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The foods and drinks you should eat to reduce inflammation in your digestive system

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the foods and drinks you should eat to reduce inflammation in your digestive system

An Australian nutritionist has revealed how to avoid inflaming your digestive system by eating the right food every day.

Susie Burrell, from Sydney, said there are a number of anti-inflammatory foods that should be consumed regularly – including fresh fruit, leafy green vegetables, nuts and legumes.

The mother-of-two said inflammation is the body’s natural response when the digestive system is put under stress, is injured or damaged from chronic conditions such as Type 2 diabetes and fatty liver. 

‘It has been known for some time that our diet, or specifically the balance of key nutrients in our diets can play a key role in preventing and managing the levels of inflammation in the body,’ Susie said.

‘Specifically it is the general shift towards more processed foods, and a greater intake of the types of fat that can promote inflammatory pathways that is hypothesised as one of the key reasons inflammatory conditions.’ 

If inflammation persists after long periods of time, it’s important to seek health advice from a professional. 

Susie Burrell, from Sydney, said there are a number of anti-inflammatory foods that should be consumed regularly - including fresh fruit, leafy green vegetables, nuts and legumes

Susie Burrell, from Sydney, said there are a number of anti-inflammatory foods that should be consumed regularly - including fresh fruit, leafy green vegetables, nuts and legumes

Susie Burrell, from Sydney, said there are a number of anti-inflammatory foods that should be consumed regularly – including fresh fruit, leafy green vegetables, nuts and legumes

Get the fat balance right

While some types of good fat helps reduce inflammation, others have a tendency to increase it and so it’s important to get the balance right.

Susie said good fats, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, should be consumed three to four times daily by eating walnuts, oily fish, flaxseeds, avocado and almonds.

Whereas only two to three serves of saturated fat from meat, dairy and coconut products should only be consumed to minimise inflammation.

‘Many of us fail to get this balance right as we do not eat enough oily fish and by overdoing the coconut products and fatty meat,’ Susie said. 

If these portion sizes are consumed, the individual will balance their daily recommended source of fat.  

Susie said good fats, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, should be consumed three to four times daily by eating walnuts, oily fish, flaxseeds, avocado and almonds

Susie said good fats, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, should be consumed three to four times daily by eating walnuts, oily fish, flaxseeds, avocado and almonds

Susie said good fats, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, should be consumed three to four times daily by eating walnuts, oily fish, flaxseeds, avocado and almonds

Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables

Eating fresh fruit and vegetables is highly recommended to maintain a healthy diet, and eating specific antioxidant foods will help the digestive system and minimise inflammation.

‘Countries with the longest lifespan and the lowest prevalence of chronic disease are known to consume seven to ten serves of antioxidant rich fresh fruits and vegetables every single day,’ Susie said.

‘The brighter the colour of the fresh fruit or vegetable, the higher the antioxidant content and the more antioxidants we consume naturally as part of our daily diet, the better it is for the health of our cells long term.’

Berries are antioxidant-rich fruits, but Susie recommends eating carrots and capsicums to ‘lower inflammatory makers in the blood’.

She also suggests eating leafy green vegetables every day to boost magnesium levels.

Eating fresh fruit and vegetables is highly recommended to maintain a healthy diet, and eating specific antioxidant foods will help the digestive system

Eating fresh fruit and vegetables is highly recommended to maintain a healthy diet, and eating specific antioxidant foods will help the digestive system

Eating fresh fruit and vegetables is highly recommended to maintain a healthy diet, and eating specific antioxidant foods will help the digestive system

Susie’s example of an anti-inflammatory diet

Breakfast 

Beetroot, celery, carrot juice

Vegetable Omelette

Snack 

Homemade Bliss/Protein Ball

Lunch

Chicken salad with sweet potato and beans

Green tea

Snack 

Handful of mixed nuts and seeds, punnet of berries

Dinner 

150g salmon fillet

Roasted vegetables with olive oil

Source: Susie Burrell 

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Drink more tea

Although red wine and hot dark chocolate are good for the body, Susie recommends swapping these drinks for a cup of tea.

‘Tea, both and black and green tea, is linked to reduced inflammatory markets in several studies,’ she said. 

This helps soothe the digestive system and can reduce inflammatory levels, which can settle the stomach in the evening after food has been consumed. 

Although red wine and hot dark chocolate are good for the body, Susie recommends swapping these drinks for a cup of tea

Although red wine and hot dark chocolate are good for the body, Susie recommends swapping these drinks for a cup of tea

Although red wine and hot dark chocolate are good for the body, Susie recommends swapping these drinks for a cup of tea

Cutting down on sugar and refined carbohydrates from a diet is usually recommended when losing weight, but Susie also endorses this to reduce inflammation

Cutting down on sugar and refined carbohydrates from a diet is usually recommended when losing weight, but Susie also endorses this to reduce inflammation

Cutting down on sugar and refined carbohydrates from a diet is usually recommended when losing weight, but Susie also endorses this to reduce inflammation 

Cut out sugary drinks and refined carbs

Cutting down on sugar and refined carbohydrates from a diet is usually recommended when losing weight, and Susie also endorses this to reduce inflammation.

