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Quarantine whinger mopes about the standard of his meals – claims he’s being treated like a prisoner

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quarantine whinger mopes about the standard of his meals claims hes being treated like a prisoner

An Australian traveller claims he’s being treated worse than a prisoner as he waits out the mandatory two-week quarantine in a taxpayer-funded hotel.

The sailor, who refused to reveal his identity, is facing 14 days mandatory isolation at the Four Points by Sheraton in Brisbane on the taxpayer’s dime.

He only just arrived home from the Netherlands despite warnings for travellers to return to Australia in mid-March due to COVID-19.

In a rant to Daily Mail Australia about the quarantine process, the man complained about everything from the standards of his meals to the size of his room. 

An Australian traveller who waited three months to return home has complained about his taxpayer-funded quarantine conditions. Pictured: A breakfast he claimed was giving him 'serious risk of nutritional deficiency'

An Australian traveller who waited three months to return home has complained about his taxpayer-funded quarantine conditions. Pictured: A breakfast he claimed was giving him 'serious risk of nutritional deficiency'

An Australian traveller who waited three months to return home has complained about his taxpayer-funded quarantine conditions. Pictured: A breakfast he claimed was giving him ‘serious risk of nutritional deficiency’

‘The provided food is less than satisfactory and does not cover the basic nutritional food groups. I am at risk of nutritional deficiency,’ he told Daily Mail Australia.

He shared a photograph of a breakfast served during his stay which included a hash brown, grilled mushrooms, a tomato and an English muffin. 

He also said despite being told food would arrive three times a day at set times, it often arrived up to 90 minutes late and was sometimes cold.

The lack of fresh air and inability to open a window or stretch his legs on a balcony were also high up on his list of complaints. 

‘I understand that mandatory quarantine must take place, however, I do not consent to being treated worse than a prisoner,’ he said. 

He is facing a 14 days mandatory isolation at the Four Points by Sheraton in Brisbane. The che

He is facing a 14 days mandatory isolation at the Four Points by Sheraton in Brisbane. The che

He is facing a 14 days mandatory isolation at the Four Points by Sheraton in Brisbane, where the cheapest room is around $200 for one night

Food delivery is allowed for travellers in mandatory quarantine, through services like Deliveroo or Uber Eats.

However the traveller said because he was only informed ‘five minutes before’ landing he would be serving out two weeks in a hotel.

‘Due to the sudden situation, I am not equipped and prepared to make this transaction, making it impossible to gain outside deliveries,’ he said. 

He is staying at the Four Points Sheraton in Brisbane, part of the Marriott Hotel chain.

The cheapest room in the luxury hotel online is around $200, for one night and features WIFI, air conditioning and a flat screen TV.

Westin Hotels Group defended their quarantine conditions, saying they provided returning travellers 'three nutritious meals a day'

Westin Hotels Group defended their quarantine conditions, saying they provided returning travellers 'three nutritious meals a day'

 Westin Hotels Group defended their quarantine conditions, saying they provided returning travellers ‘three nutritious meals a day’

Westin Hotels Group Marketing Director Michelle Scott told Daily Mail Australia they provide ‘three nutritious meals a day’, 

‘The menu rotates on a daily basis and includes fresh whole fruit, vegetables, whole grain fibre, proteins such as chicken, beef, fish. We also cater for a large variety of food intolerances, allergies and dietary preferences that our guests advise us of,’ Ms Scott said. 

‘The health and wellbeing of our guests and hotel team are our top priority.’

Ms Scott also advised travellers can request access to fresh air and it will be organised with the Queensland Police. 

‘We are following the guidelines of the authorities and QLD Health regarding access to fresh air, where guests call to request this and its organised via the QPS,’ she said.

The federal government's mandatory quarantine for Australia travellers has been highly publicised around the world since beginning in early March

The federal government's mandatory quarantine for Australia travellers has been highly publicised around the world since beginning in early March

The federal government’s mandatory quarantine for Australia travellers has been highly publicised around the world since beginning in early March

The federal government’s mandatory quarantine for Australia travellers has been highly publicised around the world since early March. 

Residents are being placed into luxury hotels in Sydney or Brisbane for two weeks as part of efforts to stop community transmission of COVID-19.

