyond the initial weekend in March when the program was announced

The Police Association of Victoria and unions all had concerns about their members working within the hotels

The Police Association of Victoria and unions all had concerns about their members working within the hotels

The Police Association of Victoria and unions all had concerns about their members working within the hotels

It was through those subcontractors that Victoria’s deadly second wave was spread. 

‘I think it is explicable in terms of the initial decision but I’m not aware of the context in which the decision was made to carry on,’ Mr Pakula said. 

The minister’s department had been in charge of the hotel quarantine plan in the days before it was announced by the premier on March 27, at which point the health department took over control. 

He claimed he had been unaware of any issues about hotel quarantine until after the inquiry into the debacle was established. 

In hindsight, the minister said he would have preferred Jenny Mikakos’ health department to have been in control from the beginning and made its own arrangements for security.

‘I agree that it would be preferable for the agency which has overall responsibility to have the contractual management responsibility. I think that would have been better,’ he said.

Private security guards were dumped by the State Government at the end of June as it became clear the virus had spread from the hotels they were guarding. 

The inquiry continues.  

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Tax expert reveals how to maximise your return and get the most out of WFH deductions

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tax expert reveals how to maximise your return and get the most out of wfh deductions

Australians who’ve been working from home during the coronavirus crisis are expected to miss out on $1.1billion in unclaimed expenses. 

Experts say taxpayers miss out on what they are owed by the taxman because they’re either uniformed or trying to save time. 

Almost six million workers were been forced to get their job done from home during the height of the pandemic – about half of Australia’s entire workforce.

But as a result, taxpayers are entitled to claim a range of new expenses to partially offset the once-in-a-lifetime upheaval.

If you want to maximise your returns before the October 31 deadline, there are a few things you should know. 

Expert Andrew Chia, from TaxFox, told Daily Mail Australia the most important thing to keep in mind is that saving time will not save you money.

Australians who've been working from home during the coronavirus crisis are expected to miss out on $1.1billion in unclaimed expenses

Australians who've been working from home during the coronavirus crisis are expected to miss out on $1.1billion in unclaimed expenses

Australians who’ve been working from home during the coronavirus crisis are expected to miss out on $1.1billion in unclaimed expenses

The Australian Tax Office has introduced an 80 cents per hour shortcut for anyone who was obliged to perform services at home.  

‘We advise our clients to not use the shortcut,’ Mr Chia said.

Working from home tax claims simplified

Every person working from home in a house or apartment will be entitled to claim a flat rate of 80 cents an hour

It will cover March 1 to June 30, 2020

They will also be allowed to claim 52 cents an hour for heating, lighting, cleaning and depreciation of furniture and computers

Source: Australian Taxation Office 

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‘If you are an office worker performing duties at home the main claimable expenses are your running costs like electricity, gas and other utilities like internet.’ 

Mr Chia strongly suggests you calculate the costs yourself or get a professional to assist because you’re likely to be entitle to far more than 80 cents per working hour.

Anyone working from home can also claim computer, mobile phone and screen expenses, as well as any other equipment used for work.  

‘If you have had to purchase a table, a chair, desk or if you had to add anything to make your home work space conform with Occupational Health and Safety requirements such as lights or lamps, it’s deductible,’ Mr Chia said.

Some of the lesser known items that are also claimable when working from home are plants, anti-glare reading glasses for looking at computer screens, and various home office essentials such as printer ink.

For those who didn’t have the option to work from home, Mr Chia stressed that personal protective equipment is also tax deductible.  

‘Healthcare workers and essential services workers had to continue to support our local communities and the broader economy by performing their services during the pandemic and obviously we appreciate them so much for that,’ he said.

‘And they may have had to purchase items to make themselves safe for work. So any masks and safety gear can be deducted if they are not provided by their employment.’

Essential services workers can claim protective equipment such as face masks and gloves

Essential services workers can claim protective equipment such as face masks and gloves

Essential services workers can claim protective equipment such as face masks and gloves

Those working from home may also be able to claim items like plants and printer ink

Those working from home may also be able to claim items like plants and printer ink

Those working from home may also be able to claim items like plants and printer ink

This also extends to essential workers who are travelling to and from work, not just at work.

With the economic uncertainty around the pandemic, Scott Morrison’s government introduced a number of grants and support payments to cushion the surge in job losses. 

‘People receiving JobKeeper and JobSeeker payments must be aware they also have to report that income as part of their tax return,’ Mr Chia said.

Last year Australian workers missed out on $10billion in unclaimed deductions.

To make sure you don’t miss out, Mr Chia says taxpayers should use technology to their advantage and get an tax app like TaxFox.

‘If you have a systematic approach where you just take photos of receipts throughout the year, you won’t miss out on deductions and it will save you time and effort,’ he said. 

To make sure you don't miss out on any potential deductions, Mr Chia says taxpayers should use technology to their advantage

To make sure you don't miss out on any potential deductions, Mr Chia says taxpayers should use technology to their advantage

To make sure you don’t miss out on any potential deductions, Mr Chia says taxpayers should use technology to their advantage

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Meghan Markle labels November vote the most important of our lifetime

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meghan markle labels november vote the most important of our lifetime

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have spoken out about the upcoming U.S. election, in a stark break with British tradition that prohibits royal involvement in politics, as they continue to define their new public roles after stepping down as senior royals.

