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Self-taught baker, 26, wows with simple recipe for red velvet cake – and you can make it in a MUG

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self taught baker 26 wows with simple recipe for red velvet cake and you can make it in a mug

A video from ‘Instagram famous’ baker Eloise Head showing viewers a simple way to make a red velvet mug cake has gone viral, with many calling it her best recipe yet.

The 26-year-old, who is the founder of FitWaffle Kitchen, an Instagram page dedicated to decadent desserts that take just a few minutes to prepare, has amassed almost 26,500 likes on her latest clip since it was shared on Thursday.

In it, the amateur chef from London whips up an indulgent sponge with basic supermarket ingredients like butter, flour, sugar, vegetable oil and food colouring to give the mixture its signature ruby hue – all inside a coffee cup.

Ms Head said it’s ‘by far the quickest red velvet recipe’ she has ever shared and it’s so easy, it’s virtually impossible to mess up – even for beginners.

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London baker Eloise Head's red velvet mug cake, which she claims is 'by far the quickest recipe' she has ever shared

London baker Eloise Head's red velvet mug cake, which she claims is 'by far the quickest recipe' she has ever shared

London baker Eloise Head’s red velvet mug cake, which she claims is ‘by far the quickest recipe’ she has ever shared

Ms Head, 26, who built a mammoth Instagram following of 682,000 during lockdown by sharing her simple tricks for making decadent desserts

Ms Head, 26, who built a mammoth Instagram following of 682,000 during lockdown by sharing her simple tricks for making decadent desserts

Her latest recipe involves mixing basic supermarket ingredients like butter, flour and sugar in a coffee cup

Her latest recipe involves mixing basic supermarket ingredients like butter, flour and sugar in a coffee cup

Ms Head (left) built a mammoth Instagram following of 682,000 during lockdown by sharing her simple tricks for making decadent desserts (right)

To make the sponge, whisk three tablespoons of milk with a half teaspoon of lemon juice in a mug.

Then add four tablespoons of flour, two tablespoons of sugar, a quarter teaspoon of baking powder, three quarters of a teaspoon of cocoa powder, one and a half tablespoons of vegetable oil and a dash of food colouring, mixing until smooth.

Add a handful of white chocolate chips – though these are optional – on top, fold in, then microwave for about 70 seconds before turning your attention to the cream cheese icing.

This can be made by mixing 40 grams of cream cheese with 15 grams of icing sugar – it’s that simple.

Spoon a generous dollop of icing over the top along with a sprinkle of icing sugar for decoration, before tucking in – that’s roughly five minutes preparation time from start to finish.

Recipe for red velvet mug cake 

Ingredients

For the sponge 

3 tbsp milk

1/2 tsp lemon juice or white vinegar

4 tbsp plain flour

2 tbsp granulated sugar

3/4 tsp cocoa powder

1/4 tsp baking powder

1 1/2 tbsp vegetable oil

Red food colouring

30g white choc chips

For the cream cheese icing 

40g cream cheese

15g icing sugar 

Method

1. Whisk milk with lemon juice in a mug.

2. Add flour, sugar, baking powder, cocoa powder, vegetable oil and a dash of food colouring and mix until smooth.

3. Sprinkle white chocolate chips over the top, fold in, then microwave for about 70 seconds.

4. Mix icing sugar with cream cheese to make the frosting, then spoon on top and enjoy.

Source: FitWaffle Kitchen

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The tutorial drew hundreds of delighted responses, with many tagging their friends begging them to make the mug cake at home.

‘Need to try this,’ one woman replied.

‘Adding these to my list,’ said a second.

It’s the latest of Ms Head’s simple recipes to become a viral sensation, following wildly popular videos on Nutella brownies with a marbled chocolate top and red velvet brownies.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Australia

Victorian quarantine dodger is fined $5,000 in the Northern Territory

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victorian quarantine dodger is fined 5000 in the northern territory

A Victorian man has been slapped with a $5,000 fine for flouting the Northern Territory’s quarantine rules.

The 30-year-old was permitted to enter the NT to perform essential work on the proviso he isolated for 14-days after arrival.

But the man was not at his Darwin quarantine accommodation when compliance officers dropped by on Monday.

A Victorian man has been slapped with a $5,000 fine for flouting the Northern Territory's quarantine rules (file picture)

A Victorian man has been slapped with a $5,000 fine for flouting the Northern Territory's quarantine rules (file picture)

A Victorian man has been slapped with a $5,000 fine for flouting the Northern Territory’s quarantine rules (file picture)

‘He was contacted by police and was told to immediately return,’ a spokesman said Tuesday.

The man was later tested for COVID-19 and returned a negative result.

Officers issued him with a $5,056 fine for breaching his quarantine requirements.