The sailor is the latest in a long line of travellers who have aired frustrations about the conditions in their taxpayer-funded stays.

During the first wave of COVID-19, hundreds of travellers were funnelled from airport to hotel as part of coronavirus safety measures.

But there has been widespread complaints about the food on offer, and lack of fresh air and freedom from Australian travellers since the initiative began. 

This includes frustrations around a lack of vegan food available, a lack of air conditioning and paper-thin walls.

An image of the food served at the Crown Promenade Hotel in Melbourne at the end of March  taken by traveller Alex Oh

An image of the food served at the Crown Promenade Hotel in Melbourne at the end of March  taken by traveller Alex Oh

An image of the food served at the Crown Promenade Hotel in Melbourne at the end of March  taken by traveller Alex Oh

The hotel provided Ms Oh with breakfast, (pictured) lunch and dinner at no cost but she complained the meals weren't vegan and barely fill her stomach

The hotel provided Ms Oh with breakfast, (pictured) lunch and dinner at no cost but she complained the meals weren't vegan and barely fill her stomach

The hotel provided Ms Oh with breakfast, (pictured) lunch and dinner at no cost but she complained the meals weren’t vegan and barely fill her stomach 

One man holed up at the Hilton on Sydney described his room as a ‘luxurious jail cell’. 

While another likened the situation to imprisonment.  

‘It was just a nightmare … you really felt like you were in prison,’ he said.

While Instagram influencer and fitness coach Jess Pinili has been trolled online after she posted a video complaining about hotel quarantine. 

The string of complaints have been met with comments from authorities to stop whingeing. 

New South Wales Police Commissioner Mick Fuller said those being required to isolate should stop complaining about the accommodation.

While Instagram influencer and fitness coach Jess Pinili (pictured)  was trolled online after she posted a video complaining about hotel quarantine

While Instagram influencer and fitness coach Jess Pinili (pictured)  was trolled online after she posted a video complaining about hotel quarantine

While Instagram influencer and fitness coach Jess Pinili (pictured)  was trolled online after she posted a video complaining about hotel quarantine

‘I understand that maybe the sheets do not get changed daily but you are coming back into… five-star hotels. They are not going that badly. There are people after the bushfires still living in tents and caravans. People are going okay,’ he said.

‘The reality is they are in a hotel room, and yes, they will be isolated for 14 days. That is for their own protection, the protection of their family members and the protection of the NSW community.’

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian added: ‘It will not be perfect and foolproof.

‘We understand some people have had a very stressful time trying to get back home and we want to consider their position, but we also need to consider the health and safety of eight million residents in NSW and also more broadly, 25 million people in Australia.’ 

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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg DEAD

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justice ruth bader ginsburg dead

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died aged 87 after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer, the Supreme Court has announced. 

The judge, only the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court Justice, passed away surrounded by her family at her home in Washington D.C. following complications with her illness. 

Ginsburg, who served for almost 27 years on the highest court of the land, had battled several bouts of cancer after first being diagnosed in 2009.

Her death paves the way for Donald Trump to expand his conservative majority on the Supreme Court ahead of November’s election. 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured above in 2009, served for almost 27 years on the highest court of the land and was the second woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured above in 2009, served for almost 27 years on the highest court of the land and was the second woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured above in 2009, served for almost 27 years on the highest court of the land and was the second woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court

Ginsburg, the leader of the court’s four-member liberal wing, voiced concerns about the political impact of her passing in the days leading up to her death. 

‘My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed,’ the legal pioneer said in a statement dictated to her granddaughter Clara Spera days before her death.

Chief Justice John Roberts led tributes to his colleague Friday describing her as a ‘champion of justice’.

‘Our nation has lost a justice of historic stature,’ Roberts said in a statement. 

‘We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her, a tired and resolute champion of justice.’  

Ginsburg’s death gives Trump the opportunity to name her successor.

The president has already appointed two members of the Supreme Court, Justices Neil M. Gorsuch and Brett M. Kavanaugh, in a move that pushes the court increasingly right wing.

The replacement of Ginsburg by another Republican will leave the court Democrats outnumbered, with six Republicans to their three.   

