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NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian has ‘given up on love’ after ‘dodgy Daryl’ Maguire relationship

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nsw premier gladys berejiklian has given up on love after dodgy daryl maguire relationship

Gladys Berejiklian has ‘given up on love indefinitely’ after revealing that she hoped to one day marry disgraced former MP Daryl Maguire.

The New South Wales Premier was forced to unceremoniously sack the Wagga Wagga representative in 2018 after learning he was making dodgy deals. 

But she continued a ‘close personal relationship with the 61-year-old until as recently as this September, when she was called to give evidence at an Independent Commission Against Corruption inquiry.

Ms Berejiklian told The Daily Telegraph having intimate details of her private life laid bare was a nightmare situation and left her feeling ‘humiliated and embarrassed’.

‘I’m still trying to process it. I feel like it’s someone else living this… It’s like I’m the main protagonist in a movie. It’s like I’m the feature and the film is going to end and my life is going to go back to normal but it will never be normal again,’ she said.

The premier said she would continue to put her professional career above her personal life. 

Gladys Berejiklian has 'given up on love indefinitely' after revealing that she hoped to one day marry disgraced former MP Daryl Maguire

Gladys Berejiklian has 'given up on love indefinitely' after revealing that she hoped to one day marry disgraced former MP Daryl Maguire

Gladys Berejiklian has ‘given up on love indefinitely’ after revealing that she hoped to one day marry disgraced former MP Daryl Maguire

‘I can formally say to people I’ve given up on love,’ she said. ‘I’m just going to say I have always put my job first, rightly or wrongly, and that will now continue indefinitely.’ 

But that wasn’t always the case.

At the height of their relationship, Ms Berejiklian hoped to one day go public with Mr Maguire, and even dreamed of marrying him.

Throughout the ICAC inquiry and several media appearances afterwards, Ms Berejiklian appeared stoic, but confessed she had shed tears in the privacy of her own home over the embarrassment of the entire experience.

She learned during the corruption hearing just how much Mr Maguire had relied on her name during discussions with business associates and her government’s resources in his dodgy side deals. 

‘I’m never going to speak to him again. My life’s changed forever,’ she said.

Ms Berejiklian is a notoriously private woman who had never spoken publicly about her personal affairs or relationship status before details of this romance became public last week.

Throughout the ICAC inquiry and several media appearances afterwards, Ms Berejiklian appeared stoic, but confessed she had shed tears in the privacy of her own home over the embarrassment of the entire experience

Throughout the ICAC inquiry and several media appearances afterwards, Ms Berejiklian appeared stoic, but confessed she had shed tears in the privacy of her own home over the embarrassment of the entire experience

Throughout the ICAC inquiry and several media appearances afterwards, Ms Berejiklian appeared stoic, but confessed she had shed tears in the privacy of her own home over the embarrassment of the entire experience

Not even her own family knew about her five-year affair with Mr Maguire. 

The premier informed her two sisters that she was about to be publicly humiliated during the hearing, but couldn’t go into detail with them for legal reasons.

But she asked them to watch over their parents in case things got ‘messy’.

Ms Berejiklian still has not defined what exactly her relationship was with Mr Maguire, admitting to the publication that it was difficult to label.

‘It wasn’t a traditional type of relationship,’ she said.

The duo had been friends for more than 20 years before becoming intimate around 2015.  

While she never introduced him to her family, she admitted that she did love him and considered marrying him after decades of being ‘married to the job’.  

Testifying on Friday, Mr Maguire said he instructed his electoral staff to delete all his records that may have been incriminating after his appearance at a 2018 ICAC inquiry that forced his resignation as member for Wagga Wagga.

‘When it became evident that I could no longer retain the position of member for Wagga Wagga… yes, I told them to wipe everything,’ Mr Maguire said.

Testifying on Friday, Mr Maguire said he instructed his electoral staff to delete all his records that may have been incriminating after his appearance at a 2018 ICAC inquiry that forced his resignation as member for Wagga Wagga

Testifying on Friday, Mr Maguire said he instructed his electoral staff to delete all his records that may have been incriminating after his appearance at a 2018 ICAC inquiry that forced his resignation as member for Wagga Wagga

Testifying on Friday, Mr Maguire said he instructed his electoral staff to delete all his records that may have been incriminating after his appearance at a 2018 ICAC inquiry that forced his resignation as member for Wagga Wagga

He also admitted a back-up copy of his files on a USB was ‘dropped’ at his farm gate and run over several times, rejecting the suggestion he had destroyed it deliberately.