She said there is a link between the ‘glycaemic load of a diet and chronic inflammatory conditions’.

The glycaemic load of food is the number that estimates how much food will raise an individual’s blood glucose level.

‘One of the easiest ways to reduce glycaemic load is to focus your diet less on heavy carb foods such as white bread, rice, pasta and sweet snacks and instead shift your focus to lean proteins such as fish, eggs, lean meat and chicken and plenty of vegetables,’ Susie said.

Liquid forms of sugar such as soft drinks and alcohol are also known to cause inflammation and small amounts should be consumed at any given time.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Australia

Scott Morrison slams ex-Malaysia PM for saying Muslims have right to kill after Nice terror attack

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scott morrison slams ex malaysia pm for saying muslims have right to kill after nice terror attack
Scott Morrison (pictured on Thursday) has slammed the former Malaysian prime minister and paid tribute to terror attack victims

Scott Morrison (pictured on Thursday) has slammed the former Malaysian prime minister and paid tribute to terror attack victims

Scott Morrison (pictured on Thursday) has slammed the former Malaysian prime minister and paid tribute to terror attack victims

Scott Morrison has slammed the former Malaysian prime minister for saying Muslims ‘have the right to kill millions of French people’ after a knife-wielding Islamist murdered three people in a church in Nice. 

The prime minister said Mahathir Mohamad’s tweets were ‘absurd and abhorrent’ and paid tribute to the victims of the terror attack in southern France.

‘The only thing that should be said today is to completely condemn those attacks. The only response is to be utterly, utterly devastated,’ Mr Morrison told 2GB radio on Friday morning.

He added: ‘This was the most callous and cowardly and vicious act of barbarism by a terrorist, and should be condemned in the strongest possible way.’ 

Mr Morrison said he had contacted French President Macron and told him that Australia ‘stands with him’.

‘Our hearts go out to the French people who are dealing with so much during COVID19. We condemn all acts of terrorism & stand united against these vile acts,’ he later wrote on Twitter.   

On Thursday morning a 21-year-old Tunisian migrant attacked the Notre Dame basilica in the city of Nice, killing 45-year-old church warden Vincent Loques, slitting the throat of an elderly woman in an apparent beheading attempt and stabbing another woman in her 40s who succumbed to her injuries after seeking refuge in a nearby bar. He was shot and detained.

It came after French President Macron caused fury across the Islamic world for defending satirical cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed, the founder of Islam. 

In a series of tweets, ex-Malaysian PM Mohamad, who lost power in February this year, had tweeted that freedom of expression does not include ‘insulting other people’. 

The 95-year-old politician said he did not approve of the beheading of a French school teacher for sharing caricatures of the Prophet, but said: ‘Irrespective of the religion professed, angry people kill’.

‘The French in the course of their history [have] killed millions of people. Many were Muslims,’ he said in a tweet which has since been removed for violating the website’s rules.

Mahathir, who has drawn controversy for comments about Jews and LGBT people in the past, went on: ‘Muslims have a right to be angry and to kill millions of French people for the massacres of the past.’ 

35015096 8893671 image m 21 1604001372392

35015096 8893671 image m 21 1604001372392

Malaysia’s former PM Mahathir Mohamad, pictured in Kuala Lumpur earlier this month, said that Muslims ‘have the right to be angry and to kill millions of French people’ 

Removed: Twitter took down Mahathir's most provocative post about 'killing millions of French people'

Removed: Twitter took down Mahathir's most provocative post about 'killing millions of French people'

Removed: Twitter took down Mahathir’s most provocative post about ‘killing millions of French people’ 

Three people have died - two of whom were beheaded - after a knifeman attacked the Notre Dame basilica in Nice at 9am on Friday, before he was shot and arrested by police

Three people have died - two of whom were beheaded - after a knifeman attacked the Notre Dame basilica in Nice at 9am on Friday, before he was shot and arrested by police

Three people have died – two of whom were beheaded – after a knifeman attacked the Notre Dame basilica in Nice at 9am on Friday, before he was shot and arrested by police

The Malaysian politician said that ‘by and large’, Muslims have not applied the principle of ‘eye for an eye’: ‘Muslims don’t. The French shouldn’t. Instead the French should teach their people to respect other people’s feelings’. 

Mahathir, who served as Malaysian premier twice for a total of 24 years, said that French President Emmanuel Macron was ‘very primitive’ and ‘not showing that he is civilised’.   

