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Trump administration’s fear of leaks leaves White House staff in the dark

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trump administrations fear of leaks leaves white house staff in the dark

The White House has been thrown into chaos and confusion in the wake of Donald Trump‘s coronavirus diagnosis as staffers are left in the dark about the president’s condition and potential risks to their own health.  

Over the past four days Trump’s team has offered a number of conflicting reports surrounding the president’s illness, sowing doubt about when he tested positive and how severe his symptoms have been.  

Meanwhile the virus has continued to spread through the White House, infecting at least 12 people who work there by Saturday night, as staff try to stay informed via the media in the absence of transparency from top brass in the Trump administration.  

One senior White House official lifted the lid on the state of the 1600 Penn in an interview with Intelligencer on Saturday, decrying how paranoid attempts to avoid leaks have not only failed, but are threatening the health and safety of staff. 

‘Ninety percent of the [White House] complex most certainly learned about it in the news, as has been the case ever since,’ the senior official said. 

‘There are reports that COVID is spreading like wildfire through the White House. Since this whole thing started, not one email has gone out to tell employees what to do or what’s going on.’

The White House has been thrown into chaos and confusion in the wake of Donald Trump's coronavirus diagnosis as staffers are left in the dark about the president's condition and potential risks to their own health. Pictured: Marine One leaves the White House on Friday as Trump is transported to Walter Reed National Military Hospital for treatment

The White House has been thrown into chaos and confusion in the wake of Donald Trump's coronavirus diagnosis as staffers are left in the dark about the president's condition and potential risks to their own health. Pictured: Marine One leaves the White House on Friday as Trump is transported to Walter Reed National Military Hospital for treatment

The White House has been thrown into chaos and confusion in the wake of Donald Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis as staffers are left in the dark about the president’s condition and potential risks to their own health. Pictured: Marine One leaves the White House on Friday as Trump is transported to Walter Reed National Military Hospital for treatment 

Over the past four days Trump's team has offered a number of conflicting reports surrounding the president's illness, sowing doubt about when he tested positive and how severe his symptoms have been. Pictured: Trump delivers an address in a Twitter video on Saturday night

Over the past four days Trump's team has offered a number of conflicting reports surrounding the president's illness, sowing doubt about when he tested positive and how severe his symptoms have been. Pictured: Trump delivers an address in a Twitter video on Saturday night

Over the past four days Trump’s team has offered a number of conflicting reports surrounding the president’s illness, sowing doubt about when he tested positive and how severe his symptoms have been. Pictured: Trump delivers an address in a Twitter video on Saturday night

The official said that the majority of staff has received little to no reliable information, about the president’s condition or about anything else regarding the outbreak.  

 ‘I think most of it is paranoia about leaks,’ they said, ‘yet … the leaks continue.’ 

Outside the White House, confusion erupted on Saturday when Trump’s team of doctors at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center offered a vague but sunny update on his health that was then contradicted by the president’s Chief of Staff Mark Meadows.  

‘This morning, the president is doing very well. The team and I are extremely happy with the progress the president has made. He’s been fever free for 24 hours and we are cautiously optimistic,’ Trump’s personal physician Sean Conley told reporters outside Walter Reed.   

Conley’s depiction was far more hopeful than one put forward by Meadows, who spoke to a press pooler on background immediately after the briefing ended. 

‘The president’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We’re still not on a clear path to a full recovery,’ Meadows said.  

The briefing raised more questions than answers as Conley declined to say what temperature Trump had when he had a fever or whether he was on oxygen. 

Conley also said that the president was ’72 hours into the diagnosis’, indicating that Trump could have tested positive as early as Wednesday – not Thursday night as the White House had claimed.  

If he was 72 hours into his diagnosis, that would mean Trump was positive a day after the presidential debate with Joe Biden and positive during a Minnesota rally Wednesday and a fundraising event in New Jersey attended by 100 people Thursday. 

Conley and other senior officials spent the rest of Saturday backtracking, claiming that the doctor misspoke when he said ’72 hours’ and that he actually meant ‘day three’. 

Trump's personal physician Sean Conley (pictured) offered a vague update on his condition outside Walter Reed on Saturday morning, saying the president is doing 'very well'

Trump's personal physician Sean Conley (pictured) offered a vague update on his condition outside Walter Reed on Saturday morning, saying the president is doing 'very well'

Trump’s personal physician Sean Conley (pictured) offered a vague update on his condition outside Walter Reed on Saturday morning, saying the president is doing ‘very well’

After the presser Chief of Staff Mark Meadows (pictured) told a pool reporter: 'The president's vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We're still not on a clear path to a full recovery'

After the presser Chief of Staff Mark Meadows (pictured) told a pool reporter: 'The president's vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We're still not on a clear path to a full recovery'

After the presser Chief of Staff Mark Meadows (pictured) told a pool reporter: ‘The president’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We’re still not on a clear path to a full recovery’

WHO TRUMP’S BEEN IN CONTACT WITH AND WHO IS INFECTED

Hope Hicks, counselor to the president – POSITIVE

Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump – NEGATIVE   

Barron Trump – NEGATIVE   

Tiffany Trump – NEGATIVE

Eric Trump, Lara Trump – NEGATIVE

Donald Trump Jr, Kimberly Guilfoyle – NEGATIVE

Vice President Mike Pence – NEGATIVE 

Joe Biden and Jill Biden – NEGATIVE 

Dan Scavino, Social Media Director – NEGATIVE 

RNC Chair Ronna McDaniel – POSITIVE  

Mark Meadows, White House chief of staff – NEGATIVE 

Kayleigh McEnany, press secretary – NEGATIVE  

KellyAnne Conway, Trump’s former advisor  who attended Saturday’s announcement of SCOTUS nominee – POSITIVE 

Amy Coney Barrett, Supreme Court nominee – NEGATIVE (She had the virus in the summer)

Rev John Jenkins, President of Notre Dame who attended Saturday’s announcement of SCOTUS nominee – POSITIVE 

Republican Sen. Thom Tillis of North Carolina who attended Saturday’s announcement of SCOTUS nominee – POSITIVE 

Mike Lee, Utah Republican senator who attended Saturday’s announcement of SCOTUS nominee – POSITIVE  

Bill Stepien, campaign manager – POSITIVE    

Chris Christie, helped with debate prep – POSITIVE 

Nick Luna, White House special assistant to the president – POSITIVE 

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Trump announced his diagnosis just before 1am Friday, hours after it emerged that his top aide, Hope Hicks, had tested positive after she started feeling sick on Wednesday while traveling to Minnesota with the president for his rally.  

The White House sought to keep Hicks’ diagnosis under wraps and apparently didn’t inform its own staff despite the possibility that they could have been exposed to her.

Questions over the timeline are concerning both within and outside the White House because the president had traveled to multiple states and was exposed to countless people in the days before his diagnosis was announced.  

On Wednesday the president appeared before a crowd of hundreds of people, who were notably not socially distanced, at a rally in Duluth, Minnesota. 

He spoke for 45 minutes, far less than his usual performances of more than an hour. 

At the rally he was seen throwing red MAGA caps into the crowd. 

Then he fell asleep on Air Force One in contrast to normally watching television and tweeting. 

The following day Trump traveled to his golf course and resort in Bedminster, New Jersey for an indoor fundraiser with about 100 attendees.  

Trump reportedly met about 19 high-dollar GOP donors in private and seemed ‘lethargic’ at that fundraiser. 

The contact tracing process is underway in New Jersey and Gov Phil Murphy is urging anyone at the Bedminster event or around it to self quarantine and get tested.

Organizers of the fundraiser have sent out an email to attendees informing them of Trump’s diagnosis, urging them to get tested if they experience symptoms.

It is unclear whether Trump caught the virus directly from Hicks, who traveled with him Tuesday for his debate against Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden in Cleveland and on Wednesday to Minnesota. 

By Friday evening the president was flown on Marine One to Walter Reed hospital for a several days long stay to undergo treatment ‘out of an abundance of caution’ after reporting symptoms of fever, cough and congestion that the White House described as ‘mild’. 

