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Storms sweep the east coast bringing damaging winds and golf-ball sized hail as alert is issued

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storms sweep the east coast bringing damaging winds and golf ball sized hail as alert is issued

Brisbane has been pummelled by a life-threatening super cell storm which has caused flash flooding, torrential rain and ‘destructive’ winds.

Residents throughout southeast Queensland, right from Brisbane through to the Sunshine Coast, were urged to hunker down at home if possible.  

Several main roads were flooded by Tuesday evening, leaving motorists stranded and banked up in standstill traffic. 

One motorist was pictured seeking refuge on the roof of his car, which was almost entirely submerged. 

Beachmere, near Caboolture recorded 80mm of rain in an hour on Tuesday, while 70mm bucketed down on The Upper Lockyer, west of Brisbane, the Bureau of Meteorology reported.

The bureau warns a severe thunderstorm stretches from Caboolture south to Brisbane, Logan and Stradbroke island, with people in the areas urged to seek shelter.

A severe thunderstorm warning is in place for southeast Queensland for Tuesday afternoon

A severe thunderstorm warning is in place for southeast Queensland for Tuesday afternoon

A severe thunderstorm warning is in place for southeast Queensland for Tuesday afternoon

Photos of mini tornados reaching into the grey skies near Warwick have been shared across social media as residents brace for more wild weather

Photos of mini tornados reaching into the grey skies near Warwick have been shared across social media as residents brace for more wild weather

Photos of mini tornados reaching into the grey skies near Warwick have been shared across social media as residents brace for more wild weather

‘We’ve got intense rainfall over the Brisbane CBD that may lead to localised flash flooding and we are already seeing some reports of flash flooding,’ meteorologist Rosa Hoff said.

‘Very damp indeed.’

The thunderstorms are moving east, with Deception Bay waters, Bribie Island, Beenleigh, Cleveland likely to be impacted later in the day.

A heavy rainfall warning has also been issued for people in Redland City, parts of Logan, the Scenic Rim, the Gold Coast, the Sunshine Coast, Brisbane City and Moreton Bay Council Areas.

The bureau warns the intense rainfall could lead to dangerous and life-threatening flash flooding.

A severe thunderstorm warning remains current for the southeast coast and parts of the Capricornia, Wide Bay and Burnett and Darling Downs and Granite Belt districts.

Earlier, areas near Gympie, north of the Sunshine Coast, were pelleted with hail as multiple severe thunderstorms moved from the Toowoomba and South Burnett areas towards the coast.

Almost 50mm of rain fell in an hour at Kalbar in the Scenic Rim.

More than 60mm of rain dumped on Helidon, near Toowoomba, while flash floods inundated some parts of nearby Gatton.

Flash flooding was also recorded at Beachmere.

‘Eighty millimetres of rain in an hour is hard to get rid of,’ Ms Hoff said.

The storms are forecast to continue into Tuesday evening.

‘We could see damaging winds in excess of 90 km/h and large hail that has a diameter larger than 2cm – bigger than a $2 coin,’ Ms Hoff said.

Pictured in purple are severe wind gusts forecast for the NSW east coast. Hail wider than 5cm, heavy rainfall and gusts in excess of 100km/h are forecast as likely for Brisbane, Rockhampton in central Queensland and the Gold Coast on Tuesday

Pictured in purple are severe wind gusts forecast for the NSW east coast. Hail wider than 5cm, heavy rainfall and gusts in excess of 100km/h are forecast as likely for Brisbane, Rockhampton in central Queensland and the Gold Coast on Tuesday

Pictured in purple are severe wind gusts forecast for the NSW east coast. Hail wider than 5cm, heavy rainfall and gusts in excess of 100km/h are forecast as likely for Brisbane, Rockhampton in central Queensland and the Gold Coast on Tuesday

A fallen tree in Queensland as wild weather battered the Australian east coast. The wild weather will continue for another three days, meteorologists have warned

A fallen tree in Queensland as wild weather battered the Australian east coast. The wild weather will continue for another three days, meteorologists have warned

A fallen tree in Queensland as wild weather battered the Australian east coast. The wild weather will continue for another three days, meteorologists have warned

‘Or potentially, even heavy rain that could lead to localised flash flooding.’

