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The three public servants who could take blame for Victoria’s quarantine bungle

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the three public servants who could take blame for victorias quarantine bungle

Three top public servants came under fire on the final day of the inquiry into Victoria’s catastrophic hotel quarantine program.

Department of Premier and Cabinet secretary Chris Eccles, Department of Health and Human Services secretary Kym Peake and Department of Jobs secretary Simon Phemister should have kept ministers better informed about problems, the inquiry heard.

Counsel assisting Ben Ihle said Mr Eccles should have told Premier Daniel Andrews the federal government had offered ADF troops to man the scheme.

Department of Jobs secretary Simon Phemister (pictured) was mentioned on the final day of the hotel inquiry

Department of Jobs secretary Simon Phemister (pictured) was mentioned on the final day of the hotel inquiry

Department of Jobs secretary Simon Phemister (pictured) was mentioned on the final day of the hotel inquiry

Department of Premier and Cabinet secretary Chris Eccles is pictured facing the inquiry in Melbourne

Department of Premier and Cabinet secretary Chris Eccles is pictured facing the inquiry in Melbourne

Department of Premier and Cabinet secretary Chris Eccles is pictured facing the inquiry in Melbourne

On April 8, Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet secretary Philip Gaetjens emailed his Victorian counterpart Chris Eccles to again offer ADF assistance. Mr Eccles replied: 'Thanks Phil' - but no request for help was made

On April 8, Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet secretary Philip Gaetjens emailed his Victorian counterpart Chris Eccles to again offer ADF assistance. Mr Eccles replied: 'Thanks Phil' - but no request for help was made

On April 8, Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet secretary Philip Gaetjens emailed his Victorian counterpart Chris Eccles to again offer ADF assistance. Mr Eccles replied: ‘Thanks Phil’ – but no request for help was made

On April 8, Mr Eccles got an email from the Prime Minster’s office offering troops. He replied saying ‘thanks’ but Mr Ihle said there was no evidence he told the premier. 

Counsel assisting Rachel Ellyard said: ‘We do invite you to find that the offers of assistance made or available to be made to Victoria by the ADF should have been raised with the Premier, thinking particularly about the apparent availability of inclined personnel in early April.’

Ms Peake was mentioned for not briefing former health minister Jenny Mikakos about various health concerns.

One was an email from Public Health Commander Finn Romanes about a ‘risk to the health and safety of detainees’.

Ms Peake previously told the inquiry she did not tell Ms Mikakos because ‘I was satisfied that the issues that had been raised had been addressed.’ 

Health Secretary Kym Peake (pictured) was mentioned for not briefing former health minister Jenny Mikakos about various health concerns

Health Secretary Kym Peake (pictured) was mentioned for not briefing former health minister Jenny Mikakos about various health concerns

Health Secretary Kym Peake (pictured) was mentioned for not briefing former health minister Jenny Mikakos about various health concerns

The final day of the inquiry came after former health minister Jenny Mikakos (pictured) resigned

The final day of the inquiry came after former health minister Jenny Mikakos (pictured) resigned

The final day of the inquiry came after former health minister Jenny Mikakos (pictured) resigned

Pictured: A traveller returned from overseas is checked into an inner-city hotel in Melbourne on March 30. Lawyers at the inquiry said the program failed to meet its primary objective

Pictured: A traveller returned from overseas is checked into an inner-city hotel in Melbourne on March 30. Lawyers at the inquiry said the program failed to meet its primary objective

Pictured: A traveller returned from overseas is checked into an inner-city hotel in Melbourne on March 30. Lawyers at the inquiry said the program failed to meet its primary objective

The other issues were a suspected suicide and delay in transferring a sick detainee who was later admitted to intensive care.

Ms Peake referred the cases to healthcare quality body Safer Care Victoria but did not brief the minister on the outcomes of the reports because ‘they had been addressed,’ she said. 

Mr Ihle on Monday said this was ‘the deliberate and conscious decision to not inform the minister of an issue which is of significance falling within the minister’s portfolio’. 

Mr Phemister was mentioned after the inquiry heard that security companies were made responsible for making sure guards had infection control training. 

Ms Ellyard said Mr Phemister should have consulted Jobs Minister Martin Pakula about this before the contracts were signed.

‘It shouldn’t have happened without appropriate ministerial consultation and knowledge, it shouldn’t have happened without appropriate consideration at the highest levels of the department,’ she said.

