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Trainer Tiffiny Hall, 35, reveals the ‘three hour’ rule she swears by for staying lean

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trainer tiffiny hall 35 reveals the three hour rule she swears by for staying lean

Resetting your food intake and attitude towards food every three hours is key to staying lean and toned, personal trainer Tiffiny Hall has claimed.

The 35-year-old former star of The Biggest Loser told FEMAIL that her ‘three hour reset rule’ means that you treat every new meal or snack as a ‘new event’ – so that if you slip up and eat something processed when you didn’t mean to, you don’t end up ‘writing off’ the entire day.

‘With the rule, you are actively allowed and able to enjoy the treat without feeling guilty, and then you can reset and start fresh,’ Tiffiny told FEMAIL.

‘Too often, my clients tell me that one chocolate bar or one bag of chips can often make them feel like they failed a particular day, week or month.

Resetting your food intake and attitude towards food every three hours is key to staying lean and toned, personal trainer Tiffiny Hall (pictured) has claimed

Resetting your food intake and attitude towards food every three hours is key to staying lean and toned, personal trainer Tiffiny Hall (pictured) has claimed

Resetting your food intake and attitude towards food every three hours is key to staying lean and toned, personal trainer Tiffiny Hall (pictured) has claimed

The 35-year-old former star of The Biggest Loser (pictured) told FEMAIL that her 'three hour reset rule' means that you treat every new meal or snack as a 'new event'

The 35-year-old former star of The Biggest Loser (pictured) told FEMAIL that her 'three hour reset rule' means that you treat every new meal or snack as a 'new event'

The 35-year-old former star of The Biggest Loser (pictured) told FEMAIL that her ‘three hour reset rule’ means that you treat every new meal or snack as a ‘new event’

‘But this all or nothing attitude is not sustainable and not a healthy way to live.’ 

Tiff said she came up with the idea for the ‘three hour reset rule’ several years ago as a way to short circuit negative attitudes and to stop both herself and others from dwelling on the past.

‘I don’t just apply it to snacks and food, I also apply the rule to other elements of my life,’ Tiff said.

‘If you miss the train on the way to work, or your car broke down, or your toddler didn’t go down for a nap, you shouldn’t let it ruin your day.

‘Just take a moment to be angry or frustrated, but feel the feels, then reset.’

Tiff (pictured) came up with the idea for the 'three hour reset rule' several years ago as a way to short circuit negative attitudes and to stop both herself and others from dwelling on the past

Tiff (pictured) came up with the idea for the 'three hour reset rule' several years ago as a way to short circuit negative attitudes and to stop both herself and others from dwelling on the past

Tiff (pictured) came up with the idea for the ‘three hour reset rule’ several years ago as a way to short circuit negative attitudes and to stop both herself and others from dwelling on the past

The trainer also shared her tops for staying on track with your exercise and diet goals, with the first one being that you don’t need to ditch your favourite foods.

‘Comfort food doesn’t have to disappear, just make smarter swaps,’ Tiff said.

‘Try a baked apple with honey and sultanas instead of apple pie, swap Greek yoghurt for ice cream and use cauliflower in your macaroni cheese.’ 

The 35-year-old said you should also establish some sort of exercise routine, and remember not everything has to be intense.

‘Habit and consistency is more important than intensity,’ Tiff said.

‘Designate your workout time in the week and stick to it, even if it’s a stretching session; keep that time as workout time.’ 

Tiffiny (pictured) shared her day on a plate - which includes pea and feta on toast, grilled steak with a salad and smoothies

Tiffiny (pictured) shared her day on a plate - which includes pea and feta on toast, grilled steak with a salad and smoothies

Tiffiny (pictured) shared her day on a plate - which includes pea and feta on toast, grilled steak with a salad and smoothies

Tiffiny (pictured) shared her day on a plate - which includes pea and feta on toast, grilled steak with a salad and smoothies

Tiffiny (pictured) shared her day on a plate – which includes pea and feta on toast, grilled steak with a salad and smoothies

The trainer (pictured) said she never eats after 8pm in order to give her digestive system a major rest and reset

The trainer (pictured) said she never eats after 8pm in order to give her digestive system a major rest and reset

The trainer (pictured) said she never eats after 8pm in order to give her digestive system a major rest and reset

What is Tiff Hall’s day on a plate?

* BREAKFAST: Espresso and pea and feta on toast

* MID-MORNING: Second coffee and protein bowl of coconut yoghurt mixed with protein powder, a handful of fresh blueberries, walnuts and flax seeds.

* LUNCH: Pre-prepped chicken salad or leftovers.

* AFTERNOON SNACK: Smoothie.

* DINNER: Grilled steak with a salad or grilled salmon with a salad. 

Source: Triple White 

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Previously, Tiffiny shared her day on a plate – which includes pea and feta on toast, grilled steak with a salad and smoothies.