Mr Maguire also conceded he had told some of his business associates to delete their records too.

Earlier on Friday ICAC apologised to Ms Berejiklian and Mr Maguire, after a transcript of suppressed details of their relationship was accidentally uploaded online.

The transcript of the closed-door hearing, during which Mr Maguire was grilled about sensitive details of their relationship, was available online for more than 30 minutes.

Ms Berejiklian has been forced to defend her integrity after admitting on Monday she had a five-year relationship with Mr Maguire. She insists she had no inkling his dealings may be dodgy.

A transcript of private hearings on Thursday were released on Friday showing Mr Maguire admitted forming a relationship with Ms Berejiklian as early as 2013 and becoming ‘close’ in 2014. Both previously said it began around 2015.

Mr Maguire told the inquiry he did shield the premier from details of his business activities, but had used her as a ‘sounding board’.

‘I thought it would cause her difficulties, so I limited the information that I gave her, yes … obviously, there is a conflict of interest and all that kind of stuff,’ he said.

Ms Berejiklian on Friday batted away more questions about her integrity.

‘Hand on heart, I have done nothing wrong,’ she said.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Australia

New South Wales records another four coronavirus infections linked to a worrying mystery cluster 

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new south wales records another four coronavirus infections linked to a worrying mystery cluster

Four new coronavirus cases have popped up in Sydney’s south-west, sparking fears of a mystery cluster as health officials scramble to find a source.

Another case was found in hotel quarantine, bringing Thursday’s total to five.

Two of the local cases are understood to be pupils of Malek Fahd Islamic School in Hoxton Park, Australia’s biggest Islamic school.

‘The school will be cleaned and will be non-operational for 14 days,’ a NSW Health update reads.

‘Contact tracing and investigations are underway.’

More to follow.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Florida’s pandemic death toll may be undercounted by 8,000

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floridas pandemic death toll may be undercounted by 8000

Florida‘s 2020 death toll is as many as 8,000 fatalities higher than a usual year’s, even beyond the deaths directly caused by COVID-19, according to an analysis of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data. 

The sunshine state saw as many as 23,000 ‘excess deaths’ beyond the expected number between January 1 and October 3, according to the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. 

As of October 3, the state had reported 16,505 COVID-19 deaths. 

But the CDC’s data suggests the deadly toll exacted on the state since the coronavirus pandemic arrived in the US may be much higher. 

Many of these excess deaths are likely not directly due to COVID-19, but rather to the shockwaves of the pandemic, including delayed care for chronic conditions, overdoses and suicides. 

But counting coronavirus cases and deaths has been a subject of ongoing controversy, particularly in Florida, where families have been denied requests to test deceased loved ones for COVID-19, crooked officials have hidden the severity of the outbreak from view and backlogs of autopsy reports have amassed as systems built to address urgent emergencies have been stretched with the pandemic. 

There have been as many as 8,000 excess deaths beyond the 16,571 attributed to COVID-19 in Florida in 2020, according to a Sun-Sentinel analysis of CDC data (pictured: CDC data shows the expected number of deaths, in orange, excess deaths, including those from coronavirus, in blue, and excess deaths not attributed to coronavirus in green)

There have been as many as 8,000 excess deaths beyond the 16,571 attributed to COVID-19 in Florida in 2020, according to a Sun-Sentinel analysis of CDC data (pictured: CDC data shows the expected number of deaths, in orange, excess deaths, including those from coronavirus, in blue, and excess deaths not attributed to coronavirus in green)

There have been as many as 8,000 excess deaths beyond the 16,571 attributed to COVID-19 in Florida in 2020, according to a Sun-Sentinel analysis of CDC data (pictured: CDC data shows the expected number of deaths, in orange, excess deaths, including those from coronavirus, in blue, and excess deaths not attributed to coronavirus in green) 

As of Wednesday, the Florida Department of Health reports 16,571 COVID-19 deaths among residents, and 204 among non-residents. 

According to the state’s dashboard, a total of 790,426 people have been infected in the state. 

Those figures, Dr Stephen Nelson, District Medical Examiner for Florida’s 10th Judicial Circuit, insists, are ‘very accurate and up-to-date,’ he told DailyMail.com. 

Or, at least he’d ‘like to think so.’ 

But he admits that they haven’t always been. 

The Board of Medical Examiners was responsible for counting the state’s COVID-19 deaths from the time Governor Ron DeSantis declared a state of emergency for the pandemic, on March 9, until August 14. 

