Connect with us

Australia

Sydney taxi driver worked for 8 days infectious – as NSW records two COVID-19 cases and one death 

Published

on

sydney taxi driver worked for 8 days infectious as nsw records two covid 19 cases and one death

There are fears of a coronavirus explosion in Sydney after a taxi driver drove around the city for ten days while infected with coronavirus. 

New South Wales recorded two new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday and one death, bringing the state’s death toll to 55. 

The man in his 70s died on Saturday at Sydney’s Royal North Shore hospital, Premier Gladys Berejiklian confirmed on Sunday. 

Ms Berejiklian confirmed the two new cases on Sunday, one of which is in hotel quarantine.

The other was the Sydney taxi driver who tested positive for the virus after working eight days while infectious and visiting venues in Sydney and the South Coast.  

NSW Health first issued the warning on Saturday night after the infected driver worked September 8, 9, 10, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18 in the city’s western suburbs.

Passengers who caught a taxi in Moorebank, Bankstown, Chipping Norton, Liverpool, Lidcombe, Warwick Farm and Milperra have been warned to watch for symptoms and get tested immediately if they feel ill. 

A taxi driver with coronavirus drove around Sydney for seven days and potentially infected customers

A taxi driver with coronavirus drove around Sydney for seven days and potentially infected customers

A taxi driver with coronavirus drove around Sydney for seven days and potentially infected customers

Self isolate and get tested: 

Campbelltown Golf Club,  – Glen Alpine – September 16 from 2pm-4.30pm in the TAB area

Milton Ulladulla Ex Servos Club – September 12 from  2pm-6.15pm

Carlo’s Italian Restaurante Bar & Seafood, Ulladulla – September 12 from 8pm-9.30pm

Bannisters Pavilion Rooftop Bar & Grill, Mollymook – September 13 from 12.30pm-2.15pm

Anyone who attended these venues for a least one hour during the times mentioned is considered to be a close contact and is being directed to get tested and isolate for 14 days. Glen Alpine

Source: NSW Heatlh 

<!—->Advertisement

‘NSW Health is working with the person and 13CABS to identify passengers,’ a spokesperson said.

An alert has also been issued for locations in southern and western Sydney after a person with COVID-19 visited a range of venues for at least one hour each.

Anyone who visited Campbelltown Golf Club on September 16 between 2pm and 4.30pm in western Sydney has been asked to get tested and self-isolate.

The patron also visited Carlo’s Italian Restaurante Bar & Seafood and Milton Ulladulla ExServos Club in Ulladulla, on the NSW south coast, on September 12, and nearby Bannisters Pavilion Rooftop Bar & Grill in Mollymook on September 13.

Bannisters is home to UK celebrity chef Rick Stein’s world-renowned seafood restaurant. 

Anyone who attended the Bannisters Pavilion Rooftop Bar & Grill in Mollymook (pictured) on September 13 from 12.30pm-2.15pm is considered a close contact

Anyone who attended the Bannisters Pavilion Rooftop Bar & Grill in Mollymook (pictured) on September 13 from 12.30pm-2.15pm is considered a close contact

Anyone who attended the Bannisters Pavilion Rooftop Bar & Grill in Mollymook (pictured) on September 13 from 12.30pm-2.15pm is considered a close contact

The site is home to Rick Steins' world renowned seafood restaurant. Pictured:  The Balconies of rooms at Bannisters by the Sea Hotel

The site is home to Rick Steins' world renowned seafood restaurant. Pictured:  The Balconies of rooms at Bannisters by the Sea Hotel

The site is home to Rick Steins’ world renowned seafood restaurant. Pictured:  The Balconies of rooms at Bannisters by the Sea Hotel

Anyone who visited the venues is considered a casual contact and should monitor for symptoms.

‘Early investigations into the source of infection indicate the case may have acquired the virus at Liverpool Hospital,’ the spokesperson said. 

The COVIDSafe App is being used to help identify contacts. 

NSW reported three new COVID-19 cases overnight.

Two cases are from returned travellers currently staying in hotel quarantine.

