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Number of Melbourne COVID-19 restrictions lifted with businesses and pubs told to wait little longer

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number of melbourne covid 19 restrictions lifted with businesses and pubs told to wait little longer

Victorian premier Daniel Andrews has announced a number of social restrictions will be eased from midnight with businesses told they will have to wait another couple of weeks before reopening. 

The state reported two new cases on Sunday and a rolling daily case count of 7.5 in metropolitan Melbourne for the fortnight up to Saturday. Regional Victoria’s two-week average is 0.5.

The statistics mean Victoria’s coronavirus death count remains at 816 and the national toll is 904.

Premier Daniel Andrews announced significant changes to Melbourne’s restrictions on movement and gatherings will come into effect from 11.59pm on Sunday.

The 5 kilometre travel restriction will be extended to 25 kilometres. 

Melburnians will also be able to exercise or leave their homes for longer than the current two-hour time limit while the cap on outdoor gatherings will be increased to 10 people. 

Victorian premier Daniel Andrews has announced a number of social restrictions will be eased in Melbourne, though businesses will have to wait a bit longer before reopening (pictured, residents jogging in Melbourne)

Victorian premier Daniel Andrews has announced a number of social restrictions will be eased in Melbourne, though businesses will have to wait a bit longer before reopening (pictured, residents jogging in Melbourne)

Victorian premier Daniel Andrews has announced a number of social restrictions will be eased in Melbourne, though businesses will have to wait a bit longer before reopening (pictured, residents jogging in Melbourne)

Melburnians will also be able to exercise or leave their homes for longer than the current two-hour time limit (pictured, Melbourne residents fishing)

Melburnians will also be able to exercise or leave their homes for longer than the current two-hour time limit (pictured, Melbourne residents fishing)

Melburnians will also be able to exercise or leave their homes for longer than the current two-hour time limit (pictured, Melbourne residents fishing)

Sports enthusiasts will also be allowed to play tennis or golf without having to go through a clubroom.

Skate parks and DIY car washes will reopen. 

Hairdressers will also reopen and outdoor pools will be able to host 30 swimmers.   

Real estate auctions will also be able to go ahead outdoors with 10 bidders. 

Outdoor maintenance and repair workers, mobile pet groomers and photographers will also be allowed to return to work.

Retail businesses and pubs will have to wait until November 1 for further rollbacks. 

Retail and hospitality venues will reopen with 20 people allowed inside and a maximum of 50 people seated outside. 

Changes coming to Melbourne and regional Victoria

State premier Daniel Andrews announced massive changes would be coming to Melbourne from 11.59pm on Sunday.  

1) The 5 kilometre travel restriction will be extended to 25 kilometres. 

2) Melburnians will be able to exercise or leave their homes for longer than the current two-hour time limit.

3) Outdoor gatherings will be increased to 10 people from two different households. 

4) Tennis courts, golf courses and skate parks will be reopened.

5) DIY car washes will reopen 

6) Hairdressers will reopen 

7) Outdoor pools will be able to host 30 swimmers

8) Real estate auctions will also be able to go ahead outdoors with 10 bidders. 

9) Outdoor home maintenance, repairs and renovations permitted with maximum of five workers.

Mr Andrews also announced a number of restrictions will be lifted in regional Victoria from 11.59pm on Sunday 

1)  Hospitality venues will increase their capacity to 70 people outside and 40 people inside.

2) Outdoor religious gatherings will also increase to 20 people.

3) Regional and toy libraries will also be able to accommodate 20 people indoors. 

 

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The four reasons to also leave home will also be scrapped. 

‘Victorians have done an amazing job over recent weeks and months,’ Mr Andrews said. 

‘We in Melbourne and Victoria are well placed to have a COVID safe summer. Yes these lockdowns have come with significant pain and damage, but this strategy is working. 

In regional Victoria, hospitality venues will increase their capacity to 70 people outside and 40 people inside from 11.59pm on Sunday.

Outdoor religious gatherings will also increase to 20 people.  The cap will be extended to 50 people from midnight on November 1.

