Connect with us

Australia

Pentagon is forming new task force to investigate UFO sightings, defense officials say

Published

on

pentagon is forming new task force to investigate ufo sightings defense officials say

The Pentagon is forming a new task force to investigate UFO sightings over US military bases, according to defense officials.

Two defense officials told CNN the task force will hunt and investigate UFOs that have been seen by military aircraft and will be headed up by Deputy Secretary of Defense David Norquist.

The task force will be officially announced over the next few days, they added. 

This comes just weeks after it emerged the Pentagon’s once secret UFO hunting department continued to operate over the past decade despite claims it was disbanded and as US senators demand more transparency from the Pentagon over mysterious encounters in the skies.

The Pentagon (pictured) is forming a new task force to investigate UFO sightings over US military bases, according to defense officials

The Pentagon (pictured) is forming a new task force to investigate UFO sightings over US military bases, according to defense officials

The Pentagon (pictured) is forming a new task force to investigate UFO sightings over US military bases, according to defense officials

Details of the new task force such as its name and whether its investigations will be made public are not yet clear. 

It is also not clear whether the new task force will replace the Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon Task Force which the New York Times revealed last month was still in operation.

A secret multi-million dollar program named the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program first began in 2007 under the Defense Intelligence Agency before moving to the Office of Naval Intelligence.

In 2017, the Pentagon acknowledged funding the program to investigate UFO sightings but defense chiefs claimed it ended in 2012 citing ‘other, higher priority issues that merited funding’. 

In July, the Times reported that people who worked with the UFO program through to 2017 and beyond confirmed it continued to exist – but under a different name and office.

Members of the unit insisted some of the objects discovered were items humans ‘couldn’t make ourselves’ and ‘vehicles not made on this earth’.   

In April, the Pentagon released footage from three sightings of unidentified objects

In April, the Pentagon released footage from three sightings of unidentified objects

One of the videos was captured off the coast of Jacksonville, Florida, in 2015 (pictured)

One of the videos was captured off the coast of Jacksonville, Florida, in 2015 (pictured)

In April, the Pentagon released footage from three sightings of unidentified objects (pictured)

The grainy black and white footage had previously been leaked and the Navy acknowledged they were genuine videos

The grainy black and white footage had previously been leaked and the Navy acknowledged they were genuine videos

The grainy black and white footage had previously been leaked and the Navy acknowledged they were genuine videos

Donald Trump expressed skepticism over the validity of the footage calling it 'one hell of a video' and saying 'I just wonder if it's real'

Donald Trump expressed skepticism over the validity of the footage calling it 'one hell of a video' and saying 'I just wonder if it's real'

Donald Trump expressed skepticism over the validity of the footage calling it ‘one hell of a video’ and saying ‘I just wonder if it’s real’

In June, US senators demanded to see the Pentagon’s UFO files as they pushed for influence over the secretive Navy program. 

The Senate Intelligence Committee wanted defense chiefs to publish a report on the Pentagon’s UFO program and any phenomena it observes.

The committee said it ‘supports the efforts of the Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon Task Force’ – appearing to also confirm such a program still existed – but said the public should be better informed of its activities.    

The Pentagon’s UFO department could now be forced to give reports to the public every six months. 

The push for transparency from the Senate came after the Pentagon released three videos showing US Navy pilots encountering UFOs flying over military bases back in April.

The grainy black and white footage had previously been leaked and the Navy acknowledged they were genuine videos. 

One of the videos was shot in November 2004 and the other two in January 2015.

In one, a weapons sensor operator appears to lose lock on a rapidly moving object which seconds later suddenly accelerates away to the left and out of view.

The new UFO task force will be headed up by Deputy Secretary of Defense David Norquist (pictured), according to officials

The new UFO task force will be headed up by Deputy Secretary of Defense David Norquist (pictured), according to officials

The new UFO task force will be headed up by Deputy Secretary of Defense David Norquist (pictured), according to officials

In another video which is tracking an object above the clouds, one pilot wonders if it is a drone.  

The Department of Defense said it was ‘releasing the videos in order to clear up any misconceptions by the public on whether or not the footage that has been circulating was real, or whether or not there is more to the videos.’

Donald Trump expressed skepticism over the validity of the footage calling it ‘one hell of a video’ and saying ‘I just wonder if it’s real’. 

‘Hazard reports’ about the unexplained encounters were then released the following month. 

‘The unknown aircraft appeared to be small in size, approximately the size of a suitcase, and silver in color,’ one report about an incident in 2014 read.   