Rumors that officials were downplaying the severity of Trump’s condition began to swirl on Friday night as an anonymous White House official claimed he was hospitalized because he was having ‘trouble breathing’. 

On Wednesday the president spoke before a crowd of hundreds of people, who were notably not socially distanced, at a rally in Duluth, Minnesota

On Wednesday the president spoke before a crowd of hundreds of people, who were notably not socially distanced, at a rally in Duluth, Minnesota

On Wednesday the president spoke before a crowd of hundreds of people, who were notably not socially distanced, at a rally in Duluth, Minnesota

It is unclear whether Trump caught the virus directly from Hicks, who traveled with him Tuesday for his debate against Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden in Cleveland and on Wednesday to Minnesota. Hicks pictured with White House advisor Jared Kushner and White House social media director Dan Scavino walking to Air Force One Wednesday

It is unclear whether Trump caught the virus directly from Hicks, who traveled with him Tuesday for his debate against Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden in Cleveland and on Wednesday to Minnesota. Hicks pictured with White House advisor Jared Kushner and White House social media director Dan Scavino walking to Air Force One Wednesday

It is unclear whether Trump caught the virus directly from Hicks, who traveled with him Tuesday for his debate against Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden in Cleveland and on Wednesday to Minnesota. Hicks pictured with White House advisor Jared Kushner and White House social media director Dan Scavino walking to Air Force One Wednesday

A timeline of Trump's movements and who he has come into contact with in the last week. Both he and presidential aide Hope Hicks tested positive for the coronavirus on Thursday

A timeline of Trump's movements and who he has come into contact with in the last week. Both he and presidential aide Hope Hicks tested positive for the coronavirus on Thursday

A TIMELINE OF THE PRESIDENT’S TRAVEL 

Saturday, September 26: Trump announces his Supreme Court pick at the White House, then travels to a rally in Pennsylvania with aides including Hope Hicks. 

Sunday, September 27: The president plays golf in Virginia, gives a press conference in the White House briefing room and hosts a reception for Gold Star families. 

Monday, September 28: Trump gives a press briefing and inspects pickup vehicles on the White House lawn.  

Tuesday, September 29: Hicks is aboard Air Force One with the president and Melania to travel to the first presidential debate in Cleveland. Hicks is seen leaving the jet without a mask. 

The president spars with Joe Biden in a chaotic debate. Trump family members do not wear masks during the debate, violating venue rules.  

Wednesday, September 30: Hicks travels on Marine One and on Air Force One to a rally in Minnesota Wednesday.

She is understood to have felt poorly on the way back, quarantining on the presidential plane to get home. 

Thursday, October :  Hicks tests positive. 

White House aides are told about it and pull people from Air Force One who had been in contact with her but they still let Trump go to the NJ event. 

Trump went to the event where the NY Times claims he came into contact with 100 people. 

He then came back to the WH, where he was ‘lethargic’, and tested positive.  

Friday, October 2:

  A political rally in Sanford, Florida is cancelled. 

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Dr Conley said Saturday that he was speaking ’48 hours after’ Trump received his first dose of Regenron’s experimental polyclonal antibody cocktail. That would mean on Thursday morning. 

And another doctor – Brian Garibaldi – said: ‘About 48 hours ago the president received a special antibody therapy directed against the coronavirus. We are working very closely with the company to monitor him in terms of that outcome. Yesterday evening he received his first dose of IV remdesvir.’ 

Then in a statement Conley said Regenron was first administered on Friday – but not when. That means two doctors have now said the White House has misspoken.  

Conley repeatedly refused to answer questions about whether the president had ever been placed on supplemental oxygen, merely stating that he wasn’t on it at the time of the briefing. 

Conley has worked with the Trump as a patient for years and the president has veto over any aspect of revealing his medical information, such as when and how he was diagnosed, his use of oxygen and his maximum temperature.

The physician said Trump’s medical team was still assessing the president to determine when he can be discharged from Walter Reed but asserted that he was on the mend.  

Both Conley and the White House maintained that Trump’s hospitalization was precautionary, rather than a sign that his case was growing more serious.  

However, Intelligencer spoke to Panagis Galiastatos, a pulmonary and critical-care physician at Johns Hopkins who has treated more than 100 COVID-19 patients in his hospital’s ICU, challenged that suggestion. 

Galiastatos said that the details about Trump’s remdesivir treatment indicated that he is suffering from a ‘moderate’ or ‘severe’ case of COVID-19.  

The doctor said he suspects Trump ‘probably had COVID-19 around Wednesday’, noting that patients are understood to be contagious ‘several days before’ showing symptoms. 

If that’s the case, it could mean that Trump was positive during Tuesday night’s debate with Biden. Both Biden and his wife Jill tested negative after the news of Hicks’ diagnosis.  

Meadows contradicted Conley’s assertion that Trump was doing ‘very well’ in his comment to the press pool immediately after the Walter Reed briefing. 

The chief of staff apparently did not intend for his message to reach the wider press pool – but after it did, he appeared on Fox News on Saturday night and admitted that Trump’s condition had been ‘very concerning’ on Friday. 

Multiple sources also claimed that Trump had been placed on oxygen prior to being admitted to Walter Reed, which the White House confirmed later on Sunday evening. 

The president addressed the nation himself in a video from the hospital on Saturday night, saying he was feeling better while acknowledging, as Meadows had said, that the next two days are critical.  

‘I came here, I wasn’t feeling so well, I feel much better now. We’re working hard to get me back. I have to get all the way back because we still have to make America great again,’ Trump said at the start of Saturday’s video. 

‘We’ve been so proud of it but this was something that’s happened and it was something that happened to millions of people all over the world and I’ve been fighting for them, not just in the US, I’m fighting for them all over the world.’

The White House released this photo of Trump working at Walter Reed on Saturday night

The White House released this photo of Trump working at Walter Reed on Saturday night

The White House released this photo of Trump working at Walter Reed on Saturday night

The president added that people ‘criticize me’ for boasting about cures but that the therapeutics he’s taking are ‘like they’re miracles coming down from God so I just want to tell you that I’m starting to feel good’.

‘We’re going to beat the coronavirus or whatever you want to call it and we’re going to beat it soundly,’ he said. 

‘I don’t know the next period of a few days, I guess. That’s the real test so we’ll be seeing what happened over those next couple of days.’ 

Trump also said that his wife Melania, 50, was doing better than he was, joking: ‘As you’ve probably read, she’s slightly younger than me, just a little tiny bit.’   

The president is said have been upset over the confusion surrounding his condition after Meadows appeared to undermine Conley’s optimistic report.  

But equally frustrated are those working in the White House, who are only getting updates via the media amid fears that they could be the next staffer infected with the virus.  

Speaking to the senior White House official, Intelligencer placed the ordeal in a broader context, asking how Americans could trust the Trump administration’s portrayal of the coronavirus nationwide given the chaotic handling of this internal outbreak.  

‘I can’t,’ the official replied. 

THE CRUCIAL QUESTIONS OVER TRUMP’S HEALTH 

WHEN PRECISELY WAS HE DIAGNOSED WITH COVID-19?  

We now have had three different versions of when Trump was diagnosed from the White House, ranging from Wednesday morning to Friday at 1am. The White House has also not said what ‘diagnosed’ means – it could mean spotting clinical symptoms or testing positive.

The White House first announced Donald Trump’s positive test result – and that of the first lady – at 1am EST on Friday morning. 

But Dr. Sean Conley said on Saturday morning just before midday that the president was ’72 hours into the diagnosis’. 

That’s hours before he flew to Minnesota for an indoors fundraiser and outdoors rally in Duluth, and one day before he attended an indoor fundraiser at Trump’s golf course and country club Bedminster, New Jersey. 

There were reportedly 100 people in attendance and Trump reportedly met about 19 high-dollar GOP donors in private. He was reportedly ‘lethargic’ at that fundraiser. 