France’s digital minister demanded that Twitter also ban Mahathir from its platform, with Cedric O saying he told the managing director of the social media giant in France that his account ‘must be immediately suspended.’ 

Mr O tweeted on Thursday. ‘If not, @twitter would be an accomplice to a formal call for murder.’

The former prime minister made no direct reference to the attack in a church in Nice on Thursday.

Scott Morrison said: 'This was the most callous and cowardly and vicious act of barbarism by a terrorist, and should be condemned in the strongest possible way'

Scott Morrison said: 'This was the most callous and cowardly and vicious act of barbarism by a terrorist, and should be condemned in the strongest possible way'

Scott Morrison said: ‘This was the most callous and cowardly and vicious act of barbarism by a terrorist, and should be condemned in the strongest possible way’

Emmanuel Macron takes part in a video conference on Covid-19 with members of the European Council at the Elysee Palace

Emmanuel Macron takes part in a video conference on Covid-19 with members of the European Council at the Elysee Palace

Emmanuel Macron takes part in a video conference on Covid-19 with members of the European Council at the Elysee Palace

Emergency services at the basilica

Emergency services at the basilica

Emergency services at the basilica

Emergency services at the basilica

An elderly woman who had come to the church early to pray was the first to be beheaded before a male church warden was also killed. A third woman was then stabbed multiple times, ran across the street, and died of her injuries

Emmanuel Macron arrives at the scene of the attack, where he spoke with paramedics and police officers

Emmanuel Macron arrives at the scene of the attack, where he spoke with paramedics and police officers

Emmanuel Macron arrives at the scene of the attack, where he spoke with paramedics and police officers

Police storm the basilica

Police storm the basilica

Police storm the basilica

Police storm the basilica

Police swarmed the area around 9am, running into the church before the attacker was shot and arrested. Mayor Christian Estrosi said the attacker kept shouting Allahu Akbar even after being medicated

The first attack took place at 9am in Nice, before the second attack in Avignon two hours later. Separately, a guard at the French consulate in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, was stabbed

The first attack took place at 9am in Nice, before the second attack in Avignon two hours later. Separately, a guard at the French consulate in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, was stabbed

The first attack took place at 9am in Nice, before the second attack in Avignon two hours later. Separately, a guard at the French consulate in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, was stabbed

UN extremism official blasts ‘inflammatory’ Charlie Hebdo cartoons

The head of a UN anti-extremism body expressed ‘deep concern’ Wednesday about growing tensions over satirical cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed, urging ‘mutual respect’ between people.

The statement by Miguel Angel Moratinos – who heads the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations – follows growing anger in the Muslim world over France’s response to the beheading of a teacher who had shown his pupils the images as part of a class on free speech.

President Emmanuel Macron has vigorously defended the publication of cartoons depicting the Prophet Mohammed on free speech grounds, sparking angry protests across swathes of the Muslim world and campaigns to boycott French products.

The UN High Representative ‘is following with deep concern the growing tensions and instances of intolerance triggered by the publication of the satirical caricatures depicting Prophet Mohammed,’ a spokesman said.

‘The inflammatory caricatures have also provoked acts of violence against innocent civilians who were attacked for their sheer religion, belief or ethnicity.

‘Insulting religions and sacred religious symbols provokes hatred and violent extremism leading to polarization and fragmentation of the society.’

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Malaysia’s ex-PM said: ‘The French should teach their people to respect other people’s feelings. 

‘Since you have blamed all Muslims and the Muslims’ religion for what was done by one angry person, the Muslims have a right to punish the French.

‘The boycott cannot compensate the wrongs committed by the French all these years.’   

It also comes two weeks after a schoolteacher, Samuel Paty, was beheaded in Paris for showing cartoons of the Prophet to his class in a lesson on free speech. 

On Thursday Vincent Loques, 45, a sacristan of the Notre Dame basilica in the city of Nice, was killed as he prepared for the first Mass of the day after 21-year-old migrant Brahim Aoussaoui attacked the church.

French anti-terror prosecutors said Aoussaoui attacked worshippers in the heart of the Mediterranean resort city with a foot-long blade, slitting the throat of an elderly woman in an apparent beheading attempt.

A mother in her forties also succumbed to her injuries after seeking refuge in a nearby bar. 

The assailant was shot and wounded by armed police as he screamed ‘Allahu Akbar’ during the attack and ‘even while under medication’ as he was taken to hospital, Nice’s Mayor Christian Estrosi said. 

The assailant, born in Tunisia in 1999, entered Continental Europe via the Italian island of Lampedusa on September 20 and arrived in Paris on October 9, Jean-Francois Ricard told journalists.

