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Sun safety: Australian experts reveal the exact amount of sunscreen needed for total protection

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sun safety australian experts reveal the exact amount of sunscreen needed for total protection

Adults should be rubbing seven teaspoons of sunscreen over their bodies every two hours to protect skin from harmful UV rays, experts have revealed.

That’s the summertime message from product reviewers at Australian consumer advice company CHOICE, who crunched numbers to determine the precise amount of sunscreen needed for total protection. 

For the average adult, the recommended amount of sunscreen per application equates to 35mL or seven teaspoons.

The equivalent of one teaspoon should be applied to the head and neck, two teaspoons for the torso, and one for each arm and leg to reduce the risk of sunburn, sun spots, wrinkles and skin cancer.

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For the average adult, the recommended amount of sunscreen per application equates to 35mL or seven teaspoons (stock image)

For the average adult, the recommended amount of sunscreen per application equates to 35mL or seven teaspoons (stock image)

For the average adult, the recommended amount of sunscreen per application equates to 35mL or seven teaspoons (stock image)

Failure to apply enough sunscreen or forgetting to reapply after swimming or exercising can result in sunburn as the product is loses its effectiveness.

And because Australia has one of the harshest and hottest summer climates in the world, CHOICE experts say it’s not enough to simply ‘slip, slop slap’ when the mercury rises.

Wearing sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat as well as sitting in the shade when the sun is at it’s peak between midday and 3pm is crucial for total protection.

‘Most sunscreen failure is down to human error – the best sunscreen in the world won’t work if you don’t use it properly,’ CHOICE experts wrote in a blog post.

Specific types of sunscreen can also be bought for children and toddlers, but it’s advisable to keep babies out of the sun as much as possible for the first 12 months of their lives.

If sun exposure is unavoidable, it’s recommended to have a hat, clothing and shade in addition to wearing sunscreen if the UV index is three or more.

‘If you’re trying a new sunscreen and have sensitive skin, do a patch test on your inner arm and leave it for 24 hours to see if there’s any reaction,’ CHOICE said.

Top tips for applying sunscreen

* Put it on clean, dry skin 15 to 30 minutes before you go out in the sun to allow it time to interact with your skin. Re-apply it just before you go out – you’ll increase the amount applied and be more likely to get the stated SPF benefit.

* Cover all parts of the body not protected by clothing (don’t forget your ears, the back of your neck, the backs of your hands and the tops of your feet).

* Apply it evenly, and don’t rub it in excessively – most sunscreens will absorb into the outer layer of skin and don’t need to be rubbed in vigorously.

* Re-apply at least once every two hours and after swimming or exercise.

* Think beyond the beach and pool – use sunscreen whenever you go outdoors for a significant amount of time, such as to the park, a lunchtime walk to the shops, playing sports or gardening.

* Store your sunscreen at a temperature of less than 30 degrees Celsius. If you leave it in the glovebox of your car or in the sun, it may lose its effectiveness. Keep it in the esky with the drinks, in the shade or wrapped in a towel.

* Don’t use sunscreens that have passed their expiry date as they may have lost their effectiveness.

Source: Choice

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The equivalent of one teaspoon should be applied onto the head and neck, two teaspoons for the torso, one for each arm and one for each leg (stock image)

The equivalent of one teaspoon should be applied onto the head and neck, two teaspoons for the torso, one for each arm and one for each leg (stock image)

The equivalent of one teaspoon should be applied onto the head and neck, two teaspoons for the torso, one for each arm and one for each leg (stock image)

Inexpensive yet effective sunscreen can be bought at chemists, pharmacies, department stores, supermarkets and independent retailers across Australia.

Coles home brand starts from just $2.75 while sunscreen from the Australian Cancer Council costs $5.

Sydney doctor Sam Saling told Bed Threads that while some sunlight exposure is beneficial to boost vitamin D levels, too much can be detrimental both long and short term. 