Incredible life of the woman who became the Notorious RBG: How Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Brooklyn-born daughter of Russian Jewish migrants became a trailblazer, the second woman to serve as Supreme Court Justice and a feminist pop culture icon 

by Dusica Sue Malesevic for DailyMail.com

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court Justice, a legal pioneer who broke barriers for women in law, a feminist icon to many, and the recent pop culture phenomenon known as the ‘Notorious RBG’ has died. She was 87.

The collar-wearing octogenarian captured the public’s imagination – especially for those on the left who offered everything from kale to protective bubbles to later on wearing masks on social media to safeguard her continued tenure on the highest court in the land. The list of things that Ginsburg inspired is long: two films, memes that range from the ribald to inspirational, mountains of memorabilia from t-shirts to totes, cocktails, a book on her workout, and even tattoos.

But beyond the persona of the ‘Notorious RBG’ and her groundbreaking law career, Ginsburg was a mother of two, had two grandchildren, and was married to her husband Martin D. Ginsburg for 56 years until his death in 2010. She blazed a path for women in the legal profession, and at five-foot-one had become a towering figure in Washington, D.C. 

Ginsburg battled several bouts of cancer after being first diagnosed in 2009. 

Above, Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) at Fort Sill, Oklahoma in 1954. They were married for 56 years and met while they both attended Cornell University. After graduating, the couple moved to Fort Sill so Martin could do his military service

Above, Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) at Fort Sill, Oklahoma in 1954. They were married for 56 years and met while they both attended Cornell University. After graduating, the couple moved to Fort Sill so Martin could do his military service

Above, Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) at Fort Sill, Oklahoma in 1954. They were married for 56 years and met while they both attended Cornell University. After graduating, the couple moved to Fort Sill so Martin could do his military service

It was love at first Charles Dickens. Ruth Bader Ginsburg, (left), pictured here with her husband of 56 years, Martin D. Ginsburg (right). They met while college students at Cornell University during the 1950s. Ruth was impressed by Martin's answer to a quiz question during a literature class taught by famous novelist Vladimir Nabokov, according to the biography called ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life’ by Jane Sherron De Hart

It was love at first Charles Dickens. Ruth Bader Ginsburg, (left), pictured here with her husband of 56 years, Martin D. Ginsburg (right). They met while college students at Cornell University during the 1950s. Ruth was impressed by Martin's answer to a quiz question during a literature class taught by famous novelist Vladimir Nabokov, according to the biography called ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life’ by Jane Sherron De Hart

It was love at first Charles Dickens. Ruth Bader Ginsburg, (left), pictured here with her husband of 56 years, Martin D. Ginsburg (right). They met while college students at Cornell University during the 1950s. Ruth was impressed by Martin’s answer to a quiz question during a literature class taught by famous novelist Vladimir Nabokov, according to the biography called ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life’ by Jane Sherron De Hart

The Ginsburg family, above, in a photo taken in 1958. Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) with their daughter Jane C. Ginsburg (center). Jane C. Ginsburg followed in her mother's steps and became a lawyer after graduating from Harvard Law School, and currently teaches at Columbia Law School

The Ginsburg family, above, in a photo taken in 1958. Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) with their daughter Jane C. Ginsburg (center). Jane C. Ginsburg followed in her mother's steps and became a lawyer after graduating from Harvard Law School, and currently teaches at Columbia Law School

The Ginsburg family, above, in a photo taken in 1958. Martin D. Ginsburg (left) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) with their daughter Jane C. Ginsburg (center). Jane C. Ginsburg followed in her mother’s steps and became a lawyer after graduating from Harvard Law School, and currently teaches at Columbia Law School

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (center) and Martin D. Ginsburg (standing behind her) married in 1954 after she graduated at the top of her class at Cornell. Their first child, Jane C. Ginsburg, was born in  1955, and their second child, James S. Ginsburg, in 1965. Shown here on Oct. 21, 1993 at the Supreme Court, are from left, son-in-law George T. Spera Jr and her daughter Jane C. Ginsburg, her husband Martin, and her son James S. Ginsburg. The judge's grandchildren Clara Spera (left) and Paul Spera (right) are in front