‘I have an espresso with breakfast and always before training – at 5:30am! (I always work out before my son Arnie wakes up),’ Tiff told Triple White.

‘I also find a great morning workout gives me that awesome post-exercise satisfaction for the rest of the day.’

Tiff follows her coffee and pea and feta toast with a snack of a ‘protein bowl’ and another coffee mid morning.

Her protein bowl consists of coconut yoghurt mixed with protein powder, a handful of fresh blueberries, walnuts and flax seeds.

‘This bowl is protein-rich and fuels my body and muscles – plus, it keeps me energised during TIFFXO shoots,’ she told the publication.

Lunch is a pre-prepped chicken salad or leftovers, before a smoothie in the afternoon and a dinner of grilled salmon or steak:

‘After dinner, I finish the night off with a cup of elderberry tea and a few squares of (really) dark chocolate or some frozen grapes,’ Tiff said.

She also never eats after 8pm in order to give her digestive system a rest. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Australia

Traffic chaos in Sydney as ute goes up in flames on Eastern Distributor

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traffic chaos in sydney as ute goes up in flames on eastern distributor

A vehicle blaze on the Eastern Distributor in Sydney is causing major delays. 

All southbound lanes are closed from Moore Park in the city’s south. 

Fire crews are working to contain the fire and there are no reports of injuries. 

Footage of the incident shows a ute engulfed in flames at the exit from a tunnel along what is one of the city’s major arterial roads. 

More to come.  

Footage of the  incident shows the blazing ute parked to the edge of the asphalt at the exit of one of the tunnels (pictured)

Footage of the  incident shows the blazing ute parked to the edge of the asphalt at the exit of one of the tunnels (pictured)

Footage of the  incident shows the blazing ute parked to the edge of the asphalt at the exit of one of the tunnels (pictured) 

Fire crews are working to control the blaze and traffic is affected going southbound

Fire crews are working to control the blaze and traffic is affected going southbound

Fire crews are working to control the blaze and traffic is affected going southbound 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Surge of coronavirus cases in 75% of US is a ‘distressing trend’ officials say

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surge of coronavirus cases in 75 of us is a distressing trend officials say

US health officials on Wednesday promised that ‘hope is on the way’ in the form of COVID-19 vaccines and treatments expected by year-end – but acknowledged a ‘distressing’ upward trend in cases across the US. 

Coronavirus infections are on the rise in about three quarters of US states, said Dr Jay Butler, deputy director for infectious diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   

Dr Butler, CDC director Dr Robert Redfield and Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Alex Azar blamed this nationwide increase on gatherings moving indoors, and poor adherence to infection control guidelines, like masking. 

They hung their hopes on the availability of vaccines in ‘weeks or months,’ as well as antibody treatments like the one that President Trump was given. 

When pressed on whether Trump’s rift with top infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci would undermine trust in a vaccine, Azar said that the conflict had nothing to do with the reliability of science driving the vaccine research, and underscored the series of five vaccine safety ‘checks’ in place in the approval process. 

Azar also defended against accusations that his own agency had undermined the CDC, saying that critics ‘have not lived in and [worked in] an agency like this and fail to appreciate that.’  

CDC and HHS officials said during a Wednesday briefing that the rise of coronavirus cases is 'distressing' but said  they anticipate a vaccine available to vulnerable Americans by year-end

CDC and HHS officials said during a Wednesday briefing that the rise of coronavirus cases is 'distressing' but said  they anticipate a vaccine available to vulnerable Americans by year-end

CDC and HHS officials said during a Wednesday briefing that the rise of coronavirus cases is ‘distressing’ but said  they anticipate a vaccine available to vulnerable Americans by year-end

Wednesday’s press briefing largely rehashed promises and warnings already made by the HHS and CDC.  

‘The past week, we’ve seen nearly 60,000 cases a day as well as 700 deaths,’ said Butler. 

Case increases were accompanying a sense of fatigue and perhaps false security after the relatively low case numbers of the late summer and early fall, with more people seeing friends and family, ‘especially as these gatherings are moving indoors and adherence to face coverings may not be optimal,’ Dr Butler added. 

‘We are all getting tired with the impacts that COVID-19 has had on our lives, we get tired of wearing masks, but it continues to be as important as it’s ever been.’  

Seconding his warning, Azar said:  ‘While we are making exciting progress on vaccines and therapeutics, we see concerning trends across the country. 

‘There is hope on the way in the form of safe and effective vaccines in a matter of weeks or months.’ 

But he added that the ‘three W’s’ – washing hands, watching your distance and wearing a mask – are the ‘bridge’ between  current pandemic conditions and the arrival of vaccines. 

Trials of vaccines being made by AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson are on hold in the US following potential adverse events. 