Ms Hoff said the worst of the weather was expected on Tuesday afternoon and into the evening.

‘As we track forward into tomorrow, the increased chance of seeing severe storm development does move closer to Brisbane,’ she said.

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services have warned people to move their cars under cover and secure loose outdoor items.

Photos of mini tornados reaching into the grey skies near Warwick have been shared across social media as residents brace for the impending wild weather to come. 

Meanwhile, conditions in most of New South Wales are expected to ease from Tuesday after the state was lashed with heavy rainfall, gale-force winds, cold temperatures and hazardous surf conditions on Monday.

Gosford on the NSW Central Coast received 128mm of rain in 24 hours, while Wallis Lake on the mid-north coast was soaked by 248mm in three hours on Monday afternoon.  

The effects of the low pressure coastal trough in Queensland will extend into northern NSW on Wednesday with the threat of thunderstorms in Armidale, Coffs Harbour and Port Macquarie. 

BOM meteorologist Jonathan How said the thunderstorm threat for south-east Queensland would extend into Thursday.    

Cool temperatures and cloudy weather will continue in southern NSW, with a top of about 20C for Sydney, but storms are expected to return on Wednesday.

A hazardous surf warning has also been issued on Tuesday for the Hunter, Sydney and Illawarra coastline.

Storm damage in Queensland on Sunday. The BOM said the thunderstorm threat for south-east Queensland would extend into Thursday

Storm damage in Queensland on Sunday. The BOM said the thunderstorm threat for south-east Queensland would extend into Thursday

Storm damage in Queensland on Sunday. The BOM said the thunderstorm threat for south-east Queensland would extend into Thursday

Singleton SES members in the NSW Hunter Valley were called out after reports of severe storm damage (pictured, a caravan is destroyed after wind lifted off several roofs in the park)

Singleton SES members in the NSW Hunter Valley were called out after reports of severe storm damage (pictured, a caravan is destroyed after wind lifted off several roofs in the park)

Singleton SES members in the NSW Hunter Valley were called out after reports of severe storm damage (pictured, a caravan is destroyed after wind lifted off several roofs in the park)

Melbourne meanwhile will be partly cloudy on Tuesday and Wednesday, although showers are then forecast for the next three days with the chance for both cloud and fog.  

Meteorologists have said the conditions are a result of La Nina climate cycle which will make the upcoming summer months hotter and wetter than usual.

The NSW State Emergency Service’s Hunter region units received 362 calls for help on Monday, and spent the day rescuing horses, patching up tree damage and repairing leaky roofs. 

Sydney also copped a deluge with St Ives receiving 98mm of rain in 24 hours. 

‘One that’s really noteworthy, that at first we were a little bit sceptical of because of just how intense the rainfall was, is at Wallis Lakes (near Forster),’ BOM meteorologist David Wilkie said.

‘They received 248mm between 1pm and 4pm and 124mm in an hour.’  

Temperatures have dropped to around 15 degrees, down about eight degrees for this time of year, due to a cold front which saw almost 10 centimetres of snowfall in the alps.

‘We do have some hazardous conditions at the moment for the beaches with the strong southeasterly winds whipping up a bigger southeasterly swell up to around four, potentially five metres,’ BOM spokeswoman Rebecca Kamitakahara told ABC radio on Monday.

A road and park in Tumbarumba is pictured completely underwater after flash flooding on Sunday

A road and park in Tumbarumba is pictured completely underwater after flash flooding on Sunday

A road and park in Tumbarumba is pictured completely underwater after flash flooding on Sunday

Pictured: A car in Brisbane that was crushed by a falling tree amid damaging winds and heavy rain

Pictured: A car in Brisbane that was crushed by a falling tree amid damaging winds and heavy rain

Pictured: A car in Brisbane that was crushed by a falling tree amid damaging winds and heavy rain

Pictured: A trampoline in south-east Queensland that wrapped around a power pole in strong winds

