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Scientists worry whether COVID-19 vaccine will make a difference with 51 percent saying won’t take

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scientists worry whether covid 19 vaccine will make a difference with 51 percent saying wont take

Scientists in the U.S. are concerned that the battle to control the coronavirus has become so politicized that many people may decide not to take a vaccine when one becomes available. 

Several different companies are working to develop injections with the government having provided $10 billion of investment as part of ‘Operation Warp Speed’ which aims to deliver 300 million doses of a vaccine to Americans by January 2021. 

But such is the current mistrust of politicians and even the worry that any such ‘cure’ may be being rushed, that it could lead to greater numbers deciding not to get the jab at all. 

A Pew Research poll conducted last month found about half of US adults (51 percent) wouldn’t get a COVID-19 vaccine should one be available today. In May the figure was 72 percent.

Misinformation about the effects of a vaccine and the original causes behind the coronavirus pandemic have also contributed to the overall uncertainty.

'Operation Warp Speed' which aims to deliver 300 million doses of a vaccine to Americans by January 2021. Hundreds of vaccines in a pre-clinical testing phase

'Operation Warp Speed' which aims to deliver 300 million doses of a vaccine to Americans by January 2021. Hundreds of vaccines in a pre-clinical testing phase

‘Operation Warp Speed’ which aims to deliver 300 million doses of a vaccine to Americans by January 2021. Hundreds of vaccines in a pre-clinical testing phase

Adding to the worry, two major drug manufacturers halted their vaccine trials because of safety concerns. 

There are hundreds of vaccines in a pre-clinical testing phase, but only four — those run by Pfizer, Moderna, Johnson & Johnson, and AstraZeneca — are currently in Phase 3 clinical trials. 

In August, more than a third of Americans said they would not get a vaccine against coronavirus even if it were to be free and approved by the FDA. 

Sixty-five per cent of survey respondents say they would accept the offer and get themselves vaccinated while 35% said they would not. 

Those who who say they would not be happy to get the injection also runs roughly along party political lines with less than half of Republicans (47%) saying they would take the jab but with 81% of Democrats ready to line up to be inoculated, according to the poll by Gallup

‘As the situation stands today, the nation’s influencers — including health professionals, policymakers and leaders — who see a vaccine as a way forward may have their work cut out for them in persuading Americans to take advantage of such an option,’ Gallup said in a post announcing the findings. 

‘Policymakers in government, healthcare, industry and education will need to anticipate that a significant proportion of the population will be hesitant to get a vaccine, even at no cost,’ the group said. 

Some high profile voices are also expressing doubts over whether they would take the jab. 

Elon Musk, 49, said he won't get a coronavirus vaccine when they're available because he's 'not at risk', in an interview with the New York Times earlier this month

Elon Musk, 49, said he won't get a coronavirus vaccine when they're available because he's 'not at risk', in an interview with the New York Times earlier this month

Elon Musk, 49, said he won’t get a coronavirus vaccine when they’re available because he’s ‘not at risk’, in an interview with the New York Times earlier this month

In September, Elon Musk revealed he would not get a coronavirus vaccine when available because he’s ‘not at risk’.

The Tesla and SpaceX founder said in a New York Times’ podcast that even when vaccines are readily accessible, he won’t take one.

When asked ‘Will you get a vaccine? What will you do with your own family?’ he curtly replied, ‘No, I’m not at risk for COVID. Nor are my kids.’

‘I mean this is a hot button issue where rationality takes a back seat. In the grand scheme of things what we have something with a very low mortality rate and high contagion,’ he said.  

‘Vaccine hesitancy’ is one of the top-ten threats to global health according to the World Health Organization.

A protester holds an anti-vaccination sign in California. Several polls have suggested that Republicans are more likely to refuse a vaccine than Democrat supporters

A protester holds an anti-vaccination sign in California. Several polls have suggested that Republicans are more likely to refuse a vaccine than Democrat supporters

A protester holds an anti-vaccination sign in California. Several polls have suggested that Republicans are more likely to refuse a vaccine than Democrat supporters

Physician and medical misinformation expert at the City University of New York and Columbia University, Scott Ratzan, says anti-COVID vaccine sentiment is the result of 'a massive assault on trust in government, in science and in public-health authorities.'