The travel information came from a document on Aoussaoui from the Italian Red Cross, the state prosecutor said. A bag was found by police in the basilica containing two unused knives, Mr Ricard added.

The attacker is in hospital after he was wounded by police. He was unknown to French security services. 

Elsewhere a security guard was stabbed and wounded outside the French consulate in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, while two other men were arrested – one while carrying a knife near a church in Sartrouville after his father reported he was about to carry out a Nice-style attack, and another who tried to board a train in Lyon carrying a long blade. 

It was thought that police had foiled another Islamist attack in the town of Avignon when an armed man was shot dead by officers after refusing to drop his weapon.

However, it later transpired the man was part of the far-Right, anti-Islam Identarian Movement, and had made a Nazi Salute. French media initially reported the man shouted ‘Allahu Akbar’, which turned out to be incorrect.  

Mr Macron travelled to Nice following the attack and gave a speech shortly after 3pm, as church bells sounded across France to honour the dead. The President said it was ‘clear that France that is under attack… because of our values of freedom and our desire not to give in to terror’. 

‘I say it with lots of clarity again today: we will not give any ground,’ he added. 

Mahathir Mohamad

Mahathir Mohamad

Mahathir Mohamad

Mahathir Mohamad

Mahathir Mohamad, who lost power in February this year, said freedom of expression does not include ‘insulting other people’ as fury over satirical cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed sweeps the Islamic world

Police block a cordon near the Notre-Dame de l'Assomption Basilica in Nice after a knifeman killed three people at the church

Police block a cordon near the Notre-Dame de l'Assomption Basilica in Nice after a knifeman killed three people at the church

Police block a cordon near the Notre-Dame de l’Assomption Basilica in Nice after a knifeman killed three people at the church

A person who was wounded during the attack on a basilica in Nice is wheeled into the back of an ambulance

A person who was wounded during the attack on a basilica in Nice is wheeled into the back of an ambulance

A person who was wounded during the attack on a basilica in Nice is wheeled into the back of an ambulance

Special forces stand guard near the scene of a reported knife attack at Notre Dame church in Nice

Special forces stand guard near the scene of a reported knife attack at Notre Dame church in Nice

Special forces stand guard near the scene of a reported knife attack at Notre Dame church in Nice

A security officer secures the area after a reported knife attack at Notre Dame church in Nice

A security officer secures the area after a reported knife attack at Notre Dame church in Nice

A security officer secures the area after a reported knife attack at Notre Dame church in Nice

Forensic officers wait outside the basilica after two people were killed inside during a terror attack in Nice

Forensic officers wait outside the basilica after two people were killed inside during a terror attack in Nice

Forensic officers wait outside the basilica after two people were killed inside during a terror attack in Nice

Police officers stand guard near Notre Dame church in Nice, southern France, after a terror attack

Police officers stand guard near Notre Dame church in Nice, southern France, after a terror attack

Police officers stand guard near Notre Dame church in Nice, southern France, after a terror attack

The beheading of teacher Mr Paty prompted President Macron to promise a crackdown on Islamic extremism.

Mr Macron and others have also launched a full-throated defence of freedom of expression and the right to mock religion, in a move which has inflamed tensions in several Muslim countries.   

The latest in a long line of violent attacks in France was ‘already being celebrated massively across jihadi communities’ by late Thursday, according to the SITE Intelligence monitoring group.

SITE director Rita Katz said it was ‘hard to recall social media celebration this massive for terrorism’ with jihadists taking to Twitter and Facebook to welcome the latest grisly murders.

Katz said that jihadists were celebrating the attackers ‘freedom of action’ after three violent episodes in the space of a few hours. ‘These new attacks comes amid a massive and enduring wave of jihadi media condemning France and its cartoonists,’ she said.

A report by SITE said that jihadists were ‘overjoyed’ by the news from Nice, Avignon and Saudi Arabia on Thursday.

Extremists linked to both ISIS and al-Qaeda have seized on the beheading of Samuel Paty earlier this month to incite more attacks against France.

French politicians were taking part in a coronavirus lockdown debate when the news reached them - and held a minute of silence in the chamber (pictured)

French politicians were taking part in a coronavirus lockdown debate when the news reached them - and held a minute of silence in the chamber (pictured)

French politicians were taking part in a coronavirus lockdown debate when the news reached them – and held a minute of silence in the chamber (pictured)

Katz said that the ‘prospect of co-ordination’ between the various attackers seemed ‘increasingly plausible’, although not confirmed. 

The two recent attacks are the latest in a long line of terror attacks in France in recent years, including the Charlie Hebdo massacre in 2015. 

French politicians lined up to demand tougher action against Islamist terrorism on Thursday after the triple murder. 

Nice’s mayor Christian Estrosi said on Thursday that ‘enough is enough… it’s time now for France to exonerate itself from the laws of peace in order to definitively wipe out Islamo-fascism from our country’.