Mr Andrews revealed the border closure between Melbourne and regional Victoria would remain closed. 

‘Victorians in every community, in every circumstance have stayed the course,’ Mr Andrews said.

‘We have just a little longer to go to beat that second wave and then find that normal and find that process of rebuilding.’ 

Federal health minister Greg Hunt earlier urged the Victorian government to ease restrictions in line with NSW.

‘The epidemiological conditions for a COVID-safe reopening of hospitality, movement (and) family reunions among others, have now been firmly met,’ Mr Hunt posted on Twitter on Saturday.

‘Victoria should now be able to move to the next step in line (with) NSW.’

However Mr Andrews said Mr Hunt was not an epidemiologist and accused him of ‘playing games’, before adding that he would not be rushed in reopening Victoria.

‘We are not going to risk everything that Victorians have sacrificed. And that’s why this strategy is not about racing to open up (and) running to COVID-normal – it’s about safe and steady steps,’ the premier said.

‘We are right on the edge now of defeating this second wave. It’s not occurred in many countries, if any, across the world.’ 

Mr Andrews has confirmed Sunday’s announcements will be ‘much more in the social space than in the economic space’, dashing the hopes of those in retail and hospitality industries.

‘We have to be conservative and careful, we have to take safe and steady steps.’

Mr Andrews said on Saturday he would not bend under pressure from some politicians who were calling for bigger rollbacks.

Mr Andrews revealed the border closure between Melbourne and regional Victoria would remain closed

Mr Andrews revealed the border closure between Melbourne and regional Victoria would remain closed

Mr Andrews revealed the border closure between Melbourne and regional Victoria would remain closed 

Retail businesses and pubs have been told restrictions will be eased from November 1

Retail businesses and pubs have been told restrictions will be eased from November 1

Retail businesses and pubs have been told restrictions will be eased from November 1 

‘Whatever I stand up here … and announce, there will be members of that federal government, some who are from Victoria but I don’t think they’re for Victoria, who will be out there saying ‘It is not enough, you should have done more’,’ he said.

Federal Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said he had only Victorians’ interests at heart.

‘I, like so many other Victorians — be they in the health, legal, business or broader community — will not be silenced nor stand by as our fellow Victorians lose their liberties and have their economic livelihoods damaged,’ he said.

‘We are from Victoria and we are for Victoria.’ 

Health authorities continue to investigate Victoria’s 15 cases for the fortnight up to Thursday which have no known source.

Health authorities continue to investigate Victoria's 15 cases for the fortnight up to Thursday which have no known source (pictured, a COVID-19 pop-up clinic at Shepparton)

Health authorities continue to investigate Victoria's 15 cases for the fortnight up to Thursday which have no known source (pictured, a COVID-19 pop-up clinic at Shepparton)

Health authorities continue to investigate Victoria’s 15 cases for the fortnight up to Thursday which have no known source (pictured, a COVID-19 pop-up clinic at Shepparton)

Melbourne residents enjoy a day out at the park ahead of announcements to ease restrictions in the city

Melbourne residents enjoy a day out at the park ahead of announcements to ease restrictions in the city

Melbourne residents enjoy a day out at the park ahead of announcements to ease restrictions in the city

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Tragic story behind this photo of Killian the koala hanging off a power pole

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tragic story behind this photo of killian the koala hanging off a power pole

A helpless koala that was almost electrocuted while hanging off a power pole next to a busy highway has been rescued seven times by volunteers.

Killian the male koala was rescued from a power pole next to the busy Anzac Avenue in Kippa-Ring on the Redcliffe Peninsula, north of Brisbane, at 8.30pm on Tuesday.

Moreton Bay Koala Rescue shared pictures of Killian dangerously sitting above electric wiring right at the top of the pole on Wednesday. 

Killian lives in an area where there have been 86 koala deaths from car strikes this year. There have been 53 deaths and 11 injuries from June to present alone. 