Counting the dead during COVID-19 became the group’s responsibility as a result of a system put into place following a bizarre conspiracy theory that emerged in the early 1990s. 

After Hurricane Andrew slammed into the state’s Southern tip, a small faction of Floridian’s became convinced that then-governor Lawton Chiles was having bodies of storm victims smuggled to a barge to be sunk in the Atlantic. 

Chiles was under fire for his response to the hurricane because he waited five days to request FEMA assistance. Locals suspected he was trying to get rid of evidence of the real death toll in an effort to downplay the devastation caused by Andrew. 

Florida’s Office of Medical Examiners was the charged with determining the death toll of any disaster after a governor declared state of emergency, in order to wrest some of the narrative control from the state’s leader. 

But disasters declared state emergencies last a matter of days, or perhaps weeks. 

The coronavirus pandemic has remained an emergency for Florida – and most of the US – for over seven months. 

So far, nearly 17,000 people (including residents and non-residents) have died of coronavirus in Florida, according to the state's health department, but its counts have been mired in controversy and political accusations that they are lower than  the pandemic's real death toll

So far, nearly 17,000 people (including residents and non-residents) have died of coronavirus in Florida, according to the state's health department, but its counts have been mired in controversy and political accusations that they are lower than  the pandemic's real death toll

So far, nearly 17,000 people (including residents and non-residents) have died of coronavirus in Florida, according to the state’s health department, but its counts have been mired in controversy and political accusations that they are lower than  the pandemic’s real death toll 

‘COVID really overwhelmed most of the medical examiners offices and they got very, very far behind trying to keep up with all the COVID-19 deaths,’ said Dr Nelson. 

‘So, at one point, [Miami-]Dade County alone was 650 COVID cases behind…the systme was not designed for this.’ 

On August 14, the health department took over the counting. Dr Nelson says the backlog has long been cleared – but other problems have arisen. 

The medical examiners ran behind, but they were thorough, and counted ‘snow birds’ – people who had fled other states to weather the winter and the lockdown in Florida – as deaths in the state. 

The health department ascribed a location to a death based on the residential address of the deceased. So, by their estimation, if you had been living in Florida for two months, and you died of COVID-19 in Florida, but you got mail in New York, you would be counted a New York death – not Florida’s. 

Yet, somehow, the health department was coming up with higher death numbers than were the medical examiners prior to the August 14 changeover. Dr Nelson still doesn’t know why. 

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34975368 8890911 image a 7 1603931283876

34975386 8890911 image a 9 1603931289268

34975386 8890911 image a 9 1603931289268

And then there were even more troubling issues. Back in March, before COVID-19 was declared a state emergency in Florida, Patrick Hidalgo died at age 41. His death certificate, signed by the Miami-Dade county medical examiner said heart disease killed the former Obama staffer. 

His family begged for officials to test him for COVID-19 posthumously, but were denied, the Sun-Sentinel reported. 

Months later, an autopsy performed at Columbia University in New York ruled that Hidalgo likely had COVID-19. His had not counted as a Florida coronavirus fatality. 

Democratic state lawmakers have accused death reporting in the state of lacking rigor, blaming Republicans for downplaying the toll of the pandemic on Florida. 

Dr Nelson insists that the reasons that deaths like Hidalgo’s went uncounted were unlikely politically motivated. 

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34975370 8890911 image a 12 1603931295535

But that doesn’t mean that the count is accurate. 

Medical examiners, he says, are trained to trace the cause of death. If someone had died, had pneumonia and a gunshot wound, they would be unlikely to rule the cause of death to be pneumonia. 

On the other hand, someone who had been generally healthy, but had both heart disease and COVID-19 – or even tell-tale signs of it a severe respiratory infection in the midst of a pandemic – might well be ruled a coronavirus death. 

‘I’m not real confident that a lot of hospital physicians or community physicians know [to do that] – they don’t necessarily make that kind of connection,’ he said. 

He acknowledges, too, that the number of COVID-19 deaths are likely undercounted. 

‘Excess deaths that are respiratory-related – over time, we may see more pneumonias and things like that no than in years past, and this is why a lot of people don’t really rely on death certificates,’ Dr Nelson said.

‘So if you died of pneumonia, was it related to COVID? If a doctor is not attuned to that, it could go out as anything [on a death certificate], and that’s not really helpful.’ 

But when it comes to the CDC’s general count of excess deaths in Florida, he doubts that these are entirely COVID-19 deaths, although the toll has likely been driven up by the conditions of the pandemic. 