Mr Phemister previously told the inquiry he did not brief Mr Pakula because he did not have a detailed level of knowledge of the contracts. 

Mr Pakula said ministers were not normally consulted on contracts. 

Questioned about the public servants, Mr Andrews on Tuesday said he is confident they are ‘acting appropriately’.

‘I am aware of what the inquiry heard. I’m aware what submissions were led by counsel assisting yesterday. I’m indicating to you that I’m confident that those three public servants – indeed all public servants are acting appropriately,’ he said. 

Overseas travellers arrive at the Crown Promenade Hotel in Melbourne on March 29

Overseas travellers arrive at the Crown Promenade Hotel in Melbourne on March 29

Overseas travellers arrive at the Crown Promenade Hotel in Melbourne on March 29

Report: Lockdowns to  cost nation $319billion 

A report by free market think tank The Institute of Public Affairs claims Australia has ended up pursuing a coronavirus elimination strategy which will cost $319billion between 2020 and 2022. 

That figure, equivalent to 23 per cent of GDP, is same as the cost of defence, education, health, and social security and welfare combined in one year.

The report says that a ‘medical capacity’ strategy to reduce Covid-19 infections so that hospitals do not get overwhelmed – rather than eliminate community transmission – would cost only $93.8billion. 

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The final day of the inquiry came after former health minister Jenny Mikakos resigned.

Mr Andrews reportedly faced a backlash from some of his own Labor MPs after he told the inquiry on Friday that Ms Mikakos was ‘accountable’ for hotel quarantine. 

‘It has put a lot of people on edge,’ an anonymous minister told The Herald Sun. 

‘He is a tyrant. He is a dictator with a capital D.I.C.K,’ another said.

‘He doesn’t care about anybody but himself… I don’t like the way she was treated.’

When asked about Ms Mikakos on Sunday, Mr Andrews said he had not contacted the former minister since her resignation.

‘No one is happy to see someone who is an incredibly hard working member of the team go, but if you make a decision that you can’t serve in the cabinet then you can’t serve in the cabinet,’ he said. 

Meanwhile, a report by free market think tank The Institute of Public Affairs claims Australia has ended up pursuing a coronavirus elimination strategy which will cost $319billion between 2020 and 2022. 

That figure, equivalent to 23 per cent of GDP, is same as the cost of defence, education, health, and social security and welfare combined in one year.

The report says that a ‘medical capacity’ strategy to reduce Covid-19 infections so that hospitals do not get overwhelmed – rather than eliminate community transmission – would cost only $93.8billion. 

Officially National Cabinet policy is to purse an ‘aggressive suppression strategy’. But IPA researchers say this has amounted to elimination because the goal is no community transmission.  

‘Eliminating COVID-19 means eliminating jobs, freedom, and hope,’ said Daniel Wild, Director of Research at the IPA and co-author of the report.

Asher Judah, IPA Associate and co-author. said: ‘Governments must adopt an approach that recognises that we must learn to live with the virus.

‘Lockdowns… impose significant social, cultural, and economic costs.

‘Governments should put in place measures to protect the elderly and vulnerable, implement high quality contact tracing, continue with random community testing, and maintain international border control measures. 

‘Otherwise, economic, social, and recreational life should return to normal, with social distancing observed as needed.’ 

Suggested findings for Victorian quarantine hotels inquiry 

Lawyers Tony Neal QC, Rachel Ellyard and Ben Ihle submitted their suggested findings to Victoria’s hotel quarantine inquiry on Monday. They are as follows:

GOVERNMENT HAD NO PLAN

* Public servants were given just 36 hours to set up the program.

* There was no suggestion those who set up the program worked other than with ‘the best of intentions and to the best of their ability’.

* ‘Bad faith or corruption is not what the evidence shows.’

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Calls are growing for Daniel Andrews (pictured) to resign after an inquiry heard the state’s hotel quarantine disaster caused 768 deaths

DHHS WAS IN CONTROL

* The Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions played a substantial role but the Department of Health and Human Services was the control agency responsible for the program.

BRETT SUTTON SHOULD’VE BEEN IN CHARGE

* It was wrong to appoint people without public health expertise as the state controllers of the pandemic in February as it ‘influenced the way in which DHHS subsequently understood and acted on its responsibilities’.

