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Paedophiles to be jailed for LIFE under new laws set to pass parliament today 

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paedophiles to be jailed for life under new laws set to pass parliament today

A landmark bill allowing judges to jail paedophiles for life is set to pass federal parliament on Thursday.

Those who commit sickening crimes against children have often been handed short sentences, with some even released into the community without supervision, attorney general Christian Porter said. 

Child abusers would receive a mandatory minimum sentence under the new bill, which also limits bail for repeat offenders.

Under current rules, nearly 40 per cent of federally-convicted child sex offenders spent no time in prison in 2019. 

Most child sex offences are dealt with by states, with this new law only applying to federal cases.

A new law targeting paedophiles is likely to pass in federal parliament on Thursday (stock image)

A new law targeting paedophiles is likely to pass in federal parliament on Thursday (stock image)

A new law targeting paedophiles is likely to pass in federal parliament on Thursday (stock image)

The proposed new laws are aimed at dealing with online or overseas predators, with new offences being set up to target the owners of websites known to host child sex abuse content. 

‘Sexual crimes against children destroy lives,’ Mr Porter said on Thursday. 

While Labor has expressed concerns about mandatory minimum sentencing, senators have indicated they won’t oppose the bill. 

Opposition leader Anthony Albanese told parliament on Wednesday his party would help the government in ‘any way possible’ to end child abuse. 

It follows comments made by home affairs minister Peter Dutton, after a police operation saved 14 children from abuse. 

‘The Australian Federal Police working with AUSTRAC and others is detecting more and more people who are depraved, who are online and who deserve to be caught and will be punished,’ Mr Dutton told parliament.

It would also create offences for when someone subjects a child to cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment, or which causes a child to die.

The proposal will not apply to people under 18.

More to follow. 

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Shore School students slam poor suburbs in TikTok video

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shore school students slam poor suburbs in tiktok video

Students at the elite Shore School have mocked battling western Sydney suburbs as being full of ‘druggos’ in a viral video – after they were caught planning vile Muck Up day antics and boasting about their exclusive facilities. 

The TikTok video shows students from the $33,000-a-year school on Sydney’s north shore being interviewed by popular account Fonzie Gomez, who asks the boys in their trademark boater hats and uniforms to to name the ‘worst’ suburbs in Sydney.

All the students name suburbs in Sydney’s western, including Blacktown and Mount Druitt as they prepare to board the train at North Sydney station.

The latest video comes after students were slammed for bragging about their lavish facilities, including a ‘$50 mill[ion] gym’ and library with Sydney Harbour views in an earlier TikTok clip. 

Then on Tuesday, a document that circulated among Year 12 students detailing their plans for muck-up day was leaked to the public. 

The ‘pranks’ included spitting on homeless men and taking drugs.

Scroll down for video 

Students at the $33,000-a-year Shore School have slammed other suburbs for being full of 'druggos' in a viral TikTok video (pictured), in the latest scandal to rock the elite college

Students at the $33,000-a-year Shore School have slammed other suburbs for being full of 'druggos' in a viral TikTok video (pictured), in the latest scandal to rock the elite college

Students at the $33,000-a-year Shore School have slammed other suburbs for being full of ‘druggos’ in a viral TikTok video (pictured), in the latest scandal to rock the elite college

In the now deleted TikTok interview, a group of four Shore School students were told to name the worst suburb in Sydney. 

‘Blacktown,’ the four boys answer in unison.

When asked to elaborate one said ‘because its Blacktown’, before another answered ‘druggos’.

Another pair of mates were asked the same question, with one replying: ‘The worst is Bankstown… too many ‘eshays’ who’ll roll you’.

An eshay refers to a Sydney subculture of young criminals who tend to wear bumbags, and sneaks and are usually considered to be from battler suburbs.

The exception among the group was one boy who said the worst suburb ‘is Mosman because all the rich kids live there’.

the TikTok comes the day after a document detailing plans for a crime-spree among Year 12 students on Muck up Day was revealed.