Pictured: A trampoline in south-east Queensland that wrapped around a power pole in strong winds

Pictured: A trampoline in south-east Queensland that wrapped around a power pole in strong winds

Pictured: a monster hail stone in Brisbane

Pictured: a monster hail stone in Brisbane

Pictured: Large hail stones in Queensland

Pictured: Large hail stones in Queensland

 Hail the size of tennis balls were seen in Brisbane’s western and southern suburbs

Tamworth and Nundle, south-west of Grafton in northern NSW, saw about 60mm of rain on Sunday with an evacuation at a campsite due to flash flooding (regional NSW pictured)

Tamworth and Nundle, south-west of Grafton in northern NSW, saw about 60mm of rain on Sunday with an evacuation at a campsite due to flash flooding (regional NSW pictured)

Tamworth and Nundle, south-west of Grafton in northern NSW, saw about 60mm of rain on Sunday with an evacuation at a campsite due to flash flooding (regional NSW pictured)

‘The good news is later in the week we will start to see a little more sunshine… with those temperatures coming back up to what we’d normally expect at this time of year.’

But the rain has brought relief for farmers across the western ranges and areas west and southwest and parts of the central west.

‘They’re not seeing as quite as high rainfall totals as what we’re getting on the coast but they are still seeing some more steady, persistent rain on top of what they saw on the weekend,’ Ms Kamitakahara said. 

About 30,000 homes across Brisbane, Ipswich, Logan and Redland were left without power on Sunday as the region was hit with 78,000 lightening strikes and hail the size of tennis balls.   

The south-east Queensland region also had 78,000 lightening strikes on Sunday afternoon

The south-east Queensland region also had 78,000 lightening strikes on Sunday afternoon

The south-east Queensland region also had 78,000 lightening strikes on Sunday afternoon

THE WEATHER IN YOUR CITY 

 SYDNEY    

 Wednesday: Min 13. Max 21. Showers

Thursday: Min 15. Max 21. Shower

Friday: Min 14. Max 23. Shower. Possible late storm

MELBOURNE     

Wednesday: Min 10. Max 19. Partly cloudy

Thursday: Min 11. Max 19. Shower or two

Friday: Min 12. Max 18. Shower or two 

CANBERRA  

Wednesday: Min 7. Max 19. Shower or two

Thursday: Min 8. Max 20. Shower or two

Friday: Min 9. Max 21. Shower or two. Possible storm 

DARWIN   

Wednesday: Min 25. Max 32. Showers

Thursday: Min 25. Max 33. Showers

Friday: Min 25. Max 33. Showers 

 BRISBANE 

Wednesday: Min 18. Max 27. Showers. Storm likely

Thursday: Min 18. Max 31. Sunny 

Friday: Min 16. Max 31. Sunny 

ADELAIDE  

Wednesday: Min 9. Max 21. Sunny

Thursday: Min 11. Max 21. Shower or two

Friday: Min 11. Max 20. Shower or two 

PERTH  

Wednesday: Min 14. Max 25. Partly cloudy

Thursday: Min 13. Max 32. Sunny

Friday: Min 18. Max 36. Sunny

HOBART  

Wednesday: Min 9. Max 15. Shower or two

Thursday: Min 8. Max 17. Showers

Friday: Min 10. Max 16. Showers 

 Source: Bureau of Meteorology

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Australia

How viruses like Covid trick us into spending more time socialising

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how viruses like covid trick us into spending more time socialising

Can viruses such as the one that causes Covid-19 attack our brains and change our behaviour — thereby prolonging an outbreak?

That’s the suggestion from U.S. researchers who say that the coronavirus may be manipulating the behaviour of infected people, sometimes even before they show symptoms, so they become more sociable.

In fact, such behaviour-changing effects of viruses — so-called behavioural host manipulation — are not new, and have previously been reported for the flu and rabies viruses, among others.