* ‘Had the chief health officer or another person with public health expertise been appointed state controller … they would have had direct oversight of the hotel quarantine program and been able to directly influence the model of that program.’

NO ONE PERSON MADE THE DECISION TO USE SECURITY GUARDS

* ‘It can be best understood … as a creeping assumption or default consensus reached in the state control centre after the preference of Victoria Police was known.’

POLICE HAD PREFERENCE FOR GUARDS

* ‘It was not Victoria Police’s decision, but Victoria Police’s clear position that security would be preferable was a substantial contributing factor to the consensus.’

PREMIER SHOULD HAVE BEEN TOLD ABOUT ADF OFFER

* Department of Premier and Cabinet secretary Chris Eccles should have told Premier Daniel Andrews his federal counterpart had offered Australian Defence Force support in an April 8 email exchange.

* But the initial decision not to have ADF boots on the ground was ‘reasonable and open – and no criticism should be directed to those who made those operational decisions’.

CONTRACTS WERE INAPPROPRIATE

* ‘There was insufficient supervision of those contracts to ensure compliance with the contractual terms, including as to subcontracting.’

* ‘The contracts with hotels and security companies should not have placed responsibility for PPE and infection control education on those contractors.’

HOTEL QUARANTINE RESPONSIBLE FOR SECOND WAVE

* Ninety per cent of second wave COVID-19 cases are attributable to the Rydges on Swanston outbreak in mid-May. Just under 10 per cent were attributable to the outbreak at the Stamford Hotel in mid-June.

* ‘The hotel quarantine program in Victoria failed to achieve its primary objective. The program that was intended to contain the disease was instead a seeding ground for the spread of COVID-19 into the broader community.’

* ‘The failure by the hotel quarantine program to contain this virus is, as at today’s date, responsible for the deaths of 768 people and the infection of some 18,418 others.’

PEOPLE IN QUARANTINE NOT LOOKED AFTER

* ‘The program did not always operate so as to meet the needs of those who were detained, in particular, those who had specific needs or vulnerabilities.’

* ‘Very early on, better consideration ought to have been given to the likely psychosocial impact of detention and expert advice should have been sought.’

* ‘Exemptions could and likely should have been granted in more situations.’

LACK OF TRANSPARENCY

* ‘There were significant issues which should have been brought to the respective ministers’ attention. The departmental secretaries were obliged to ensure that they discharged those obligations.’

* ‘They likely contributed to a loss in opportunities to identify and address issues which may have prompted better, fuller and more timely action.’

The submissions may form the recommendations of the inquiry’s chair, retired judge Jennifer Coate. She is due to deliver her final report to Victorian Governor Linda Dessau by November 6.

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On Monday Victorian Opposition leader Michael O’Brien said Victoria’s quarantine operation was ‘the worst failure of public administration in Victorian history’. 

He added: ‘If accountability for the deaths and damage is to mean anything, all those responsible must go – starting with Andrews.’

On Monday afternoon the final day of Victoria’s hotel quarantine inquiry heard the program’s failure was responsible for the deaths of all 768 residents who have died in the state’s second wave. 

Mr Ihle said protective gear was not used properly, staff were poorly trained and there was a lack of social distancing at the quarantine hotels. 

He said the system was set up quickly and the government failed to monitor it.

Opposition leader Michael O'Brien

Opposition leader Michael O'Brien

Opposition leader Michael O’Brien

‘What was established was necessarily untested and prudence dictated that the program should have been accompanied by intensive ongoing monitoring and auditing,’ he said.

‘The Victorian government failed to adequately ensure that this was done.’

Former Health Minister Jenny Mikakos resigned on Saturday after Mr Andrews said she was ‘accountable’ for the quarantine program. 

On Sunday Mr Andrews said he would not resign, telling reporters: ‘I don’t run from problems and challenges’. 

Melbourne’s second wave of coronavirus was sparked in late May when the disease escaped from a quarantine hotel and rapidly spread around the city. 

‘The scientific evidence now strongly suggests, and we submit that the board can comfortably find, that 90 per cent of positive cases in Victoria since [26 May] are attributable to that initial outbreak at the Rydges in late May,’ Mr Ihle said.

The Victorian government has been criticised for using private security guards to man the hotels instead of the police and ADF troops like in New South Wales and Queensland.

Contracts written up by the Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions left infection control and training in personal protective equipment use to the security companies.