A wide range of health issues arise when the skin becomes sunburnt, including dehydration, fatigue and headaches, as well as inflammation, redness and peeling.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Australia

Australian woman finds a centipede in her shoe after remembering to check it before putting it on

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australian woman finds a centipede in her shoe after remembering to check it before putting it on

An Australia woman had a lucky escape from a painful bite from a centipede when she spotted it in her shoe as she was about to put it on.

Remembering her morning ritual of checking her footwear for bugs before putting them on, she spied the creepy crawly just in time.

The woman’s husband posted a photo to social media of her blue Vans at their Adelaide home on Wednesday.

Inside, a brown centipede with orange legs sat inside of the woman’s shoe.

An Australian woman has found a centipede in her shoe during her morning ritual of checking her footwear for bugs before putting them on

An Australian woman has found a centipede in her shoe during her morning ritual of checking her footwear for bugs before putting them on

An Australian woman has found a centipede in her shoe during her morning ritual of checking her footwear for bugs before putting them on

The insect’s front legs, which they use to catch food and secrete venom, appear ready to strike.

The woman’s husband said the shoe check saved his wife ‘a bit of pain’ if she had put it on.

The relieved husband said the shoes were not left outside and the insect must sneaked inside their home under the door.

Social media users commiserated with the woman and her husband.

‘F**k I hate centipedes. I’ll cop spiders, snakes, wasps and loads of other critters we have – but keep these creepy f**ks away from me,’ one person said.

Another said: ‘Yeah they’re just the worst, “oh I need like 30 legs because eight just doesn’t cut it”.’

One person said: ‘My husband has told me of the morning ritual of the “checking of the shoe.” Now, I see it.’

Another person said the entire pair of shoes needed to be thrown out.  

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Australian businesses BOYCOTT China and refuse to ever use its products

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australian businesses boycott china and refuse to ever use its products

A high-profile CEO has called on Australian businesses to boycott Chinese products in the wake of growing hostilities.

Kennards’ Self Storage boss Sam Kennard said Australians needs to fight back against the Chinese Communist Party, with the authoritarian regime continuing to turn the screws on more than $20billion of key exports as payback for the federal government speaking out on Beijing’s human rights violations and their handling of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Last week Beijing slapped a crippling 200 per cent tariff on Australian wine and on Monday a top Chinese diplomat tweeted an image depicting an Australian holding a knife to the throat of an Afghan child.

‘Every Australian business should now be reviewing supply contracts,’ the business leader posted to Twitter

‘Change and prefer non-Chinese made products where possible. We have made this decision.’

'Every Australian business should now be reviewing supply contracts,' Sam Kennard (pictured with partner) posted to Twitter

'Every Australian business should now be reviewing supply contracts,' Sam Kennard (pictured with partner) posted to Twitter

‘Every Australian business should now be reviewing supply contracts,’ Sam Kennard (pictured with partner) posted to Twitter

Kennards' Self Storage is the largest storage company in Australia with 81 locations including New Zealand

Kennards' Self Storage is the largest storage company in Australia with 81 locations including New Zealand

Kennards’ Self Storage is the largest storage company in Australia with 81 locations including New Zealand

The Kennards Hire business was first launched in 1947 by Sam’s father Walter.

In 1973, Kennards Hire launched Australia’s first nationwide self storage company which is now independently owned.

It has the country’s largest storage business with a total of 81 locations and rakes in about $110million a year.

Mr Kennard wants local companies need to show a united front against Beijing’s bullying tactics.

‘The Chinese Communist Government has proven to be difficult to trust. They’ve placed tariffs on lobster, wine and barley out of revenge or spite and the risk is, you just don’t know who is next,’ Mr Kennard told NCA NewsWire.

He admits it may be difficult for many beholden Australian companies to entirely cut Chinese products out of their supply line as ‘some feel quite helpless’.

But he is urging both businesses and consumers to find an alternative to Chinese imports if they can. 