Meanwhile, an 18-year-old man has been fined for failing to wear a mask in the Howard Springs quarantine facility after being repeatedly warned for not doing so.

The infringement penalty for failing to abide by the NT Chief Health Officer’s directions is $25,280 for a business and $5,056 for an individual.

NT Police and Environmental Health Officers have conducted 32,955 compliance checks and 152 fines have been issued for breaching COVID-19 health directions.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Hundreds of Centrelink workers will be forced to join the welfare queue after being SACKED

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hundreds of centrelink workers will be forced to join the welfare queue after being sacked

Hundreds of workers have been fired without redundancy payouts only two months before Christmas

The 420 employees working as Centrelink call centre operators at Dandenong and Mill Park in suburban Melbourne were told on Tuesday their jobs no longer exist.

They won’t be given payouts because they were employed as casuals.  

Centrlink Call centre operators will be forced to join the queue for welfare payments from October 30  (Pictured: queues form outside the Centrelink office in Melbourne in March)

Centrlink Call centre operators will be forced to join the queue for welfare payments from October 30  (Pictured: queues form outside the Centrelink office in Melbourne in March)

Centrlink Call centre operators will be forced to join the queue for welfare payments from October 30  (Pictured: queues form outside the Centrelink office in Melbourne in March)

They will be forced to join the queue for welfare payments from October 30, in a move described as a ‘disgrace’ by the federal opposition. 

Workers were contracted to the Service Australia welfare department by the $2billion British Public Service group Serco. 

The company told workers on Tuesday they had lost the contract for after-hours processing with Services Australia, according to the Age.    

The 420 employees working as Centrelink call centre operators Dandenong and Mill Park in suburban Melbourne were told on Tuesday their jobs no longer exist (Pictured: stock image of call centre workers)

The 420 employees working as Centrelink call centre operators Dandenong and Mill Park in suburban Melbourne were told on Tuesday their jobs no longer exist (Pictured: stock image of call centre workers)

The 420 employees working as Centrelink call centre operators Dandenong and Mill Park in suburban Melbourne were told on Tuesday their jobs no longer exist (Pictured: stock image of call centre workers)

Worker Sinead McKinlay, 34, said even though it’s legal, it doesn’t seem fair to the workers. 

She said workers began to ‘feel sick’ as soon as they were told they were going to meet with managers. 

‘With our history with Serco, there is no trust. At a whim they shut us down, don’t pay us, cut us off. People knew something was coming,’ she said. 

‘There’s a lot of younger and older workers and workers with English as a second language. They will struggle in the job market and face financial hardship … I’m concerned for their mental health, for potential self-harm and family violence.’

Serco said it is hoping to explore the possibility of finding work for the displaced employees elsewhere. 

The Australian Services Union described the decision as ‘heartless’.

The union’s Victorian Branch secretary Matt Norrey, said workers are bearing the brunt of the company’s deteriorating business circumstances.  

Meanwhile Labor’s government services spokesman, Bill Shorten is demanding an explanation. 

‘The Morrison government preach a lot about Team Australia but are quite happy to give other Australians the boot,’ eh said. 

Services Australia General Manager Hank Jongen told Daily Mail Australia in a statement they are not responsible for overseeing staffing.

‘It’s important to note our service delivery partners are, and have always been, responsible for managing their own staffing levels in order to meet the contracted work and other requirements,’ the spokesperson said. 

Daily Mail Australia has contacted Serco for comment.

Employees working for Serco were also asked to take leave without pay in July during an outbreak at a call centre in Mill Park.

About 450 staff were urged to apply for the Victorian government’s $1500 hardship payment when they were temporarily stood down. 

Australia’s unemployment rate was sitting at 6.9 per cent in September according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics’s latest figures. 

In Victoria around 223,000 residents were out of work last month, around 6.7 per cent of the population.  

In Victoria around 223,000 residents were out of work last month, around 6.7 per cent of the population (pictured: a couple takes a walk along St Kilda's foreshore in Victoria)

In Victoria around 223,000 residents were out of work last month, around 6.7 per cent of the population (pictured: a couple takes a walk along St Kilda's foreshore in Victoria)

In Victoria around 223,000 residents were out of work last month, around 6.7 per cent of the population (pictured: a couple takes a walk along St Kilda’s foreshore in Victoria)

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Brawl between two crime families just days before Mejid Hamzy’s Sydney assassination probed by cops

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brawl between two crime families just days before mejid hamzys sydney assassination probed by cops
The older brother of Bassam Hamzy (Bassam pictured) was gunned down outside his duplex home on Monday morning in Condell Park, south-western Sydney

The older brother of Bassam Hamzy (Bassam pictured) was gunned down outside his duplex home on Monday morning in Condell Park, south-western Sydney

The older brother of Bassam Hamzy (Bassam pictured) was gunned down outside his duplex home on Monday morning in Condell Park, south-western Sydney

A violent brawl between two crime families may have sparked the execution of a notorious crime boss’ older brother who was gunned down outside his suburban home.