Can viruses such as the one that causes Covid-19 attack our brains and change our behaviour — thereby prolonging an outbreak? [File photo]

Can viruses such as the one that causes Covid-19 attack our brains and change our behaviour — thereby prolonging an outbreak? [File photo]

Can viruses such as the one that causes Covid-19 attack our brains and change our behaviour — thereby prolonging an outbreak? [File photo]

The theory is that pathogens do this to maximise their reproduction rate (known as R0) and in turn, their spread and survival.

Now researchers from the State University of New York at Albany, have explained how the Covid-19 virus could be changing the behaviour of those it infects to make them more likely to pass it on to others.

One idea is that it may do this in the incubation period, when people are infected but show no symptoms, so they are more likely to socialise.

The researchers suggest the virus may act on an area of the brain called the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), which is involved in social behaviour and emotional regulation. 

By manipulating the ACC, instead of observing distancing rules, people would be drawn to ‘gather socially’, they wrote in the journal Medical Hypotheses.

They stress their theories are based on the effects of other infections in changing behaviour and there are no known manipulations associated with Covid-19. 

‘Only time will tell how it manipulates its host for its own survival and replication.’

The researchers suggest the virus may act on an area of the brain called the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), which is involved in social behaviour and emotional regulation. By manipulating the ACC, instead of observing distancing rules, people would be drawn to ‘gather socially’, they wrote in the journal Medical Hypotheses [File photo]

The researchers suggest the virus may act on an area of the brain called the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), which is involved in social behaviour and emotional regulation. By manipulating the ACC, instead of observing distancing rules, people would be drawn to ‘gather socially’, they wrote in the journal Medical Hypotheses [File photo]

The researchers suggest the virus may act on an area of the brain called the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), which is involved in social behaviour and emotional regulation. By manipulating the ACC, instead of observing distancing rules, people would be drawn to ‘gather socially’, they wrote in the journal Medical Hypotheses [File photo]

Dr Frank Ryan, a consultant physician and evolutionary virologist in Sheffield, says the Covid-19 virus may also interfere with hormone levels to change our behaviour.

‘While there are effects on behaviour through virus-induced changes in the nervous system, Covid has the potential also to change the endocrine system that produces hormones that regulate many functions, from sleep to reproduction and social behaviour,’ he says.

‘Behavioural effects are speculative since very little focus has been put on the impact of Covid-19 on the endocrine system, but a study in the Journal of Endocrinological Investigation confirms the virus’s effect on the endocrine system is a real complication.

‘Human behaviour is complex and in my experience endocrine disturbance is sometimes accompanied by behavioural changes,’ he says, adding that the doctors treating patients will, however, naturally focus on the physical aspects of the infection.

But support for the idea that Covid-19 affects social behaviour comes from evidence with other similar viruses.

In a 2010 study using the flu vaccine (as a proxy for infection because of ethical problems in deliberately infecting people), which contains a modified form of the virus, U.S. researchers found that in the two days after being exposed, the number of people patients met doubled, from an average of 54 to 101, compared to the two days before immunisation, reported the Annals of Epidemiology.

Under the microscope

Comedian and mental health campaigner, Ruby Wax, 67, takes our health quiz.

Can you run up the stairs?

I do Pilates and kayak as well as generally running up and down the stairs, but currently I’m going cold- water swimming and biking every day — I’m in Northern Scotland. 

I stay in the water for two seconds, and get a high when I get out. I heard it wards off dementia and depression, so if it can hit the two Ds, I’m doing it.

Get your five a day?

I think I do — four or five.

Ever dieted?

I went on the grapefruit diet when I was 25 which led me to having my stomach pumped in a hospital — the fruit filled my intestines and there was no room for anything else. 

When I was 45 I did the juice diet and was sick on a train — they told me I’d drunk the equivalent of three football fields, but if you put it in the condenser how do you know? 

I also tried the Paleo diet, when I only ate things with a pulse. I don’t worry about my weight any more — it just levelled ten years ago.

I weigh around 9st 12lb and I’m 5ft 2in.

Any vices?

Martinis and chocolate.

Any family ailments?

My dad died of a heart attack because he only ate sausages — he was a sausage manufacturer. My mum died of anger . . . I think they were [aged] 100 and 90.

Worst illness/injury?