Killian the male koala (pictured) risked electric shock when he sat on wiring at the top of a power pole next to the busy Anzac Avenue in Kippa-Ring on the Redcliffe Peninsula, north of Brisbane, at 8:30pm on Tuesday

Killian the male koala (pictured) risked electric shock when he sat on wiring at the top of a power pole next to the busy Anzac Avenue in Kippa-Ring on the Redcliffe Peninsula, north of Brisbane, at 8:30pm on Tuesday

Killian the male koala (pictured) risked electric shock when he sat on wiring at the top of a power pole next to the busy Anzac Avenue in Kippa-Ring on the Redcliffe Peninsula, north of Brisbane, at 8:30pm on Tuesday

‘We don’t know what to say anymore. What we do know is enough is enough,’ Moreton Bay Koala Rescue captioned the post. 

‘Last night we were called out to a koala who had crossed Anzac Avenue and climbed a light post. As soon as our rescuers pulled up to the location they knew exactly who was up there. It was Killian, for the seventh time it was KILLIAN.

‘Being up a power pole we are unable to use our equipment so we made a call to Energex who were happy to send out the next available cherry picker to assist us. 

‘Luckily, while we waited for them to arrive, Killian made his way down enough for his rescuers to successfully get him to safety! Killian is once again at the wildlife hospital for assessment.’ 

Moreton Bay Koala Rescue called a cherry picker from Energex to help save the koala at the top of the pole (pictured) but Killian eventually climbed down to be rescued

Moreton Bay Koala Rescue called a cherry picker from Energex to help save the koala at the top of the pole (pictured) but Killian eventually climbed down to be rescued

'Killian made his way down enough for his rescuers to successfully get him to safety! Killian is once again at the wildlife hospital for assessment,' Moreton Bay Koala Rescue said

'Killian made his way down enough for his rescuers to successfully get him to safety! Killian is once again at the wildlife hospital for assessment,' Moreton Bay Koala Rescue said

Moreton Bay Koala Rescue called a cherry picker from Energex to help save the koala at the top of the pole (pictured) but Killian eventually climbed down to be rescued  

An untagged female koala (pictured) was found dead after being hit by a car on Anzac Avenue in Mango Hill, Moreton Bay earlier this month. Senior rescuer Mike Fowler said it's 'only a matter of time' before Killian is fatally hit by a car

An untagged female koala (pictured) was found dead after being hit by a car on Anzac Avenue in Mango Hill, Moreton Bay earlier this month. Senior rescuer Mike Fowler said it's 'only a matter of time' before Killian is fatally hit by a car

An untagged female koala (pictured) was found dead after being hit by a car on Anzac Avenue in Mango Hill, Moreton Bay earlier this month. Senior rescuer Mike Fowler said it’s ‘only a matter of time’ before Killian is fatally hit by a car

Speaking to Daily Mail Australia, senior rescuer Mike Fowler said Killian is okay but it’s ‘only a matter of time’ before he is fatally hit by a car. 

‘He will probably be released again sometime today within one kilometre or thereabouts from where he was rescued,’ Mr Fowler said. 

‘This is just the stupidity of the situation. They have no habitat and he’s looking for a home but there’s nowhere to go. I hope I don’t get the call when he is surely hit by a car and killed. It’s only a matter of time.’ 

Queensland laws prevent rescue services from releasing koalas more than one kilometre from where they were found. 

‘We had a koala named Winston, he was rescued nine times. His was final rescue was when he was hit by a car on Elizabeth street last year. He died in hospital,’ he said. 

‘The frustration is we know we will get a call when Killian’s killed by a car but our hands are tied. We can’t take him anywhere else since we’re not allowed to, there’s no adequate fencing around their habitat and quite frankly, there isn’t much of it left.’