Hotels, meanwhile, were responsible for cleaning, unless a returned traveller tested positive to Covid-19.

‘Responsibility for managing the risk of infection and providing for the safety of those involved in the program should have remained with the state. No contract should have purported to outsource those matters,’ Ms Ellyard said.

Counsel assisting Tony Neal QC said there was no suggestion those who set up the program worked other than with ‘the best of intentions and to the best of their ability’.

‘Bad faith or corruption is not what the evidence shows,’ he said.

‘Yet it is true that the hastily assembled program failed at two locations within approximately two and a half months and with disastrous consequences.

‘A multitude of decisions, actions and inaction, many of which compounded the effect of the other, ultimately expressed itself in the outbreaks which subverted the very reason for the existence of a hotel quarantine program. 

Hotel quarantine: A timeline 

* March 27 – National cabinet announces returned overseas travellers will have to complete 14 days of hotel quarantine. The Australia Defence Force prepares 100 personnel in each large state (and 50 in smaller states and territories) to ‘support expected quarantine compliance monitoring requests’. NSW and Queensland accept the support, Victoria decides to use private security guards. The decision is made at a 4:30pm meeting in Victoria’s state control centre.

* March 28 – At another state control centre meeting, Emergency Management Victoria Commissioner Andrew Crisp says there is no need for ADF ‘boots on the ground’. Victoria’s hotel quarantine program, named Operation Soteria, launches at 11:59pm.

* April 8 – Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet secretary Philip Gaetjens emails Victoria’s Department of Premier and Cabinet secretary Chris Eccles to offer ADF assistance.

* April 9 – Public Health Commander Finn Romanes writes to Department of Health and Human Services secretary warning of a ‘risk to the health and safety of detainees’ due to governance issues. Letter backed by Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton and his deputy Annaliese van Diemen.

* April 11 – Man takes own life while in quarantine at Pan Pacific hotel.

* May 15 – A family of four with COVID-19 are moved to the Rydges on Swanston hotel, a ‘hot’ hotel.

* May 25 – A staff member at the Rydges on Swanston tests positive to COVID-19. Two others develop symptoms.

* May 27 – Rydges on Swanston outbreak first identified by the DHHS. It will grow to 17 people who have either worked at the hotel, or are household members or social contacts.

* June 1 – Stage-three restrictions eased.

* June 14 – Staff member at Stamford Plaza tests positive to COVID-19.

* June 17 – Stamford Plaza outbreak identified by DHHS. The cluster will grow to 46 people.

* June 21 – Further easing of restrictions.

* June 24 – Mr Crisp requests 850 ADF personnel to replace private security at hotels. Request rescinded a day later as the Department of Justice and Community Safety takes over the program.

* June 26 – It’s revealed 30 per cent of travellers in hotel quarantine are refusing tests.

* June 29 – Hot-spot Melbourne suburbs return to lockdown and international flights diverted.

* June 30 – Premier Daniel Andrews announces an inquiry into the hotel quarantine program after genomic sequencing revealed a number of COVID-19 cases can be linked to ‘staff members in hotel quarantine breaching well-known and well-understood infection control protocols’.

* July 4 – Hard lockdown announced at short notice for nine public housing towers. State records 108 new cases – its first day above 100 since late March.

* July 4, July 6, July 11 – As Victorian cases escalate, Prime Minister Scott Morrison writes to Mr Andrews three times offering ADF support.

* July 6 – The Victoria-NSW border shuts for first time in century.

* July 8 – Melbourne and Mitchell Shire go into stage-three lockdown for six weeks.

* July 20 – Hotel Quarantine Inquiry begins.

* August 2 – Victoria records 671 cases and seven deaths. State of disaster declared, stage four restrictions imposed.

* August 5 – Stage four restrictions delay inquiry’s public hearings by two weeks. State records 725 new cases and 15 deaths.

* August 11 – Mr Andrews tells a parliamentary inquiry ADF support was not offered for hotel quarantine, sparking war of words with federal Defence Minister Linda Reynolds.

* August 17 – Public hearings at inquiry begin.

* August 18 – DHHS epidemiologist Charles Alpren tells inquiry 99 per cent of active cases in Victoria stem from Rydges and Stamford outbreaks.

* September 6 – Stage four restrictions extended until October.

* September 25 – Mr Andrews appears before inquiry, apologises for mistakes. The program is responsible for more than 18,000 COVID-19 infections and 750 deaths.