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (center) and Martin D. Ginsburg (standing behind her) married in 1954 after she graduated at the top of her class at Cornell. Their first child, Jane C. Ginsburg, was born in  1955, and their second child, James S. Ginsburg, in 1965. Shown here on Oct. 21, 1993 at the Supreme Court, are from left, son-in-law George T. Spera Jr and her daughter Jane C. Ginsburg, her husband Martin, and her son James S. Ginsburg. The judge's grandchildren Clara Spera (left) and Paul Spera (right) are in front

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (center) and Martin D. Ginsburg (standing behind her) married in 1954 after she graduated at the top of her class at Cornell. Their first child, Jane C. Ginsburg, was born in  1955, and their second child, James S. Ginsburg, in 1965. Shown here on Oct. 21, 1993 at the Supreme Court, are from left, son-in-law George T. Spera Jr and her daughter Jane C. Ginsburg, her husband Martin, and her son James S. Ginsburg. The judge’s grandchildren Clara Spera (left) and Paul Spera (right) are in front

A 2018 biography emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s during a time where some women went to college to get their ‘MRS degree,’ meaning that it was a means to an end to find a spouse. Ginsburg said Martin was the ‘the only young man I dated who cared that I had a brain,’ and they had a long-lasting marriage until Martin died in 2010 from cancer at the age of 78. They are pictured here at a gala opening night dinner after a Washington Opera performance on October 21, 2000

A 2018 biography emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s during a time where some women went to college to get their ‘MRS degree,’ meaning that it was a means to an end to find a spouse. Ginsburg said Martin was the ‘the only young man I dated who cared that I had a brain,’ and they had a long-lasting marriage until Martin died in 2010 from cancer at the age of 78. They are pictured here at a gala opening night dinner after a Washington Opera performance on October 21, 2000

A 2018 biography emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s during a time where some women went to college to get their ‘MRS degree,’ meaning that it was a means to an end to find a spouse. Ginsburg said Martin was the ‘the only young man I dated who cared that I had a brain,’ and they had a long-lasting marriage until Martin died in 2010 from cancer at the age of 78. They are pictured here at a gala opening night dinner after a Washington Opera performance on October 21, 2000

Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her engagement photo taken in December 1953 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her engagement photo taken in December 1953 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her engagement photo taken in December 1953 

Born on March 15, 1933 in Brooklyn, Joan Ruth Bader was the second daughter of Russian Jewish immigrants, Celia and Nathan Bader. Her older sister, who would later die at aged six from meningitis, nicknamed her ‘Kiki’ for apparently being ‘a kicky baby.’ Her mother, Celia, a garment factory worker, would encourage Ruth – she went by her middle name to distinguish herself from the other Joans in her Brooklyn class – to attain a higher level of education than she did. 

‘My mother told me two things constantly. One was to be a lady, and the other was to be independent. The study of law was unusual for women of my generation. For most girls growing up in the ’40s, the most important degree was not your BA, but your MRS,’ she recalled to the ACLU, referring to the idea that women went to college to land a man, get married and become a missus – not to get a bachelor’s degree. 

Her mother died from cancer right before Ginsburg graduated from high school.

In 1950, Ginsburg started attending Cornell University where she would meet her husband, Martin D. Ginsburg, during a literature class taught by famous novelist Vladimir Nabokov, according to the biography called ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life’ by Jane Sherron De Hart.

Martin was able to answer Nabokov’s quiz question about Charles Dickens, and Ginsburg was smitten, later saying that Martin was the ‘the only young man I dated who cared that I had a brain.’

‘Meeting Marty was by far the most fortunate thing that ever happened to me,’ Ginsburg said in one of the films about her, the documentary ‘RBG.’ ‘Marty was a man blessed with a wonderful sense of humor. I tend to be rather sober.’

At aged 21, Ginsburg, who majored in government, graduated at the top of her class in 1954 at Cornell and married Martin soon after. Their first child, Jane C. Ginsburg, was born on July 21, 1955. Due to Martin’s military service, they moved to Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

‘After dinner, the newlyweds often spent their evenings reading aloud to each other from Pepys, Tolstoy, Dickens and even Spinoza, although the philosopher was tougher fare,’ De Hart wrote, according to a Washington Post article about the biography.

De Hart emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s, and the couple decided they both would pursue careers. After two years in Oklahoma, Ginsburg and Martin went to Harvard Law School in 1956. Women had only started being admitted to the law school six years earlier, and Ginsburg was one of nine women in a class of about 500.