'Every Australian business should now be reviewing supply contracts. We have made this decision,' the businesses leader said (pictured wife partner)

'Every Australian business should now be reviewing supply contracts. We have made this decision,' the businesses leader said (pictured wife partner)

‘Every Australian business should now be reviewing supply contracts. We have made this decision,’ the businesses leader said (pictured wife partner)

Mr Kennard is urging both businesses and consumers to find an alternative to Chinese imports if they can (workers are pictured at a factory in Beijing)

Mr Kennard is urging both businesses and consumers to find an alternative to Chinese imports if they can (workers are pictured at a factory in Beijing)

Mr Kennard is urging both businesses and consumers to find an alternative to Chinese imports if they can (workers are pictured at a factory in Beijing)

Padlocks are among the products Kennards Storage purchases from Chinese suppliers.

Australia’s total export markets in 2019

1. China: $135 billion (33% of total Australian exports)

2. Japan: $36 billion (9%)

3. South Korea: $21 billion (5%)

4. United Kingdom: $16 billion (3.8%)

5. United States: $15 billion (3.7%)

Source: Worldstopexports.com  

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‘We only discussed this yesterday and we are looking to see if we can get those padlocks, say from Taiwan, Korea or Germany,’ Mr Kennard said.

The Export Council of Australia on Monday had a similar message for Australian businesses.

‘Recent official Chinese messaging suggests that our bilateral relationship has now entered a new low,’ ECA Chair Dianne Tipping said.

‘We encourage exporters to assess the risks much better, and to push harder to realise new opportunities.’

With totalitarian state attempting to isolate Australian producers, the ECA recommends turning to other markets.

‘Opportunities abound in the strong emerging economies of India, Indonesia, and Vietnam, in the mature economies of Japan, Korea, the EU and UK, as well as in the Middle East and Latin America,’ Ms Tipping said.

‘Australian exporters are resilient, agile, and competitive. We are confident they can successfully pivot to new markets.’

In the financial year to 2020, China accounted for 39 percent of all Australian exports, totalling about $150 billion.

Australia imported about $81 billion from Chinese suppliers. 

Australian plans to take China to the World Trade Organisation (pictured, President Xi Jinping)

Australian plans to take China to the World Trade Organisation (pictured, President Xi Jinping)

Australia is concerned over China's politically motivated tariff increases (Prime Minister Scott Morrison)

Australia is concerned over China's politically motivated tariff increases (Prime Minister Scott Morrison)

Australian plans to take China to the World Trade Organisation over ‘politically motivated’ tariff increases (pictured, President Xi Jinping left and Prime Minister Scott Morrison right)

China’s ’14 grievances’  

1. ‘Incessant wanton interference in China’s Xinjiang, Hong Kong and Taiwan affairs’

2. ‘Siding with the US’ anti-China campaign and spreading misinformation’

3. ‘Thinly veiled allegations against China on cyber attacks without any evidence’

4.  ‘An unfriendly or antagonistic report on China by media’

5. Providing funding to ‘anti-China think tank for spreading untrue reports’ 

6. ‘Foreign interference legislation’

7. ‘Foreign investment decisions’

8. ‘Banning Huawei technologies and ZTE from the 5G network’

9. ‘Politicisation and stigmatisation of the normal exchanges and coorperation between China and Australia’

10. Making statements ‘on the South China Sea to the United Nations’

11. ‘Outrageous condemnation of the governing party of China by MPs and racist attacks against Chinese or Asian people’ 

12. ‘The early drawn search and reckless seizure of Chinese journalists’ homes and properties’  

13. Calls for an independent inquiry into Covid-19

14. ‘Legislation to scrutinise agreements with a foreign government’ 

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Relations between Australia have reached their lowest point in decades this year with a litany of diplomatic spats compromising the robust economic partnership.

The banning of Huawei from the nation’s 5G network in 2018 on the grounds of national security concerns infuriated the totalitarian state, but it was Mr Morrison’s call for an independent international inquiry in the origins of the coronavirus back in April which prompted a drastic response from Beijing.

China immediately slapped the 80 per cent tariff on Australian barley, suspended beef imports and told students and tourists not to travel Down Under.

Beijing again responded with fury and outrage this month when Mr Morrison set off to Japan – one of China’s greatest historic rivals – to strengthen trade and military ties.

Days after, Beijing published a list of 14 grievances.