Another male koala named Winston (pictured) was rescued nine times before he died. On the ninth rescue, he was hit by a car and later died in hospital

Another male koala named Winston (pictured) was rescued nine times before he died. On the ninth rescue, he was hit by a car and later died in hospital

Another male koala named Winston (pictured) was rescued nine times before he died. On the ninth rescue, he was hit by a car and later died in hospital 

Killian the male koala is pictured after he was hit by a car on Anzac Avenue on the Redcliffe Peninsula, just north of Brisbane, in July. He has so far been rescued seven times and was most recently rescued on Tuesday

Killian the male koala is pictured after he was hit by a car on Anzac Avenue on the Redcliffe Peninsula, just north of Brisbane, in July. He has so far been rescued seven times and was most recently rescued on Tuesday

Killian the male koala is pictured after he was hit by a car on Anzac Avenue on the Redcliffe Peninsula, just north of Brisbane, in July. He has so far been rescued seven times and was most recently rescued on Tuesday 

Mr Fowler said: ‘We would love for Killian to go into a species management program, but it’s a lengthy process that has to be approved by the DES

‘Out of the 400 or 500 koalas that I have personally rescued, only two have gone into species management, so it’s not easy. There has to be a facility that can take him, he has to have behave a certain way and multiple other factors. 

‘These aren’t the koalas you see at Lone Pine and Australia Zoo that you get to cuddle and take a pictures with. These are the guys that go in as a display and essentially live out the rest of their lives in a zoo.’

Another option for Killian is koala translocation, which involves relocating the animal to similar bushland further away than the one kilometre limit – but this is only allowed as part of scientific research programs. 

A DES spokeswoman said ‘there are a range of options to be considered when releasing a rehabilitated koala back into the wild’. 

‘Ideally, the koala is released at or where they were rescued. However, if this cannot be facilitated, the koala can be released into prescribed natural habitat within one kilometre of the rescue site,’ she said. 

‘Or if this is still not possible, the koala can be released into prescribed natural habitat within five kilometres of the rescue site.

‘If there are not suitable release options within five kilometres, then an application can be made to the department to release the koala outside of prescribed habitat.’   

Killian caused train delays when he walked across the tracks at Kippa-Ring Station, also on the peninsula, earlier this month. He then climbed up a power pole (pictured) on the side of the tracks before Pine Rivers Koala Care came to collect him

Killian caused train delays when he walked across the tracks at Kippa-Ring Station, also on the peninsula, earlier this month. He then climbed up a power pole (pictured) on the side of the tracks before Pine Rivers Koala Care came to collect him

Killian caused train delays when he walked across the tracks at Kippa-Ring Station, also on the peninsula, earlier this month. He then climbed up a power pole (pictured) on the side of the tracks before Pine Rivers Koala Care came to collect him

The DES released the South East Queensland Koala Conservation Strategy in August ‘to halt the decline of koala populations in the wild in SEQ, and secure their long-term survival’. 

‘The Strategy outlines 46 actions across six action areas designed to work together to put SEQ koala populations on the path to recovery, including habitat protection and restoration, threat management, enhanced monitoring and reporting,’ the spokeswoman said. 

‘New koala conservation protections, which commenced on February 7, 2020, increased both the area of koala habitat protected across SEQ and increased the level of protection offered within the regulatory framework.

‘Koala habitat areas now cover 716,266 hectares of land across SEQ, including areas within the Redcliffe Peninsula.’ 

Killian was previously rescued from a tree near Anzac Avenue in Kippa-Ring on October 10, before being released the next day. 

Two days prior, the mischievous marsupial caused train delays when he walked across the tracks at Kippa-Ring Station. 

He then climbed up a power pole on the side of the tracks before Pine Rivers Koala Care came to collect him. 

Five days earlier, he was again rescued from a large tree on the side of Anzac Avenue before being released back the next day. 

Killian was previously hit by a car on Anzac Avenue on July 19. After being struck, he climbed up a large tree on the median strip before being rescued. 

He recovered for several months before he was released on September 17.   

While Anzac Avenue is a troublesome spot, more koalas have been killed on Moreton Bay’s Eatons Crossing Road, which has claimed 18 koala lives this year. 

Killian was rescued by Moreton Bay Koala Rescue for the first time on April 3 after he climbed up a power pole in a suburban street in Kippa-Ring. 

He was also saved a second time by the nearby Pine Rivers Koala Care, which bring his total rescues to seven. 