Martin graduated from Harvard in 1958 and practiced tax law in New York. Ginsburg switched schools, attending Columbia Law School to be close to her husband. In 1959, she graduated with her law degree, a Juris Doctor, from Columbia, and was tied for first in her class.

A young Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured here in 1977, who broke barriers in the legal profession to become the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court justice

A young Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured here in 1977, who broke barriers in the legal profession to become the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court justice

A young Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured here in 1977, who broke barriers in the legal profession to become the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court justice

Despite the credentials, Ginsburg, now 26, was still a woman and she had a hard time finding a place at a law firm after graduation.

‘You think about what would have happened… Suppose I had gotten a job as a permanent associate. Probably I would have climbed up the ladder and today I would be a retired partner. So often in life, things that you regard as an impediment turn out to be great good fortune,’ Ginsburg said during the documentary series, ‘Makers: Women Who Make America.’

Ginsburg was also rejected for a Supreme Court clerkship due to being a woman. But there were successes as well: she was the first female member of the Harvard Law Review and was elected to the Columbia Law Review as well. Eventually, Ginsburg landed a clerkship for a judge of the US District Court for the Southern District of New York.

After two years with the Southern District, Ginsburg was a research associate and associate director for the Project of International Procedure at Columbia Law School. She also learned Swedish, and conducted research in Sweden for a book that she co-authored on civil procedure in the country. 

After serving as a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for 13 years, Ginsburg was nominated by President Bill Clinton to Supreme Court after Justice Byron White announced he was retiring. Clinton (left) is shaking Ginsburg's hand during the announcement in the Rose Garden at the White House on June 14, 1993

After serving as a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for 13 years, Ginsburg was nominated by President Bill Clinton to Supreme Court after Justice Byron White announced he was retiring. Clinton (left) is shaking Ginsburg's hand during the announcement in the Rose Garden at the White House on June 14, 1993

After serving as a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for 13 years, Ginsburg was nominated by President Bill Clinton to Supreme Court after Justice Byron White announced he was retiring. Clinton (left) is shaking Ginsburg’s hand during the announcement in the Rose Garden at the White House on June 14, 1993

'The announcement of this vacancy,' Clinton said on June 14, 1993, 'brought forth a unique outpouring of support for distinguished Americans on Judge Ginsburg’s behalf. What caused that outpouring is the essential quality of the judge herself: her deep respect for others and her willingness to subvert self-interest to the interest of our people and their institutions.' Ginsburg (pictured) at the announcement ceremony at the White House's Rose Garden

'The announcement of this vacancy,' Clinton said on June 14, 1993, 'brought forth a unique outpouring of support for distinguished Americans on Judge Ginsburg’s behalf. What caused that outpouring is the essential quality of the judge herself: her deep respect for others and her willingness to subvert self-interest to the interest of our people and their institutions.' Ginsburg (pictured) at the announcement ceremony at the White House's Rose Garden

‘The announcement of this vacancy,’ Clinton said on June 14, 1993, ‘brought forth a unique outpouring of support for distinguished Americans on Judge Ginsburg’s behalf. What caused that outpouring is the essential quality of the judge herself: her deep respect for others and her willingness to subvert self-interest to the interest of our people and their institutions.’ Ginsburg (pictured) at the announcement ceremony at the White House’s Rose Garden

In 1963, she started teaching at Rutgers University School of Law when there were few female law professors. Also during this time, she and Martin had their second child, James S. Ginsburg, on September 8, 1965. She taught at Rutgers until 1972 and then moved to Columbia Law School, where, at aged 39, she was the first woman put on a tenure track.

She taught at Columbia for eight years, co-authored a law school book, and also worked as general counsel for the ACLU, where she argued several hundred gender discrimination cases, six of which were before the Supreme Court. 

By 1980, Ginsburg, then 47, was selected to be a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, which is often a springboard to the Supreme Court. After thirteen years as a judge on that court, President Bill Clinton nominated the 60-year-old Ginsburg for the Supreme Court after Justice Byron White said he was retiring. 