Physician and medical misinformation expert at the City University of New York and Columbia University, Scott Ratzan, says anti-COVID vaccine sentiment is the result of 'a massive assault on trust in government, in science and in public-health authorities.'

Physician and medical misinformation expert at the City University of New York and Columbia University, Scott Ratzan, says anti-COVID vaccine sentiment is the result of ‘a massive assault on trust in government, in science and in public-health authorities.’

There is also plenty of misinformation that has mostly been spread online through social media and a controversial documentary ‘Plandemic,’ in which discredited virologist Judy Mikovits claims a hypothetical COVID vaccine would ‘kill millions.’

Physician and medical misinformation expert at the City University of New York and Columbia University, Scott Ratzan, says anti-COVID vaccine sentiment is the result of ‘a massive assault on trust in government, in science and in public-health authorities.’ 

‘Throw in QAnon and people’s increasing impatience with the effect of the disease on their lives and livelihoods, and you have fertile ground to sow anti-science propaganda,’ Ratzan said to the New York Post. ‘It’s been like manna from heaven for hardcore anti-vaxxers.’

Rita Palma, seen first on left, is the founder of the anti-vax group My Kids, My Choice. She has seen a recent bump her in membership because of the doubt expressed publicly by politicians and personalities alike.

Rita Palma, seen first on left, is the founder of the anti-vax group My Kids, My Choice. She has seen a recent bump her in membership because of the doubt expressed publicly by politicians and personalities alike.

Rita Palma, seen first on left, is the founder of the anti-vax group My Kids, My Choice. She has seen a recent bump her in membership because of the doubt expressed publicly by politicians and personalities alike.

'COVID is God's gift to the vaccine-choice movement,' she says. 'It's woken up so many people and put us in a national spotlight. People are finally questioning and having doubt about vaccines,' Palma said

'COVID is God's gift to the vaccine-choice movement,' she says. 'It's woken up so many people and put us in a national spotlight. People are finally questioning and having doubt about vaccines,' Palma said

‘COVID is God’s gift to the vaccine-choice movement,’ she says. ‘It’s woken up so many people and put us in a national spotlight. People are finally questioning and having doubt about vaccines,’ Palma said

Rita Palma is the founder of the anti-vax group My Kids, My Choice.

‘COVID is God’s gift to the vaccine-choice movement,’ she says. ‘It’s woken up so many people and put us in a national spotlight. People are finally questioning and having doubt about vaccines,’ she told the Post. 

Palma, 57, from New York started her group in 2006 which now has around 3,000 members.   

‘I’ve been getting so many e-mails and texts from people,’ she says.  ‘They don’t want the COVID vaccine. Even people who vaccinate their families are like, ‘Oh, no, I’m not taking that one.”

‘Even if God himself came down from the heavens and said it will do you no harm, I’d say ‘No thank you,’ Palma says. ‘I believe in a whole different way of taking care of the body. I believe in healthy foods, sunshine, love, Earth connection, exercise. I just don’t believe good health can ever be found in an injection.’ 

If fewer people decide to get the vaccine, then its overall effect will be diminished according to Johns Hopkins University which estimates between 70 and 90 percent of Americans will need to have coronavirus antibodies in order for society to reach herd immunity. 

'If Dr. [Anthony] Fauci, if the doctors, tell us that we should take it, then I'll be first in line to take it,' Sen. Kamala Harris stated during her vice presidential debate earlier this month. 'But if Donald Trump tells us that we should take it — then I'm not taking it.'

'If Dr. [Anthony] Fauci, if the doctors, tell us that we should take it, then I'll be first in line to take it,' Sen. Kamala Harris stated during her vice presidential debate earlier this month. 'But if Donald Trump tells us that we should take it — then I'm not taking it.'

‘If Dr. [Anthony] Fauci, if the doctors, tell us that we should take it, then I’ll be first in line to take it,’ Sen. Kamala Harris stated during her vice presidential debate earlier this month. ‘But if Donald Trump tells us that we should take it — then I’m not taking it.’ 

'Politics has clearly been inserted into scientific discovery these past few months,' says Rohan Arora, 19, an environmental health activist based in Washington, DC.

'Politics has clearly been inserted into scientific discovery these past few months,' says Rohan Arora, 19, an environmental health activist based in Washington, DC.