If Trump was 72 hours into his diagnosis, that would mean Trump was positive a day after the presidential debate with Joe Biden and positive during a Minnesota rally Wednesday (above) and a fundraising event in New Jersey attended by 100 people Thursday

If Trump was 72 hours into his diagnosis, that would mean Trump was positive a day after the presidential debate with Joe Biden and positive during a Minnesota rally Wednesday (above) and a fundraising event in New Jersey attended by 100 people Thursday

If Trump was 72 hours into his diagnosis, that would mean Trump was positive a day after the presidential debate with Joe Biden and positive during a Minnesota rally Wednesday (above) and a fundraising event in New Jersey attended by 100 people Thursday

The crowd that gathered for Trump's rally at Duluth International Airport Wednesday above

The crowd that gathered for Trump's rally at Duluth International Airport Wednesday above

The crowd that gathered for Trump’s rally at Duluth International Airport Wednesday above 

Dr. Conley then offered a different version saying that on Thursday afternoon ‘we repeated testing’ and Trump was given a PCR test – the most accurate kind because he ‘gave a kind of clinical indication.’

He did not say if that was before or after he flew to New Jersey for an indoors fundraiser. 

Trump himself told Sean Hannity shortly after 9pm that night that he was waiting for a test. 

After Conley spoke a White House source said ‘on background’: ‘The doctor meant it’s day 3, not yet 72hrs. Diagnosis made Thursday night.’ 

Then in another turn, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany issued a written statement from Conley saying he incorrectly used the term ‘seventy two hours’ instead of ‘day three’ and ‘forty eight hours’ instead of ‘day two’ with regards to his diagnosis and treatment.

Then in another turn, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany issued a written statement from Conley saying he incorrectly used the term 'seventy two hours' instead of 'day three' and 'forty eight hours' instead of 'day two' with regards to his diagnosis

Then in another turn, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany issued a written statement from Conley saying he incorrectly used the term 'seventy two hours' instead of 'day three' and 'forty eight hours' instead of 'day two' with regards to his diagnosis

Then in another turn, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany issued a written statement from Conley saying he incorrectly used the term ‘seventy two hours’ instead of ‘day three’ and ‘forty eight hours’ instead of ‘day two’ with regards to his diagnosis

‘The president was first diagnosed with COVID-19 on the evening on Thursday October 1st and had received Regeron’s antibody cocktail on Friday October 2nd,’ he clarified. 

A Regeneron spokesperson said Conley was also incorrect by calling it polyclonal antibody theory in his memo. 

‘It is two monoclonal antibodies. It was incorrect in the physician’s letter,’ Regeneron spokesperson Hala Mirza told CBS News. 

When asked point blank Conley refused to share the date of Trump’s last negative COVID-19 test. 

WHY DID A WHITE HOUSE SOURCE IMMEDIATELY CONTRADICT HIS DOCTOR?  

A White House official said immediately after Conley’s press conference Saturday that the doctor misspoke in saying Trump was ’72 hours’ into his diagnosis.

The official said Conley was wrong and Trump was diagnosed Thursday night and treatment began that night.  

WHEN PRECISELY WERE SYMPTOMS FIRST DETECTED AND WHEN PRECISELY WAS HE TESTED?

There is no clarity over when Trump was last tested before his positive result. Dr. Conley repeated the White House claim that he is tested ‘frequently’ but did not say what that meant. They have never said if he was routinely given the less accurate Abbott Labs 15 minute test or the advanced PCR test.

When he arrived at Tuesday’s presidential debate Trump was too late to be tested by the Cleveland Clinic. Moderator Chris Wallace said there was an ‘honor system’ for the candidates; Trump’s team told the Debate Commission he was negative. That night he flew home on Air Force One from the presidential debate and aides said he was tired but decided it was because of the debate. But lethargy is symptom – and it is unknown if doctors took note of it.

Charlie Kolean who works in financial services posted video of himself driving to the event

Charlie Kolean who works in financial services posted video of himself driving to the event

Later in the afternoon, he took video of the president's helicopter, Marine One lifting off

Later in the afternoon, he took video of the president's helicopter, Marine One lifting off

Charlie Kolean who works in financial services posted video of himself driving the Trump fundraiser (left) and took video of the president’s helicopter Marine One lifting off (right)

As of Friday evening New Jersey was apparently still waiting for a full roster compiled from information from the RNC, White House and golf club of those who were in attendance. The Bedminster club house is pictured (file photo)

As of Friday evening New Jersey was apparently still waiting for a full roster compiled from information from the RNC, White House and golf club of those who were in attendance. The Bedminster club house is pictured (file photo)

As of Friday evening New Jersey was apparently still waiting for a full roster compiled from information from the RNC, White House and golf club of those who were in attendance. The Bedminster club house is pictured (file photo)

Then Dr. Conley initially said Trump was diagnosed ’72 hours’ before the Saturday statement which would mean Wednesday morning.

Trump went to Minnesota on Wednesday for a fundraiser in Minneapolis and a rally in Duluth, where he spoke for 45 minutes, far less than his usual performances of more than an hour. Then he fell asleep on Air Force One in contrast to normally watching television and tweeting. But it is unknown if this was seen as a possible symptom at the time.

Hope Hicks’ positive result came on Thursday morning but nobody has said if Trump was tested as soon as it was given or if it was until late Thursday afternoon that he was given a full nasal swab. 

WHEN WAS HE FIRST TREATED FOR COVID?

Dr. Sean Conley said Saturday that he was speaking ’48 hours after’ the first Regenron treatment was given to Trump. That would mean on Thursday morning. 

And another doctor – Brian Garibaldi – said: ‘About 48 hours ago the president received a special antibody therapy directed against the coronavirus. We are working very closely with the company to monitor him in terms of that outcome. Yesterday evening he received his first dose of IV Remdesvir.’ 

But the public were not told he was even ill until Friday at 1am, and no drug treatment was disclosed until Friday afternoon. 

After Dr. Conley spoke, a White House source spoke ‘on background’ and said: ‘The Doctor meant it’s day 3, not yet 72hrs, Regeneron administered later that night (2 days ago), not 48hrs ago.’ 

Then in a statement Dr. Conley said Regenron was first administered on Friday – but not when. That means two doctors are now being said by the White House to have misspoken.  

DO WE KNOW ALL THE PRESIDENT’S UNDERYING CONDITIONS?  

We do not know if we do. The last medical report in June said he was clinically obsess but had health cholesterol, resting heart rate and blood pressure., normal kidney, liver and thyroid function, normal blood count and normal Vitamin V12 and Vitamin D levels. ,

But the White House has never explained fully his mystery trip to Walter Reed in November 2019 when Mike Pence was told to be on ‘standby’ to assume the powers of the presidency. 

Since then Trump’s struggle to walk down a ramp at West Point and his strange drinking of water with two hands has been the subject of widespread speculation about cognitive issues. He has denied having ‘a series of mini-strokes’ in an angry tweet but his physician has never fully addressed the visit or his cognitive state. 

Trump is at a is 74 years old and at 244lbs and 6ft 3, is technically obese which puts him at higher risk of serious complications from the virus. 

Older men are at great risk of becoming severely ill from COVID-19 and are twice as likely to die than women of the same age, according to an analysis by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

When asked about any other risk factors Conley said Trump is overall healthy, saying his health and cholesterol are ‘great’.  

DID HE GO TO ANY EVENTS WHEN DOCTORS SUSPECTED HE WAS UNWELL OR HAD BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH CLINICAL SYMPTOMS OF COVID?

The White House doctors and series of statements offer no insight into when Trump first felt unwell; when anyone suspected he was unwell; when he was first tested; and if a doctor had seen clinical signs of COVID before he was nasally swabbed. 

That means that Trump could have gone to any or all of a Minnesota fundraiser and rally; a White House South Lawn event; and a New Jersey fundraiser with doctors suspecting he had COVID or even having tested him for it.  

HAS THE PRESIDENT EVER BEEN ON OXYGEN?