Depression. I don’t have it now — you don’t have it all the time — you have to take medication and do mindfulness. 

My worst injury was a fractured back when I got flipped off a horse in 2019 and afterwards I fell down the stairs. It took a few months to recover and I haven’t ridden since.

Pop any pills?

You mean like ecstasy . . .? Yes, antidepressants — lots of them.

Had anything removed?

Three babies when I had caesareans.

Ever have plastic surgery?

No — there was a moment I cared and now I don’t.

Cope well with pain?

I can take a lot but I’m not going to suffer, so I never went through childbirth — I had caesareans. I don’t believe in not taking the drugs.

Tried alternative remedies?

Fish oil — that’s it. Everybody says it keeps your brain going.

Ever been depressed?

I’ve had a career on it and an OBE.

Hangover cure?

I can’t figure that one out — you just have to go back to sleep.

What keeps you up at night?

Netflix — that’ll go on all night because you know it’s an addiction.

Any phobias?

Flying, but I do it anyway. It’s got better over the years.

Like to live for ever?

Yes, but in young form . . .

Ruby’s new book, And Now For The Good News…: The Much-Needed Tonic For Our Frazzled World, is published by Penguin (£14.99).  

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The two days immediately after exposure to flu are important because this is when people are most infectious, but display no symptoms — so are more likely to spread the disease. 

The researchers ruled out the so-called knowledge effect — that people felt safer after the vaccine and were therefore more sociable — because four weeks after the jab, socialisation rates had dropped back to pre-vaccine levels, suggesting that the immediate two days are important.

‘Human social behaviour changed on the introduction of the virus,’ say the researchers. ‘This is the strongest indicator yet discovered of pathogen-related behavioural change in humans.’

The virus that has attracted most attention from research into behavioural effects is rabies, an infection of the brain and nerves caught from the bite or scratch of an infected animal.

It’s been found that it can manipulate the nervous system and make animals more aggressive, and more likely to bite, scratch and spit, increasing the spread of the virus, which kills 59,000 people a year worldwide.

A 2017 study in Scientific Reports from Alaska University found that the virus blocks chemicals in the human brain that play a crucial role in regulating behaviour.

It’s not just viruses that may be manipulating us. Take Toxoplasma gondii, a single-celled parasite — its natural host is the cat, where it poses no great problem. But mice and rats infected with it become less fearful of cats, and are therefore more likely to be devoured. And that’s good news for the parasite because it gets into the cat, the only animal in which it can reproduce, and pass to other species.

Toxoplasma gondii is thought to infect one in three humans worldwide, and researchers have found it can make them less fearful, reckless and turn us into bad drivers. According to a 2007 research analysis by parasitologists at Charles University, Prague, infected people are 2.65 times more likely to be involved in traffic accidents.

One theory is that it increases testosterone, which may increase risk taking. ‘Results obtained during the past 15 years strongly suggest that it influences the behaviour not only of rodent hosts but also of humans,’ the researchers wrote in the journal Schizophrenia Bulletin.

Meanwhile, a virus found in algae may also affect us, and reduce our navigation skills.

While studying mental ability in adults, researchers serendipitously discovered DNA from an algae virus in throat samples. ATCV-1 is a type of chlorovirus, that infects green algae, which is common in lakes and ponds, but until then was not thought to infect humans.

Researchers from Johns Hopkins University in the U.S. then discovered that people infected with the virus had reduced performance on mental tests of visual processing. Why is unclear. ‘Exposure to ATCV-1 was associated with significant changes in the regulation of over 1,000 genes,’ say the researchers, whose study appeared in the 2014 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

‘If confirmed, these findings hint that other yet-unknown viruses may have subtle effects on human health and behaviour.’

Some experts even believe symptoms such as coughing and sneezing that we develop due to a viral infection may be another way viruses manipulate behaviour to maximise their spread.

The commonly held view is that we cough, sneeze or vomit (in the case of norovirus) as this helps get rid of the harmful cells from our bodies.

But this is a ‘daft theory’, says Greg Towers, a professor of molecular virology at University College London.