The other case is a staff member who worked while potentially infectious at Concord Hospital, in Sydney’s inner west. 

Anyone who attended the Milton Ulladulla Ex Servos Club (pictured) on September 12 from 2pm-6.15pm is considered a close contact and is urged to self isolate

Anyone who attended the Milton Ulladulla Ex Servos Club (pictured) on September 12 from 2pm-6.15pm is considered a close contact and is urged to self isolate

Anyone who attended the Milton Ulladulla Ex Servos Club (pictured) on September 12 from 2pm-6.15pm is considered a close contact and is urged to self isolate

Anyone who attended Carlo's Italian Restaurante Bar & seafood Ulladullla (pictured) on September 12 from 8pm-9.30pm is considered a close contact and is urged to self isolate

Anyone who attended Carlo's Italian Restaurante Bar & seafood Ulladullla (pictured) on September 12 from 8pm-9.30pm is considered a close contact and is urged to self isolate

Anyone who attended Carlo’s Italian Restaurante Bar & seafood Ulladullla (pictured) on September 12 from 8pm-9.30pm is considered a close contact and is urged to self isolate

Where Taxi worked: 

Moorebank 

Bankstown 

Chipping Norton 

Liverpool 

Lidcombe 

Warwick Farm 

Milperra 

Anyone who caught a Taxi in these areas on September 8, 9, 10, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18 is being urged to monitor their health.

 

<!—->Advertisement

Monitor your health:

Picnic Point Bowling Club – September 18, from 3pm-6pm

Campbelltown Golf Club course, Glen Alpine – September 16, from 9.30am-2pm

Anyone who attended these venues at the times mentioned is also considered a casual contact and must monitor for symptoms and get tested immediately if they develop symptoms.

  

Source: NSW Health 

 

<!—->Advertisement

 

NSW Health said it was investigating how the staff member became infected.

‘The case cared for patients with COVID-19 and further investigation is underway to identify how the infection was acquired.

‘Contact tracing is underway.’

The total number of COVID-19 infections has now risen to 4009 in NSW, however only 140 cases are still active. 

Four people are currently being treated in intensive care units with two connected to respirators. 

The death toll in the state currently stands at 52. 

Anyone who attended Campbelltown Golf Club at Glen Alpine (pictured) on September 16 from 2pm-4.30pm in the TAB area is considered a close contact and is urged to self isolate

Anyone who attended Campbelltown Golf Club at Glen Alpine (pictured) on September 16 from 2pm-4.30pm in the TAB area is considered a close contact and is urged to self isolate

Anyone who attended Campbelltown Golf Club at Glen Alpine (pictured) on September 16 from 2pm-4.30pm in the TAB area is considered a close contact and is urged to self isolate

Anyone who attended the Campbelltown Golf Club course at Glen Alpine (pictured) on September 16 from 9.30am-2pm is considered a casul contact and is urged to monitor their health

Anyone who attended the Campbelltown Golf Club course at Glen Alpine (pictured) on September 16 from 9.30am-2pm is considered a casul contact and is urged to monitor their health

Anyone who attended the Campbelltown Golf Club course at Glen Alpine (pictured) on September 16 from 9.30am-2pm is considered a casul contact and is urged to monitor their health

Powered by: Daily Mail

Australia

Today show host Karl Stefanovic promises a ‘nudie run’ if Trump loses the election

Published

on

By

today show host karl stefanovic promises a nudie run if trump loses the election

Today show host Karl Stefanovic is known for his cheeky antics on the popular Channel Nine breakfast program. 

But the 46-year-old has outdone himself by promising a ‘nudie run’ if U.S. President Donald Trump loses the upcoming election. 

Reported in the Herald Sun newspaper this week, Karl said: ‘If he doesn’t win I will run naked through Flinders Street station.’