Conley sparked confusion in regards to if the president was ever on supplemental oxygen. The coronavirus affects a person’s breathing and some patients end up on ventilators.

‘He’s not needed any this morning today at all,’ he said grinning, refusing to admit if Trump was ever on oxygen.

‘Yesterday and today he is not on oxygen,’ he said. 

Trumo pictured arriving at the Walter Reed Medical Center in Maryland on Friday

Trumo pictured arriving at the Walter Reed Medical Center in Maryland on Friday

Trumo pictured arriving at the Walter Reed Medical Center in Maryland on Friday

About an hour later the New York Times and Associated Press reported Trump was given oxygen at the White House residence. 

Two people close to the White House told the New York Times in separate interviews that Trump had trouble breathing on Friday and doctors put him on supplemental oxygen after his oxygen level dropped while he was still at the White House.  

There has been no official denial or confirmation but Dr. Conley had left that possibility open. Why he would not confirm it is unknown. 

Conley said, ‘all indicators are that he’ll remain off of oxygen going forward’. 

WHAT TEMPERATURE DID THE PRESIDENT’S FEVER SPIKE AT?

This simple question was not answered. It is a crucial clinical indication but all Dr. Conley would say is that he has been fever-free for 24 hours. Given that the White House now disputed Dr. Conley’s use of 48 and 72 hours, even that cannot be taken as true.

On Friday Conley and White House aides said Trump was suffering from a low-grade fever. 

On Saturday when asked a specific fever temperature, Conley said, ‘I’d rather not give any specific numbers but he did have a fever Thursday into Friday and since Friday morning he’s had none.’ 

DOES THE PRESIDENT HAVE HEART OR LUNG DAMAGE? 

Conley was asked about lung damage and said: ‘We’re following all of that. We do daily ultrasounds. We do daily lab work. The team is tracking all of that.’ But that does not say if there is any damage to his lungs.’ He simply ignored a question about Trump’s heart. 

DO WE KNOW EVERY DRUG OR TREATMENT HE HAS TAKEN?

The White House in two statements has detailed drugs Trump has been given. 

On Friday’s afternoon it said he was given the experimental Regeneron antibody ‘cocktail’ as well as zinc, Vitamin D and the histamine-blocker famotidine. 

Then late on Friday night a statement from Dr. Conley said he had been given the antiviral Remdesvir. But Dr. Conley refused to answer if Trump was on steroids. He did not say if he is on any other drugs. 

Trump previously took hydroxychloroquine in late May and early June despite its use at the time being at best questionable and at worst risky. In June Dr. Conley said Trump takes three daily drugs: 40mg of Rosuvastatin, a statin; 1mg of finasteride, the hair-loss drug generally marketed as Propecia; and 81mg of aspirin.

Trump had asked about hydroxychloroquine in his treatment, which he famously repeatedly touted as a cure to the virus, but Conley said, ‘he’s not on it now’.

WHO IS TREATING THE PRESIDENT?

His treatment is being led by Dr. Sean Conley, who introduced other Walter Reed staff – including pulmonary specialists – on Saturday. 

But the White House has not answered questions on the names of his full team. It has also not said if he or Dr. Conley have consulted other doctors on the coronavirus task force including Dr. Tony Fauci and Dr. Deborah Birx, both renowned specialists. And it has not said if he has consulted Dr. Scott Atlas the controversial member of the taskforce who has spoken in favor of ‘herd immunity’ and minimized the importance of masks, and been called an ‘outlier’ who gives ‘bad information’ by Dr. Fauci. 

His treatment is being led by Dr. Sean Conley (center), who introduced other Walter Reed staff ¿ including pulmonary specialists ¿ on Saturday

His treatment is being led by Dr. Sean Conley (center), who introduced other Walter Reed staff ¿ including pulmonary specialists ¿ on Saturday

His treatment is being led by Dr. Sean Conley (center), who introduced other Walter Reed staff – including pulmonary specialists – on Saturday

Also unaddressed is whether Dr. Conley has reached out to Admiral Ronny Jackson, Trump’s last White House doctor. He quit after his nomination to run Veterans Affairs was withdrawn and an investigation opened into whether he was drunk on the job and gave out prescription drugs to staffers, earning the nickname ‘Candyman.’ He had previously claimed the president could ‘live to 200. 

On Friday he tweeted that the president was ‘asymptomatic’ which quickly became plainly untrue. He is running for Congress as a Republican and it is unclear if he retains a medical registration

IS THE PRESIDENT’S DOCTOR OVERWORKED?

Given that we do not know exactly who was treating the president in the White House, we do not know if Dr. Conley has had adequate sleep, or adequate backup. 

He has been dealing with an escalating crisis since at least Thursday morning when Hicks tested positive but possibly for longer – and we do not know how long, given his changing version of events. White House staff are working around the clock and on Friday when Trump got on Marine One appeared both shellshocked and exhausted. But Dr. Conley went with him to Walter Reed, and it is unclear if he was relieved by other doctors or has worked around the clock. Dr. Conley however is a commander in the Navy and would be expected to be aided by multiple specialists to perform his task. 

Doctors are trained not to become over-tired and to recognize the need to get rest. His superior officers would emphasize that to him and at Walter Reed, Trump could have been attended by specialists who could take over to let Dr. Conley rest – but we do not know if that happened.

HAS ANY CONTACT TRACING BEEN DONE BY THE WHITE HOUSE IN ANY FORM?

The White House medical unit in conjunction with the CDC and local health departments are conducting contact tracing. 

On Friday, more than 24 hours after the New Jersey fundraiser ended, contact tracers in the state had not been given a complete list of everyone who attended the event.

The Trump campaign emailed all of those supporters who attended the roundtable event to alert them about Trump's positive COVID-19 result

The Trump campaign emailed all of those supporters who attended the roundtable event to alert them about Trump's positive COVID-19 result

The Trump campaign emailed all of those supporters who attended the roundtable event to alert them about Trump’s positive COVID-19 result 

The Republican National Committee sent the names of those it knew had attended the event to Governor Phil Murphy’s office at 2:30pm.

However, the list may not include people who were working at the event including golf club workers and outsider vendors that were brought in to help stage the event. 

HAS THE PRESIDENT OR ANYONE ELSE ORDERED DOCTORS NOT TO BE FULLY TRANSPARENT – AND DID DR. CONLEY WRITE HIS OWN STATEMENT?

This is simply unknown. Dr. Conley has never before spoken to reporters, and read initially from a prepared statement. 

He has had lengthy time with the president and as a patient, the president has veto over any aspect of revealing his medical information, such as when and how he was diagnosed, his use of oxygen and his maximum temperature. Also present at Walter Reed is Mark Meadows, the White House chief of staff. He does not formally control Dr. Conley who is in the military chain of command, but is a member of the Cabinet and would be seen as having authority to act on the president’s behalf to control the release of information.

IF THE PRESIDENT IS TWEETING IS THAT A GOOD SIGN?

Multiple people can access Trump’s twitter account, but it is principally run by Dan Scavino, his director of social media. Under CDC guidelines Scavino should be self-quarantining after extensive contact with Trump and Hicks although it is unknown if he is. Mark Meadows, the White House chief of staff, hinted Friday that Trump was not in control of his account when he said that ‘we decided to put out that tweet’ of the 1am Friday tweet saying: Tonight, @FLOTUS and I tested positive for COVID-19. We will begin our quarantine and recovery process immediately. We will get through this TOGETHER!’ So a tweet Saturday from Trump cannot be taken as proving he is well, or disproving that he is unwell.

 

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Turkey earthquake: Rescuers search into night for survivors

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turkey earthquake rescuers search into night for survivors

Rescuers search into the night for survivors in Turkey after a powerful 7.0-magnitude earthquake sent people fleeing from their homes on Greek islands – leaving 22 dead and nearly 800 injured.  

Search and rescue teams dug through heavy blocks of concrete desperately trying to find survivors after the catastrophic earthquake. 