An obvious solution to Killian's constant rescues would be to relocate him to another area - but Moreton Bay Koala Rescue does not have the authority to do so

An obvious solution to Killian's constant rescues would be to relocate him to another area - but Moreton Bay Koala Rescue does not have the authority to do so

An obvious solution to Killian’s constant rescues would be to relocate him to another area – but Moreton Bay Koala Rescue does not have the authority to do so

Several housing developments have been completed in Moreton Bay in the last year, which have eroded koala habitats. 

Mr Fowler said politicians of all levels need to pay more attention to koala habitats before they are completely wiped out. 

‘There are hundreds of hectares of pristine koala habitat that is still being developed,’ he said. 

‘It’s a trickle down effect. The Federal government will tell the state government, we have X amount of people arriving in Queensland, so you have to develop more. Then the state government will tell local councils that they need to make more space.

‘They’re a national icon that are treated so poorly by politicians at all levels. I’ve never had a politician go on a rescue with me, but they all want to go on a release because it’s a nice photo opportunity. ‘     

KILLIAN THE KOALA’S RESCUES AND RELEASES 

April 3: Killian was rescued by Moreton Bay Koala Rescue for the first time after climbing up a power pole on a suburban street in Kippa-Ring 

April 4: Killian was released back into bushland on the peninsula  

July 19: Killian was hit by a car on Anzac Avenue before climbing a large tree in the median strip. Moreton Bay Koala Rescue took him into their care. 

September 17: Killian was released back into bushland on the peninsula 

October 3: Killian was rescued from a large tree on the road side of Anzac Avenue by Moreton Bay Koala Rescue

October 4: Killian was released back into bushland on the peninsula  

October 8: Killian crossed the tracks at Kippa-Ring Station, causing train delays. He then climbed up a pole before Pine Rivers Koala Care came to collect him

October 9: Killian was released back onto the peninsula 

October 10: Killian was rescued from a tree near the busy Anzac Avenue on the Redcliffe Peninsula by Moreton Bay Koala Rescue

October 11: Killian was released back onto the peninsula by Moreton Bay Koala Rescue 

October 27: Killian was rescued from a power pole next to Anzac Avenue in Kippa-Ring by Moreton Bay Koala Rescue 

*Killian was also saved a second time by the nearby Pine Rivers Koala Care, which bring his total rescues to seven 

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Vegemite is now available in a SQUEEZY bottle – but not everyone is sold on the idea

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vegemite is now available in a squeezy bottle but not everyone is sold on the idea

Vegemite is now available in a squeeze top bottle in supermarkets across Australia, but not everyone is sold on the new packaging.

The brand announced the launch on Instagram early Wednesday morning, describing the product as ‘Vegemite, just squeezier’ than the original jar.

‘Whether you’re preparing your trusty Vegemite sandwich or adding Vegemite to your favourite dish, you’ll love the convenience of Vegemite Squeezy!’ a product overview on the brand’s website reads.

While some were thrilled by the novelty, critics were quick to slam the product with many accusing Vegemite manufacturer Bega Cheese of tampering with the signature recipe to make it thin enough to squeeze.

Vegemite is now available in a squeeze top bottle in supermarkets across Australia, but not everyone is sold on the new packaging.

Vegemite is now available in a squeeze top bottle in supermarkets across Australia, but not everyone is sold on the new packaging.

Vegemite is now available in a squeeze top bottle in supermarkets across Australia, but not everyone is sold on the new packaging.

Poll

Are you a fan of the squeezy bottle?

  • Yes 1 votes
  • No, it’s fine in the jar 2 votes

Now share your opinion

But it’s not the first time the iconic spread has been sold in alternative packaging.

A toothpaste-like ‘travel tube’ was released in November 1996 to coincide with the start of the summer holiday period, at a time when international travel was becoming more accessible to ordinary Australians.

The flexible, robust container meant it was easier – and lighter – than ever to carry Vegemite overseas. 

People expressed strong opinions on social media nonetheless. 

‘Awesome, no more butter or toast crumbs in the jar after the kids attack it, I love this so much,’ one woman said.