One of Mr Macron’s party colleagues called for ‘total mobilisation’ against extremism in what another called a ‘war that the Islamists are waging on our nation’.   

Mr Macron’s prime minister Jean Castex said France’s alert level had been raised to its highest ‘attack emergency’ setting after Thursday’s violence. 

Within hours of the Nice attack, a gunman had been shot dead by police in Paris while a knifeman was arrested for attacking a guard at a French consulate in Saudi Arabia.  

Speaking in parliament, where he had earlier been talking about France’s new lockdown, Mr Castex said the Nice attack was ‘as cowardly as it is barbaric’.

Tunisians take part in a protest against the publication of cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in France

Tunisians take part in a protest against the publication of cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in France

Tunisians take part in a protest against the publication of cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in France

Indian Muslims burn posters of Emmanuel Macron during protest against his defence of cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed

Indian Muslims burn posters of Emmanuel Macron during protest against his defence of cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed

Indian Muslims burn posters of Emmanuel Macron during protest against his defence of cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed

Muslims demonstrators burn posters of Emmanel Macron during a protest in Quetta, Pakistan, on Thursday

Muslims demonstrators burn posters of Emmanel Macron during a protest in Quetta, Pakistan, on Thursday

Muslims demonstrators burn posters of Emmanel Macron during a protest in Quetta, Pakistan, on Thursday

TERROR IN FRANCE: HOW ATTACKS HAVE UNFOLDED OVER FIVE YEARS

An attacker with a knife killed three people and wounded several others at a church in Nice on Thursday, police said.

The terror attack took place less than two weeks after the beheading of middle school teacher Samuel Paty by a man of Chechen origin.

Paty’s attacker said he wanted to punish him for showing pupils cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad in a civics lesson.

Here are other attacks that have taken place in France over the past few years:

Sept 25, 2020 – Two people are stabbed and wounded in Paris near the former offices of the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine, where Islamist militants carried out a deadly attack in 2015. A man originally from Pakistan was arrested 

Oct. 3, 2019 – Mickael Harpon, a 45-year-old IT specialist with security clearance to work in the Paris police headquarters, killed three police officers and one civilian employee before being shot dead by police. He had converted to Islam about 10 years earlier.

March 23, 2018 – A gunman kills three people in southwestern France after holding up a car, firing on police and taking hostages in a supermarket, screaming ‘Allahu Akbar’. Security forces storm the building and kill him.

July 26, 2016 – Two attackers kill a priest and seriously wound another hostage in a church in northern France before being shot dead by French police. Francois Hollande, who was France’s president at the time, says the two hostage-takers had pledged allegiance to Islamic State.

July 14, 2016 – A gunman drives a heavy truck into a crowd celebrating Bastille Day in the French city of Nice, killing 86 people and injuring scores more in an attack claimed by Islamic State. The attacker is identified as a Tunisian-born Frenchman.

June 14, 2016 – A Frenchman of Moroccan origin stabs a police commander to death outside his home in a Paris suburb and kills his partner, who also worked for the police. The attacker told police negotiators during a siege that he was answering an appeal by Islamic State.

Nov. 13, 2015 – Paris is rocked by multiple, near simultaneous gun-and-bomb attacks on entertainment sites around the city, in which 130 people are killed and 368 are wounded. Islamic State says it was responsible for the attacks. Two of the 10 known perpetrators were Belgian citizens and three others were French.

Jan. 7-9, 2015 – Two Islamist militants break into an editorial meeting of satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo on Jan. 7 and rake it with bullets, killing 12 people. Another militant kills a policewoman the next day and takes hostages at a supermarket on Jan. 9, killing four before police shoot him dead.

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Swimming legend Michael Klim reveals personal sacrifice to keep his skincare empire afloat

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swimming legend michael klim reveals personal sacrifice to keep his skincare empire afloat

Australian swimming legend Michael Klim has opened up about raising his children in a blended family and the sacrifices he was forced to make during the pandemic.

The dual Olympic gold medallist revealed he has not seen his children since leaving them behind in Bali when he flew back to Australia in July to save his skincare business Milk & Co.

Klim, 43, told Daily Mail Australia his company first took a financial hit in March when lockdowns when into effect, and left him with no choice but to return home to reinvent the brand. 

But the move separated Klim from his blended family – ex-wife, Lindy Rama-Ellis, their kids Stella, 14, Rocco, 11 and Frankie, eight, Lindy’s new husband Adam Ellis and their daughter Goldie, and Klim’s new girlfriend Michelle Owen.

Klim was reluctant to discuss his DJ partner of more than one year, but recently said he was grateful for her support during a challenging period. 