Turkey and Greece were battered by a 7.0-magnitude earthquake today which killed at least 22 people, flattened buildings and caused a mini-tsunami which flooded streets in horrifying scenes on the Turkish coast.

Debris was racing down Turkish streets after an apparent sea surge near Izmir where at least seventeen buildings were destroyed and footage showed people climbing over the wreckage of collapsed multi-storey blocks. 

Gunay Ozisik ,14, who was under the rubbles is being carried out of wreckage

Gunay Ozisik ,14, who was under the rubbles is being carried out of wreckage

Gunay Ozisik ,14, who was under the rubbles is being carried out of wreckage

Rescue and health workers carry a dead body from a collapsed building

Rescue and health workers carry a dead body from a collapsed building

Rescue and health workers carry a dead body from a collapsed building

Search teams are desperately looking for survivors at collapsed buildings

Search teams are desperately looking for survivors at collapsed buildings

Search teams are desperately looking for survivors at collapsed buildings

The 7.0-magnitude earthquake today has left  at least 22 people dead and nearly 800 injured

The 7.0-magnitude earthquake today has left  at least 22 people dead and nearly 800 injured

The 7.0-magnitude earthquake today has left  at least 22 people dead and nearly 800 injured

An injured woman being carried out on a strecher after she was found among the rubbles

An injured woman being carried out on a strecher after she was found among the rubbles

An injured woman being carried out on a strecher after she was found among the rubbles

Rescue operations are being carried out after the earthquake

Rescue operations are being carried out after the earthquake

Rescue operations are being carried out after the earthquake

 Turkey’s disaster agency said at least 22 people were dead and nearly 800 injured in the earthquake, while two teenagers were killed in Greece when the wall of a building collapsed on the island of Samos.

The mini-tsunami reached Samos too where islanders were told to avoid the coast after some fled their homes because of the quake, which was also felt in Athens and nearby Albania, North Macedonia and Bulgaria.

According to Turkey’s disaster agency, at least 244 aftershocks were recorded, with 24 of them being more than 4 on the Richter scale. 

Footage shows a building collapsing filling the air with dust some while people can seen trying to protect themselves. 

Gokhan Kan, a 32-year-old courier said: ‘I thought: Is it going to end? It felt like 10 minutes, like it was never going to end. 

 ‘I was terrified not for myself in that moment but for my family, my wife and four-year-old son.’ 

The shocking moment a building collapses during the earthquake in Izmir

The shocking moment a building collapses during the earthquake in Izmir

The shocking moment a building collapses during the earthquake in Izmir

The air is filled with dust as the seven- story building collapses within moments

The air is filled with dust as the seven- story building collapses within moments

The air is filled with dust as the seven- story building collapses within moments

As the building collapses making a rumpling sound, some people's cries can be heard in the background

As the building collapses making a rumpling sound, some people's cries can be heard in the background

As the building collapses making a rumpling sound, some people’s cries can be heard in the background

A destroyed building in Izmir, Turkey, after the 7.0-magnitude earthquake in the Aegean today which killed at least 22 people and injured nearly 800 others in Turkey, while injuring at least four people in Greece

A destroyed building in Izmir, Turkey, after the 7.0-magnitude earthquake in the Aegean today which killed at least 22 people and injured nearly 800 others in Turkey, while injuring at least four people in Greece

A destroyed building in Izmir, Turkey, after the 7.0-magnitude earthquake in the Aegean today which killed at least 22 people and injured nearly 800 others in Turkey, while injuring at least four people in Greece 

The moment a rescue team carry an injured woman out of the debris in Izmir, Turkey

The moment a rescue team carry an injured woman out of the debris in Izmir, Turkey

The moment a rescue team carry an injured woman out of the debris in Izmir, Turkey

Rescue workers trying to clean the debris of a collapsed building while searching for survivors

Rescue workers trying to clean the debris of a collapsed building while searching for survivors

Rescue workers trying to clean the debris of a collapsed building while searching for survivors

28-year-old Malik Tahirler is being rescued from wreckage by the search and rescue teams in Bornova district

28-year-old Malik Tahirler is being rescued from wreckage by the search and rescue teams in Bornova district

28-year-old Malik Tahirler is being rescued from wreckage by the search and rescue teams in Bornova district

Rescue operations take place on a collapsed building after the earthquake

Rescue operations take place on a collapsed building after the earthquake

Rescue operations take place on a collapsed building after the earthquake

Wounded people are cut free from the wreckage of a toppled building in Izmir, Turkey, after the quake struck

Wounded people are cut free from the wreckage of a toppled building in Izmir, Turkey, after the quake struck

Wounded people are cut free from the wreckage of a toppled building in Izmir, Turkey, after the quake struck

A man who was rescued  from wreckage is surrounded by search and rescue workers

A man who was rescued  from wreckage is surrounded by search and rescue workers

A man who was rescued  from wreckage is surrounded by search and rescue workers 

Search and rescue teams continue to look for survivors with dogs in Izmir

Search and rescue teams continue to look for survivors with dogs in Izmir

Search and rescue teams continue to look for survivors with dogs in Izmir

Rescuers search for survivors at a collapsed building after a powerful earthquake struck Turkey's western coast

Rescuers search for survivors at a collapsed building after a powerful earthquake struck Turkey's western coast

Rescuers search for survivors at a collapsed building after a powerful earthquake struck Turkey’s western coast

A man is being carried out of debris of a collapsed building in Izmir

A man is being carried out of debris of a collapsed building in Izmir

A man is being carried out of debris of a collapsed building in Izmir

Rescue operations are in place after the 7.0 magnitude earthquake in the coastal province of Izmir

Rescue operations are in place after the 7.0 magnitude earthquake in the coastal province of Izmir

Rescue operations are in place after the 7.0 magnitude earthquake in the coastal province of Izmir

Debris was floating along streets in high waters after the earthquake in Turkey

Debris was floating along streets in high waters after the earthquake in Turkey

Debris in flooded streets after the earthquake

Debris in flooded streets after the earthquake

Debris was racing down Turkish streets after an apparent sea surge near Izmir amid a ‘mini-tsunami’ in Turkey and Greece which followed the 7.0-magnitude earthquake in the Aegean Sea today 

Rescue workers and local volunteers carry a wounded person on a stretcher after they were found in the debris of a building

Rescue workers and local volunteers carry a wounded person on a stretcher after they were found in the debris of a building

Rescue workers and local volunteers carry a wounded person on a stretcher after they were found in the debris of a building

Search and rescue teams work their way through the rubble of a collapsed building in Izmir, Turkey, after the country was struck by a magnitude 7 earthquake

Search and rescue teams work their way through the rubble of a collapsed building in Izmir, Turkey, after the country was struck by a magnitude 7 earthquake

Search and rescue teams work their way through the rubble of a collapsed building in Izmir, Turkey, after the country was struck by a magnitude 7 earthquake

The rubble of a flattened building is seen from the air as night falls over Izmir, Turkey, after the city was hit by an earthquake

The rubble of a flattened building is seen from the air as night falls over Izmir, Turkey, after the city was hit by an earthquake

The rubble of a flattened building is seen from the air as night falls over Izmir, Turkey, after the city was hit by an earthquake

Heavy lifting machinery is used to sift the rubble of a collapsed building in Izimir, Turkey, after it was hit by an earthquake

Heavy lifting machinery is used to sift the rubble of a collapsed building in Izimir, Turkey, after it was hit by an earthquake

Heavy lifting machinery is used to sift the rubble of a collapsed building in Izimir, Turkey, after it was hit by an earthquake

Dozens of buildings have been reported to be destroyed from the 7.0 magnitude earthquake that rocked Turkey and Greece

Dozens of buildings have been reported to be destroyed from the 7.0 magnitude earthquake that rocked Turkey and Greece

Dozens of buildings have been reported to be destroyed from the 7.0 magnitude earthquake that rocked Turkey and Greece

Rescue teams going through the debris of a collapsed building in Bayrakli district

Rescue teams going through the debris of a collapsed building in Bayrakli district