* September 26 – Health Minister Jenny Mikakos resigns.

* September 28 – Inquiry’s closing submissions. Final report due November 6.

Source: AAP 

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Coronavirus antibodies that can ‘neutralize’ the virus can last at least five months

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coronavirus antibodies that can neutralize the virus can last at least five months

Coronavirus immunity can last up to five months – and maybe even longer – in the majority of survivors, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that those who had mild-to-moderate illness, about 90 percent of people, had a robust and stable immune response against COVID-19. 

What’s more, most of these patients had antibodies that were able to neutralize, or kill, the virus, known as SARS-CoV-2.

The team, from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, says the findings show it is very likely decrease the odds of reinfection – and if it occurs – severely weakens the disease.. 

It comes on the heels of a study from the UK that found a more than 26 percent decline in COVID-19 antibodies over the course of three months.  

About 70% of coronavirus survivors had high levels of antibodies, 22% had moderate levels and 8% had low levels (above)

About 70% of coronavirus survivors had high levels of antibodies, 22% had moderate levels and 8% had low levels (above)

About 70% of coronavirus survivors had high levels of antibodies, 22% had moderate levels and 8% had low levels (above)

All of the blood serum in the high groups had neutralizing activity against the virus's spike protein as did 90% in the moderate group and 50% in the low group (above)

All of the blood serum in the high groups had neutralizing activity against the virus's spike protein as did 90% in the moderate group and 50% in the low group (above)

All of the blood serum in the high groups had neutralizing activity against the virus’s spike protein as did 90% in the moderate group and 50% in the low group (above)

Patients had stable response after three months with only modest declines after five months (above)

Patients had stable response after three months with only modest declines after five months (above)

Patients had stable response after three months with only modest declines after five months (above)

‘While some reports have come out saying antibodies to this virus go away quickly, we have found just the opposite,’ said senior author Dr Florian Krammer, a professor of vaccinology at the Icahn School of Medicine.

‘[M]ore than 90 percent of people who were mildly or moderately ill produce an antibody response strong enough to neutralize the virus, and the response is maintained for many months.’

For the study, published in the journal Science, the team looked at data from more than 30,000 individuals screened at The Mount Sinai Health System between March 2020 and October 2020.

The antibody test used was the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which looks for antibodies that attach to the spike protein the virus uses to enter and infect human cells.

It is also capable of measuring the titer, or level, of antibodies an individual has. 

Antibody test results using distinct dilutions set at 1:80, 1:160, 1:320, 1:960 or 1:2800, with each score indicating the number of times the scientist can dilute a patient’s blood and still be able to detect the presence of antibodies. 

Titers of 1:80 and 1:160 were categorized as low; 1:320 as moderate; and 1:960 or  1:2880 as high.

Of the 30,000-plus patients, about 7.1 percent of patients had low levels, 22.5 percent had moderate levels and 70.4 percent had high levels.

This means more than 90 percent of coronavirus survivors had moderate-to-high levels of anti-spike antibodies.   

Additionally, about 50 percent of blood serum in the low range had neutralizing activity as did 90 percent in the moderate range and all did in the high range. 

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Next, the team recalled 121 plasma donors who had a variety of levels to repeat antibody test three months after recovering and again at five months. 

Results showed slight drops after each tests, but a moderate level was retained by most people five months later 

In an interesting findings, there was an increase in levels among those who originally tested as have low or moderate antibody levels.

It may explain the findings of the British study, with 6.6 precent of those having antibody responses to the virus in June and 4.4 percent in September – because those with mild cases have responses that take a longer time to mount.

‘The serum antibody titer we measured in individuals initially were likely produced by plasmablasts, cells that act as first responders to an invading virus and come together to produce initial bouts of antibodies whose strength soon wanes,’ said first author Dr Ania Wajnberg, Director of Clinical Antibody Testing at The Mount Sinai Hospital. 

‘The sustained antibody levels that we subsequently observed are likely produced by long-lived plasma cells in the bone marrow. 

‘This is similar to what we see in other viruses and likely means they are here to stay. We will continue to follow this group over time to see if these levels remain stable as we suspect and hope they will.’   