The need to investigate the existence of UFOs stems less out of concern over extraterrestrials, however, and more from the threat posed by real-world US adversaries such as China.

The Pentagon admitted in June that a nuclear detonation in space by Russia or China was among the possible threats to US interests. 

The US is particularly worried about China’s espionage capabilities, including use of drones and other aerial technology. 

Earlier in July, Florida Senator Marco Rubio, the acting chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, told CBS that he was concerned about unidentified aircraft flying over US military bases. 

He claimed that China or Russia may have made ‘some technological leap’ that ‘allows them to conduct this sort of activity’. 

‘Maybe there is a completely, sort of, boring explanation for it. But we need to find out,’ he added. 

Powered by: Daily Mail

Australia

Mourners hold a candlelight vigil outside of the Supreme Court for RBG

Published

on

By

mourners hold a candlelight vigil outside of the supreme court for rbg

Vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris joined hundreds of mourners outside the Supreme Court as she paid tribute to ‘titan’ and ‘legal mind of the ages’ Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. 

The U.S. Senator and her husband Douglas Emhoff on Saturday stopped by a makeshift memorial outside the steps of the high court in Washington D.C. where the veteran judge served for 27 years before her death on Friday. 

The site is now blanketed with a collection of flowers, homemade cardboard signs and prayer candles left by hundreds of mourners who visited the steps of the court to pay their respects in the wake of her passing. 

Harris shared a photo of her visit on Twitter, calling the Supreme Court justice ‘a titan—a relentless defender of justice and a legal mind for the ages.’

‘The stakes of this election couldn’t be higher. Millions of Americans are counting on us to win and protect the Supreme Court—for their health, for their families, and for their rights,’ Harris said.

It comes after President Trump announced he will nominate a replacement for  Ginsburg ‘without delay’, setting up an extraordinary confirmation battle in the Senate just weeks before the election.  

Scroll down for video 

Kamala Harris and her husband Douglas Emhoff on Saturday stopped by a makeshift memorial outside the steps of the Supreme Court to pay tribute to late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Kamala Harris and her husband Douglas Emhoff on Saturday stopped by a makeshift memorial outside the steps of the Supreme Court to pay tribute to late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Kamala Harris and her husband Douglas Emhoff on Saturday stopped by a makeshift memorial outside the steps of the Supreme Court to pay tribute to late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

The Democratic vice presidential nominee dressed comfortably and wore a mask during her visit to the high court

The Democratic vice presidential nominee dressed comfortably and wore a mask during her visit to the high court

The Democratic vice presidential nominee dressed comfortably and wore a mask during her visit to the high court 

Harris shared a photo of her visit on Twitter remembering Ginsburg as a 'relentless defender of justice.'

Harris shared a photo of her visit on Twitter remembering Ginsburg as a 'relentless defender of justice.'

Harris shared a photo of her visit on Twitter remembering Ginsburg as a ‘relentless defender of justice.’ 

33376430 8750495 image a 39 1600534995850

33376430 8750495 image a 39 1600534995850

Mourners stopped by the Supreme Court early Saturday to pay their respects to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died after a battle with pancreatic cancer on Friday

Mourners stopped by the Supreme Court early Saturday to pay their respects to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died after a battle with pancreatic cancer on Friday

Mourners stopped by the Supreme Court early Saturday to pay their respects to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died after a battle with pancreatic cancer on Friday

Scores of people laid flowers, prayer candles and condolence messages to the late justice outside of the high court

Scores of people laid flowers, prayer candles and condolence messages to the late justice outside of the high court

Scores of people laid flowers, prayer candles and condolence messages to the late justice outside of the high court 

The Supreme Court Justice passed away in her home in Washington, D.C. on Friday, after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer

The Supreme Court Justice passed away in her home in Washington, D.C. on Friday, after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer

The Supreme Court Justice passed away in her home in Washington, D.C. on Friday, after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer

Flowers and tribute signs lined the sidewalk outside of the Supreme Court, where Ginsburg served for 27 years

Flowers and tribute signs lined the sidewalk outside of the Supreme Court, where Ginsburg served for 27 years

Flowers and tribute signs lined the sidewalk outside of the Supreme Court, where Ginsburg served for 27 years

Ginsburg, who had battled several bouts of cancer after first being diagnosed in 2009, finally succumbed to metastatic pancreas cancer Friday evening surrounded by her family at her home in Washington D.C. 

Hundreds of people packed the steps of the Supreme Court on Friday night and the street across from the U.S. Capitol as they sang and wept together during a candlelight vigil.