‘The announcement of this vacancy,’ Clinton said on June 14, 1993, according to a YouTube video courtesy of the William J. Clinton Presidential Library, ‘brought forth a unique outpouring of support for distinguished Americans on Judge Ginsburg’s behalf. What caused that outpouring is the essential quality of the judge herself: her deep respect for others and her willingness to subvert self-interest to the interest of our people and their institutions.’

At the announcement, Ginsburg said: ‘Most closely, I have been aided by my life’s partner, Martin D. Ginsburg, who has been, since our teenage years, my best friend and biggest booster.’

On August 4, 1993, the US Senate confirmed her by a vote of 96 to 3, the New York Times reported. She was sworn in as a justice on August 10, 1993.

Later in October 1993, a photo shows Ginsburg and her family at the court. Her daughter, Jane C. Ginsburg, followed in her footsteps, graduating from Harvard Law School, and currently teaches at Columbia Law School. She married George T. Spera Jr and they have two children together: Paul Spera, who is an actor, and Clara Spera, who is also a lawyer and clerked for the US District of the Southern District of New York. 

With a vote of 96 to 3, the US Senate approved Ginsburg's nomination to the Supreme Court. She was confirmed, on August 3, 1993, to the position vacated by retiring Associate Justice Byron White. President Bill Clinton (left), who nominated Ginsburg (right), is seen here walking with her on the White House colonnade

With a vote of 96 to 3, the US Senate approved Ginsburg's nomination to the Supreme Court. She was confirmed, on August 3, 1993, to the position vacated by retiring Associate Justice Byron White. President Bill Clinton (left), who nominated Ginsburg (right), is seen here walking with her on the White House colonnade

With a vote of 96 to 3, the US Senate approved Ginsburg’s nomination to the Supreme Court. She was confirmed, on August 3, 1993, to the position vacated by retiring Associate Justice Byron White. President Bill Clinton (left), who nominated Ginsburg (right), is seen here walking with her on the White House colonnade

On August 10, 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was sworn in as a Supreme Court Justice - the second woman appointed to the court. Pictured above is Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist (right) swearing Ginsburg (with arm raised) in while her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (second from right) and President Bill Clinton (left) look on

On August 10, 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was sworn in as a Supreme Court Justice - the second woman appointed to the court. Pictured above is Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist (right) swearing Ginsburg (with arm raised) in while her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (second from right) and President Bill Clinton (left) look on

On August 10, 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was sworn in as a Supreme Court Justice – the second woman appointed to the court. Pictured above is Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist (right) swearing Ginsburg (with arm raised) in while her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (second from right) and President Bill Clinton (left) look on

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (left) with her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (right). At the announcement for her nomination to the Supreme Court on on June 14, 1993, Ginsburg said: 'Most closely, I have been aided by my life’s partner, Martin D. Ginsburg, who has been, since our teenage years, my best friend and biggest booster'

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (left) with her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (right). At the announcement for her nomination to the Supreme Court on on June 14, 1993, Ginsburg said: 'Most closely, I have been aided by my life’s partner, Martin D. Ginsburg, who has been, since our teenage years, my best friend and biggest booster'

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (left) with her husband Martin D. Ginsburg (right). At the announcement for her nomination to the Supreme Court on on June 14, 1993, Ginsburg said: ‘Most closely, I have been aided by my life’s partner, Martin D. Ginsburg, who has been, since our teenage years, my best friend and biggest booster’

In her biography, ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life,’ Jane Sherron De emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s, and the couple decided they both would pursue careers. After two years in Oklahoma, Ginsburg and Martin went to Harvard Law School in 1956. Women had only started being admitted to the law school six years earlier, and Ginsburg was one of nine women in a class of about 500.

In her biography, ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life,’ Jane Sherron De emphasized Marty’s ‘proto-feminism’ in the 1950s, and the couple decided they both would pursue careers. After two years in Oklahoma, Ginsburg and Martin went to Harvard Law School in 1956. Women had only started being admitted to the law school six years earlier, and Ginsburg was one of nine women in a class of about 500.

Jane Sherron De Hart, in her book, ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life,’ emphasized the ‘proto-feminism’ of Martin D. Ginsburg (left) in the 1950s, and the couple decided they both would pursue careers. Both Ruth Bader Ginsburg (right) and Martin went to Harvard Law School in 1956. Women had only started being admitted to the law school six years earlier, and Ginsburg was one of nine women in a class of about 500

Ginsburg told the New Republic that her grandchildren loved the fact that she had become an Internet sensation. 