Police are hunting two gunmen after Mejid Hamzy, 44, was shot dead at Condell Park in south-western Sydney as he stepped outside the duplex he shared with his wife and young children at about 7.30am on Monday morning. 

His brother Bassam Hamzy is a convicted murderer serving a 40-year sentence behind bars – and the leader of the feared Brother’s 4 Life gang.

A police source said footage of the brawl on a south-west Sydney street showed a group connected to the Hamzy family fighting last week with a man who worked for the well-known Alameddine crime family.

High-profile Alameddine family member Talal Alameddine is jailed in the same prison as Bassam Hamzy – who traded blows in a vicious brawl in the Goulburn Supermax exercise yard in 2018.

Talal was earlier this year convicted of assaulting his fellow inmate, but the NSW Director of Public Prosecutions dropped a charge of affray against Hamzy in August 2019.

Mejid Hamzy (pictured) was gunned down outside his home at Condell Park about 7.30am on Monday morning, with police now hunting two gunmen over the attack

Mejid Hamzy (pictured) was gunned down outside his home at Condell Park about 7.30am on Monday morning, with police now hunting two gunmen over the attack

Mejid Hamzy (pictured) was gunned down outside his home at Condell Park about 7.30am on Monday morning, with police now hunting two gunmen over the attack

Footage has emerged of a brawl between a group connected to the Hamzy family fighting with a man who worked for the well-known Alameddine crime family

Footage has emerged of a brawl between a group connected to the Hamzy family fighting with a man who worked for the well-known Alameddine crime family

A source said the fight would have been over a drug turf dispute

A source said the fight would have been over a drug turf dispute

Footage has emerged of a brawl between a group connected to the Hamzy family fighting with a man who worked for the well-known Alameddine crime family

The fight pictured in the brawl would have been a dispute over rights to drug distribution that then spilled over, senior police officers said according to The Daily Telegraph.

‘Whether it sparked off the latest round of tit for tat confrontations is not exactly known, but it’s believed it certainly escalated things,’ a source said. 

In the wake of Mejid Hamzy’s slaying, police are now trying to locate those filmed in the brawl.

A source with close ties to Hamzy previously told Daily Mail Australia he was rocked by the news of his brother’s killing.

‘Look, he was shattered, he sees it as an act of cowardice, but as always Bassam remains strong and resilient,’ they said.  

The death is the second tragedy to rock the Hamzy family in the past few months.

The boys’ father Khaled Hamzy died in August after a long battle with illness, with the family’s most infamous member not allowed to attend the funeral or watch from jail.

It seems almost certain prison bosses will do the same for his brother’s farewell.

Several members of the Hamzy family name are synonymous with gangland crime in Australia.

It began in the 1990s when family patriarch Khaled was jailed for his role in a highly sophisticated drug syndicate.

His sons were quick to follow in his criminal footsteps, with Hamzy convicted in 1999 of the murder of a teenage boy outside a Sydney nightclub.

That was the first on what is now a long list of criminal offences committed by one of NSW’s most notorious criminals.

But while Bassam has garnered a lot of attention over the years, underworld sources told Daily Mail Australia in the wake of Mejid’s death that he too was ‘well connected’ in the crime world. 

Pools of blood and ripped clothing lie on the ground outside the house of a friend where Mejid Hamzy stumbled to after being shot in the front yard of his own home on Monday morning

Pools of blood and ripped clothing lie on the ground outside the house of a friend where Mejid Hamzy stumbled to after being shot in the front yard of his own home on Monday morning

Pools of blood and ripped clothing lie on the ground outside the house of a friend where Mejid Hamzy stumbled to after being shot in the front yard of his own home on Monday morning

‘Whoever pulled this stunt is a madman for sure. He (Mejid) is one of the biggest names in Sydney,’ they said.

‘Mejid is the one who made that family who they are today. Bassam is big but Mejid is a different breed.

‘This guy was well connected and loved by heaps of heavies. His crew won’t take this lightly.’

After several other high profile figures such as Wally Ahmad were killed or jailed, the void was filled by Mejid and his crew.  

There are now widespread fears his associates will seek retribution for his death, in a move that could spark an all out gang war in Sydney’s west.

So too may his brother who still wields massive influence on the outside from prison.