The impromptu nighttime memorial was held shortly after news of her passing broke, which triggered an outpouring of tributes from both sides of the political spectrum.  

President Donald Trump issued a proclamation directing that flags at the White House and all public buildings and grounds and military facilities be flown at half-staff until the late Justice Ginsburg is interred. 

During the memorial, dozens of people wearing protective masks sat on the steps quietly reflecting on Ginsburg’s legacy, while others knelt to leave bouquets of flowers, small American flags and photos of the justice. 

Several times, dozens in the crowd broke out into song, singing ‘Amazing Grace’ and ‘This Land is Your Land’ as others embraced one another and wiped tears from their eyes. 

At one point, the crowd broke into a thunderous applause – lasting for about a minute – for Ginsburg.

‘Thank you RBG,’ one sign read. On the sidewalk, ‘RBG’ was drawn inside a pink chalk heart.

Jennifer Berger, 37, said she felt compelled to join the large crowd that gathered to pay tribute to Ginsburg’s life.

‘I think it is important for us to recognize such a trailblazer,’ she said. ‘It is amazing to see how many people are feeling this loss tonight and saying goodbye.’

Visitors were seen breaking down in tears as they mourned the loss of the veteran justice

Visitors were seen breaking down in tears as they mourned the loss of the veteran justice

Visitors were seen breaking down in tears as they mourned the loss of the veteran justice

Mourners left hundreds of handwritten messages as well as 'RBG' merch that had become popular among young people in recent years

Mourners left hundreds of handwritten messages as well as 'RBG' merch that had become popular among young people in recent years

Mourners left hundreds of handwritten messages as well as ‘RBG’ merch that had become popular among young people in recent years

On Friday, hundreds packed the steps of the Supreme Court as they held an impromptu candlelight vigil for Ginsburg

On Friday, hundreds packed the steps of the Supreme Court as they held an impromptu candlelight vigil for Ginsburg

On Friday, hundreds packed the steps of the Supreme Court as they held an impromptu candlelight vigil for Ginsburg

Many were seen singing and weeping as they reflected on Ginsburg's legacy. She spent her final years on the bench as the unquestioned leader of the court's liberal wing and became something of a rock star to her admirers

Many were seen singing and weeping as they reflected on Ginsburg's legacy. She spent her final years on the bench as the unquestioned leader of the court's liberal wing and became something of a rock star to her admirers

Many were seen singing and weeping as they reflected on Ginsburg’s legacy. She spent her final years on the bench as the unquestioned leader of the court’s liberal wing and became something of a rock star to her admirers

People gather to mourn the passing of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the steps in front of the Supreme Court on September 18

People gather to mourn the passing of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the steps in front of the Supreme Court on September 18

People gather to mourn the passing of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the steps in front of the Supreme Court on September 18

Ginsburg spent her final years on the bench as the unquestioned leader of the court’s liberal wing and became something of a rock star to her admirers. 

Young women especially seemed to embrace the court’s Jewish grandmother, affectionately calling her the ‘Notorious RBG’, for her defense of the rights of women and minorities.

The memorial service remained mostly peaceful and somber, but turned tense for several minutes after a man with a megaphone approached people in the crowd and began to chant that ‘Roe v. Wade is dead,’ a reference to the landmark Supreme Court ruling establishing abortion rights nationwide.

A large group confronted the man, leading to a brief shouting match. 

Many in the crowd began yelling ‘RBG’ to try to drown out the man’s voice as he continued to say Republicans would push to quickly appoint a conservative justice to the court. 

Supreme Court police officers stood alongside the crowd and the man eventually left the area.

Ginsburg had notably won over the country's younger generation, as the unquestioned leader of the court's liberal wing

Ginsburg had notably won over the country's younger generation, as the unquestioned leader of the court's liberal wing

Ginsburg had notably won over the country’s younger generation, as the unquestioned leader of the court’s liberal wing

A woman was overcome with emotion during the memorial service on Friday night

A woman was overcome with emotion during the memorial service on Friday night

A woman was overcome with emotion during the memorial service on Friday night 

Several times, dozens in the crowd broke out into song, singing 'Amazing Grace' and 'This Land is Your Land' as others embraced one another and wiped tears from their eyes

Several times, dozens in the crowd broke out into song, singing 'Amazing Grace' and 'This Land is Your Land' as others embraced one another and wiped tears from their eyes

Several times, dozens in the crowd broke out into song, singing ‘Amazing Grace’ and ‘This Land is Your Land’ as others embraced one another and wiped tears from their eyes

The memorial service remained mostly peaceful and somber

The memorial service remained mostly peaceful and somber

The memorial service remained mostly peaceful and somber

Ginsburg’s death paves the way for Donald Trump to expand his conservative majority on the Supreme Court ahead of November’s election.