‘Politics has clearly been inserted into scientific discovery these past few months,’ says Rohan Arora, 19, an environmental health activist based in Washington, DC.

‘A vaccine won’t do much good unless we have a significant number of the population immunized,’ says Ratzan. 

According to a recent Harris STAT poll, 78 percent of Americans are worried that a COVID-19 vaccine is being influenced more by politics than science. 

‘Politicians giving public-health advice during the COVID-19 crisis has led to public confusion both about what is truth and what is fiction,’ said Nancy Kass, a professor of Bioethics and Public Health at Johns Hopkins to The Post. 

‘It’s turned COVID into a political disease rather than a public-health problem.’ 

Some of the anti-Trump, anti-vaccine backlash has been created by members of the Democratic Party. 

‘If Dr. [Anthony] Fauci, if the doctors, tell us that we should take it, then I’ll be first in line to take it,’ Sen. Kamala Harris stated during her vice-presidential debate. ‘But if Donald Trump tells us that we should take it — then I’m not taking it.’ 

'I'm really skeptical about whether these vaccines are being streamlined by credible researchers. Considering that this is an election year, it's clear politicians have a vested interest in coming up with any solution to end this pandemic, even if the solution is just an ineffective PR facade,' says Arora

'I'm really skeptical about whether these vaccines are being streamlined by credible researchers. Considering that this is an election year, it's clear politicians have a vested interest in coming up with any solution to end this pandemic, even if the solution is just an ineffective PR facade,' says Arora

‘I’m really skeptical about whether these vaccines are being streamlined by credible researchers. Considering that this is an election year, it’s clear politicians have a vested interest in coming up with any solution to end this pandemic, even if the solution is just an ineffective PR facade,’ says Arora

‘Politics has clearly been inserted into scientific discovery these past few months,’ says Rohan Arora, 19, an environmental health activist based in Washington, DC. 

‘I’m really skeptical about whether these vaccines are being streamlined by credible researchers. Considering that this is an election year, it’s clear politicians have a vested interest in coming up with any solution to end this pandemic, even if the solution is just an ineffective PR facade.’ 

In another poll by Pew Research, 78 percent believe vaccines are being developed too quickly, before being safely tested safety and effectiveness are fully understood. 

The New England Journal of Medicine recently published a paper suggesting that those in the public unwilling to take a COVID vaccine voluntarily ‘should incur a penalty’ — and a ‘relatively substantial’ one, including ’employment suspension or stay-at-home orders.’ 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Australia

Farmer slams influencers ‘invading’ neighbour’s canola field  

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farmer slams influencers invading neighbours canola field

A mother-of-two has slammed day trippers for ‘invading’ her neighbour’s canola field to take photos for their Instagram pages. 

Barbara Bryan, who runs Lets Go Mum on Instagram, shared a video to TikTok of her driving past dozens of people trampling through the field in New South Wales.

‘Influencers invading my neighbour’s canola field,’ text overlaid on the video read.

Barbara Bryan, who runs Lets Go Mum on Instagram, shared a video to TikTok of her driving past dozens of people standing in the field in New South Wales

Barbara Bryan, who runs Lets Go Mum on Instagram, shared a video to TikTok of her driving past dozens of people standing in the field in New South Wales

'Influencers invading my neighbour's canola field,' text overlaid on the video read

'Influencers invading my neighbour's canola field,' text overlaid on the video read

Barbara Bryan, who runs Lets Go Mum on Instagram, shared a video to TikTok of her driving past dozens of people standing in the field in New South Wales. ‘Influencers invading my neighbour’s canola field,’ text overlaid on the video read

She captioned the video with hashtags ‘Influencers In The Wild’ and ‘They Do This Every Year’. 

Ms Bryan said the footage was taken on the Federal Highway, between Canberra and Goulburn.

The video has been viewed more than 45,000 times, with TikTok users commenting their disappointment with the day trippers. 

‘Rude! Zero class,’ one person wrote.

‘They destroy people’s income,’ another said.

A third wrote: ‘Yeah it might not cost us a lot, maybe $50 max but it’s the disrespect. First it’s illegal but like we’re trying to feed our country and ppl just don’t care and think it’s okay to walk all through it.’  