Stripping off: Today show host Karl Stefanovic, 46, (pictured) has promised a 'nudie run' in Melbourne if Donald Trump loses the election while speaking on Fox FM earlier this week

Stripping off: Today show host Karl Stefanovic, 46, (pictured) has promised a 'nudie run' in Melbourne if Donald Trump loses the election while speaking on Fox FM earlier this week

Stripping off: Today show host Karl Stefanovic, 46, (pictured) has promised a ‘nudie run’ in Melbourne if Donald Trump loses the election while speaking on Fox FM earlier this week 

Karl made the comments on Fox FM’s FiFi, Fev and Byron show.

Despite Karl calling the President a ‘nutcase’ he seemed to imply that the shy vote for him will be in force again this year. 

‘Last time around four years ago, we (Today) were there, and everyone thought that Donald Trump was going to get absolutely belted,’ Karl said. 

‘He is in the same position he was four years ago and even more people think he is a complete nutcase, but he has got just as much chance of getting back in.’ 

Betting Trump: 'Last time around four years ago, we (Today) were there, and everyone thought that Donald Trump was going to get absolutely belted,' Karl said. Pictured: Donald Trump

Betting Trump: 'Last time around four years ago, we (Today) were there, and everyone thought that Donald Trump was going to get absolutely belted,' Karl said. Pictured: Donald Trump

Betting Trump: ‘Last time around four years ago, we (Today) were there, and everyone thought that Donald Trump was going to get absolutely belted,’ Karl said. Pictured: Donald Trump

Karl finished by saying he couldn’t get a clear picture of who was going to win until election day but he believed Trump would be victorious.

The beloved breakfast TV host is no stranger to a gag, even getting a spray tan live on air earlier this month.

Karl had complained of not getting enough vitamin D, with him then coming-up with the idea to get the tan. 

Standing in a black booth alongside news presenter Alex Cullen, Karl wasn’t shy about revealing his almost bare physique on national television.

The process: Armed with a spray tan gun, his co-host Allison Langdon appeared very eager to give Karl (pictured) a tan, quipping: 'I'll just wing it!' earlier this month

The process: Armed with a spray tan gun, his co-host Allison Langdon appeared very eager to give Karl (pictured) a tan, quipping: 'I'll just wing it!' earlier this month

The process: Armed with a spray tan gun, his co-host Allison Langdon appeared very eager to give Karl (pictured) a tan, quipping: ‘I’ll just wing it!’ earlier this month

He was sporting nothing but a pair of rather revealing boxer shorts and he had stuck a stencil of NRL team, the Brisbane Broncos, logo to his chest.

Allison then went to give Karl a very dark and uneven tan, saying: ‘I think maybe this was a really bad idea’ in the lighthearted segment.

Karl has indicated he is a supporter of the controversial American president in the past. In 2017, he referred to himself as ‘the Donald Trump of breakfast TV.’

Fun lover: Karl has indicated he was a supporter of the president in the past. In 2017, he referred to himself as 'the Donald Trump of breakfast TV.' Here with Chuck Norris (R)

Fun lover: Karl has indicated he was a supporter of the president in the past. In 2017, he referred to himself as 'the Donald Trump of breakfast TV.' Here with Chuck Norris (R)

Fun lover: Karl has indicated he was a supporter of the president in the past. In 2017, he referred to himself as ‘the Donald Trump of breakfast TV.’ Here with Chuck Norris (R) 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Australia

Trump tears into Biden during back-to-back rallies in North Carolina, Ohio and Wisconsin

Published

on

By

trump tears into biden during back to back rallies in north carolina ohio and wisconsin

President Donald Trump wrapped up a series of campaign rallies in swing states on Saturday, blasting his Democratic opponent Joe Biden as a corrupt politician and creature of Washington while painting himself as a political outsider.

Trump repeated the argument from his successful 2016 campaign when voters responded to the unorthodox candidate by handing him the White House.

He did three rallies in three critical background states – North Carolina, Ohio and Wisconsin – kicking off a final 10 days of campaigning that will feature a jam-packed schedule headed into November 3. 

‘We can’t take any chances. We have to win,’ Trump told his supporters in Waukesha, Wisconsin, in his final rally of the day.