‘Just to say that there’s excess deaths kind of bothers me because clearly we’ve seen an uptick in overdose deaths during the pandemic, and suicides, and those are fairly common types of attributes when things go badly,’ Dr Nelson said. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Creator of the Bunnings warehouse jingle is a man named Trevor Hilton from Busselton, WA

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creator of the bunnings warehouse jingle is a man named trevor hilton from busselton wa

The man who created the Bunnings Warehouse jingle 25 years ago has revealed it was ‘just another day at the office’ when he wrote the now iconic tune. 

Freelance composer and audio engineer Trevor Hilton from Busselton, two hours south of Perth in Western Australia made the Bunnings jingle in 1995. 

Mr Hilton appeared on ABC’s Gruen on Wednesday to explain how he wrote the jingle, which he still received royalties from to this day – before giving the first televised performance of the song. 

He has even kept the original keyboard he used to compose the tune, an old 90s Casio model. 

Mr Hilton was completely unknown as the Bunnings jingle creator until his identity was revealed on Wednesday. 

‘I knew this day would come,’ Mr Hilton reportedly said when he was first contacted by the show.

Freelance composer and audio engineer Trevor Hilton (pictured) from Busselton, two hours south of Perth, in WA created the Bunnings Warehouse jingle in 1995

Freelance composer and audio engineer Trevor Hilton (pictured) from Busselton, two hours south of Perth, in WA created the Bunnings Warehouse jingle in 1995

Freelance composer and audio engineer Trevor Hilton (pictured) from Busselton, two hours south of Perth, in WA created the Bunnings Warehouse jingle in 1995

‘Hello, my name is Trevor Hilton and yes, I wrote that jingle on a nice sunny afternoon in January 1995,’ Mr Hilton said on the show. 

‘For me it was just another day at the office, jingling away on this very keyboard with this very floppy disk with this very organ sample. This one.

‘And so I rolled tape with my basic track and basically improvised over it like this.’ 

Mr Hilton then began playing the Bunnings Warehouse jingle using the original organ sample while a backing track with drums and woodwinds played in the background. 

After playing the tune, Mr Hilton said: ‘And now it’s all this!’ 

The musician was referring to TikTok videos shown earlier on the ABC show, in which a rapper freestyled over the Bunnings Warehouse jingle and another where a guitarist covered the tune as a rock riff. 

Mr Hilton appeared on ABC's Gruen (pictured) on Wednesday and explained exactly how he composed the jingle, which he still received royalties from to this day

Mr Hilton appeared on ABC's Gruen (pictured) on Wednesday and explained exactly how he composed the jingle, which he still received royalties from to this day

Mr Hilton appeared on ABC’s Gruen (pictured) on Wednesday and explained exactly how he composed the jingle, which he still received royalties from to this day

The jingle has been used in most Bunnings Warehouse advertisements since 1995 and is as iconic for the franchise as its popular sausage sizzles. 

Mr Hilton said he still whistles the tune when he visits his local Bunnings Warehouse in Busselton. 

Two years ago, a person claiming to Mr Hilton’s child posted on Reddit about how they found out their father wrote the song. 

‘Today I found out my dad made the Bunnings Warehouse theme song! Thought that was pretty cool,’ they said. 

‘Here’s some of the old stuff he made for them, I guess it’s some proof?,’ they added, posting a link to the original jingle. 

Mr Hilton was anonymous as the Bunnings jingle creator until Gruen revealed his identity on Wednesday. 'I knew this day would come,' Mr Hilton reportedly said when he was first contacted by Gruen

Mr Hilton was anonymous as the Bunnings jingle creator until Gruen revealed his identity on Wednesday. 'I knew this day would come,' Mr Hilton reportedly said when he was first contacted by Gruen

Mr Hilton was anonymous as the Bunnings jingle creator until Gruen revealed his identity on Wednesday. ‘I knew this day would come,’ Mr Hilton reportedly said when he was first contacted by Gruen

An old Bunnings advertisement from the 90s. The jingle has been used in most Bunnings Warehouse advertisements since 1995 and is as iconic for the franchise as its popular sausage sizzles

An old Bunnings advertisement from the 90s. The jingle has been used in most Bunnings Warehouse advertisements since 1995 and is as iconic for the franchise as its popular sausage sizzles

An old Bunnings advertisement from the 90s. The jingle has been used in most Bunnings Warehouse advertisements since 1995 and is as iconic for the franchise as its popular sausage sizzles

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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