He also credited NAB’s new Business Fit health and wellbeing program, which provides online support and advice to business operators and staff, for being able to adjust to the coronavirus crisis. 

Michael Klim admits 2020 has been professionally and personally challenging. He's pictured with partner Michelle Owen

Michael Klim admits 2020 has been professionally and personally challenging. He's pictured with partner Michelle Owen

Michael Klim admits 2020 has been professionally and personally challenging. He’s pictured with partner Michelle Owen

Klim said he was juggling co-parenting and running the business remotely when lockdowns went into effect in both Bali and Australia.

With Australian employees working from home and new financial pressures on the business, he decided to return home to make sure the company, which he and Lindy started in 2008, would survive.  

‘Being stuck in Bali and not being able to travel while managing and motivating the team back in Sydney was tricky,’ Klim told Daily Mail Australia.

‘There were financial pressures and the business suffered, which forced us to be more innovative and reinvent ourselves.’

‘The kids were holed at home as well, doing school via online learning. It’s been a different way of life, making sure they were doing the tasks they had to do each day.’

‘But they’ve really adapted and has since gone back to school. Rocco has tennis every day while Stella has dancing and surfing.’

Kilm championed NAB's new Business Fit program which provides online support and advice to business operators and staff during challenging times.

Kilm championed NAB's new Business Fit program which provides online support and advice to business operators and staff during challenging times.

Kilm championed NAB’s new Business Fit program which provides online support and advice to business operators and staff during challenging times.

Klim's new partner Michelle Owen (far right) regularly appears in blended family photos with Klim's ex-wife Lindy and her second husband Adam Ellis

Klim's new partner Michelle Owen (far right) regularly appears in blended family photos with Klim's ex-wife Lindy and her second husband Adam Ellis

Klim’s new partner Michelle Owen (far right) regularly appears in blended family photos with Klim’s ex-wife Lindy and her second husband Adam Ellis

Before the pandemic Klim had travelled to Australia once a month for the business, and said he plans to return home to Bali in a few weeks.

‘I definitely miss the cheeky monkeys and speak to them every day, FaceTime has been a godsend,’ Klim said.

Nor has he seen his parents or sister based in virus-stricken Victoria since January, the longest period he’s been apart from them in many years. 

Klim said lockdown had a severe impact on Milk & Co.

‘We’ve had all the pressures everyone else has endured,’ he said

‘Our focus was on brick and mortar retail where we heavily relied on foot traffic.

‘When lockdown hit, people stopped going out as much and then things started to reopen, Melbourne went into lockdown a second time.’

‘We had to look at other channels, launch a new website and spend more time on building our online customer base.’

He now has more business plans in the pipeline, including an expansion of the Milk Baby product range and is in talks with major distributors overseas. 

Klim and new partner Michelle Owen celebrated their one year anniversary in August

Klim and new partner Michelle Owen celebrated their one year anniversary in August

Klim and new partner Michelle Owen celebrated their one year anniversary in August

Klim’s Instagram account provides a glimpse into his luxurious lifestyle in Bali, which includes surfing and yoga and being a devoted dad.

Klim was previously married to socialite and princess niece of a Balinese king Lindy for 10 years before they announced their split in February 2016. 

Lindy married property developer Adam Ellis in 2018, a year after they welcomed  their daughter Goldie into their blended family.

Klim avoided discussions on Owen but regularly posts photos of the couple on social media, complete with gushing captions. 

‘The past six months has been interesting to say the least… bloody grateful to have you by my side,’ he recently posted.

The couple celebrated their one year anniversary in August. 

‘You can’t explain it, you can’t predict it, it just happens! Bloody grateful you came into my life and very excited for what the future holds,’ Klim wrote at the time.

Owen has also won the approval of Klim’s ex-wife, with the couple often appearing together in photos with Ms Rama-Ellis, her husband and their blended family.

The former Olympic swimming champion Klim has made personal sacrifices to keep his skincare empire Milk and Co afloat during tough time

The former Olympic swimming champion Klim has made personal sacrifices to keep his skincare empire Milk and Co afloat during tough time

The former Olympic swimming champion Klim has made personal sacrifices to keep his skincare empire Milk and Co afloat during tough time

Following his high profile divorce, Klim said he and his ex-wife were on good terms and maintained a united front in co-parenting their children in a 2019 interview.

‘I think we have realised the kids are the priority and all our decisions of late have been in the best interest of the kids,’ he told news.com.au at the time.

‘The kids get home from school at about 4.30pm and they’re either horse riding, swimming or surfing — I’m just like a normal parent in Australia where I’ve become a chauffer, but I do it on a scooter.

Klim also opened up about how life on the holiday island he has called home for the last eight years has changed. 

‘Life on the island is now a lot different after lockdown, which now survives on local tourism and expats trying to stimulate the economy,’ he told Daily Mail Australia. 