‘Can you imagine losing to this guy?’ he said of Biden, calling for a ‘thundering’ defeat of his Democratic rival at the ballot box while blasting the opposition party as ‘anti-American.’

‘If you want to raise your children safely you must defeat Sleepy Joe Biden,’ he said. 

President Donald Trump in Waukesha, Wisconsin, the last of three campaign rallies he held in critical battleground states on Saturday

President Donald Trump in Waukesha, Wisconsin, the last of three campaign rallies he held in critical battleground states on Saturday

President Donald Trump in Waukesha, Wisconsin, the last of three campaign rallies he held in critical battleground states on Saturday

In Wisconsin, Trump spoke before A Thin Blue Line flag which supports police

In Wisconsin, Trump spoke before A Thin Blue Line flag which supports police

In Wisconsin, Trump spoke before A Thin Blue Line flag which supports police

President Trump attacked Joe Biden as a corrupt politician

President Trump attacked Joe Biden as a corrupt politician

President Trump attacked Joe Biden as a corrupt politician

President Trump attacked former President Barack Obama for 'hate-laced' speeches; Obama campaigned for Joe Biden in Miami on  Saturday

President Trump attacked former President Barack Obama for 'hate-laced' speeches; Obama campaigned for Joe Biden in Miami on  Saturday

President Trump attacked former President Barack Obama for ‘hate-laced’ speeches; Obama campaigned for Joe Biden in Miami on  Saturday

Trump started his day by casting his ballot in his new home state of Florida, which he needs to win if he wants a second term in the White House. Early voting started there on Monday. 

The president will be in New Hampshire on Sunday. He’ll be in Pennsylvania on Monday. On Tuesday he travels to Michigan, Wisconsin and Nebraska. 

A senior administration official also said the president will make another West Coast swing, campaigning in Arizona and Nevada, later next week with more stops in Florida, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin.

Trump spent the day on the attack – against Biden and his son Hunter, former President Barack Obama, the Washington ‘swamp,’ the media and big tech. 

The supporters at his rally shouted back some of his favorite things to hear: ‘four more years,’ ‘lock him up,’ and ‘we love you.’ 

Trump portrayed himself as a victim of ‘hate-laced’ Obama, who he repeatedly called by his full name: Barack Hussein Obama.

The former president has started campaigning for Biden. He was at a rally for him in Philadelphia on Wednesday and campaigned for him in Miami on Saturday.

Obama has come out hard against his successor in the Oval Office, criticizing his policies and his rhetoric.  

‘Trump wants full credit for the economy he inherited and zero blame for the pandemic he ignored,’ Obama said on Saturday.

Trump, meanwhile, has painted a dark portrait of life under a President Biden, warning people their taxes will go up, their churches will be closed and they will lose their second amendment rights. 

He told them he would fight for them.  

‘If I don’t sound like a typical Washington politician it’s because I’m not a typical politician,’ he told supporters in Circleville, Ohio. ‘I’m fighting for you harder than any politician.’ 

He thanked supporters for firing ‘depraved’ Democrats in the White House four years ago.

‘In 2016, Ohio voted to fire this depraved political establishment and you elected an outsider as your president who is finally putting America first,’ he said.

‘Nobody told me the swamp was going to be that deep and that vicious,’ he said of Washington D.C.

President Donald Trump brushed off polls showing him trailing Democratic rival Joe Biden and predicted a 'red wave like you've never seen before' on Election Day; above he addresses supporters in Ohio

President Donald Trump brushed off polls showing him trailing Democratic rival Joe Biden and predicted a 'red wave like you've never seen before' on Election Day; above he addresses supporters in Ohio

President Donald Trump brushed off polls showing him trailing Democratic rival Joe Biden and predicted a ‘red wave like you’ve never seen before’ on Election Day; above he addresses supporters in Ohio

President Trump addresses thousands of supporters in Circleville, Ohio

President Trump addresses thousands of supporters in Circleville, Ohio

President Trump addresses thousands of supporters in Circleville, Ohio

President Trump, speaking at the Columbus airport, told reporters in Ohio there is a 'hidden' vote that will come out for him

President Trump, speaking at the Columbus airport, told reporters in Ohio there is a 'hidden' vote that will come out for him

President Trump, speaking at the Columbus airport, told reporters in Ohio there is a ‘hidden’ vote that will come out for him

The three states the president was in on Saturday are all tight in the polls.  