‘At my advanced age – I’m now an octogenarian – I’m constantly amazed by the number of people who want to take my picture,’ she said in 2014.

Not only did people want their photo taken, an interest in her workout also took hold. In her eighties, Ginsburg would do exercises such as a wall squat with a yoga ball. So much so that her trainer of many years, Bryant Johnson, wrote the book ‘The RBG Workout.’

When Ginsburg joined the court in 1993, Sandra Day O’Connor had already been on it since 1981. Sandra Day O’Connor became the first woman to serve on the Supreme Court, nominated by President Ronald Reagan. Ginsburg called O’Connor a mentor, and Ginsburg told The Washington Post that they ‘thought it would be appropriate if we included as part of our robe something typical of a woman.

‘So I have many, many collars.’

Fans of Ginsburg have parsed her collars, which were sometimes lace, gold embellished and beaded. One was dubbed ‘the dissenter.’

A feminist icon to many, Ginsburg told ‘Makers,’ the documentary series, that feminism is ‘that notion that we should each be free to develop our own talents, whatever they may be, and not be held back by artificial barriers – manmade barriers, certainly not heaven sent.’  

After O’Connor retired in early 2006, Ginsburg was the only woman on the court until Sonia Sotomayor was confirmed on August 8, 2009. Ginsburg was also close to conservative justice Antonin Scalia until his death in February 2016.

‘We care about this institution more than our individual egos and we are all devoted to keeping the Supreme Court in the place that it is, as a co-equal third branch of government and I think a model for the world in the collegiality and independence of judges,’ Ginsburg said on C-SPAN.

In 2015, Ginsburg told MSNBC how she would liked to be remembered.  

‘Someone who used whatever talent she had to do her work to the very best of her ability. And to help repair tears in her society, to make things a little better through the use of whatever ability she has. To do something, as my colleague David Souter would say, outside myself. ‘Cause I’ve gotten much more satisfaction for the things that I’ve done for which I was not paid.’  

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Victoria records 21 new coronavirus cases and seven deaths

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Victoria has recorded 21 new cases of COVID-19 in the lowest daily increase since June, and a further seven deaths. 

Metropolitan Melbourne’s 14-day average has plummeted and now sits at 39.3 as the state moves to a COVID normal. 

In regional Victoria, the 14-day average is at just 1.9.

Victoria recorded 21 new cases of COVID-19 and seven deaths on Saturday. Pictured: A resident walks along South Wharf in Melbourne as part of their permitted exercise on Wednesday

Victoria recorded 21 new cases of COVID-19 and seven deaths on Saturday. Pictured: A resident walks along South Wharf in Melbourne as part of their permitted exercise on Wednesday

Victoria recorded 21 new cases of COVID-19 and seven deaths on Saturday. Pictured: A resident walks along South Wharf in Melbourne as part of their permitted exercise on Wednesday

The daily update comes as disgruntled Melburnians revealed they are planning to take to the streets again in protest of the city’s Stage Four lockdown restrictions. 

Over the last two weekends protesters have clashed with police at the Shrine Of Remembrance, The Tan track and Queen Victoria Market.

Police arrested 74 people and issued at least 176 infringement notices during last Sunday’s protest at the market.  

More to come. 

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Richard Wilkins strips down to his jocks in a Byron Bay car park

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richard wilkins strips down to his jocks in a byron bay car park

Richard Wilkins turned a car park into a change room while filming for the Today show in Byron Bay on Friday. 

The 66-year-old started off in a long-sleeved, blue shirt and dark jeans, while going without shoes. 

He quickly stripped down to just a pair of black underwear, showing off buff form in the process. 

Looking good! Richard Wilkins (pictured) opted to make a car park into a change room while filming for the Today show in Byron Bay on Friday

Looking good! Richard Wilkins (pictured) opted to make a car park into a change room while filming for the Today show in Byron Bay on Friday

Looking good! Richard Wilkins (pictured) opted to make a car park into a change room while filming for the Today show in Byron Bay on Friday

The entertainment reporter was all smiles as he performed his public strip off by his car. 