Pictured: A woman in a hat poses in front of canola fields for an Instagram picture

Pictured: A woman in a hat poses in front of canola fields for an Instagram picture

Pictured: A woman in a hat poses in front of canola fields for an Instagram picture

She captioned the video with hashtags 'Influencers In The Wild' and 'They Do This Every Year'

She captioned the video with hashtags 'Influencers In The Wild' and 'They Do This Every Year'

She captioned the video with hashtags ‘Influencers In The Wild’ and ‘They Do This Every Year’

Cowra, in the Central West region of New South Wales, made headlines earlier this month when it became an overnight tourist attraction as thousands of vistors flocked to take selfies in canola fields. 

The area saw 2,160 day trippers over the October long weekend – up from the usual 200 – while staff scrambled to create ‘canola tours’ to meet the demand.

‘We had so many people coming just for the canola that we did up a canola touring guide for them,’ centre employee Kurt Overzet told the Canberra Times.

Farmer Douglas Houston said some groups made the four-hour-long trip from Sydney to take photos of the blooming crop, before getting back in the car and heading home.

‘We’ve had a bunch of tourists coming just looking at paddocks. They love it. There must be something about the yellow flower which just intrigues people,’ he told the publication. 

The video has been viewed more than 45,000 times, with TikTok users commenting their disappointment with the Instagramers. Pictured: A woman poses for a picture at a canola field

The video has been viewed more than 45,000 times, with TikTok users commenting their disappointment with the Instagramers. Pictured: A woman poses for a picture at a canola field

The video has been viewed more than 45,000 times, with TikTok users commenting their disappointment with the Instagramers. Pictured: A woman poses for a picture at a canola field

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Mosaic Brands which owns Noni B, Katies, Millers and Rivers announces it WILL close 250 stores 

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mosaic brands which owns noni b katies millers and rivers announces it will close 250 stores

The fashion retailer behind iconic Australian brands including Millers, Rivers, Katies and Noni B, has announced it will close up to 250 stores as it struggles to cope in the coronavirus downturn.

Scott Evans, the chief executive of Mosaic Brands, had warned the group could be forced to shut as many as 500 of its 1,400 stores nationwide, but hoped to negotiate rent discounts with retail landlords.

The company announced though on Thursday many of those negotiations had been unsuccessful, with some refusing to offer rental help to keep shop doors open, resulting in the loss of thousands of jobs.

‘We’re encouraged that a number of landlords have in recent weeks come to the table on rental reductions but not all have and we expect up to a further 250 store closures by June 2021,’ Mr Evans said. 

Fashion retailer Mosaic brands, which owns Millers, Rivers, Katie's and Noni B, has announced it will close 250 stores

Fashion retailer Mosaic brands, which owns Millers, Rivers, Katie's and Noni B, has announced it will close 250 stores

Fashion retailer Mosaic brands, which owns Millers, Rivers, Katie’s and Noni B, has announced it will close 250 stores

The company, which runs Katies, would be pushing on to close more stores as landlords refused to cancel rents amid the COVID-19 downturn

The company, which runs Katies, would be pushing on to close more stores as landlords refused to cancel rents amid the COVID-19 downturn

The company, which runs Katies, would be pushing on to close more stores as landlords refused to cancel rents amid the COVID-19 downturn

The growth of online, putting products on sale and a 50 per cent drop in inventory holdings led to a 67 per cent margin growth compared to 61.8 per cent the same time last year.

‘We’ve found ourselves in an unfamiliar position, for any retailer, where our customers have wanted to visit our stores but couldn’t – and we’re saying by and large that’s been for the best,’ Mr Evans said. 

‘With most restrictions lockdowns now lifted we are confident those customers will stir from that hibernation and resume visiting our loyalty brands. Exactly when they will have the confidence to return in-store is still unknown.’

In August, Mosaic was involved with a rental dispute with Scentre Group.

Westfield boarded up more than 129 shops following the fracas.

Retailers either refused to pay rent during coronavirus lockdown or negotiated to pay a lower amount.

The growth of online, putting products on sale and a 50 per cent drop in inventory holdings led to a 67 per cent margin growth compared to 61.8 per cent the same time last year

The growth of online, putting products on sale and a 50 per cent drop in inventory holdings led to a 67 per cent margin growth compared to 61.8 per cent the same time last year

The growth of online, putting products on sale and a 50 per cent drop in inventory holdings led to a 67 per cent margin growth compared to 61.8 per cent the same time last year

Mosaic had reportedly been paying the shopping centre empire a lower percentage of rent during and were trying to come to an agreement moving forward but Scentre Group did not approve of the changes.