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35008062 0 image a 49 1603989566640

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Surveillance footage shows Calgary cop slamming a handcuffed black woman face-first to the floor

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surveillance footage shows calgary cop slamming a handcuffed black woman face first to the floor

Shocking surveillance footage has shown a Calgary cop slamming a handcuffed black woman face-first to the floor and breaking her nose in what a fellow officer has described as the ‘worst use of force he has seen in 30 years’. 

Calgary Police Constable Alex Dunn was charged with assault causing bodily harm over the violent incident that took place during the arrest of Dalia Kafi back in December 2017 in Calgary, in the western Canadian province of Alberta. 

Dunn is currently standing trial for the alleged assault but has not been fired from the force and is currently working in an administrative role. 

Video played at his trial Monday shows the police officer flipping Kafi to the ground in a ‘judo-style throw’ causing her face to bounce off the concrete and leaving her lying in a pool of blood.   

A Calgary cop is on trial for slamming a handcuffed black woman face-first to the floor and breaking her nose in what a fellow officer has described as the 'worst use of force he has seen in 30 years'. Pictured the footage of the incident above

A Calgary cop is on trial for slamming a handcuffed black woman face-first to the floor and breaking her nose in what a fellow officer has described as the 'worst use of force he has seen in 30 years'. Pictured the footage of the incident above

A Calgary cop is on trial for slamming a handcuffed black woman face-first to the floor and breaking her nose in what a fellow officer has described as the ‘worst use of force he has seen in 30 years’. Pictured the footage of the incident above

The shocking footage of the incident was shown to the court this week and provincial court Judge Michelle Christopher agreed to release it to members of the media.

It shows the officer approaching Kafi, 26 at the time, who is stood in handcuffs with her back against the wall inside a police arrest processing facility. 

Dunn reaches up to Kafi’s head and tries to pull off the headscarf she is wearing. 

Kafi tries to lean away from him but Dunn yanks it off her head. 

The cop then forcefully hurls her to the ground face first in one swift motion with her face visibly bouncing off the ground.

Dunn has a hold of Kafi’s wrists that are handcuffed behind her back and her arms are held in the air as she lies still on the ground for a moment. 

Kafi is seen stirring slightly while Dunn continues to hold her arms and look down at her on the ground for several seconds making no motion to check her injuries.

Another male officer then walks over about 15 seconds later and Dunn steps away.

The officer helps Dafi to her knees and blood spatters can be seen along the floor from the alleged victim’s face.  

Another two male officers emerge in the frame and one is seen putting on medical gloves.  

There is no audio in the footage. 

Calgary police Constable Alex Dunn was charged with assault causing bodily harm during the arrest of Dalia Kafi in December 2017 in Calgary. The shocking footage of the incident was shown to the court this week at Dunn's trial

Calgary police Constable Alex Dunn was charged with assault causing bodily harm during the arrest of Dalia Kafi in December 2017 in Calgary. The shocking footage of the incident was shown to the court this week at Dunn's trial

Calgary police Constable Alex Dunn was charged with assault causing bodily harm during the arrest of Dalia Kafi in December 2017 in Calgary. The shocking footage of the incident was shown to the court this week at Dunn’s trial

Dunn approaches Kafi, 26 at the time, who is stood in handcuffs with her back against the wall inside the police arrest processing facility

Dunn approaches Kafi, 26 at the time, who is stood in handcuffs with her back against the wall inside the police arrest processing facility

Dunn reaches up to Kafi's head and tries to pull off the headscarf she is wearing

Dunn reaches up to Kafi's head and tries to pull off the headscarf she is wearing

It shows the officer approaching Kafi, 26 at the time, who is stood in handcuffs with her back against the wall inside the police arrest processing facility. Dunn reaches up to Kafi’s head and tries to pull off the headscarf she is wearing

The cop then forcefully hurls her to the ground face first in one swift motion with her face visibly bouncing off the ground

The cop then forcefully hurls her to the ground face first in one swift motion with her face visibly bouncing off the ground

The cop then forcefully hurls her to the ground face first in one swift motion with her face visibly bouncing off the ground

A fellow officer told the court it was a 'judo-style throw' and said he heard the alleged victim's facial bones crack on the ground

A fellow officer told the court it was a 'judo-style throw' and said he heard the alleged victim's facial bones crack on the ground

A fellow officer told the court it was a ‘judo-style throw’ and said he heard the alleged victim’s facial bones crack on the ground

Dunn has a hold of Kafi's wrists that are handcuffed behind her back and her arms are held in the air as she lies still on the ground for a moment in a pool of blood

Dunn has a hold of Kafi's wrists that are handcuffed behind her back and her arms are held in the air as she lies still on the ground for a moment in a pool of blood

Dunn has a hold of Kafi’s wrists that are handcuffed behind her back and her arms are held in the air as she lies still on the ground for a moment in a pool of blood

Kafi was taken to hospital where she needed stitches in her lip and underwent surgery for a broken nose.