Biden holds a slight lead over Trump in Wisconsin, polls show. But Trump became the first Republican in more than 20 years to carry the state in 2016 and he’s fighting hard to win it again, making his second trip in eight days. And he’ll be back again on Tuesday.

Trump has a slight edge over Biden in Ohio where recent polls have shown the president leading. Trump won Ohio by 8 points in 2016.

North Carolina is essentially tied. Trump won the state by 3 points in 2016 and is focused on keeping it in his corner. In addition to his multiple campaign visits, Ivanka Trump campaigned in North Carolina earlier this week.

Trump brush off polls showing him trailing Biden and predicted a ‘red wave like you’ve never seen before’ on Election Day.

‘Well we have ten days, and, you know, nothing worries me,’ he told reporters after he landed in Columbus, Ohio, for his second campaign rally of the day on Saturday. 

‘We’re going to take this right up until the end and then I suspect I’ll rest for about two hours but we’ll see what happens,’ he said. 

He claimed there was a ‘hidden vote’ out there not being seen. He did not elaborate on what he meant.

‘We’re way ahead than where we were four years ago right? Way ahead where we were four years ago,’ he said. ‘I don’t know if it is a hidden vote. I don’t know what it is.’ 

President Trump also campaigned in Circleville, Ohio, on Saturday

President Trump also campaigned in Circleville, Ohio, on Saturday

President Trump also campaigned in Circleville, Ohio, on Saturday

Joe Biden and his wife Jill Biden attend a drive-in campaign event at Dallas High School in Dallas, Pennsylvania

Joe Biden and his wife Jill Biden attend a drive-in campaign event at Dallas High School in Dallas, Pennsylvania

Joe Biden and his wife Jill Biden attend a drive-in campaign event at Dallas High School in Dallas, Pennsylvania

Supporters at President Trump's rally in Circleville, Ohio

Supporters at President Trump's rally in Circleville, Ohio

Supporters at President Trump’s rally in Circleville, Ohio

Biden leads Trump by 8 points in the RealClearPolitics voting average on the race but the president and his team are expressing confidence he’ll prevail in the election. 

There are multiple factors that make 2020 unlike any other: the coronavirus pandemic, the uptake in mail-in ballots that could lead to post-election day lawsuits from both sides, and the record number of early votes being cast.

More than 56 million Americans ave already cast their ballot and more than 86 million mail-in ballots have been requested, according to the Election Project.

‘If you look at the early vote it is not nearly what they thought it would be. It’s just not what they thought. A great red wave – going to be a red wave like you’ve never seen before,’ he said.  

The president uses the size of his rallies to judge his support. He based his claim he is winning, in part, on having bigger rallies than Biden. 

‘Is there any place better than a Trump rally,’ he said to thousands of supporters who came out in Ohio. ‘You are so lucky I’m president.’

And, in his speech in North Carolina, he mocked his Democratic rival for holding drive-in rallies instead of traditional ones during the coronavirus pandemic.  

‘People in cars – I don’t get it. I’ve never seen so few cars,’ Trump said. ‘And the cars weren’t in a circle. They were too close together. They weren’t socially distanced.’ 

‘It was a tiny little crowd. You head a couple of horns – honk, honk,’ he added. 

Biden held a drive-in event in Bristol, Pennsylvania, on Saturday, but his campaign kept it small due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

‘I wish I could go car to car to meet you all. I don’t like the idea of all this distance, but it’s necessary,’ Biden told his supporters. ‘What we don’t want to do is become super-spreaders.’ 

