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Sydney mobile phone detection cameras have ‘loophole’ allowing people to avoid demerit points

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sydney mobile phone detection cameras have loophole allowing people to avoid demerit points

Thousands of drivers busted using their mobile phones behind the wheel are exploiting a loophole to avoid losing demerits points, while the government nets millions of extra dollars in revenue. 

Between March and June this year about 43,000 Sydney motorists were caught on their phones, but eight per cent were linked to company-owned cars.

If businesses can not identify the driver the $349 fine is increased to $1,745, but the offender avoids the five demerit point hit.

The cameras generated an additional $19 million in revenue for the NSW government from March until June – a figure that would be significantly smaller if all fined drivers were nominated. 

A 'loophole' in the mobile phone detection cameras system allows vehicles linked to business take a larger fine over nominating the guilty driver so the offender is not hit with demerit points. Pictured are drivers caught by the cameras

A 'loophole' in the mobile phone detection cameras system allows vehicles linked to business take a larger fine over nominating the guilty driver so the offender is not hit with demerit points. Pictured are drivers caught by the cameras

A ‘loophole’ in the mobile phone detection cameras system allows vehicles linked to business take a larger fine over nominating the guilty driver so the offender is not hit with demerit points. Pictured are drivers caught by the cameras

Labor’s shadow minister for roads John Graham told The Sydney Morning Herald the government needed the extra revenue and was hesitant to address the issue. 

‘This loophole is leaving dangerous drivers on our roads. Some of these thousands of drivers should no longer have a licence,’ Mr Graham said.

‘There is a conspiracy of silence about this behaviour because the government needs the money.’ 

Mr Graham estimated the $1,745 fines had collected nearly $6million during the time period.

The mobile phone detection cameras generated an additional $19 million in revenue for the NSW government between March and June. Pictured are the cameras in NSW

The mobile phone detection cameras generated an additional $19 million in revenue for the NSW government between March and June. Pictured are the cameras in NSW

The mobile phone detection cameras generated an additional $19 million in revenue for the NSW government between March and June. Pictured are the cameras in NSW

Transport Minister Andrew Constance said he was aware of the issue.

‘This matter is under consideration as part of the statutory review of the Road Transport Act 2013,’ he said. 

Mr Constance noted that while the existing regulations allowed drivers to escape demerit points if caught on camera, police officers gave no such exemptions.

Mobile phone detection cameras were first rolled out in Sydney early last year on a trial basis before the government started issuing fines in March 2020. 

Labor's shadow minister for roads John Graham said the government was hesitant to fix the issue due to the extra millions it was making

Labor's shadow minister for roads John Graham said the government was hesitant to fix the issue due to the extra millions it was making

Labor’s shadow minister for roads John Graham said the government was hesitant to fix the issue due to the extra millions it was making

The camera fines have given a huge boost the NSW government’s bottom line, recording $26 million in total fines for mobile phones in the last financial year.

The figure compares to $10 million the previous financial year when the fines were given out exclusively by police officers.

Victoria and Queensland have rolled out their own mobile phone detection camera programs, with each featuring an initial trail period that will only issue warnings to drivers rather than fines.

Other states in Australia are expected to implement the technology in time.  

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Phillip Island’s Penguin Parade halted as mother goose causes standoff

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phillip islands penguin parade halted as mother goose causes standoff

A standoff between Phillip Island’s iconic fairy penguins and a stubborn mother goose has been captured on camera.

The Live Penguin TV livestream recorded the Cape Barren goose and her two goslings blocking the Penguin Parade pathway on on Sunday night.

Following almost 10 minutes of chest pouting, the defiant mother goose eventually conceded defeat in the stand-off, allowing the rattled penguins to pass in numbers.

Penguins have been a long standing tourist attraction for visitors to Australia (stock image)

Penguins have been a long standing tourist attraction for visitors to Australia (stock image)

Penguins have been a long standing tourist attraction for visitors to Australia (stock image)

The footage then showed a disappointed goose move on, with her two goslings in tow. 