The leader of the court’s four-member liberal wing had voiced concerns about the political impact of her passing in the days leading up to her death. 

‘My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed,’ the legal pioneer said in a statement dictated to her granddaughter Clara Spera days before her death.

President Trump was on stage in Minnesota when the Justice’s death was announced and had carried on with his campaign rally apparently unaware of the news.   

He was later asked about her death by reporters, Trump said: ‘She just died? Wow. I didn’t know that, you’re telling me now for the first time.’

He then paused and held his hands in the air before paying tribute to Ginsburg – who he had a fraught relationship with since he moved in to the White House.

‘She led an amazing life. What else can you say? She was an amazing woman whether you agreed [with her] or not. She was an amazing who led an amazing life. 

‘I’m actually sad to hear that. I’m sad to hear that,’ he said, before he turned and walked toward his jet. 

A man kneels as he brings a megaphone to a vigil on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court following the death of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, in Washington

A man kneels as he brings a megaphone to a vigil on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court following the death of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, in Washington

A man kneels as he brings a megaphone to a vigil on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court following the death of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, in Washington

On the sidewalk, 'RBG' was drawn inside a pink chalk heart. Other messages thanked the Supreme Court Justice for her service to the country

On the sidewalk, 'RBG' was drawn inside a pink chalk heart. Other messages thanked the Supreme Court Justice for her service to the country

On the sidewalk, ‘RBG’ was drawn inside a pink chalk heart. Other messages thanked the Supreme Court Justice for her service to the country

Young women especially seemed to embrace the court's Jewish grandmother, affectionately calling her the 'Notorious RBG', for her defense of the rights of women and minorities

Young women especially seemed to embrace the court's Jewish grandmother, affectionately calling her the 'Notorious RBG', for her defense of the rights of women and minorities

Young women especially seemed to embrace the court’s Jewish grandmother, affectionately calling her the ‘Notorious RBG’, for her defense of the rights of women and minorities

A man plays the violin as people gather outside of the U.S. Supreme Court for a nighttime memorial for RBG

A man plays the violin as people gather outside of the U.S. Supreme Court for a nighttime memorial for RBG

A man plays the violin as people gather outside of the U.S. Supreme Court for a nighttime memorial for RBG 

Meanwhile the White House flag was lowered to half staff and his Chief of Staff Mark Meadows tweeted a tribute to the ‘trailblazer’ and ‘dedicated public servant’. 

Trump later tweeted a longer statement, describing Ginsburg as a ‘titan of the law’ whose legal expertise and historic decisions inspired generations of Americans.  

‘Today, our nation mourns the loss of a titan of the law’ who was ‘renowned for her brilliant mind and her powerful dissents at the Supreme Court,’ Trump said, after the rally in Minnesota.

‘Her opinions, including well-known decisions regarding the legal equality of women and the disabled, have inspired all Americans, and generations of great legal minds,’ he added.

‘May her memory be a great and magnificent blessing to the world.’

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died aged 87 after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer. She is pictured at one of her last public appearances in February.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died aged 87 after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer. She is pictured at one of her last public appearances in February.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died aged 87 after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer. She is pictured at one of her last public appearances in February. 

33363770 8750495 image a 90 1600526671391

33363770 8750495 image a 90 1600526671391

33363772 8750495 image a 29 1600531838909

33363772 8750495 image a 29 1600531838909

He did not mention plans for nominating a replacement. 

Chief Justice John Roberts paid tribute to his colleague Friday describing her as a ‘champion of justice’.

‘Our nation has lost a justice of historic stature,’ Roberts said in a statement. 

‘We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her, a tired and resolute champion of justice.’ 

Former presidents Barack Obama, Bill Clinton, George Bush and Jimmy Carter all voiced their tributes, along with politicians including Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and New York Governor Andrew Cuomo voiced their tributes. 

The White House lowered its flags to half staff and social media users pointed out that in Jewish tradition, a person who dies on Rosh Hashanah – which started tonight – is regarded as a person of great righteousness.  