Plans for a scavenger hunt, titled the ‘Triwizard Shorenament’ in a reference to Harry Potter, encourages students to take drugs, assault strangers and trespass on private property.  

The ‘rule book’ – detailed by students in a PDF documents – reveals plans to meet at a park on the lower north shore on the night before the traditional celebrations.

Year 12 students would be split into teams of five or six before carrying out a series of tasks to gain the most points.

It comes after a shocking document detailing plans for a crime-spree among Year 12 students on Muck up Day was revealed, with students planning to spit on homeless men as part of the 'Triwizard Shorenament' (Pictured is the front page of the document sent between students)

It comes after a shocking document detailing plans for a crime-spree among Year 12 students on Muck up Day was revealed, with students planning to spit on homeless men as part of the 'Triwizard Shorenament' (Pictured is the front page of the document sent between students)

It comes after a shocking document detailing plans for a crime-spree among Year 12 students on Muck up Day was revealed, with students planning to spit on homeless men as part of the ‘Triwizard Shorenament’ (Pictured is the front page of the document sent between students)

The school is among the top ranked in New South Wales and regularly features impressive Year 12 results

The school is among the top ranked in New South Wales and regularly features impressive Year 12 results

The school is among the top ranked in New South Wales and regularly features impressive Year 12 results 

Founded in 1889, the school overlooks Sydney Harbour (pictured) and features a distinguished list of ex-students including a Prime Minister

Founded in 1889, the school overlooks Sydney Harbour (pictured) and features a distinguished list of ex-students including a Prime Minister

Founded in 1889, the school overlooks Sydney Harbour (pictured) and features a distinguished list of ex-students including a Prime Minister 

Some challenges are illegal, such as ‘snort a line’ (of cocaine) or ‘rip a cone on the Harbour Bridge’ (smoke cannabis out of a bong).

Others dare students to ‘break into Taronga Zoo’, ‘spit on a homeless man’, and ‘sh** on a train’.

Some involve assaulting total strangers by hitting them in the genitals while they are walking past.

The list of challenges also denigrates women, urging students to have sex with a woman over 80kg or hook up with an unattractive women deemed ‘3/10 or lower’. 

Others tasks are more family friendly, including getting mullet haircuts and waxing armpit hair.  

Instructions written into the rule book advise students they must document their completed tasks on Instagram.

But they are also warned not to upload any potentially incriminating evidence of illegal behaviour including ‘inappropriate or sexual advances’.

‘If anyone gets caught by a teacher/cops they will say that they were just having fun between the 5/6 of them and won’t mention the tournament,’ the instructions state.

Before starting on the challenges, the groups first have to finish a case of 30 beers in 15 minutes. 

The school's library features uninterrupted views over the Sydney Harbour Bridge (pictured)

The school's library features uninterrupted views over the Sydney Harbour Bridge (pictured)

The school’s library features uninterrupted views over the Sydney Harbour Bridge (pictured)

Students first created headlines recently after bragging about the school's facilities, which includes a state-of-the-art gym (pictured)

Students first created headlines recently after bragging about the school's facilities, which includes a state-of-the-art gym (pictured)

Students first created headlines recently after bragging about the school’s facilities, which includes a state-of-the-art gym (pictured)

The game was discovered by school administrators, who contacted New South Wales Police.

A spokesman for Shore school – which charges up to $33,000-a-year in fees, told the Sydney Morning Herald it had issued a stern warning to students and parents over the game. 

FAMOUS SHORE SCHOOL ALUMNI

John Gorton – Australia’s 19th prime minister

Frank Packer – media goliath and Packer family patriarch 

Dyson Heydon – High Court judge

Errol Flynn – Hollywood legend

John Newcombe – tennis superstar

Phil Waugh – Australian rugby great 

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‘As soon as the school became aware of the document police were informed and an urgent communication was sent to all year 12 parents instructing that under no circumstances are Shore boys to participate in the activities specified,’ the spokesman said. 