This toothpaste-like 'travel tube' was released in November 1996, a time when international travel was becoming more accessible to ordinary Australians

This toothpaste-like 'travel tube' was released in November 1996, a time when international travel was becoming more accessible to ordinary Australians

This toothpaste-like ‘travel tube’ was released in November 1996, a time when international travel was becoming more accessible to ordinary Australians

A man added: ‘About time. Should re-name it ‘Vegemate’ now.’

Another called it ‘a great idea for picnics, camping and caravanning’. 

But many felt differently.

‘I can’t see how this can be good. They would have to change the recipe to make it squeezable. It will be more plastic, which we are trying to use less of,’ one woman said.

‘There would be too much left in the container so lots of waste. It’s vegemite, it’s perfect! Leave it alone.’

Vegemite has been Australia's favourite spread since it launched in Melbourne in 1922

Vegemite has been Australia's favourite spread since it launched in Melbourne in 1922

Vegemite has been Australia’s favourite spread since it launched in Melbourne in 1922

Others argued the distinctive formula must have been altered to make it suitable for a squeeze top bottle, as the original texture would be too dense to be worked out.

‘More water in the product, it’s just another downsizing for increased profits,’ one man said.

Some said they’d give the thumbs up to any product with Vegemite branding.

‘Vegemite is Vegemite, so good anyway you package it,’ said one woman. 

New ‘Squeezy Vegemite’ is now available online and in-store at Coles and Woolworths nationwide.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Shocked neighbours claim couple didn’t deserve $40 million harbourside estate

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shocked neighbours claim couple didnt deserve 40 million harbourside estate

Locals have been left shocked after a $40 million waterfront estate was handed to a neighbouring couple in an extraordinary court decision that overruled a woman’s last will.

When Barbara Murphy died at 83 in 2015 she left her two properties at Birchgrove, a harbourside suburb in Sydney’s inner-west, to her elderly brother and sister.

The will also provided that her neighbours David Moore and Dee Andreasen received $25,000.

That allowance came after the couple agreed not to build an extension to their home that would block Mrs Murphy’s view of the Sydney Harbour Bridge – and also care for her in her final years.

But Mr Moore and Mrs Andreasen told the NSW Supreme Court that Mrs Murphy had promised to give them a lot more than just $25,000 – her whole $40 million estate.

Chief Judge Kathryn Ward agreed with the couple and last week ordered 66 and 68 Louisa Road be signed over to them leaving other neighbours in the street shocked.

The decision to give the entire estate - worth an estimated $40 million - to the couple has shocked other neighbours such as Bev Maunsell (pictured)

The decision to give the entire estate - worth an estimated $40 million - to the couple has shocked other neighbours such as Bev Maunsell (pictured)

The decision to give the entire estate – worth an estimated $40 million – to the couple has shocked other neighbours such as Bev Maunsell (pictured) 

Mrs Murphy and her husband owned both 66 and 68 Louisa Road at Birchgrove, while Mr Moore died aged 83 in her beloved harbour front property at 68 Louisa Road in Birchgrove, in the city's inner west, in 2015 (pictured)

Mrs Murphy and her husband owned both 66 and 68 Louisa Road at Birchgrove, while Mr Moore died aged 83 in her beloved harbour front property at 68 Louisa Road in Birchgrove, in the city's inner west, in 2015 (pictured)

Mrs Murphy and her husband owned both 66 and 68 Louisa Road at Birchgrove, while David Moore and Dee Andreasen moved into number 70 in 1999

Bev Maunsell lived across the road from Mrs Murphy for more than 30 years.

She said she does not believe being the couple’s actions warranted getting someone else’s home.

‘I’m absolutely flabbergasted,’ Mrs Maunsell told Daily Mail Australia.

‘She was an amazing woman. She used to mow the lawns for all the houses along there and all the able bodied men used to give her money for petrol, including Mr Moore. 

Mrs Maunsell’s view is shared by fellow Louisa Road resident Drew Vukelic, who also gave evidence at the Supreme Court hearing.

‘He organised some people, apparently from his church, they came and looked after her superbly,’ he said. 

‘I would’ve thought you may give them a little bit, sure, but not the whole estate.’ 