Phillip Island Ranger Skye Nichol described the scene as ‘quite a stand off.’

‘One penguin went to pass and the Mumma Goose said no,’ she told the Bass Coast News.

 ‘She was quite fiesty as she was protecting her babies.’

The adorable waddling penguins at Phillip Island have long been a must-see attraction for visitors at one of Australia’s premier tourist destinations in Victoria. 

From 6.30pm every night (AEST), a livestream of the penguins making their way home from the beach has been a massive hit on Facebook and YouTube.

More than 771,000 viewers tuned in for the online launch back on August 25.

Mother geese are notorious for their protective streak when it comes to their goslings (stock image)

Mother geese are notorious for their protective streak when it comes to their goslings (stock image)

Mother geese are notorious for their protective streak when it comes to their goslings (stock image)

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How you can transform an old children’s swing set into the ultimate boho backyard retreat

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how you can transform an old childrens swing set into the ultimate boho backyard retreat

An Australian mum has shared the ultimate summer DIY project using a pair of macrame rope seats and an old swing set.

The lady, who lives in New South Wales, shared a photo on Facebook of her children’s outdoor swing set complete with two adult-sized seats and cushions as well as fairy lights wrapped around the framework.

The result looked like a boho backyard retreat, perfect for lazy afternoon swinging and relaxing chats underneath the setting sun.

The result looked like a boho backyard retreat, perfect for lazy afternoon swinging and relaxing chats underneath the setting sun

The result looked like a boho backyard retreat, perfect for lazy afternoon swinging and relaxing chats underneath the setting sun

The result looked like a boho backyard retreat, perfect for lazy afternoon swinging and relaxing chats underneath the setting sun

‘I’m not sure if this has been posted before but it’s just an idea for old swing set frames and hanging boho chairs,’ she captioned the photo.

It quickly garnered attention online with hundreds of people saying they would like to try a similar ‘hack’ on the swing sets ‘rotting away’ at home.

‘Excellent idea. I was going to take my swing set down with a sledgehammer but this is a much better option,’ one person said.

‘Love this so much. I was going to buy another egg chair but not after seeing this,’ said another. 

A third added: ‘I have this saved on one of my Pinterest boards for my dream backyard. I’ve been saying that I am going to do it for months so I need to get on that’.

It quickly garnered attention online with hundreds of people saying they would like to try a similar 'hack' on the swing sets 'rotting away' outside (pictured is another version)

It quickly garnered attention online with hundreds of people saying they would like to try a similar 'hack' on the swing sets 'rotting away' outside (pictured is another version)

It quickly garnered attention online with hundreds of people saying they would like to try a similar ‘hack’ on the swing sets ‘rotting away’ outside (pictured is another version)

'I actually fit my hammock to rest in between the two swing spots so I can lay in it anywhere around the backyard,' one woman said

'I actually fit my hammock to rest in between the two swing spots so I can lay in it anywhere around the backyard,' one woman said

‘I actually fit my hammock to rest in between the two swing spots so I can lay in it anywhere around the backyard,’ one woman said

Other DIY lovers said they’d tried a similar thing after buying macrame hanging chairs off eBay and were glad they didn’t just throw their old swing sets away.

‘I actually fit my hammock to rest in between the two swing spots so I can put it anywhere in the backyard,’ one woman said.

‘I love my swing set now! Who would have thought the adults would be using it all these years later,’ said another.

Fairy lights were a common addition for added flair, while others indulged with flowers wrapped around the set itself.

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What your fingernails really say about your health

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what your fingernails really say about your health
Fiona Tuck (pictured) revealed how fingernails can signal internal health problems

Fiona Tuck (pictured) revealed how fingernails can signal internal health problems

Fiona Tuck (pictured) revealed how fingernails can signal internal health problems

An Australian nutritionist has revealed how changes in your fingernails can signal underlying health problems.

Fiona Tuck, from Sydney, said the nails are usually reflective of what the body is experiencing internally, but may take weeks or even months to show up.