Rescue teams going through the debris of a collapsed building in Bayrakli district

The quake thats was centred in the Aegean Sea has left dozens of building destroyed

The quake thats was centred in the Aegean Sea has left dozens of building destroyed

 The quake thats was centred in the Aegean Sea has left dozens of building destroyed

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35052736 8899389 image a 358 1604106051718

The European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre said the quake had an epicentre eight miles from of the Greek island of Samos

Flooding on the Greek island of Samos where sea water covered a square after a sea surge came in the wake of the tremor

Flooding on the Greek island of Samos where sea water covered a square after a sea surge came in the wake of the tremor

Flooding on the Greek island of Samos where sea water covered a square after a sea surge came in the wake of the tremor 

A statue of a lion looks over a flooded square with benches and trees surrounded by water at the Greek port of Vathi

A statue of a lion looks over a flooded square with benches and trees surrounded by water at the Greek port of Vathi

A statue of a lion looks over a flooded square with benches and trees surrounded by water at the Greek port of Vathi 

A Greek Orthodox church was damaged in the town of Karlovasi after the island of Samos was hit by today's earthquake

A Greek Orthodox church was damaged in the town of Karlovasi after the island of Samos was hit by today's earthquake

A Greek Orthodox church was damaged in the town of Karlovasi after the island of Samos was hit by today’s earthquake 

Greek firefighters look at a building which was knocked out of shape by the earthquake which hit the island of Samos today

Greek firefighters look at a building which was knocked out of shape by the earthquake which hit the island of Samos today

Greek firefighters look at a building which was knocked out of shape by the earthquake which hit the island of Samos today 

An injured person is surrounded by medical helpers after being cut free from the wreckage in Izmir's Bayrakli disrict today

An injured person is surrounded by medical helpers after being cut free from the wreckage in Izmir's Bayrakli disrict today

An injured person is surrounded by medical helpers after being cut free from the wreckage in Izmir’s Bayrakli disrict today

People surround the claw of an excavator as they search for survivors at a collapsed building in Izmir today

People surround the claw of an excavator as they search for survivors at a collapsed building in Izmir today

People surround the claw of an excavator as they search for survivors at a collapsed building in Izmir today 

People wearing masks look at an injured person being put on a stretcher as victims were taken for medical help in Izmir

People wearing masks look at an injured person being put on a stretcher as victims were taken for medical help in Izmir

People wearing masks look at an injured person being put on a stretcher as victims were taken for medical help in Izmir 

Locals and officials search for survivors at a collapsed building after a strong earthquake struck the Aegean Sea on Friday and was felt in both Greece and Turkey

Locals and officials search for survivors at a collapsed building after a strong earthquake struck the Aegean Sea on Friday and was felt in both Greece and Turkey

Locals and officials search for survivors at a collapsed building after a strong earthquake struck the Aegean Sea on Friday and was felt in both Greece and Turkey

People prepare stretchers as they search for survivors in a building which was totally disfigured by Friday's earthquake

People prepare stretchers as they search for survivors in a building which was totally disfigured by Friday's earthquake

People prepare stretchers as they search for survivors in a building which was totally disfigured by Friday’s earthquake 

A Volkswagen car in the rubble of a collapsed building in Izmir following the earthquake which brought down huge structures

A Volkswagen car in the rubble of a collapsed building in Izmir following the earthquake which brought down huge structures

A Volkswagen car in the rubble of a collapsed building in Izmir following the earthquake which brought down huge structures

People look at the rubble of a building in Izmir after the earthquake struck on Friday

People look at the rubble of a building in Izmir after the earthquake struck on Friday

People look at the rubble of a building in Izmir after the earthquake struck on Friday 

According to Turkey's disaster agency at least 22 people are dead and 725 injured after the catastrophic earthquake

According to Turkey's disaster agency at least 22 people are dead and 725 injured after the catastrophic earthquake

According to Turkey’s disaster agency at least 22 people are dead and 725 injured after the catastrophic earthquake

People look at a building which was knocked precariously off-balance by the earthquake which struck on Friday afternoon

People look at a building which was knocked precariously off-balance by the earthquake which struck on Friday afternoon

People look at a building which was knocked precariously off-balance by the earthquake which struck on Friday afternoon 

The rescue operation begins as people climb over the wreckage of a collapsed building following the powerful earthquake

The rescue operation begins as people climb over the wreckage of a collapsed building following the powerful earthquake

The rescue operation begins as people climb over the wreckage of a collapsed building following the powerful earthquake 

An aerial vivew of a pile of rubble in Turkey with dozens of rescuers and emergency workers on the scene as the light faded

An aerial vivew of a pile of rubble in Turkey with dozens of rescuers and emergency workers on the scene as the light faded

An aerial vivew of a pile of rubble in Turkey with dozens of rescuers and emergency workers on the scene as the light faded 

Emergency responders wearing white helmets scour the rubble today after this building was toppled by the earthquake

Emergency responders wearing white helmets scour the rubble today after this building was toppled by the earthquake

Emergency responders wearing white helmets scour the rubble today after this building was toppled by the earthquake 

Rescue workers and people search for survivors at a collapsed building after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake in Izmir, Turkey

Rescue workers and people search for survivors at a collapsed building after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake in Izmir, Turkey

Rescue workers and people search for survivors at a collapsed building after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake in Izmir, Turkey

Rescue workers and people search for survivors at a collapsed building in Izmir, Turkey

Rescue workers and people search for survivors at a collapsed building in Izmir, Turkey

Rescue workers and people search for survivors at a collapsed building in Izmir, Turkey

Rescue workers sift through the rubble of  building in Izmir, Turkey, after an earthquake that killed at least twelve

Rescue workers sift through the rubble of  building in Izmir, Turkey, after an earthquake that killed at least twelve

Rescue workers sift through the rubble of  building in Izmir, Turkey, after an earthquake that killed at least twelve

Rescue teams searching for survivors in the debris of a building located in Bayrakli area, after the 6.6 quake in Izmir, Turkey

Rescue teams searching for survivors in the debris of a building located in Bayrakli area, after the 6.6 quake in Izmir, Turkey

Rescue teams searching for survivors in the debris of a building located in Bayrakli area, after the 6.6 quake in Izmir, Turkey

Turkey’s Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency said Friday’s earthquake was centred in the Aegean at a depth of 10.3 miles. 

Interior minister Suleyman Soylu said six buildings had collapsed in two parts of Izmir, while mayor Tunc Soyer said nearly 20 buildings had collapsed in the province. 

 At one site Agriculture Minister Bekir Pakdemirli managed to establish mobile phone contact with a girl buried under the debris.

‘We ask you to remain calm,’ he told her in televised footage. ‘We will try to lift the concrete block and reach you.’

 A small tsunami struck the Seferisar district of Izmir, said Haluk Ozener, director of the Istanbul-based Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute. 

Of the twentytwo confirmed deaths, one person drowned in high waters after the earthquake while the others were thought to have been buried under the wreckage of collapsed buildings. 

Pictures from the Turkish disaster zone showed smoke blowing over the city of Izmir, debris being washed away by high waters, and dazed people trying to make their way through rubble piled high on the streets. 

There were 38 ambulances, two ambulance helicopters and 35 medical rescue teams on the ground in Izmir, where TV footage showed police using chainsaws as they tried to force their way through the rubble. Local media said 70 people had been rescued alive from the debris.  

Turkish media said the earthquake was felt across the regions of Aegean and Marmara, where Istanbul is located. However, Istanbul’s governor said there were no reports of damage. 

Soylu said there were no reports of casualties from six other provinces where the earthquake was felt but added there were small cracks in some buildings. 

Ilke Cide, a doctoral student who was in Izmir’s Guzelbahce region during the earthquake, said he went inland after waters rose after the earthquake. ‘I am very used to earthquakes… so I didn’t take it very seriously at first but this time it was really scary,’ he said, adding the earthquake had lasted for at least 25 to30 seconds. 

Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan said that ‘with all the means of our state, we stand by our citizens affected by the earthquake’. ‘We have taken action to start the necessary work in the region with all our relevant institutions and ministers,’ he said. 

Greece’s prime minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis later spoke to Erdogan to offer condolences for the victims in Turkey, saying that ‘whatever our differences, these are the times when our people need to stand together’.

‘Erdogan tweeted :’Thank you, Mr. Prime Minister. That two neighbours show solidarity in difficult times is more valuable than many things in life.’ 

France, which has been locked in an angry row with Turkey in recent weeks, also offered its ‘full solidarity’ with both Turkey and Greece. 

Tensions between Ankara and Paris had reached a peak last weekend when President Erdogan questioned the mental health of his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron. 

An injured woman is carried on a stretcher through a crowd of people at the scene of the disaster in the Bayrakli district

An injured woman is carried on a stretcher through a crowd of people at the scene of the disaster in the Bayrakli district

An injured woman is carried on a stretcher through a crowd of people at the scene of the disaster in the Bayrakli district 

A man puts a mask over his face by the side of an emergency vehicle in the Bayrakli district during search and rescue works

A man puts a mask over his face by the side of an emergency vehicle in the Bayrakli district during search and rescue works

A man puts a mask over his face by the side of an emergency vehicle in the Bayrakli district during search and rescue works

A huge crowd of locals and emergency officials search the debris of one of the collapsed buildings in Izmir today

A huge crowd of locals and emergency officials search the debris of one of the collapsed buildings in Izmir today

A huge crowd of locals and emergency officials search the debris of one of the collapsed buildings in Izmir today 

People look at the collapsed facade of a building in Izmir today with emergency services responding to Friday's disaster

People look at the collapsed facade of a building in Izmir today with emergency services responding to Friday's disaster

People look at the collapsed facade of a building in Izmir today with emergency services responding to Friday’s disaster 

The rubble of a building is heaped on the ground after it collapsed during the Aegean earthquake on Friday

The rubble of a building is heaped on the ground after it collapsed during the Aegean earthquake on Friday

The rubble of a building is heaped on the ground after it collapsed during the Aegean earthquake on Friday 

Seawater floods a shop at the port town of Vathy following a mini-tsunami caused by the earthquake on the island of Samo

Seawater floods a shop at the port town of Vathy following a mini-tsunami caused by the earthquake on the island of Samo

Seawater floods a shop at the port town of Vathy following a mini-tsunami caused by the earthquake on the island of Samo

A car is barely above water while a chair is partly submerged in a road in Vathi today after high waters brought by the quake

A car is barely above water while a chair is partly submerged in a road in Vathi today after high waters brought by the quake

A car is barely above water while a chair is partly submerged in a road in Vathi today after high waters brought by the quake 

People walk past a damaged house on the Greek island of Samos where at least two people were killed in Friday's earthquake

People walk past a damaged house on the Greek island of Samos where at least two people were killed in Friday's earthquake

People walk past a damaged house on the Greek island of Samos where at least two people were killed in Friday’s earthquake

Cars are covered in dirt at a quake-damaged site in Izmir shortly after the 7.0-magnitude pummelled Greece and Turkey

Cars are covered in dirt at a quake-damaged site in Izmir shortly after the 7.0-magnitude pummelled Greece and Turkey

Cars are covered in dirt at a quake-damaged site in Izmir shortly after the 7.0-magnitude pummelled Greece and Turkey

Buildings overlook a mountain of rubble while a car's bonnet is covered in grime following the earthquake in Izmir

Buildings overlook a mountain of rubble while a car's bonnet is covered in grime following the earthquake in Izmir

Buildings overlook a mountain of rubble while a car’s bonnet is covered in grime following the earthquake in Izmir  

A woman holds her head as she looks at the ruins in Izmir while an excavator begins the clean-up operation in the Turkish city

A woman holds her head as she looks at the ruins in Izmir while an excavator begins the clean-up operation in the Turkish city

A woman holds her head as she looks at the ruins in Izmir while an excavator begins the clean-up operation in the Turkish city

Search and rescue works underway in Izmir today with Turkish flags hanging from two nearby windows in the coastal city

Search and rescue works underway in Izmir today with Turkish flags hanging from two nearby windows in the coastal city

Search and rescue works underway in Izmir today with Turkish flags hanging from two nearby windows in the coastal city 

A car is submerged on Turkey's Aegean Sea coastline today after the mini-tsunami which followed the huge earthquake

A car is submerged on Turkey's Aegean Sea coastline today after the mini-tsunami which followed the huge earthquake

A car is submerged on Turkey’s Aegean Sea coastline today after the mini-tsunami which followed the huge earthquake 

People stand on the flooded promenade of the port town of Vathy following the earthquake in Greece

People stand on the flooded promenade of the port town of Vathy following the earthquake in Greece

People stand on the flooded promenade of the port town of Vathy following the earthquake in Greece 

Boats anchored to the coast are seen damaged after the earthquake caused an apparent sea surge and resulted in flooding

Boats anchored to the coast are seen damaged after the earthquake caused an apparent sea surge and resulted in flooding

Boats anchored to the coast are seen damaged after the earthquake caused an apparent sea surge and resulted in flooding 

A group of women wearing masks look at phones as they stand outside their homes following the earthquake in Turkey

A group of women wearing masks look at phones as they stand outside their homes following the earthquake in Turkey

A group of women wearing masks look at phones as they stand outside their homes following the earthquake in Turkey 

A massive search and rescue operation underway in Izmir after the 7.0-magnitude quake barrelled into Turkey and Greece

A massive search and rescue operation underway in Izmir after the 7.0-magnitude quake barrelled into Turkey and Greece

A massive search and rescue operation underway in Izmir after the 7.0-magnitude quake barrelled into Turkey and Greece

Boats were carried out from a harbour in Turkey

Boats were carried out from a harbour in Turkey

Debris floating in flooded streets

Debris floating in flooded streets

Boats were carried out from a harbour in Turkey (left) where debris was also seen floating along flooded streets (right)

Smoke over the city of Izmir which appeared to have taken the heaviest damage of the earthquake on the Turkish side

Smoke over the city of Izmir which appeared to have taken the heaviest damage of the earthquake on the Turkish side

Smoke over the city of Izmir which appeared to have taken the heaviest damage of the earthquake on the Turkish side 

Damaged buildings in Turkey where the earthquake destroyed at least six buildings

Damaged buildings in Turkey where the earthquake destroyed at least six buildings

Damaged buildings in Turkey where the earthquake destroyed at least six buildings

Damaged buildings in Turkey where the earthquake destroyed at least six buildings

Damaged buildings in Turkey where the earthquake destroyed at least seventeen buildings

Search and rescue works at a building in Izmir

Search and rescue works at a building in Izmir

People anxiously wait for news near a destroyed building in Izmir

People anxiously wait for news near a destroyed building in Izmir

People anxiously wait for news as crews search through the rubble of a destroyed building in Izmir for survivors

Damaged buildings are seen after a magnitude 6.6 quake shook Turkey's Aegean Sea coast, in Seferihisar district of Izmir

Damaged buildings are seen after a magnitude 6.6 quake shook Turkey's Aegean Sea coast, in Seferihisar district of Izmir

Damaged buildings are seen after a magnitude 6.6 quake shook Turkey’s Aegean Sea coast, in Seferihisar district of Izmir

Search and rescue works are being conducted at debris of a building in Bayrakli district, Izmir

Search and rescue works are being conducted at debris of a building in Bayrakli district, Izmir

Search and rescue works are being conducted at debris of a building in Bayrakli district, Izmir

The European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre said the quake had an epicentre eight miles from Samos, where the island’s 45,000 people were urged to stay away from coastal areas. 

Greece’s top seismologist Eftyhmis Lekkas told Greek media: ‘It was a very big earthquake, it’s difficult to have a bigger one.’

A tsunami warning was issued, with residents of the Samos area told to stay away from the coast while water rose above the dock in the main harbour of Samos and flooded the street. 