The NSW Supreme Court has ruled ownership of the two properties on the left should be given to David Moore and his partner Dee Andreasen, after they were promised to them by their old owner Barbara Murphy when she died

The NSW Supreme Court has ruled ownership of the two properties on the left should be given to David Moore and his partner Dee Andreasen, after they were promised to them by their old owner Barbara Murphy when she died

The NSW Supreme Court has ruled ownership of the two properties on the left should be given to David Moore and his partner Dee Andreasen, after they were promised to them by their old owner Barbara Murphy when she died

In return, the couple told the court Ms Murphy would leave them her entire estate, including two properties worth $9million at the time (Birchgrove pictured)

In return, the couple told the court Ms Murphy would leave them her entire estate, including two properties worth $9million at the time (Birchgrove pictured)

In return, the couple told the court Ms Murphy would leave them her entire estate, including two properties worth $9million at the time (Birchgrove pictured)

The NSW Supreme Court heard when Mr Moore and Ms Andreasen told Mrs Murphy they wanted to extend their home at 70 Louisa Road, she complained it would block her harbour view.

They say she offered them her properties – 66 and 68 Louisa Road – if they waited to begin the build until after she was dead. 

Mr Moore told the court that his elderly neighbour praised him and his partner and said they had been ‘so good’ to her over the years.

‘I want you and Dee to help me to stay living here,’ Ms Murphy said, according to Mr Moore’s evidence in court.

‘Will you help me to do that as I get older? I will see to it that in my will everything goes to you and Dee when I am gone.’

Mr Moore promised he would take care of Ms Murphy and ‘look after her’ as she got older, he told the court.

‘We are sure that we can figure out a way that we can renovate without building out your view,’ he said.

All three homes have views of Sydney Harbour Bridge from their waterside backyards

All three homes have views of Sydney Harbour Bridge from their waterside backyards

All three homes have views of Sydney Harbour Bridge from their waterside backyards

I would've thought you may give them a little bit, sure, but not the whole estate,' neighbour Drew Vukelic said

I would've thought you may give them a little bit, sure, but not the whole estate,' neighbour Drew Vukelic said

I would’ve thought you may give them a little bit, sure, but not the whole estate,’ neighbour Drew Vukelic said

‘Then if you leave everything to us in your will, we are very happy with that.’

Just a year before her death Mr Moore took Ms Murphy to see her solicitor to get a new will but was horrified to discover that the elderly woman had not included him.

Instead, she left almost her entire estate to her brother and sister equally and if she outlived them, the money was to go to two Sydney hospitals.

After Ms Murphy’s death Mr Moore contacted his lawyer saying he was ‘unhappy’ he had been left with $25,000 when he had been promised the entire estate.

Ms Murphy’s sister was also surprised she inherited so much property since she was told the estate would go to the neighbours, the court heard.

Her brother also admitted he had no interest in the property as he did not know how much it was worth. 

Mr Moore visited Mrs Murphy’s siblings – both in their 80s at the time – and asked for both of them to give up their share to him.

Both refused, to which Chief Judge Ward said she was ‘not surprised’. 

When Mr Moore and Mrs Andreasen purchased 70 Louise Road in 1999 it was regarded as the 'worst house in the best street', the court heard

When Mr Moore and Mrs Andreasen purchased 70 Louise Road in 1999 it was regarded as the 'worst house in the best street', the court heard

When Mr Moore and Mrs Andreasen purchased 70 Louise Road in 1999 it was regarded as the ‘worst house in the best street’, the court heard

‘That to my mind was surprisingly optimistic, though perhaps I am too cynical’, she said.

The court heard Mr Moore and Ms Andreasen decided to take legal action because they had kept their side of the agreement.

Chief Judge Ward ruled she was satisfied there was a ‘clear representation by the deceased to the effect that, if the plaintiffs looked after her (in the way in which Ms Andreasen had been looking after her own mother), so that the deceased could stay in her own home for as long as possible, then the deceased would leave the Louisa Road properties to them’.  

Ms Murphy’s lawyer and both her siblings have all died since the legal proceedings began.

The transfer will go through to the Mr Moore and Ms Andreasen by the end of the month.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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