The laundry list included everything from ‘unfair media reports’ to Canberra’s criticism of China over its human rights abuses as payback China has targeted up to $20billion in key Australian exports – including Barley, coal, sugar, timber, wine, lobster, copper and cotton

Tensions have also spiked over allegations of widespread state-sponsored cyber attacks by China, and after ASIO raided the homes of Chinese journalists suspected of political interference.

Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Lijian Zhao posted a doctored image of showing a grinning Australian soldier holding a knife to the throat of an Afghan child

Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Lijian Zhao posted a doctored image of showing a grinning Australian soldier holding a knife to the throat of an Afghan child

Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Lijian Zhao posted a doctored image of showing a grinning Australian soldier holding a knife to the throat of an Afghan child

The Chinese government has attacked Australia over war crimes allegations by posting this falsified image on Twitter

The Chinese government has attacked Australia over war crimes allegations by posting this falsified image on Twitter

The Chinese government has attacked Australia over war crimes allegations by posting this falsified image on Twitter

On Monday, the situation reached fever pitch after Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Lijian Zhao posted a doctored image showing a grinning Australian soldier holding a knife to the throat of an Afghan child.

The artwork referred to revelations made last month in the Bereton inquiry, claiming 25 Australian soldiers unlawfully killed 39 Afghan civilians and prisoners.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison demanded an apology and called for the Asian superpower to take down the ‘repugnant’ fake image.

On Tuesday, Australian embassy officials met with Chinese Foreign Ministry representatives seeking a formal apology over the fake image.

But Beijing has since doubled down on their attacks against Australia, posting another controversial image in a state-owned newspaper depicting a kangaroo with a blood soaked knife in a bow tie.

How China’s feud with Australia has escalated 

2019: Australian intelligence services conclude that China was responsible for a cyber-attack on Australia’s parliament and three largest political parties in the run-up to a May election.

April 2020: Australian PM Scott Morrison begins canvassing his fellow world leaders for an inquiry into the origins of the coronavirus pandemic. Britain and France are initially reluctant but more than 100 countries eventually back an investigation. 

April 15: Morrison is one of the few leaders to voice sympathy with Donald Trump’s criticisms of the World Health Organization, which the US president accuses of bias towards China. 

April 21: China’s embassy accuses Australian foreign minister Peter Dutton of ‘ignorance and bigotry’ and ‘parroting what those Americans have asserted’ after he called for China to be more transparent about the outbreak.  

April 23: Australia’s agriculture minister David Littleproud calls for G20 nations to campaign against the ‘wet markets’ which are common in China and linked to the earliest coronavirus cases.  

April 26: Chinese ambassador Cheng Jingye hints at a boycott of Australian wine and beef and says tourists and students might avoid Australia ‘while it’s not so friendly to China’. Canberra dismisses the threat and warns Beijing against ‘economic coercion’. 

May 11: China suspends beef imports from four of Australia’s largest meat processors. These account for more than a third of Australia’s $1.1billion beef exports to China. 

May 18: The World Health Organization backs a partial investigation into the pandemic, but China says it is a ‘joke’ for Australia to claim credit. The same day, China imposes an 80 per cent tariff on Australian barley. Australia says it may challenge this at the WTO. 

May 21: China announces new rules for iron ore imports which could allow Australian imports – usually worth $41billion per year – to be singled out for extra bureaucratic checks. 

June 5: Beijing warns tourists against travelling to Australia, alleging racism and violence against the Chinese in connection with Covid-19.  

June 9: China’s Ministry of Education warns students to think carefully about studying in Australia, similarly citing alleged racist incidents.   

June 19: Australia says it is under cyber-attack from a foreign state which government sources say is believed to be China. The attack has been targeting industry, schools, hospitals and government officials, Morrison says.

July 9: Australia suspends extradition treaty with Hong Kong and offers to extend the visas of 10,000 Hong Kongers who are already in Australia over China’s national security law which effectively bans protest.

August 18: China launches 12-month anti-dumping investigation into wines imported from Australia in a major threat to the $6billion industry. 