‘Every four years we are told the same thing, that this is the most important election of our lifetime. But this one is,’ said Markle, 39, in the video clip broadcast as part of the Time 100, the magazine’s annual list of the world’s 100 most influential people.

Markle continued: ‘When we vote, our values are put into action and our voices are heard. Your voice is a reminder that you matter, because you do and you deserve to be heard.’ 

For his part, Harry said: ‘As we approach this November, it’s vital that we reject hate speech, misinformation and online negativity.’ 

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have spoken out about the upcoming U.S. election, in a stark break with British tradition that prohibits royal involvement in politics

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have spoken out about the upcoming U.S. election, in a stark break with British tradition that prohibits royal involvement in politics

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have spoken out about the upcoming U.S. election, in a stark break with British tradition that prohibits royal involvement in politics

For his part, Harry said: 'As we approach this November, it's vital that we reject hate speech, misinformation and online negativity'

For his part, Harry said: 'As we approach this November, it's vital that we reject hate speech, misinformation and online negativity'

For his part, Harry said: ‘As we approach this November, it’s vital that we reject hate speech, misinformation and online negativity’

Harry urged Americans to be careful about what kind of content they consume online.

‘When the bad outweighs the good, for many, whether we realize it or not, it erodes our ability to have compassion and our ability to put ourself in someone else’s shoes. Because when one person buys into negativity online, the effects are felt exponentially. It’s time to not only reflect, but act,’ he said. 

Harry also referenced the fact that, because he is not a U.S. citizen, he will not be able to vote in November, noting that as a member of the royal family he had never been able to vote in the U.K.

Although British law does not explicitly forbid members of the royal family from voting, the expectation that royals remain apolitical is considered sacrosanct, and in practice they never participate in elections, by voting or otherwise.

But since announcing plans to step down as senior royals in January and moving to North America, Markle and Harry have quietly expanded their involvement in politics as they forge their own path.

Trump

Trump

Biden

Biden

Markle has made her position on the 2020 election clear in a number of appearances in recent weeks, expressing enthusiasm for the Democratic ticket

This week, feminist activist Gloria Steinem revealed that Markle had joined her in cold-calling Americans and urging them to vote.

Steinem told Access Hollywood: ‘She came home to vote. The first thing we did, and why she came to see me, was we sat at the dining room table where I am right now and we cold-called voters.’

‘Said ‘hello I’m Meg’ and ‘hello I’m Gloria’ and ‘are you going to vote?’ That was her initiative.’

Before marrying Prince Harry in 2018, Markle was no stranger to politics, ridiculing then-presidential candidate Donald Trump during a 2016 appearance on The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore.

She said Trump was ‘misogynistic and divisive’ and indicated her support for Hillary Clinton. 

Over the past few weeks, Markle has taken part in multiple interviews and summits – having reportedly grown ‘frustrated’ at her inability to get involved in politics while she was working as a senior royal. 

Last month, she joined Gloria for a ‘backyard chat’ in which she made it incredibly clear who she plans to vote for come November, expressing her excitement at seeing a woman of color on the Democratic ticket – Joe Biden’s running mate, Kamala Harris – and explaining that the nomination was particularly meaningful to her because she is biracial.

Last month, Markle (left) joined Gloria Steinem for a 'backyard chat' in which she made it incredibly clear who she plans to vote for come November

Last month, Markle (left) joined Gloria Steinem for a 'backyard chat' in which she made it incredibly clear who she plans to vote for come November

Last month, Markle (left) joined Gloria Steinem for a ‘backyard chat’ in which she made it incredibly clear who she plans to vote for come November 

Over the past few months, Markle has  moved to become more politically active and taken part in multiple interviews and summits - having reportedly grown 'frustrated' at her inability to get involved in politics while she was working as a senior royal

Over the past few months, Markle has  moved to become more politically active and taken part in multiple interviews and summits - having reportedly grown 'frustrated' at her inability to get involved in politics while she was working as a senior royal

Over the past few months, Markle has  moved to become more politically active and taken part in multiple interviews and summits – having reportedly grown ‘frustrated’ at her inability to get involved in politics while she was working as a senior royal 

‘I’m so excited to see that kind of representation,’ she said. ‘You know, for me, being biracial, growing up, whether it was a doll or a person in office, you need to see someone who looks like you in some capacity. 

‘As many of us believe, you can only be what you can see. And in the absence of that, how can you aspire to something greater than what you see in your own world? I think maybe now we’re starting to break-through in a different way.’

Meanwhile, she has also taken in voter appeals, at which she made a bold plea to women across the US to take part in the 2020 presidential election, speaking out about the need for ‘change’ at an online voter summit, while telling participants: ‘If we aren’t part of the solution, we are part of the problem.’ 

Meghan made her stance on the 2020 presidential race clear when she addressed viewers at the When All Women Vote Couch Party – an online event organized by non-profit organization When We All Vote, which was founded by ‘her friend’ Michelle Obama. 

Appearing as the opening speaker at the summit, Meghan expressed her ‘excitement’ at taking part, before telling those involved with the organization: ‘We need [your work] now more than ever.’

‘I’m really thrilled that you asked me to be a part of this,’ the mother-of-one began, adding: ‘I think this is such an exceptional time [and I am] happy to be here for my friend Michelle Obama’s When We All Vote, and to kick off the When All Women Vote Couch Party.’  

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