Powered by: Daily Mail

Continue Reading

Australia

Twist in JobSeeker saga as it emerges handout’s fate WON’T be decided anytime soon

Published

on

By

twist in jobseeker saga as it emerges handouts fate wont be decided anytime soon

The fate of the government’s JobSeeker handout will not be decided in next month’s federal budget, despite growing calls for the more certainty around the scheme.

Under the subsidy program an extra $550 was added to the base rate of $565.70 a fortnight for those looking for work.

The generous payment was introduced in April to help the surging number of recently unemployed workers get through the coronavirus crisis.

But on September 24, the $550 top up will be slashed to $250, as the Australian economy begins to rebound from the pandemic and more jobs come back.

The $250 handout, which about 1.4 million Australians rely on, is set to end on December 31.

According to the government, it’s too early to say whether the program – which has already cost $12billion – should be extended into the new year. 

The fate of the government's JobSeeker handout will not be decided in next month's federal budget, despite growing calls for the more certainty around the scheme. Pictured: Prime Minister Scott Morrison on September 18

The fate of the government's JobSeeker handout will not be decided in next month's federal budget, despite growing calls for the more certainty around the scheme. Pictured: Prime Minister Scott Morrison on September 18

The fate of the government’s JobSeeker handout will not be decided in next month’s federal budget, despite growing calls for the more certainty around the scheme. Pictured: Prime Minister Scott Morrison on September 18

The generous program was introduced in April to help the surging number of recently unemployed workers get it through the coronavirus crisis

The generous program was introduced in April to help the surging number of recently unemployed workers get it through the coronavirus crisis

The generous program was introduced in April to help the surging number of recently unemployed workers get it through the coronavirus crisis

‘There’s still much that we don’t know about where the pandemic’s going to end and what Australia is going to look like,’ Social Services Minister Anne Ruston said.

‘So we remain very focused on making sure the measures we have in place reflect the conditions at the time, and decisions about anything ongoing will be a matter for the time once the economy has settled and we know what a post-pandemic Australia looks like.’

‘We only have to see what happened in Victoria over the last couple of months to realise how terribly volatile the jobs market is, so we want to make sure our responses are timely and targeted.’

Although Scott Morrison has hinted the government is likely to continue to support unemployed Australians into next year, the opposition say a decision needs to be made sooner.

Labor leader Anthony Albanese has called for a permanent increase in the welfare subsidy – to $1100 a fortnight. 

Australian Council of Social Service chief executive Cassandra Goldie has also voiced her concerns.

‘We need the government to have people’s back & we need the government to be able to give people confidence. We need the government to give people easing of their distress about how they’ll cope,’ she told reporters on Friday.  

Business Council of Australia chief executive Jennifer Westacott is also in favor of a JobSeeker increase and extension during the pandemic. 

Under the subsidy program an extra $550 was added the base rate of $565.70 a fortnight, for those looking for work

Under the subsidy program an extra $550 was added the base rate of $565.70 a fortnight, for those looking for work

Under the subsidy program an extra $550 was added the base rate of $565.70 a fortnight, for those looking for work

How are the support payments changing from September?

JOBKEEPER

* The $1,500 fortnightly wage subsidy will continue until September 27

* From the end of September to January, JobKeeper will be reduced to $1,200 for full-time workers and $750 for people working 20 hours or less

* From January to March, the full-time rate will be $1000 and part-time will reduce to $650

* Businesses turning over less than $1billion will have to requalify for the program at both stages through showing a 30 per cent drop in revenue.

* Businesses with more than $1billion in turnover have to demonstrate a 50 per cent fall

JOBSEEKER

* The elevated unemployment benefit will remain at $1,100 a fortnight until September 24

* From that date until the end of the year the $550 coronavirus supplement will be cut by $300 to make the overall fortnightly payment $800

* People will be able to earn up to $300 without having their payment reduced

* The mutual obligation rules requiring people to search for four jobs a month will restart on August 4

* Penalties for people refusing a job offer will be reintroduced

* Job search requirements will increase in September when the assets test will also return

* The permanent JobSeeker rate to take effect from January next year will be announced in the October 6 budget.

 

<!—->Advertisement

But there are a litany of voices who claim the generous handout is acting as a dis-intensive for prospective workers.

Australia’s unemployment rate dropped from 7.5 per cent in July, to to 6.8 per cent in August, indicating the country is on the road to recovery.

However some employers say they’re having trouble finding labour.

Duane Rutherfurd, who runs East Coast Bullbars in Brisbane’s Clontarf, told the Australian Financial Review that he told two JobSeekers who had applied for a role, they were successful. 