‘Consequences for any boys who do participate will be severe and could include the loss of their place at the school.’

A spokesperson for New South Wales Police told Daily Mail Australia they respect the age old tradition of muck-up day but will not tolerate any illegal behaviour. 

Established in 1889, Shore School features state-of-the art facilities and an incredible view over Sydney Harbour.

It is regularly ranked among the highest schools in the state for its Year 12 results and has produced a Prime Minister, a High Court Judge and several sporting champions.

‘We place a strong emphasis on character formation, challenging our students to be responsible citizens of integrity who seek to serve the wider community,’ the Shore School website states. 

‘We believe the best evidence of success will be exhibited in the adult lives of those who have passed through the School. 

‘We are proud of our many Old Boys who have served in all walks of life with great dedication.’ 

Dyson Heydon (pictured), a former High Court of Australia judge, is among the schools alumni. Heydon is currently facing allegations of inappropriate workplace behaviour by multiple women who used to work with or under him

Dyson Heydon (pictured), a former High Court of Australia judge, is among the schools alumni. Heydon is currently facing allegations of inappropriate workplace behaviour by multiple women who used to work with or under him

Dyson Heydon (pictured), a former High Court of Australia judge, is among the schools alumni. Heydon is currently facing allegations of inappropriate workplace behaviour by multiple women who used to work with or under him

John Newcombe, a seven-time Grand Slam tennis champion, is also a former student at the school

John Newcombe, a seven-time Grand Slam tennis champion, is also a former student at the school

John Newcombe, a seven-time Grand Slam tennis champion, is also a former student at the school

The school is situated in wealthy North Sydney and costs around $33,000 a year in tuition

The school is situated in wealthy North Sydney and costs around $33,000 a year in tuition

The school is situated in wealthy North Sydney and costs around $33,000 a year in tuition

Former students include Australia’s 19th prime minister John Gorton, High Court of Australia judge Dyson Heydon, tennis champion John Newcombe, media goliath Frank Packer and Hollywood legend Errol Flynn.

Shore students first sparked outrage by boasting about their state-of-the-art campus on TikTok last week.

The clip showed students looking out at the Sydney Harbour Bridge from their library, as part of a global viral trend comparing school facilities.  

Daily Mail Australia has contacted Shore for comment.

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Jetstar launches ‘flash sale’ and Virgin increases flights around Australia as borders reopen

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jetstar launches flash sale and virgin increases flights around australia as borders reopen

Australians can finally start planning their summer holidays as airlines ramp up flights to celebrate the reopening of borders.

Qantas will resume flights between Sydney and Adelaide on Thursday while Jetstar has announced a 36-hour ‘flash sale’ of tickets for the two cities kicking off at midday on Wednesday.

The airline will offer 5,000 one way flights between South Australia and NSW for just $59 with holidaymakers urged to get in quick.

Virgin Australia is also set to kick off a string of services between NSW, Queensland, the ACT and South Australia for the first time in months.

The good news for travellers comes after it was announced South Australia would reopen its border to NSW from midnight on Wednesday while five NSW shires have been added to the Queensland border bubble.

Jetstar have announced a 'flash sale' of tickets for just $59 for services between Sydney and Adelaide (pictured Torrens River in Adelaide)

Jetstar have announced a 'flash sale' of tickets for just $59 for services between Sydney and Adelaide (pictured Torrens River in Adelaide)

Jetstar have announced a ‘flash sale’ of tickets for just $59 for services between Sydney and Adelaide (pictured Torrens River in Adelaide)

Daily Qantas flights between Sydney and Adelaide will be offered from Thursday with airfares starting at $213.

Jetstar will also ramp up flights between the two cities from five per week to twice a day from October.

By November 1, Jetstar will offer these routes three times a day.

It will be the first time since July Qantas has offered flights between Sydney and Adelaide due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

‘The resumption of Qantas flights from Sydney to Adelaide and additional Jetstar flights on the route will be fantastic for tourism operators and local businesses in both South Australia and New South Wales,’ a spokesperson said.