President Donald Trump criticized Joe Biden as a 'worn out politician' as he kicked off a series of campaign rallies in critical battleground states, starting in North Carolina

President Donald Trump criticized Joe Biden as a 'worn out politician' as he kicked off a series of campaign rallies in critical battleground states, starting in North Carolina

President Donald Trump criticized Joe Biden as a ‘worn out politician’ as he kicked off a series of campaign rallies in critical battleground states, starting in North Carolina

President Trump held an event with a few thousand people in North Carolina

President Trump held an event with a few thousand people in North Carolina

President Trump held an event with a few thousand people in North Carolina

Trump has had large rallies but the Biden campaign has deliberately limited attendance at their events, citing restrictions in place because of the coronavirus.  

Whether the love of Trump’s loyalists brings swing voters to the president’s side remains to be seen. Tough economies are usually bad predictors for a president’s re-election efforts but the American economy took a hit from the coronavirus, which means voters may not place the blame for the high unemployment and businesses going under on Trump. 

 He mocked Biden, saying he was the reason Trump ran for president.  

‘I wouldn’t have run, Joe, if you did a good job. I had a very nice life. I wouldn’t have run if you did a good job,’ he said in Ohio, referring to Biden’s time as vice president.  

At his rallies, President Trump repeated his attacks on Hunter Biden, the son of Joe Biden. He claimed Hunter Biden made millions from contacts in Russia, the Ukraine and China because his father was vice president.

‘The son had no job, no nothing. Unfortunately was forced out of the military, and all of a sudden he’s making millions of dollars,’ Trump said in North Carolina.

‘His father is in charge of three,’ Trump said referring to Russia, China and Ukraine.

The crowd roared in response ‘lock him up.’ 

In Wisconsin, he also repeated his complaints there wasn’t enough coverage of a laptop alleged to belong to Hunter Biden but it’s authenticity has been questioned.

‘There’s never been a more egregious assault on our people, on our country, than what the media is doing. They refuse to write about his corruption.’

‘Lock him up,’ the crowd chanted as Trump chuckled.

The president, in North Carolina, also attacked Biden for saying he wouldn’t end fracking. One of Trump’s campaign arguments against Biden is his claim the Democrat would end the practice that involves injecting liquid at high pressure into subterranean rocks, boreholes, etc. so as to force open existing fissures and extract oil or gas. 

‘He’s either crazy or the worst liar,’ Trump said of Biden’s claims he said he wouldn’t end the practice, which is  used in the battleground state of Pennsylvania.  

Joe Biden at his drive-in rally in Pennsylvania on Saturday

Joe Biden at his drive-in rally in Pennsylvania on Saturday

Joe Biden at his drive-in rally in Pennsylvania on Saturday

Biden supporters at a drive-in rally in Bristol, Pennsylvania, on Saturday

Biden supporters at a drive-in rally in Bristol, Pennsylvania, on Saturday

Biden supporters at a drive-in rally in Bristol, Pennsylvania, on Saturday

President Donald Trump cast his ballot in person on Saturday near his Florida home

President Donald Trump cast his ballot in person on Saturday near his Florida home

President Donald Trump cast his ballot in person on Saturday near his Florida home

With less than two weeks to go both Trump and Biden are on the campaign trail with their running mates and surrogates spread out across the country to rally voters ahead of November 3.  

Trump has sounded confident he will win a second term.

‘Take a look at all how returns coming in. We’re supposed to be behind until the wave, right,’ he told reporters on Air Force One on Friday evening. ‘We’re not way behind. We’re way ahead. We’re way ahead of where we were four years ago. And the wave is going to be much bigger than it was and there’s more enthusiasm now than we ever had four years ago. Four years ago it was amazing.’ 

And he’s already cast his own ballot on Saturday morning in West Palm Beach.

‘I voted for a guy named Trump,’ he said afterward.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Australia

1 million Californians set to lose power as power company fears gusty winds could snap branches

Published

on

By

1 million californians set to lose power as power company fears gusty winds could snap branches

California, which has endured its worst wildfire season in history, is bracing for the most dangerous winds of the year.

The forecast prompted the largest utility to announce plans to cut power on Sunday to nearly 1 million people to guard against its equipment sparking new blazes.