Calgary police Staff Sgt. Gordon Macdonald testified his colleague’s actions were the ‘worst use of force’ he had seen in his 30-year career and said he could hear the black woman’s bones crack as her face struck the ground. 

‘There’s only one type of sound when somebody’s bone hits the floor and that’s what I heard,’ he said from the witness box, according to CBC.  

‘I advised [Dunn] that it was the worst use of force that I had seen,’ said Macdonald. 

Macdonald, who was the commanding officer at the arresting unit, said Kafi was ‘flinching back’ from Dunn when he hurled her face-first in a ‘judo-style throw’, answering ‘no’ when asked if Kafi had acted in a way that would have justified the use of force. 

He said the black woman was complaining about her arrest but was in no way threatening or aggressive toward any of the officers. 

He said he feared the worst for Kafi after seeing and hearing the assault and called paramedics. 

Macdonald said it was standard practice for the arresting officer to accompany arrestees to the hospital but he made the decision it was not appropriate for Dunn to remain in the 26-year-old’s presence.  

Other officers arrive and Kafi is taken to hospital where she had stitches in her lip and surgery for her broken nose. Dunn is currently standing trial for the alleged assault but has not been fired from the force and is currently working in an administrative role

Other officers arrive and Kafi is taken to hospital where she had stitches in her lip and surgery for her broken nose. Dunn is currently standing trial for the alleged assault but has not been fired from the force and is currently working in an administrative role

Other officers arrive and Kafi is taken to hospital where she had stitches in her lip and surgery for her broken nose. Dunn is currently standing trial for the alleged assault but has not been fired from the force and is currently working in an administrative role

The alleged assault took place in December 2017 when Dunn arrested Kafi over allegedly breaching a court-ordered curfew. 

Kafi said she had been to a friend’s house braiding hair on the night of December 12 when she realized she was out past her curfew of 10 p.m. to 6 a.m..

She told the court a friend was driving her home when they were pulled over for turning on a yellow light.

Kafi said she gave cops her sister’s name at first because she was violating her curfew. 

She then admitted her real name to Dun and was arrested, handcuffed and taken to the arrest processing unit.  

She said she was told to stand against a wall to have her photo taken when the incident took place. 

Judge Michelle Christopher agreed to release the shocking footage

Judge Michelle Christopher agreed to release the shocking footage

Judge Michelle Christopher agreed to release the shocking footage 

The black woman told the court she passed out for a moment after striking her head off the ground, coming round to realize her face was covered in blood. 

Kafi’s mom let out a guttural noise and left the courtroom after she saw the disturbing footage of the alleged assault on her daughter Monday, CBC reported.

Dunn was charged with assault after concerns were raised by colleagues and an internal investigation was launched. 

The cop was suspended with pay for a year while awaiting trial but, after delays due to COVID-19, he has been allowed to return to work in ‘non-operational functions,’ Calgary police said. 

The force’s internal disciplinary process, which will be completed after the trial, will also determine if Dunn’s use of force was reasonable and what disciplinary action, such as dismissal, should be taken.   

‘To ensure the court process is not unfairly influenced, we are limited in regard to completing our internal disciplinary process until the court process is finished,’ police said in a statement.

‘In general terms, police officers are trained to de-escalate conflict and to use the least amount of force necessary to safely resolve a situation. 

‘We expect them to follow the law, our policies and our training.’   

The case comes one month after a judge ruled that several Calgary cops laughed at and mocked a black man who was bitten by a police dog.  

Judge Heather Lamoureux ruled in September that Latef Reakwon Tag El Din, 24, had his charter rights of life, liberty, and security of person violated by several Calgary police officers when they mocked him as he begged to be taken to hospital for his injuries. 

The judge slammed the cops for carrying out a ‘cruel and unusual punishment’ and causing the black man to ‘suffer needlessly.’