Media reports said the the two victims, the first to be reported in Greece, were aged 15 and 17, and were walking home from school in the port of Vathy when disaster struck.

‘Two unconscious youngsters were pulled from the rubble of a collapsed wall and taken to hospital for identification,’ the fire service said. The Greek authorities said another seven people have been injured in the quake, which caused the walls of several old buildings to crumble.  

People rushed into the streets on Samos and other islands following the tremor, which Greek officials put at magnitude 6.6 and the US Geological Survey at 7.0. 

‘We have never experienced anything like it,’ said one local official. ‘People are panicking.’ Police said there was damage to some old buildings on the island.  

Both countries reported aftershocks. 

Greece and Turkey are both situated in one of the world’s most active earthquake zones. In 1999, a 7.4 magnitude earthquake struck Turkey’s northwest, killing more than 17,000 people, including 1,000 in Istanbul.

Another quake in 2011 in the southeastern province of Van resulted in more than 600 deaths. In Greece, the last deadly quake killed two people on the island of Kos, near Samos, in July 2017. 

A person receives treatment after feeling faint following the earthquake on Turkey's Aegean Sea cost today

A person receives treatment after feeling faint following the earthquake on Turkey's Aegean Sea cost today

A person receives treatment after feeling faint following the earthquake on Turkey’s Aegean Sea cost today 

Boats were damaged after the earthquake which had its epicentre in the Aegean Sea struck the coast of Turkey

Boats were damaged after the earthquake which had its epicentre in the Aegean Sea struck the coast of Turkey

Boats were damaged after the earthquake which had its epicentre in the Aegean Sea struck the coast of Turkey 

People stand outside their homes in Izmir today following the earthquake that left people trapped under rubble

People stand outside their homes in Izmir today following the earthquake that left people trapped under rubble

People stand outside their homes in Izmir today following the earthquake that left people trapped under rubble 

The sun shines over a heap of rubble as people begin the clean-up operation in Izmir on Friday afternoon

The sun shines over a heap of rubble as people begin the clean-up operation in Izmir on Friday afternoon

The sun shines over a heap of rubble as people begin the clean-up operation in Izmir on Friday afternoon 

Cars are damaged and covered in muck at the port of Vathy in Greece where the mini-tsunami reached the Aegean island

Cars are damaged and covered in muck at the port of Vathy in Greece where the mini-tsunami reached the Aegean island

Cars are damaged and covered in muck at the port of Vathy in Greece where the mini-tsunami reached the Aegean island 

Cars are together piled after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

Cars are together piled after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

Cars are together piled after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

Seawater covers a square after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

Seawater covers a square after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

Seawater covers a square after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

Seawater covers a road after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

Seawater covers a road after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

Seawater covers a road after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

According to Turkey's disaster agency, at least 244 aftershocks were recorded after the quake

According to Turkey's disaster agency, at least 244 aftershocks were recorded after the quake

According to Turkey’s disaster agency, at least 244 aftershocks were recorded after the quake

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Victoria records NO new cases of coronavirus after potential transmission was reviewed 

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victoria records no new cases of coronavirus after potential transmission was reviewed

Victoria has reported no new cases of coronavirus and no deaths after a potential transmission was reviewed. 

It was initially reported that there was one new case on Saturday but Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton revealed later in the day that it had been rejected. 

‘Today’s case has been reviewed and rejected,’ Mr Sutton wrote on Twitter.   

The person in question tested negative multiple times before returning a ‘low positive’ test and another negative test afterwards. 

After it was reported there was a new case, an expert review panel examined the person before announcing they were not actually infected. 

Victoria reported just one new coronvirus infection on Saturday. Pictured: Melburnians enjoy outdoor eating on Swan Street in Richmond on Wednesday

Victoria reported just one new coronvirus infection on Saturday. Pictured: Melburnians enjoy outdoor eating on Swan Street in Richmond on Wednesday

Victoria reported just one new coronvirus infection on Saturday. Pictured: Melburnians enjoy outdoor eating on Swan Street in Richmond on Wednesday

 Victoria has now recorded four days of no new cases. There are 71 active cases in the state, which is down from 80 on Friday.

Authorities continue to investigate two mystery cases, for which there is no known source.

Melbourne exited lockdown on Wednesday and residents are enjoying their first weekend with eased restrictions, including the chance to dine out.  

But the 25km travel limit remains in place and outdoor gatherings are still capped at 10 people. 

Premier Daniel Andrews on Friday pleaded for caution despite the easing of restrictions.

‘I know that is challenging but if we want to keep doing that and not be locked down again and unable to see the people that we love, we just have to keep vigilant,’ he said.

‘We have to be, as a community, as stubborn as this virus. These last few months have to mean something, they have to be worth something.’

On Friday, Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announced her state’s travel restrictions would ease from 1am on Tuesday, with the border open to everyone but those in Greater Sydney and Victoria. 

Pictured: Shoppers walk through Bourke Street Mall as restrictions are eased in Melbourne on Wednesday

Pictured: Shoppers walk through Bourke Street Mall as restrictions are eased in Melbourne on Wednesday

Pictured: Shoppers walk through Bourke Street Mall as restrictions are eased in Melbourne on Wednesday

Victoria’s COVID-19 death toll stands at 819 and the national figure is 907.

Mr Andrews will not face the media on Saturday, bringing his daily news conference marathon to an end.

The premier has addressed Victorians for 120 consecutive days starting July 3.

Health Minister Martin Foley is due to conduct Saturday’s briefing.

Melbourne exited lockdown on Wednesday and residents are enjoying their first weekend with eased restrictions, including the chance to dine out

Melbourne exited lockdown on Wednesday and residents are enjoying their first weekend with eased restrictions, including the chance to dine out

Melbourne exited lockdown on Wednesday and residents are enjoying their first weekend with eased restrictions, including the chance to dine out

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Coronavirus Australia: Penrith Panthers fined $10k due to fans

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coronavirus australia penrith panthers fined 10k due to fans

The Penrith Panthers have lost big two weekends in a row, with its leagues club copping a $10,000 fine after footage showed fans breaching COVID safety requirements during last weekend’s NRL grand final.

The footage showed excited patrons mingling, hugging and drinking while standing during the team’s 20-26 loss to the Melbourne Storm.

NSW Liquor and Gaming director of compliance Dimitri Argeres said fans should have known better.

 

Fans (pictured) were filmed breaching COVID-19 restrictions by mingling, hugging and drinking next to the bar at Penrith Panthers Leagues Club during the grand final

Fans (pictured) were filmed breaching COVID-19 restrictions by mingling, hugging and drinking next to the bar at Penrith Panthers Leagues Club during the grand final

Fans (pictured) were filmed breaching COVID-19 restrictions by mingling, hugging and drinking next to the bar at Penrith Panthers Leagues Club during the grand final

‘It’s not fair on the club, its staff or the community,’ he said.

‘At the same time, venues need to make sure they are adequately implementing their safety plans, particularly when higher patron numbers are expected due to special events.’

The leagues club was not the only venue caught out on grand final night, with ANZ Stadium fined $5000 for allowing patrons to congregate in bar areas to watch the match.

Two other venues at Sydney Olympic Park – The Brewery at the Novotel and the Locker Room – were also issued $5000 fines.

Mr Argeres said excitement was not an excuse.

‘Sporting events build up anticipation and create lots of excitement, we get that,’ he said.

‘But they also create exactly the types of situation we’re trying to avoid – crowds that mingle and turn into one big group of close contacts.

‘Don’t forget life isn’t quite back to normal yet and if we want to enjoy summer with our friends and families, we need to keep COVID transmission low.’

The Panthers Penrith Rugby Leagues Club (pictured) was fined $10,000 for not stopping fans from breaching COVID-19 restrictions

The Panthers Penrith Rugby Leagues Club (pictured) was fined $10,000 for not stopping fans from breaching COVID-19 restrictions

The Panthers Penrith Rugby Leagues Club (pictured) was fined $10,000 for not stopping fans from breaching COVID-19 restrictions 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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