From November Jetstar will offer services between Sydney and Adelaide three times a day

From November Jetstar will offer services between Sydney and Adelaide three times a day

From November Jetstar will offer services between Sydney and Adelaide three times a day

Virgin services to the Gold Coast (pictured) from Canberra will also ramp up to five flights a week in October

Virgin services to the Gold Coast (pictured) from Canberra will also ramp up to five flights a week in October

Virgin services to the Gold Coast (pictured) from Canberra will also ramp up to five flights a week in October

‘With the ongoing travel restrictions, we’re pleased to be able to help more travellers explore world class destinations in their own country while getting more business and people back to work.’ 

Meanwhile, those hoping to get away for the summer can take advantage of Virgin’s latest flight offers that span across the country.

From October 12, three return flights a week will be on offer between Canberra and Adelaide.

Canberrans can also fly to Brisbane (pictured) from October to get away for the school holidays

Canberrans can also fly to Brisbane (pictured) from October to get away for the school holidays

Canberrans can also fly to Brisbane (pictured) from October to get away for the school holidays

Return flights to Sydney from Adelaide will ramp up to daily on October 2 and twice daily from November 2 with ticket sales opening on Wednesday.

Canberrans will also be able to enter into Queensland from Friday as long as they don’t travel through a hot spot on the way.

This means an influx of residents in the ACT will have to fly into the sunshine state. 

Virgin Australia in response will increase flights between Canberra and Brisbane to daily return services through October – as well as five flights a week between the nation’s capital and the Gold Coast. 

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You could be paid to take out a home loan if Reserve Bank Australia negative interest rates

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you could be paid to take out a home loan if reserve bank australia negative interest rates

Australians could soon be paid to take out a mortgage if the coronavirus recession worsens.

The Reserve Bank of Australia has revealed it had considered negative interest rates in a bid to deal with the first recession in 29 years. 

Deputy Governor Guy Debelle confirmed this was one of four crisis options the central bank had examined.

‘A fourth option is negative rates,’ he said.

At the very least, economists are now expecting the Reserve Bank to cut interest rates to a new record-low of 0.1 per cent at its October meeting in two weeks.

Australians could soon be paid to take out a mortgage if the coronavirus recession worsens. The Reserve Bank of Australia has revealed it had considered negative interest rates in a bid to deal with the first recession in 29 years. Pictured is a Melbourne Westpac bank during the Stage Four lockdown

Australians could soon be paid to take out a mortgage if the coronavirus recession worsens. The Reserve Bank of Australia has revealed it had considered negative interest rates in a bid to deal with the first recession in 29 years. Pictured is a Melbourne Westpac bank during the Stage Four lockdown

Australians could soon be paid to take out a mortgage if the coronavirus recession worsens. The Reserve Bank of Australia has revealed it had considered negative interest rates in a bid to deal with the first recession in 29 years. Pictured is a Melbourne Westpac bank during the Stage Four lockdown

Australia already has home loan rates of less than two per cent and the Reserve Bank’s record-low cash rate of 0.25 per cent is just one quarter of a percentage point cut away from zero.

Australian savers get very little interest

NAB iSaver: 0.95 per cent

Commonwealth Bank NetSaver: 0.9 per cent

Westpac Life: 0.85 per cent

ANZ Progress Saver: 0.85 per cent

Source: Canstar 

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Negative interest rates exist in Denmark, Switzerland, Sweden and Japan.

Denmark’s central bank, known as the Danmarks Nationalbank, has a minus 0.6 per cent rate for deposit accounts.

Since 2019, the Danish Jyske Bank, has offered home borrowers a negative annual rate of 0.5 per cent for ten years.

A rival bank, Nordea, offered the minus 0.5 per cent rate for 30 years. 

Dr Debelle said negative interest rates would be likely to weaken the Australian dollar, now trading at 71.60 US cents, which would make exports cheaper. 