The dispute reportedly came to a head when Scentre demanded payment from the brands for outstanding rent.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Final question in HSC maths exam stumps Year 12 students

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final question in hsc maths exam stumps year 12 students

The last question in the HSC’s level two extension mathematics exam is considered to be the toughest challenge any year school-leaver can face.

The New South Wales Education Standards Authority have become notorious for making the final question exceedingly difficult and in 2020 it was no different.

On the back of a long and difficult coronavirus-interrupted year, the state’s top Year 12 maths students were hit with a ‘integration’ brain-teaser.

The New South Wales Education Standards Authority have become notorious for making the final question exceedingly difficult and in 2020 it was no different (stock image)

The New South Wales Education Standards Authority have become notorious for making the final question exceedingly difficult and in 2020 it was no different (stock image)

The New South Wales Education Standards Authority have become notorious for making the final question exceedingly difficult and in 2020 it was no different (stock image)

On the back of a long and difficult coronavirus-interrupted year, the state's top mathematics students were hit with an 'integration' brain-teaser (pictured, the last question in the HSC's level two extension maths exam)

On the back of a long and difficult coronavirus-interrupted year, the state's top mathematics students were hit with an 'integration' brain-teaser (pictured, the last question in the HSC's level two extension maths exam)

On the back of a long and difficult coronavirus-interrupted year, the state’s top mathematics students were hit with an ‘integration’ brain-teaser (pictured, the last question in the HSC’s level two extension maths exam)

The complex problem asks students to determine the area or volume within an irregular shape.

In order to do this students must use a mixture of advanced trigonometry substitutions and recurrence patterns and incorporate a litany of reduction formulas including Wallis integrals.

In years to come by, the final question which is worth 11 per cent of the paper’s total grade, was normally focused around geometry.

But this year a new syllabus was introduced and exactly what kind of question would be chosen remained a mystery right up until exam day.

Raj Taware, a Sydney Technical High School student, told the Sydney Morning Herald he expected the question would be about vectors – the newest topic in the updated syllabus – and was very surprised when it turned out to be on integration.

Nevertheless, Raj was able to figure out all four parts of the mind-numbing equation and said the key to solving it was identifying repeating patterns and then reducing the question into simpler forms.

Raj Taware said the key to solving it was identifying repeating patterns and then reducing the question into simpler forms. (pictured, the answer to part i)

Raj Taware said the key to solving it was identifying repeating patterns and then reducing the question into simpler forms. (pictured, the answer to part i)

Raj Taware said the key to solving it was identifying repeating patterns and then reducing the question into simpler forms. (pictured, the answer to part i)

'It tested your ability to realise how to make a recurrence pattern. That's why most people were stuck,' Raj said (pictured, the answer to part ii)

'It tested your ability to realise how to make a recurrence pattern. That's why most people were stuck,' Raj said (pictured, the answer to part ii)

‘It tested your ability to realise how to make a recurrence pattern. That’s why most people were stuck,’ Raj said (pictured, the answer to part ii)

Raj said you have to observe which ones are integral-friendly and which ones are differential-friendly. Some people wouldn't necessarily realise that (pictured, the answer to part iii)

Raj said you have to observe which ones are integral-friendly and which ones are differential-friendly. Some people wouldn't necessarily realise that (pictured, the answer to part iii)

Raj said you have to observe which ones are integral-friendly and which ones are differential-friendly. Some people wouldn’t necessarily realise that (pictured, the answer to part iii)

Raj said if you split this up, life becomes easier for you (pictured, the answer to part iv)

Raj said if you split this up, life becomes easier for you (pictured, the answer to part iv)

Raj said if you split this up, life becomes easier for you (pictured, the answer to part iv)

‘It tested your ability to realise how to make a recurrence pattern. That’s why most people were stuck,’ he said.

‘There was observation required. Basically, you have to observe which ones are integral-friendly and which ones are differential-friendly. Some people wouldn’t necessarily realise that, if you split this up, life becomes easier for you.

‘The third part was the trickier one, where you had to realise trigonometry substitution is the key.’