Operation Warp Speed head, Dr Moncef Slaoui said Wednesday that these trials could resume as soon as next week. Officials participating in the briefing appeared unaware of Dr Slaoui’s statement. 

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The officials said that they anticipated the approval of one or more vaccines and to have enough doses for all ‘vulnerable’ Americans by year-end. 

By the end of January, Azar anticipates enough doses for all seniors and health care workers to be available. 

All other Americans who want to get vaccinated against COVID-19 should be able to do so by the end of March he said. 

Officials reiterated the partnership between the US government and pharmacy giants  Walgreens and CVS would help ensure that elderly Americans in nursing homes, as well as care home staff, have access to vaccines. 

All US states and territories have now submitted their plans for distributing coronavirus vaccines to the CDC in anticipation of emergency approval for one or more shot, the officials said.   

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Head of Operation Warp speed says he expects coronavirus vaccine trials to resume next week  

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head of operation warp speed says he expects coronavirus vaccine trials to resume next week

The head of Operation Warp Speed said he expects two paused coronavirus vaccine trials to resume as soon as next week. 

AstraZeneca Plc and Johnson & Johnson each put their respective trials on hold after participants fell inexplicably ill.

But Dr Moncef Slaouo, who leads the government’s plan to fast-track the production of millions of vaccine doses, says he believes a announcement from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is approaching.    

‘It’s for the FDA to announce and decide but I understand that this is imminent,’ Slaoui told Bloomberg.

‘I hope that the J&J trial also will restart later this week.’  

Dr Moncef Slaoui, the chief of Operation Warp Speed, says he expects two paused coronavirus trials to resume this week. Pictured: Slaoui stands on the podium before President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference at the White House, September 18

Dr Moncef Slaoui, the chief of Operation Warp Speed, says he expects two paused coronavirus trials to resume this week. Pictured: Slaoui stands on the podium before President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference at the White House, September 18

Dr Moncef Slaoui, the chief of Operation Warp Speed, says he expects two paused coronavirus trials to resume this week. Pictured: Slaoui stands on the podium before President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference at the White House, September 18

AstraZeneca's US arm was placed on hold on September 8 when a British participant suffered a serious reaction that triggered spinal cord inflammation

AstraZeneca's US arm was placed on hold on September 8 when a British participant suffered a serious reaction that triggered spinal cord inflammation

Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine trial was paused on October 12 after a volunteer developed an 'unexplained illness'

Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine trial was paused on October 12 after a volunteer developed an 'unexplained illness'

AstraZeneca’s (left) US arm was placed on hold on September 8 when a British participant suffered a serious reaction that triggered spinal cord inflammation. Johnson & Johnson’s (right) COVID-19 vaccine trial was paused on October 12 after a volunteer developed an ‘unexplained illness’

Both companies are developing what is known as a viral vector vaccine.

The immunization combines genetic material from the new virus with the genes of the adenovirus, which causes the common cold.

It codes for the spike protein that the coronavirus uses to enter and infect cells in order to train the body to recognized the virus and induce an immune response if infected.

This is the same technology that J&J used to make an experimental Ebola vaccine for people in the Democratic Republic of Congo in late 2019. 

Slaoui said there is currently no evidence to suggest viral vector vaccines are less safe than other vaccine types being developed to combat COVID-19. 

‘I have not seen data at all that suggests these platform technologies have a problem,’ he told Bloomberg.

AstraZeneca’s late-stage study, being conducted with the University of Oxford, was put on hold on September 8 when a British participant was rushed to the hospital after suffering a serious reaction that triggered spinal cord inflammation. 

An internal safety report revealed the British patient was diagnosed with transverse myelitis, an inflammation of a section of the spinal cord.

The condition damages the myelin sheath, an insulating barrier of fatty protein that protects the nerves, and interrupts messages sent by spinal cord nerves.

This results in pain, weakness, abnormal sensations, and problems of the bladder and bowel – and can even lead to permanent paralysis. 

Testing has since resumed at all other sites, but not in the US.

Now, four sources briefed on the matter, who asked to remain anonymous, say they have been told the trial could resume later this week, according to Reuters.

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Allowing testing to resume likely means the FDA believes illness suffered by the British patient was not linked to the experimental vaccine. 

However, the FDA is requiring researchers conducting the trial to add information about the incident to consent forms signed by study participants, according to one of the sources.

Meanwhile, J&J’s COVID-19 vaccine trial was paused on October 12 after a volunteer developed an ‘unexplained illness.’ 

The company has declined to provide further details about the nature of the illness and cited patient privacy.  

‘We must respect this participant’s privacy. We’re also learning more about this participant’s illness, and it’s important to have all the facts before we share additional information,’ a spokesperson said. 

J&J has refused to answer whether the participant received the vaccine or the placebo and if the trial has been paused before. 

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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