His boyish good looks evident, and wearing his blond hair in his trademark coif, Richard look far younger than his 66 years.  

Once he was out of his clothing, Richard popped on a pair of green shorts with a pineapple print. 

Dressed for success: The 66-year-old started off in a long-sleeved, blue shirt and dark jeans, while going without shoes

Dressed for success: The 66-year-old started off in a long-sleeved, blue shirt and dark jeans, while going without shoes

Dressed for success: The 66-year-old started off in a long-sleeved, blue shirt and dark jeans, while going without shoes

No drama! The entertainment reporter performed his public strip off by his car

No drama! The entertainment reporter performed his public strip off by his car

No drama! The entertainment reporter performed his public strip off by his car

Hey mate! The laid-back TV star chatted to a production assistant while taking off his clothing

Hey mate! The laid-back TV star chatted to a production assistant while taking off his clothing

Hey mate! The laid-back TV star chatted to a production assistant while taking off his clothing

No shoes! He went barefoot and the soles of his feet were muddied by the car park floor

No shoes! He went barefoot and the soles of his feet were muddied by the car park floor

No shoes! He went barefoot and the soles of his feet were muddied by the car park floor

Put them away: He then carried a number of garments, which appeared to be on hangers back to his car

Put them away: He then carried a number of garments, which appeared to be on hangers back to his car

Put them away: He then carried a number of garments, which appeared to be on hangers back to his car

He then carried a number of garments, which appeared to be on hangers back to his car. 

The laid-back TV star chatted to a production assistant while taking off his clothing, before wandering down to the beach.  

Richard has been spending a lot of time in Bryon Bay, where he has been enjoying romance with girlfriend Nicola Dale, after making it Instagram official back in July – also during a visit to Byron Bay. 

In his jocks! Richard smiled as he stood in his underwear, looking for his shorts inside the car

In his jocks! Richard smiled as he stood in his underwear, looking for his shorts inside the car

In his jocks! Richard smiled as he stood in his underwear, looking for his shorts inside the car 

Found them! He retrieved some bright swimwear from inside the vehicle

Found them! He retrieved some bright swimwear from inside the vehicle

Found them! He retrieved some bright swimwear from inside the vehicle 

Tropical: Once he was out of his clothing, Richard popped on a pair of green shorts with a pineapple print

Tropical: Once he was out of his clothing, Richard popped on a pair of green shorts with a pineapple print

Tropical: Once he was out of his clothing, Richard popped on a pair of green shorts with a pineapple print

Swim fan: His boyish good looks evident, and wearing his blond hair in his trademark coif, Richard look far younger than his 66 years as he headed for the beach

Swim fan: His boyish good looks evident, and wearing his blond hair in his trademark coif, Richard look far younger than his 66 years as he headed for the beach

Swim fan: His boyish good looks evident, and wearing his blond hair in his trademark coif, Richard look far younger than his 66 years as he headed for the beach 

The new relationship is going from strength to strength, and the couple looked smitten while enjoying lunch in Byron Bay with his son Christian earlier this month.

Christian recently transformed into a platinum blond for his acting role in the new Stan series Eden, starring alongside actor Samuel Johnson. 

The series is being set in the celebrity favoured enclave of Byron Bay and Richard stopped by the set to interview his son for Today recently. 

Together: Richard has been spending a lot of time in Bryon Bay, where he has been enjoying romance with girlfriend Nicola Dale (right) after making it Instagram official back in July - also during a visit to Byron Bay

Together: Richard has been spending a lot of time in Bryon Bay, where he has been enjoying romance with girlfriend Nicola Dale (right) after making it Instagram official back in July - also during a visit to Byron Bay

Together: Richard has been spending a lot of time in Bryon Bay, where he has been enjoying romance with girlfriend Nicola Dale (right) after making it Instagram official back in July – also during a visit to Byron Bay

All in the family: He also interviewed his son Christian (right) who recently transformed into a platinum blond for his acting role in the new Stan series Eden, which is filming in the area

All in the family: He also interviewed his son Christian (right) who recently transformed into a platinum blond for his acting role in the new Stan series Eden, which is filming in the area

All in the family: He also interviewed his son Christian (right) who recently transformed into a platinum blond for his acting role in the new Stan series Eden, which is filming in the area 

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