‘Bali is much quieter and not the buzzing island it once was.

‘We’re still not sure what the new normal is going to be yet.’

Michael Klim (pictured) is championing NAB's new Business Fit program which provides health and leadership support and advice to business operators and staff during challenging times

Michael Klim (pictured) is championing NAB's new Business Fit program which provides health and leadership support and advice to business operators and staff during challenging times

Michael Klim (pictured) is championing NAB’s new Business Fit program which provides health and leadership support and advice to business operators and staff during challenging times

Klim looks forward to returning home to Bali to his kids Stella, 14, Rocco, 11 and Frankie, 8.

Klim looks forward to returning home to Bali to his kids Stella, 14, Rocco, 11 and Frankie, 8.

Klim looks forward to returning home to Bali to his kids Stella, 14, Rocco, 11 and Frankie, 8.

Klim urges other entrepreneurs to sign up to NAB’s Business Fit online program in his quest to help enhance their mental and physical health.

The free program designed to help business owners and their staff be more resilient, transition to new ways of working while sustaining  physical and psychological wellbeing.

New research has found more than four in every 10 people in small business are feeling ‘highly anxious’, and one in five are ‘not coping well.

The free NAB program focuses on three factors- physical health, calm the mind and taking care of business through virtual workshops, podcasts, live wellbeing classes and articles on everything from staying fit to practical leadership skills. 

Klim is still an active swimmer, and is an advocate for a healthy outdoor lifestyle.

It's been 20 years since Michael Klim (third right)won two relay gold medal at the 2000 Olympics i Sydney. He's pictured on night one moments after Australia won the 100 freestyle metres relay in a famous upset over the US.

It's been 20 years since Michael Klim (third right)won two relay gold medal at the 2000 Olympics i Sydney. He's pictured on night one moments after Australia won the 100 freestyle metres relay in a famous upset over the US.

It’s been 20 years since Michael Klim (third right)won two relay gold medal at the 2000 Olympics i Sydney. He’s pictured on night one moments after Australia won the 100 freestyle metres relay in a famous upset over the US.

Klim uses exercise and family and friends to support his wellbeing during these stressful times.

‘It reinforces self-care, which is so crucial in these difficult times,’ Klim said.

‘The last six months has affected everyone in some way.’

‘It makes you a better boss if you look after yourself.’

‘The calming of the mind has been very important for me when I’ve been stressed about the future.

‘It has been hard trying to be agile while still having a connection with colleagues who may be feeling down or depressed.’ 

Michael Klim and his ex-wife Lindy maintain a united front to co-parent their three children. The former couple are pictured with Rocco, Frankie and Stella in happier times in 2014

Michael Klim and his ex-wife Lindy maintain a united front to co-parent their three children. The former couple are pictured with Rocco, Frankie and Stella in happier times in 2014

Michael Klim and his ex-wife Lindy maintain a united front to co-parent their three children. The former couple are pictured with Rocco, Frankie and Stella in happier times in 2014

Michael Klim: From gold medalist to skincare tycoon

1996: Polish-Australian Michael Klim arrived at the Atlanta Olympics ranked first in the world for 200m freestyle.

He was eliminated in the heats for that stroke, but made it to finals 100m butterfly.

He helped the Australian team secure a bronze medal during the medley relay.

2000: The summer Olympics, held in Sydney in 2000, saw Klim nab another two medals.

He placed second in both the 100m butterfly and 100m medley relay team.

His team also came in first place in the 100m freestyle relay 200m freestyle relay.

2004: The Athens Olympics would be the final time Klim competed at the highest level for his sport.

He received a silver medal for the 200m freestyle relay.

April 2006: Klim married Lindy Rama, a former model and Balinese princess. 

June 2007: Klim announced his retirement from competitive swimming.

2008: He and his wife Lindy launched Milk & Co, a skincare brand. 

February 2011: He announced that he would come out of retirement and try to earn a place London 2012 Olympics. 

He didn’t make the team, and decided to retire once more.

2016: Klim and Lindy separated. The pair have three children together. 

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Father of one-day-old Hamilton baby mauled to death by a Rottweiler suspected of taking own life

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father of one day old hamilton baby mauled to death by a rottweiler suspected of taking own life

The father of a one-day-old baby newborn baby who was mauled to death by the family pet Rottweiller’s while his mother was in the bathroom had died in a suspected suicide months earlier.

The newborn, who was called Jackson, was attacked by the two-year-old dog at his mother’s home in the Hamilton suburb of Enderley on New Zealand’s North Island on Sunday night.

A neighbour said the baby – who was rushed to Waikato Hospital but died that night after suffering critical injuries – was grabbed while his mother was using the toilet.

The infant’s grandparents Vera and Viktor Zabiyaka said they weren’t even aware of his birth until the moment they were called to the hospital.