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Jihadists celebrate Nice terror attack as ISIS and al-Qaeda call for more violence

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jihadists celebrate nice terror attack as isis and al qaeda call for more violence

Online jihadists celebrated the latest terror attack on France today after three people were murdered by a knifeman in Nice on a day which also saw a gunman killed in Avignon and a guard attacked at a French consulate in Saudi Arabia

The latest in a long line of violent attacks in France was ‘already being celebrated massively across jihadi communities’ by late Thursday, according to the SITE Intelligence monitoring group. 

SITE director Rita Katz said it was ‘hard to recall social media celebration this massive for terrorism’ with jihadists taking to Twitter and Facebook to welcome the latest grisly murders. 

No group has yet claimed responsibility for today’s violence, but it comes amid high tensions between France and the Muslim world after a teacher was beheaded for showing Prophet Mohammed cartoons to his class two weeks ago. 

An armed French police officer secures a street near the entrance of the Notre Dame Basilica in Nice where three people were murdered in a terror attack today

An armed French police officer secures a street near the entrance of the Notre Dame Basilica in Nice where three people were murdered in a terror attack today

An armed French police officer secures a street near the entrance of the Notre Dame Basilica in Nice where three people were murdered in a terror attack today 

Katz said that jihadists were celebrating the attackers ‘freedom of action’ after three violent episodes in the space of a few hours. 

‘These new attacks comes amid a massive and enduring wave of jihadi media condemning France and its cartoonists,’ she said. 

A report by SITE said that jihadists were ‘overjoyed’ by the news from Nice, Avignon and Saudi Arabia today.  

Extremists linked to both ISIS and al-Qaeda have seized on the beheading of Samuel Paty earlier this month to incite more attacks against France. 

Katz said that the ‘prospect of co-ordination’ between the various attackers seemed ‘increasingly plausible’, although not confirmed. 

The Nice attack began around 9am at the Notre Dame basilica where a knifeman killed a male church warden, an elderly female parishioner and a second woman, wounded several others, and was then shot and arrested by police.  

Both ISIS and Al-Qaeda claimed responsibility for the 2015 Charlie Hebdo attacks, which were the beginning of a wave of terrorism across France. 

Anger at France has not been confined to extremists, with many in the Islamic world staging protests and calling for boycotts over Charlie Hebdo’s controversial cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed. 

Macron has vowed to defend freedom of expression and the right to insult religion, but leaders of Muslim countries have warned his stance could lead to violence. 

Turkey’s president Recep Tayyip Erdogan has been among those to feud with France, reacting angrily to an offensive cartoon of him on the front of Charlie Hebdo.

‘I don’t need to say anything to those scoundrels who insult my beloved prophet on such a scale,’ Erdogan said on Wednesday, calling it a ‘disgusting attack’.

Emergency services work at the back of an ambulance in Nice today after a knifeman killed three people and injured several others before being shot and arrested

Emergency services work at the back of an ambulance in Nice today after a knifeman killed three people and injured several others before being shot and arrested

Emergency services work at the back of an ambulance in Nice today after a knifeman killed three people and injured several others before being shot and arrested 

Erdogan’s top press aide today sought to fend off suggestions that Turkey’s strident rhetoric had encouraged violence. 

‘We will continue to confront any politician who insults our religion and values,’ Fahrettin Altun said, condemning the attacks in Nice. 

‘We feel we owe no apology to anyone for expressing our strong opposition to racism and xenophobia. We categorically deny any effort to associate us with any kind of violence.’

Abdallah Zekri, director general of the French Council of Muslim Worship (CFCM), also condemned the attack in Nice today. 

‘I can only denounce as strongly as possible this act of cowardice against the innocent,’ he said. 

Zekri called on French Muslims to cancel festivities to mark Mohammed’s birthday, which end on Thursday, ‘in solidarity with the victims and their loved ones.’

There was also condemnation of today’s attack from abroad, with UK prime minister Boris Johnson saying he was ‘appalled’ by news of a ‘barbaric attack’. 

‘Our thoughts are with the victims and their families, and the UK stands steadfastly with France against terror and intolerance,’ the PM said. 

Angela Merkel’s spokesman said the German chancellor was ‘deeply shocked about the gruesome murders in a church in Nice’. 

Italy’s prime minister Giuseppe Conte condemned a ‘vile attack’ but vowed it ‘will not shake the common front defending the values of freedom and peace.’  

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