‘It seems more likely that respiratory viruses such as the common cold have evolved to make us cough and sneeze to transmit the virus in an effective way. No studies prove that you sneeze to get rid of viruses — this is conjecture.

‘Given that the virus is inside your cells, it is daft to suggest that you’re trying to get rid of it. It doesn’t work like that, so it’s a daft theory. The transmission theory is more likely.’

He adds: ‘In another example, norovirus makes us projectile vomit and have diarrhoea at the same time, both of which very effectively spread particles.

‘Viruses’ evolution alongside us has enabled them to manipulate any part of our biology.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Ghislaine Maxwell in quarantine as jail guard infected with COVID-19

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ghislaine maxwell in quarantine as jail guard infected with covid 19

Ghislaine Maxwell is in quarantine after a guard working near her cell inside a Brooklyn jail tested positive for coronavirus, court filings revealed on Monday.

The 58-year-old British socialite, the former girlfriend and accused ‘madam’ of Jeffrey Epstein, has been detained in the Metropolitan Detention Center, in Sunset Park, since July, ahead of her July 14, 2021, trial.

Maxwell has been charged with six federal counts including enticement of minors, sex trafficking, and perjury. 

She tested negative for COVID-19 on November 18, and is showing no symptoms, wrote Assistant U.S. Attorney Maurene Comey in a letter to Judge Alison Nathan.

Ghislaine Maxwell, pictured in 2013, has tested negative for COVID but is in quarantine

Ghislaine Maxwell, pictured in 2013, has tested negative for COVID but is in quarantine

Ghislaine Maxwell, pictured in 2013, has tested negative for COVID but is in quarantine

Maxwell is being held at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Sunset Park, Brooklyn

Maxwell is being held at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Sunset Park, Brooklyn

Maxwell is being held at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Sunset Park, Brooklyn

Maxwell's former boyfriend Jeffrey Epstein killed himself in jail last year awaiting trial

Maxwell's former boyfriend Jeffrey Epstein killed himself in jail last year awaiting trial

Maxwell’s former boyfriend Jeffrey Epstein killed himself in jail last year awaiting trial

The letter was filed in Manhattan Federal Court. 

She will remain in quarantine at the MDC for 14 days, and will only be allowed out of her cell three times a week, for 30 minutes at a time.

Maurene Comey, daughter of former FBI director James Comey, is prosecuting

Maurene Comey, daughter of former FBI director James Comey, is prosecuting

Maurene Comey, daughter of former FBI director James Comey, is prosecuting

Maxwell’s defense team has argued pandemic protocols at MDC, as well as special measures to prevent her from killing herself like Epstein, have made it difficult for her to prepare a defense.

She is allowed to talk to her lawyers on the phone every day for up to three hours and continue to use a laptop provided by the government for 13 hours a day to review discovery, the letter says.

Comey wrote that Maxwell had more privileges than other inmates, even in quarantine.

‘As was the case three months ago, the defendant continues to have more time to review her discovery than any other inmate at the MDC, even while in quarantine,’ Comey wrote.

‘The defendant also has as much, if not more, time as any other MDC inmate to communicate with her attorneys, even while in quarantine.’

Maxwell is depicted during her July 14 appearance via video-link in Manhattan federal court

Maxwell is depicted during her July 14 appearance via video-link in Manhattan federal court

Maxwell is depicted during her July 14 appearance via video-link in Manhattan federal court

Cells within the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn, in the Special Housing Unit (SHU)

Cells within the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn, in the Special Housing Unit (SHU)

Cells within the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn, in the Special Housing Unit (SHU)

A court worker is seen disinfecting the Manhattan courthouse in July ahead of arraignment

A court worker is seen disinfecting the Manhattan courthouse in July ahead of arraignment

A court worker is seen disinfecting the Manhattan courthouse in July ahead of arraignment

The pandemic has ushered in lockdowns at federal jails across the country since early March.

Attorney visits have recently resumed, but family visits remain off-limits.

The MDC is being sued for its response to the pandemic. A report by a Justice Department watchdog found that the true extent of the COVID outbreak at MDC in the early months of the pandemic is unknown because the jail failed to test inmates or staff in meaningful numbers.