Anton Zabiyaka (pictured with the killer dog left) whose baby son died after being mauled by a pet Rottweiller on Sunday night, didn't know he was going to be a dad when he was suspected of taking his own life in April

Anton Zabiyaka (pictured with the killer dog left) whose baby son died after being mauled by a pet Rottweiller on Sunday night, didn't know he was going to be a dad when he was suspected of taking his own life in April

Anton Zabiyaka (pictured with the killer dog left) whose baby son died after being mauled by a pet Rottweiller on Sunday night, didn’t know he was going to be a dad when he was suspected of taking his own life in April

‘[The midwife] told us the baby was “beautiful” and a “good” boy… he had been bitten but he was still alive,’ the grandmother told the NZ Herald.

Speaking out following the tragedy, the grandparents said the baby’s father Anton Zabiyaka didn’t know he was going to be a dad when he died of a suspected suicide in April.

The late father, then 32, was released from prison in December of last year after smashing up hotel rooms in Hamilton in 2016 while high on drugs before carjacking his way to a town 50km away.

He was convicted on counts including aggravated robbery, aggravated assault and possessing methamphetamine.

Vera Zabiyaka – who immigrated to New Zealand from Russia more than two decades ago – said prison had not helped her troubled son.

‘I think if he knew he was going to be a father he would still be here. Prison doesn’t make people better,’ she said.

‘It is hard to accept your son is dead but as a grandmother, I cannot truly believe what has happened – this is unthinkable to lose two members of your family in a matter of months.’

The city’s council has seized a Rottweiller and one other dog believed to be a Staffordshire terrier.

The baby's mother had posted an ultrasound picture of the baby in the lead up to his birth

The baby's mother had posted an ultrasound picture of the baby in the lead up to his birth

The baby’s mother had posted an ultrasound picture of the baby in the lead up to his birth

The chairman of Hamilton City Council’s Dog Control Hearing Panel councillor Ewan Wilson said they would destroy the dog if the court made that decision.

Even if the court ruled not to put down the dog, Mr Wilson said the council could use animal control legislation to launch an investigation of its own.  

On Tuesday night, the baby’s mother posted a picture of herself when she was pregnant and sitting outside on the grass on a sunny day.    

‘If only I could go back to this day with (you) still in my tummy, my son,’ she captioned the post followed by a sad face emoji.

The young mother also shared a photo of her baby boy while he was asleep with his hands in fists next his cheeks.

The baby was rushed to Waikato Hospital (pictured) but sadly died of his horrific injuries overnight

The baby was rushed to Waikato Hospital (pictured) but sadly died of his horrific injuries overnight

The baby was rushed to Waikato Hospital (pictured) but sadly died of his horrific injuries overnight 

Family and friends comforted the grieving mother in the comment section.    

‘I have no words, my friend. We are all trying to carry your loss for you, but I guess you won’t even feel it as the weight is so heavy,’ friend wrote. 

Another said: ‘We love you… and we got you. Hang in there and breathe.’

A devastated neighbour recalled the horrible moment she found the mother clutching her blood-covered newborn moments after the attack.

Karen, who did not wish to use her last name, was among the first on the scene and told Stuff she would forever be haunted by what she saw. 

She rushed over after noticing some commotion at the end of her street and had assumed her neighbour’s dog had escaped from their property again. 

As she approached the scene, she saw the mother sitting on the grass verge holding the injured infant in her arms.

Tiny wails escaped from the baby as the trio waited for the ambulance to arrive.

Karen said it appeared the dog had attempted to bury the baby, as he was covered in dirt.  

‘The whole thing is horrible, every time I close my eyes I just see him,’ she said.

The Rottweiler was a new addition for the family, who already had another dog. 

Hamilton City Council animal control manager Susan Stanford said a decision on the future of the animal had not yet been made

Hamilton City Council animal control manager Susan Stanford said a decision on the future of the animal had not yet been made

Hamilton City Council animal control manager Susan Stanford said a decision on the future of the animal had not yet been made

Karen said the Rottweiler had been known to escape the property. She said she had helped return the dog earlier that day after he had escaped. 

While returning the dog she had met the newborn baby, she said. 

The new mum had proudly shown off the infant to her neighbour. 

‘He obviously meant the world to her,’ Karen said. 

The dog was seized and secured at the Hamilton City Council animal control facility.

Hamilton City Council animal control manager Susan Stanford said a decision on the future of the animal had not yet been made.   

‘This is a traumatic time for all involved and our thoughts are with the families and individuals involved,’ the Council statement said.

New Zealand’s Ministry of Health found there were 4,958 dog attacks that required hospitalisation between 2004 and 2014.

The research found most attacks happen at home, with children under 10-years-old most vulnerable.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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