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. said the outages would start in far Northern California and ultimately could affect 386,000 customers in 38 counties, with many of the shutoffs concentrated in the San Francisco Bay Area. 

At a Saturday night briefing, utility officials said high winds were expected to arrive midday Sunday and reach 40 to 60 mph with higher gusts in the mountains. Winds that strong can topple trees and send branches into power lines.

Pacific Gas and Electric may cut power to more than 1 million people in Northern and Central California on Sunday from 10am for as long as 24 hours. (File photo from September 2020)

Pacific Gas and Electric may cut power to more than 1 million people in Northern and Central California on Sunday from 10am for as long as 24 hours. (File photo from September 2020)

Pacific Gas and Electric may cut power to more than 1 million people in Northern and Central California on Sunday from 10am for as long as 24 hours. (File photo from September 2020)

California, already devastated by wildfires, is facing what could be the biggest fire threat of the year

California, already devastated by wildfires, is facing what could be the biggest fire threat of the year

California, already devastated by wildfires, is facing what could be the biggest fire threat of the year

Tinder dry conditions couples with strong winds make it ideal conditions for wildfire to spread

Tinder dry conditions couples with strong winds make it ideal conditions for wildfire to spread

Tinder dry conditions couples with strong winds make it ideal conditions for wildfire to spread

The region is likely to be at risk throughout Sunday and into Monday morning

The region is likely to be at risk throughout Sunday and into Monday morning

The region is likely to be at risk throughout Sunday and into Monday morning

Earlier this month, parts of Oakland, California were without power due to the presence of strong winds and dangerous fire weather. Similar is likely to happen on Sunday

Earlier this month, parts of Oakland, California were without power due to the presence of strong winds and dangerous fire weather. Similar is likely to happen on Sunday

Earlier this month, parts of Oakland, California were without power due to the presence of strong winds and dangerous fire weather. Similar is likely to happen on Sunday

Some of the largest and deadliest fires in recent years were started by utility equipment being damaged by high winds, so PG&E has been aggressive about pre-preemptively cutting power when fire conditions are most dangerous. This will be the fifth time PG&E has cut power to customers this year and by far the largest shutdown.

‘We obviously recognize that power outages present hardships. That’s why we try to make it as small as we can,’ PG&E incident commander Mark Quinlan said, noting that the planned shutdown had been reduced from 466,000 customers.

Cities throughout the region planned to open emergency operations centers and add police officers and firefighters to patrol high-risk areas. 

Officials also were encouraging people to have their cellphones fully charged or, if they have a landline, to connect an older model phone that doesn’t depend on electricity.

In Berkeley, just east of San Francisco, officials recommended residents consider leaving the hills before Sunday afternoon, especially if they would have trouble getting out quickly during a fire. In neighboring Oakland, where a blaze in the city’s hills in October 1991 killed 25 people, at least 10 parks will close Sunday and Monday.

PG&E says it could begin safety shutoffs Sunday morning as gusts and low humidity ramp up the risk of downing power lines and sparking massive fires in tinder-dry brush

PG&E says it could begin safety shutoffs Sunday morning as gusts and low humidity ramp up the risk of downing power lines and sparking massive fires in tinder-dry brush

PG&E says it could begin safety shutoffs Sunday morning as gusts and low humidity ramp up the risk of downing power lines and sparking massive fires in tinder-dry brush

Pacific Gas & Electric says it may cut power to some 1 million people this weekend in central and Northern California, which could see the most dangerous fire weather of the season

Pacific Gas & Electric says it may cut power to some 1 million people this weekend in central and Northern California, which could see the most dangerous fire weather of the season

Pacific Gas & Electric says it may cut power to some 1 million people this weekend in central and Northern California, which could see the most dangerous fire weather of the season

‘I would ask all of the people who live in high-impact areas mimic us and plan ahead of time and do the planning with their neighbors, with their families and within their own households so that if they are asked to evacuate they’re ready and not just then starting to figure it out,’ Oakland Assistant Fire Chief Robert Lipp said.