‘We told them they had officially got the job but both said no because they didn’t want to do it because they didn’t want to have to drive that far,’ Mr Rutherfurd said.

‘It’s very frustrating…what I see is that the stimulus from the government has become a roadblock for getting some people off the lounge. It really is a disincentive.’  

Darren Steinberg, the chief executive of one of Australia’s largest property companies, Dexus, has a similar view.

‘People are saying: ”She’ll be right, mate. I’ll keep my support and I’ll lie around on the beach”.’

Brisbane business owner Duane Rutherfurd says the government stimulus has become a roadblock for getting some people off the lounge and is a disincentive

Brisbane business owner Duane Rutherfurd says the government stimulus has become a roadblock for getting some people off the lounge and is a disincentive

Brisbane business owner Duane Rutherfurd says the government stimulus has become a roadblock for getting some people off the lounge and is a disincentive

When advertising for a position before the pandemic, Mr Rutherfurd said he would normally get about 150 replies.

At the moment he says there are only 30 to 40. 

A survey of 1,100 businesses by the National Skills Commission’s earlier this week found 47 per cent of respondents were having trouble finding staff – a figure up 28 percent.

Meanwhile, the government’s other coronavirus supplement JobKeeper, has also come under fire on Friday after Treasury released data showing the Australian Taxation Office had received over 8000 tip-offs alleging misuse of the payment. 

Cafes and restaurant businesses were by far the worst offenders, followed hairdressing and beauty services. 

More than 900,000 businesses across Australia have received and handed out JobKeeper payments to 3.5 million workers totalling about $55billion. 

Treasury released data showing the Australian Taxation Office had received over 8000 tip-offs alleging misuse of the payment. Pictured are the worst offending industries

Treasury released data showing the Australian Taxation Office had received over 8000 tip-offs alleging misuse of the payment. Pictured are the worst offending industries

Treasury released data showing the Australian Taxation Office had received over 8000 tip-offs alleging misuse of the payment. Pictured are the worst offending industries

Powered by: Daily Mail

Continue Reading

Australia

Clive Palmer splurges on $8.3M yacht and names it Nancy-Jean after his mother who died in 2014

Published

on

By

clive palmer splurges on 8 3m yacht and names it nancy jean after his mother who died in 2014

Billionaire mining magnate Clive Palmer has purchased a $8.3million super yacht and renamed it after his late mother.

Mr Palmer reportedly arrived at Hamilton Island, in Queensland’s Whitsundays, last week to take possession of the 12-foot Sunseeker.

He purchased the boat, previously known as Vegas, from a businessman in July, the Sunday Telegraph reported.

Billionaire mining magnate Clive Palmer (pictured) has reportedly named a $8.3million yacht he bought in June after his mother

Billionaire mining magnate Clive Palmer (pictured) has reportedly named a $8.3million yacht he bought in June after his mother

Billionaire mining magnate Clive Palmer (pictured) has reportedly named a $8.3million yacht he bought in June after his mother

The boat was previously named Vegas. However, when it appeared last week, the superyacht had been repainted and renamed the Nancy-Jean

The boat was previously named Vegas. However, when it appeared last week, the superyacht had been repainted and renamed the Nancy-Jean

The boat was previously named Vegas. However, when it appeared last week, the superyacht had been repainted and renamed the Nancy-Jean

However, when it appeared last week in the resort playground, the superyacht had been repainted and renamed the Nancy-Jean.

The boat is named in honour of Mr Palmer’s mother, who died in 2014. 

She was in her 90s when she passed away ‘peacefully’. 

Residents said the arrival of Mr Palmer’s yacht has ‘turned a few heads’ for many reasons – in an area where it isn’t unusual to see a luxury boat.

One said it was ‘very bad juju’ that the boat had been renamed.     

‘Re-christening a boat is considered bad luck to boaties,’ said one local.

The boat (interior pictured) is named in honour of Mr Palmer's mother, who passed away in 2014

The boat (interior pictured) is named in honour of Mr Palmer's mother, who passed away in 2014

The boat (interior pictured) is named in honour of Mr Palmer’s mother, who passed away in 2014

‘A boat’s original name is recorded in what we call a “ledger of the deep” and changing it is considered very bad juju. It can be done but it’s extremely uncommon.’ 

Renaming a boat involves destroying log books with the old name. 

Others were simply captivated by the mere size of the three-storey vessel initially purchased in 2009.    

Daily Mail Australia has contacted Clive Palmer for comment. 

Powered by: Daily Mail

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 DiazHub.