‘A lower exchange rate would definitely be beneficial for the Australian economy, so we are continuing to watch developments in the foreign exchange market carefully,’ he said.

Instead of being paid interest, under a negative rates regime savers are instead charged to keep money in the bank.

Despite that, Dr Debelle argued negative rates would only encourage people to save more instead of spending money, which would stimulate the economy.

‘Negative rates can also encourage more saving as households look to preserve the value of their saving, particularly in an environment where they are already inclined to save rather than spend,’ he said.

Denmark's central bank, known as the Danmarks Nationalbank, has a minus 0.6 per cent rate for deposit accounts. Since 2019, the Danish Jyske Bank (Copenhagen branch pictured), has offered home borrowers a negative annual rate of 0.5 per cent for ten years

Denmark's central bank, known as the Danmarks Nationalbank, has a minus 0.6 per cent rate for deposit accounts. Since 2019, the Danish Jyske Bank (Copenhagen branch pictured), has offered home borrowers a negative annual rate of 0.5 per cent for ten years

Denmark’s central bank, known as the Danmarks Nationalbank, has a minus 0.6 per cent rate for deposit accounts. Since 2019, the Danish Jyske Bank (Copenhagen branch pictured), has offered home borrowers a negative annual rate of 0.5 per cent for ten years

‘To date, those economies with negative policy rates have not lowered them further. 

‘Instead, they have eased monetary policy settings through other means.’ 

Australia’s cheapest home loans

Bank of Us: 1.99 per cent two and three-year fixed rates (only available to existing customers and Tasmanians)

HSBC: 2.09 per cent, two-year fixed

UBank: 2.14 per cent for fixed one and three years

Source: Canstar 

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Westpac chief economist Bill Evans interpreted Dr Debelle’s speech to mean interest rates would be cut on October 6 from an already-record low of 0.25 per cent to a new record low of 0.1 per cent 

‘In a speech yesterday the Deputy Governor of the Reserve Bank gave a fairly clear hint that the board is set to cut the cash rate and other key policy rates at its October board meeting,’ he said.

Australian home loan rates are already at very low levels, with the Launceston-based Bank of Us offering a 1.99 per cent fixed rate for two and three years – but only for Tasmanians.

HSBC has a 2.09 per cent, two-year fixed rate while UBank has a 2.14 per cent fixed rate one and three years.

While borrowers are getting a better deal, savers are being punished with the Commonwealth Bank, Australia’s biggest bank, last week cutting interest rates by 0.05 per cent on its Netbank Saver and Youthsaver products.

Commonwealth’s Netbank Saver now has a rate of just 0.9 per cent. 

Canstar’s group executive of financial services Steve Mickenbecker said savers were being punished.

The Reserve Bank's Deputy Governor Guy Debelle confirmed negative interest rates had been considered. 'A fourth option is negative rates,' he said

The Reserve Bank's Deputy Governor Guy Debelle confirmed negative interest rates had been considered. 'A fourth option is negative rates,' he said

The Reserve Bank’s Deputy Governor Guy Debelle confirmed negative interest rates had been considered. ‘A fourth option is negative rates,’ he said

‘A cut of 0.05 per cent to your savings account may not sound like a lot on its own, but when it’s piled on top of multiple cuts this year it all adds up to a heavy drag on savings goals,’ he said.

‘Savers must be feeling like the proverbial frog in the saucepan. 

‘Rates have drifted down in steps, conditioning savers to a low rate environment, but ultimately delivering a blow to returns on savings.’

In October 2019, three months before the first case of COVID-19 came to Australia, Reserve Bank Govenor Philip Lowe endorsed the idea of negative interest rates.

He co-authored a paper for the Bank for International Settlements, a Swiss-based group run by the world’s central banks, suggesting the policy had worked where it had been tried.

‘Central banks judged that negative policy rates contributed to the achievement of their policy goals and that their side effects have been contained,’ Dr Lowe said. 

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