A forensic officer holds up a piece of black clothing outside the home where Mejid died about 7.30am on Monday

A forensic officer holds up a piece of black clothing outside the home where Mejid died about 7.30am on Monday

A forensic officer holds up a piece of black clothing outside the home where Mejid died about 7.30am on Monday

Blood stained shirts and other ripped clothing was taken away in evidence bags by NSW Police

Blood stained shirts and other ripped clothing was taken away in evidence bags by NSW Police

Blood stained shirts and other ripped clothing was taken away in evidence bags by NSW Police

Police and forensic officers spent much of Monday at the scene, with police tape only taken down to reopen the street late that night

Police and forensic officers spent much of Monday at the scene, with police tape only taken down to reopen the street late that night

Police and forensic officers spent much of Monday at the scene, with police tape only taken down to reopen the street late that night

In 2007, Bassam established the Brothers 4 Life gang from his jail cell before using a network of secret phones to coordinate their crimes – including a massive drug ring.

Seven years later in 2014, a gang war commenced between Hamzy associates and a man only known as XL, whose identity remains suppressed for legal reasons. 

Murdered gangster Mejid was believed to have been ­behind at least one underworld hit himself – the 2016 shooting of Hamad ­Assaad, a man known as ‘The Executioner’.

Murdered gangster Mejid (pictured) was believed to have been ­behind at least one underworld hit himself - the 2016 shooting of Hamad ­Assaad, a man known as 'The Executioner'

Murdered gangster Mejid (pictured) was believed to have been ­behind at least one underworld hit himself - the 2016 shooting of Hamad ­Assaad, a man known as 'The Executioner'

Murdered gangster Mejid (pictured) was believed to have been ­behind at least one underworld hit himself – the 2016 shooting of Hamad ­Assaad, a man known as ‘The Executioner’

A contract gunman, Assaad was believed to be the trigger man in the botched 2013 murder attempt on the Hamzy clan’s matriarch Maha, aunt of Mejid and his notorious brother Bassam.

Assaad was thought to have been paid by members of the ­Haouchar family – sworn enemies of the Hamzys.

But police believe Mejid – who had a loyal band of lieutenants – could have also had a hand in other shootings and bashings in Sydney over the past few years, and fear his assassination could ignite a fresh round of retaliation.

‘Where the next shot will come from and at whom is anyone’s guess,’ a senior police officer told The Daily Telegraph.

‘But you don’t shoot someone this high profile and not expect any retaliation.’

Mejid used to live nextdoor to underworld figure Safwan Charbaji when he was shot dead in a gunfight outside a Condell Park smash repair business in April 2016.

Mejid used to live nextdoor to underworld figure Safwan Charbaji when he was shot dead in a gunfight outside a Condell Park smash repair business in April 2016.

Charbaji was killed by crime boss Walid 'Wally' Ahmad who in turn was shot dead at Bankstown Central shopping centre three weeks later

Charbaji was killed by crime boss Walid 'Wally' Ahmad who in turn was shot dead at Bankstown Central shopping centre three weeks later

Mejid used to live nextdoor to underworld figure Safwan Charbaji (left) who was shot dead by fellow crime identity Wally Ahmad (right) after a gunfight in Condell Park in 2016

A burnt out car, believed to have been the one used by the two gunmen, was found on a nearby suburban street

A burnt out car, believed to have been the one used by the two gunmen, was found on a nearby suburban street

A burnt out car, believed to have been the one used by the two gunmen, was found on a nearby suburban street

He also cared for the four adult orphans of an uncle and aunt who had died some years earlier.

Mejid owned the property and kept a low profile, sometimes training at a park near his home.

The other half of the duplex was being rented by underworld figure Safwan Charbaji when he was shot dead in a gunfight outside a Condell Park smash repair business in April 2016.

Charbaji was killed by crime boss Walid ‘Wally’ Ahmad who in turn was shot dead at Bankstown Central shopping centre three weeks later.

NSW Police Homicide Squad detectives are now leading the investigation and are hunting two gunmen over the killing (Pictured are detectives and forensic police at the scene on Monday)

NSW Police Homicide Squad detectives are now leading the investigation and are hunting two gunmen over the killing (Pictured are detectives and forensic police at the scene on Monday)

NSW Police Homicide Squad detectives are now leading the investigation and are hunting two gunmen over the killing (Pictured are detectives and forensic police at the scene on Monday)

Ahmad, who ran the smash repair business where Charbaji was killed, lived in Townsend Street, near where Mejid was shot dead.

The cousin said Mejid had been shot outside his home and had run around the corner into Curtin Place where he died in front of a friend’s house.

‘I heard something, I thought it was fireworks man,’ he said of Monday’s gunfire.

‘When I heard the chopper I just came here straight away.’

Anyone with information about this incident is urged to contact Crime Stoppers: 1800 333 000. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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