While about one-third of the affected customers will be in the Bay Area, cuts are predicted to encompass parts of the Sacramento Valley, the northern and central Sierra Nevada, the Santa Cruz Mountains, the Central Coast and parts of southern Kern County. 

The projected shutoffs included 19,000 customers in parts of Butte County, where in November 2018 a blaze ignited by PG&E equipment destroyed much of the town of Paradise and killed 85 people, the most in state history.

Scientists say climate change has made California much drier, meaning trees and other plants are more flammable. Traditionally October and November are the worst months for fires, but already this year California has seen more than 8,600 wildfires that have scorched a record 6,400 square miles and destroyed about 9,200 homes, businesses and other structures. There have been 31 deaths.

Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) workers inspect a fire damaged property last month

Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) workers inspect a fire damaged property last month

Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) workers inspect a fire damaged property last month

Wildfires in September made for some eerie scenes in San Francisco as smoke blocked the sunlight and turned the sky a dark orange and yellow shade for most of the day

Wildfires in September made for some eerie scenes in San Francisco as smoke blocked the sunlight and turned the sky a dark orange and yellow shade for most of the day

Wildfires in September made for some eerie scenes in San Francisco as smoke blocked the sunlight and turned the sky a dark orange and yellow shade for most of the day

Four of the five largest fires in state history occurred since mid-August, when a massive series of lightning strikes sparked hundreds of fires. All of the largest fires have been fully or significantly contained. But more than 6,000 firefighters remain committed to 19 blazes, including a dozen major incidents, according to state fire officials.

Almost all of Northern California is in moderate to extreme drought. The combination of high winds, very low humidity and a parched landscape has the region on edge.

The National Weather Service issued red flag warnings for many areas, meaning fire danger is extremely high. It said the conditions could equal those during devastating fires in the Bay Area’s wine country in 2017 and last year’s Kincade Fire that burned a large swath of Sonoma County.

Fire officials said PG&E transmission lines sparked the Kincade Fire last October, which destroyed hundreds of homes and caused nearly 100,000 people to flee.

‘Given that vegetation is now at or near record dryness levels — much as it was prior to the North Bay firestorm in October 2017 — this is a very concerning forecast,’ Daniel Swain, climate scientist with UCLA and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, wrote in a blog post.

At Silverado Ace Hardware store in Calistoga, people were buying generators, electrical cords, flashlights, batteries, gas cans and other items, said Kathleen Collins, the store’s assistant manager.

Idea is to avoid a situation in which wind gusts snap off tree branches or damage equipment, creating sparks that could ignite dry brush and lead to a wildfire. Pictures, Pacific Gas & Electric crew works on replacing poles destroyed by wildfires (file photo)

Idea is to avoid a situation in which wind gusts snap off tree branches or damage equipment, creating sparks that could ignite dry brush and lead to a wildfire. Pictures, Pacific Gas & Electric crew works on replacing poles destroyed by wildfires (file photo)

Idea is to avoid a situation in which wind gusts snap off tree branches or damage equipment, creating sparks that could ignite dry brush and lead to a wildfire. Pictures, Pacific Gas & Electric crew works on replacing poles destroyed by wildfires (file photo)

The Napa County town of 5,000 people has been affected by many of the power outages this year. But in the previous outage, the PG&E brought in temporary generators to provide electricity.

‘The generators are are still set up out there, so I’m hoping they’re going to keep our power up,’ Collins said.

She said losing power is becoming a common occurrence, and people are having to live without electricity for days at time.

‘There’s not much we can do about it,’ Collins said. ‘We’ve already been devastated so much by these fires. Being without power seems the only solution right now.’

Southern California, which enjoyed several days of cool temperatures and higher humidity, will see the return of warm, dry Santa Ana winds. 

A fire weather watch is in effect for much of Los Angeles and Ventura counties from late Sunday through Tuesday. Relative humidity levels will plummet, and winds could top 55 mph in valleys, with gusts of 75 mph possible in mountain areas.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 DiazHub.