Maxwell has pleaded not guilty.

The latest legal battle in her case has revolved around whether to release a 2016 deposition in which she shared details on her ‘own sexual activity’ and the ‘sexual activities of others,’ according to filings.

Her lawyers argue the details, if made public, would harm her right to a fair trial.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Coronavirus South Australia: Couple infected in Adelaide quarantine

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coronavirus south australia couple infected in adelaide quarantine

Two infected returned travellers caught coronavirus in seemingly safe hotel quarantine in Adelaide and not overseas as first thought, health officials revealed.

An urgent investigation is now underway after genomic testing linked the man and his wife, both in their, 20s to the Parafield cluster, where the number of cases has now grown to 29.

The couple were previously identified as ‘overseas’ acquired infections after they returned from overseas on November 11.

Further testing has revealed the pair became infected while in quarantine at the Peppers Waymouth medi-hotel with the same strain of the virus linked to the Parafield cluster in Adelaide’s northern suburbs.

Adelaide's Peppers Waymouth (pictured)  is under more scrutiny after it was revealed two returned travellers became infected while in quarantine at the medi-hotel

Adelaide's Peppers Waymouth (pictured)  is under more scrutiny after it was revealed two returned travellers became infected while in quarantine at the medi-hotel

Adelaide’s Peppers Waymouth (pictured)  is under more scrutiny after it was revealed two returned travellers became infected while in quarantine at the medi-hotel

There are now fears the virus has continued to spread throughout the Peppers Waymouth, which was at the centre of the outbreak that sparked a three day statewide lockdown last week.

Urgent re-testing of all staff and guests at the medi-hotel is now underway as a precaution.

‘There is no additional risk to the public as the cases are linked to a medi-hotel staff member who has previously tested positive for COVID-19 and contact tracing has already been undertaken,’ a SA Health statement read. 

‘As a precaution, we are undertaking additional testing at one of our medi-hotels for all staff and guests today.’

Public officials insists there is no additional risk to the public, despite the latest development. Pictured are healthcare workers at a drive-through testing clinic in Adelaide on November 19

Public officials insists there is no additional risk to the public, despite the latest development. Pictured are healthcare workers at a drive-through testing clinic in Adelaide on November 19

Public officials insists there is no additional risk to the public, despite the latest development. Pictured are healthcare workers at a drive-through testing clinic in Adelaide on November 19

The fresh outbreak twist forced the state’s Chief Public Health Officer Nicola Spurrier to hold a second media conference within hours, where she described the virus strain as sneaky.

‘I knew that Covid-19 was highly transmissible, it is more highly transmissible than I first thought,’ she said.

‘We can have the best PPE and systems set up but you can still transmit this virus.’

‘I don’t believe anyone has been in the wrong room at the wrong time.’

Professor Spurrier was in a more positive mood hours earlier.

‘We’re not out of the woods yet but as I said yesterday, I’m confident that we have got rid of this again in our state,’ she said on Tuesday morning.

There are now fears the virus has continued to spread throughout the medi-hotel. Pictured are masked locals out and about in the Adelaide CBD on November 18

There are now fears the virus has continued to spread throughout the medi-hotel. Pictured are masked locals out and about in the Adelaide CBD on November 18

There are now fears the virus has continued to spread throughout the medi-hotel. Pictured are masked locals out and about in the Adelaide CBD on November 18

‘I haven’t popped the cork on the champagne bottle yet, but the champagne is on ice.

‘I’d like to see how we go this week.’

South Australia recorded one new case on Tuesday of a man in his 20s who is a close contact of a previously confirmed case. He remains in a medi-hotel.

South Australia's Chief Public Health Officer Nicola Spurrier (pictured) fronted the media twice on Tuesday following the latest developments in the outbreak

South Australia's Chief Public Health Officer Nicola Spurrier (pictured) fronted the media twice on Tuesday following the latest developments in the outbreak

South Australia’s Chief Public Health Officer Nicola Spurrier (pictured) fronted the media twice on Tuesday following the latest developments in the outbreak

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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