The 18-year-old, who plans to pursue actuarial studies at university next year, said although the question did annoy some people, he thought it was ‘relatively easy’, compared to previous years.

Almost 60,000 students across the state took a mathematics subject in 2020, but only about 3400 sat for the extension two exam. 

Although maths extension two students can now celebrate after handing in their final paper this week, exams are still continuing for a range of other subjects. 

Maths extension one, modern history, society and culture and PDHPE exams are set to take place on Thursday and Friday.

Almost 60,000 students across the state took a mathematics subject in 2020, but only about 3400 sat for the extension two exam

Almost 60,000 students across the state took a mathematics subject in 2020, but only about 3400 sat for the extension two exam

Almost 60,000 students across the state took a mathematics subject in 2020, but only about 3400 sat for the extension two exam

But while the extension two maths left many students puzzled, there was also a vast number of school-leaver left frustrated after struggling with a string of left-field questions in Monday’s HSC standard mathematics exam.    

The syllabus change resulted in many questions being common to both the standard and advanced mathematics courses. 

One particular question in the standard maths paper about crickets chirping blindsided thousands of pupils.

Students were given a box-plot of temperature data and then asked to: ‘calculate the number of chirps expected in a 15-second interval when the temperature is 19° Celsius. Give your answer correct to the nearest whole number’.

Oak Ukritnukun, Matrix Education’s head of mathematics, admitted the question was ‘really challenging.’

The question about cricket chirping (pictured above) which baffled many HSC students sitting their 2020 maths exam

The question about cricket chirping (pictured above) which baffled many HSC students sitting their 2020 maths exam

The question about cricket chirping (pictured above) which baffled many HSC students sitting their 2020 maths exam

Students needed to detail the number of chirps in a 15 second interval when the temperature was 19 degrees Celsius

Students needed to detail the number of chirps in a 15 second interval when the temperature was 19 degrees Celsius

Students needed to detail the number of chirps in a 15 second interval when the temperature was 19 degrees Celsius

‘You need to do quite a few things right to get full marks,’ he said.

‘Focus should be placed on first identifying the median, then the mean temperature. After that calculate the mean number of chirps and the value of B. You then use the value of Y to determine the number of chirps, which as a whole number gives you an answer of 29.’  

CRICKET CHIRP QUESTION EXPLAINED 

1) Identify the median (22 degrees Celsius)

2) Identify the mean temperature (21.475 degrees Celsius) 

3) Find the mean number of chirps over 15 seconds (34.2)

4) Find the value of b, by substituting x and y into the equation given:

 y = -10.6063 + bx 

34.2 = -10.6063 + b (21.475)

 b= 2.0864

5) Using the above information, find the number of chirps (y) when the temperature (x) is 19 degrees Celcius.

y = -10.6063 + (2.0864) (19) 

The answer is 29.02, or 29 to the nearest whole number

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A spokesperson from the NSW Standards Authority acknowledged some of the questions were ‘challenging,’ before adding they were part of the broader syllabus. 

Karen McDaid, the Mathematical Association of NSW president, felt the introduction of an extra booklet also rattled many students, particularly those sitting the standard maths exam.

She revealed it ‘wasn’t part of the instructions for what students expected’ and many said at the conclusion of the paper it was ‘very difficult.’

Belinda Aylett, Parramatta High School’s head of maths, also said there was a ‘little bit of surprise’ for her students. 

Earlier this month, an interpretive question baffled tens of thousands of students who sat for the English HSC exam.

Students were presented with an image of a man rowing a boat with a pencil through a wild sea accompanied by a number of words.

They were then asked to explain how the image used a variety of language forms and features to best communicate creative ideas. 

American based Julie Paschkis, the artist behind the painting, said her aim was to ‘savour language’ and show students that answers can be open ended.

‘When I put words in paintings I am thinking about the meaning of it, but I am also thinking about the sound of it or the look of it. It is a playful approach to the language, it is not just one meaning, she said.

‘My hope in education is that there is room for open ended exploration.’

The interpretive painting (pictured above) which confused tens of thousands of students sitting the English HSC exam earlier this month

The interpretive painting (pictured above) which confused tens of thousands of students sitting the English HSC exam earlier this month

The interpretive painting (pictured above) which confused tens of thousands of students sitting the English HSC exam earlier this month

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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