August 26: Prime Minster Scott Morrison announces he will legislate to stop states and territories signing deals with foreign powers that go against Australia’s foreign policy. Analysts said it is aimed at China.

October 13: Trade Minister Simon Birmingham says he’s investigating reports that Chinese customs officials have informally told state-owned steelmakers and power plants to stop Aussie coal, leaving it in ships off-shore.

November 2: Agriculture Minister David Littleproud reveals China is holding up Aussie lobster imports by checking them for minerals.

November 3: Barley, sugar, red wine, logs, coal, lobster and copper imports from Australia unofficially banned under a directive from the government, according to reports.

November 18: China releases bizarre dossier of 14 grievances with Australia. 

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Pest controller says Australians can expect 100 cockroaches and 70 SPIDERS are living in their house

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pest controller says australians can expect 100 cockroaches and 70 spiders are living in their house

A pest controller has warned Australians are living with 100 cockroaches and 70 spiders at any one time.

Jeff Wainohu, from Sydney Side Pest Control, said there are always more insects than homeowners expect inside and the problem gets worse in the summertime.   

‘If I was going to estimate, looking at a house that we were coming to do for the first time, you would see anywhere from 30 to 100 cockroaches,’ he explained. 

‘With spiders you would also find anywhere from 20 upwards of 60 or 70 in and around the outside of the building.’ 

A pest controller has warned Australians that for every cockroach they spot in their homes there could be 10x more of the bugs (pictured) lurking and another 7x more spiders

A pest controller has warned Australians that for every cockroach they spot in their homes there could be 10x more of the bugs (pictured) lurking and another 7x more spiders

A pest controller has warned Australians that for every cockroach they spot in their homes there could be 10x more of the bugs (pictured) lurking and another 7x more spiders

Jeff Wainohu, from Sydney Side Pest Control, said the average Australian house could contain up to 100 cockroaches and 70 spiders (huntsman spider pictured) at any one time

Jeff Wainohu, from Sydney Side Pest Control, said the average Australian house could contain up to 100 cockroaches and 70 spiders (huntsman spider pictured) at any one time

Jeff Wainohu, from Sydney Side Pest Control, said the average Australian house could contain up to 100 cockroaches and 70 spiders (huntsman spider pictured) at any one time 

Mr Wainohu told Daily Mail Australia pest numbers always increase over the hotter months.

‘It’s all connected to the heat, especially when you get a sharp rise in the heat and a bit of rain,’ he explained. 

‘You’ll find it’s going to activate a lot of insects that are dormant at this stage and it happens across the board.  

‘We had a massive heatwave on Saturday and were getting calls from all over Sydney. All the insects were starting to come out.’ 

Mr Wainohu urged homeowners to maintain a neat and tidy property to avoid bug infestations.       

‘Coming into summer every house is going to be a little bit different but for spiders it depends on what’s going on at the outside,’ he said. 

‘So if the home has got more vegetation around the outside then they’re more inclined to have a lot more pressure with spiders.

The pest controller urged homeowners to de-clutter their properties to avoid bugs (pictured)

The pest controller urged homeowners to de-clutter their properties to avoid bugs (pictured)

The pest controller urged homeowners to de-clutter their properties to avoid bugs (pictured) 

‘Those homes towards the northern side of Sydney will generally get a lot more spider activity and cockroach activity as well.’   

Mr Wainohu explained ‘de-cluttering’ was a key step in preparing homes for the summer months. 

‘It’s really important to keep your lawns mowed, keep your grounds well-maintained and de-clutter anything you might have outside against the house,’ he said. 

‘That includes any vegetation, your garden beds should be maintained, and anything against the walls should be moved away.’

He also recommended homeowners book a regular pest control service every year before the summer season. 

This will allow any prior bug activity to be cleared out and maintain a protective barrier against future pests.  

He also recommended every home should undergo a pest control service (pictured above) every year and especially prior to the summer season when numbers increase

He also recommended every home should undergo a pest control service (pictured above) every year and especially prior to the summer season when numbers increase

He also recommended every home should undergo a pest control service (pictured above) every year and especially prior to the summer season when numbers increase  

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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