‘Nail health can tell us whether an individual is lacking certain nutrients, such as iron or zinc, whether something more severe is occurring or if external factors have damaged the nail itself,’ she said.

‘It’s important to consider all the possibilities and look at all the fingernails, not just one and not the toenails.’  

White spots or lines

Many people will often experience white spots on the nails, which is usually an indication of a zinc or calcium deficiency.

‘These will look like white, little spots or lines on the nail – if you’re noticing these on all of the nails, it can be a sign of not getting enough zinc or calcium,’ Fiona said.

This factor is quite simple to reverse by consuming more foods containing these two vitamins.

For calcium, Fiona suggests eating more dairy products and leafy green vegetables, while eating more pumpkin seeds, oysters, poultry and red meat can boost zinc levels.

Many people will often experience white spots on the nails, which is usually an indication of a zinc or calcium deficiency

Many people will often experience white spots on the nails, which is usually an indication of a zinc or calcium deficiency

Many people will often experience white spots on the nails, which is usually an indication of a zinc or calcium deficiency

Pale or blue nails

It’s important to notice any changes in the nails, particularly the colour of the nail beds.

Fiona said healthy nails are always a natural pink colour, but pale or slightly blue nails could suggest a low blood circulation around the body.

Nails of this colour can also suggest a lack of iron in the body, which can be determined by getting a blood test or considering dieting factors.

Once the nutrients deficiency has been corrected, Fiona said the deformity in the nail will change and grow out. 

If the individual has poor blood circulation, this can be boosted by exercising more frequently.  

WHAT YOUR NAILS MIGHT INDICATE

White spots or lines = zinc or calcium deficiency

Pitted nails = psoriasis, arthritis or eczema

Koilonychia/spoon shaped nails = severe iron deficiency or anaemia

Beau’s lines = infection

Dark areas under nail = external factor, sometimes nothing or possible melanoma

Yellow nails = fungal infection 

Ridges on the nail = deficiencies or issues associated with the gut 

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Pitted nails 

Pitted nails is a less common condition, but often occurs when the body is experiencing more sinister illnesses.  

‘Pitting looks like tiny dots or pricks on the nail and this usually occurs when there’s a kind of autoimmune condition taking place within the body,’ Fiona said.

‘This is common among those who have psoriasis, a type of skin disease, or alopecia, which is when hair loss occurs.’

Fiona said these factors can be genetic, but are worth getting checked by a doctor or specialist.

Ridges on the nails

If the nails are growing to form a ridge or vertical lines, this can be indicative of further deficiencies or issues associated with the gut.

Fiona said the nails have a tendency to grow slower or form these ridges when the gut is not absorbing or receiving enough nutrients.

‘Ridges in the nails could be a sign of numerous nutrient deficiencies, such as protein, iron, zinc or minerals,’ she said.

She added this is why it’s essential to consider individual diets and what is consumed on a daily basis to help determine what might be going wrong internally.

Fiona said the nails have a tendency to grow slower or form vertical ridges when the gut is not absorbing or receiving enough nutrients

Fiona said the nails have a tendency to grow slower or form vertical ridges when the gut is not absorbing or receiving enough nutrients

Fiona said the nails have a tendency to grow slower or form vertical ridges when the gut is not absorbing or receiving enough nutrients

Clubbed nails

Clubbed nails are most common among older people and these nails are formed with the nail bed curving downwards.

This formation can be indicative of severe internal issues correlating to lung conditions or disease.

‘When the nails are clubbed or if they curve downwards, this can relate to breathing difficulties, lung conditions or even cardiovascular issues,’ Fiona said.

‘The nails often look enlarged at the ends of the fingers.’

External factors

Before seeing a doctor, it’s also important to consider whether any external factors may have impacted the growth of the nail.

Fiona said these factors can include fake nails, bumping the nail, peeling or ripping the nail or any other elements that may physically harm the nail.

She said nails can also become dry by excessively washing the hands, not moisturising or using too much hand sanitiser.

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