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Trump treated with a steroid Saturday after second ‘transient’ drop in oxygen levels 

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trump treated with a steroid saturday after second transient drop in oxygen levels

Donald Trump’s doctors said Sunday he was given a steroid and put on oxygen as they treated him for COVID-19, but White House Physician Sean Conley said the president could be discharged from Walter Reed as early as Monday.

Conley, a Navy Commander and physician to the president, revealed during a briefing Sunday that Trump was treated with the steroid dexamethasone after a drop in oxygen levels on Saturday.

The president’s top doctor also said there was some confusion over Trump’s condition because Chief of Staff Mark Meadow’s comments were ‘misconstrued.’

Trump was taken to Walter Reed Friday after hours before he announced that he and first lady Melania Trump testes positive for coronavirus.

Conley also said the president’s oxygen level had dropped down to 93 per cent on Saturday, but did not dip into the 80’s. He said the president did not feel any shortness of breath.

The comments come as Trump’s campaign advisers Stephen Miller and Steve Cortes claimed Sunday the president is eager to get back to campaigning even after Conley said Saturday he is not yet ‘out of the woods.’

Donald Trump's doctors revealed Sunday that they treated the president with a steroid and put him on oxygen Saturday

Donald Trump's doctors revealed Sunday that they treated the president with a steroid and put him on oxygen Saturday

Donald Trump’s doctors revealed Sunday that they treated the president with a steroid and put him on oxygen Saturday

Miller, the campaign’s senior adviser, said he spoke to Trump recently and said the president told him ‘he’s going to defeat this virus… and our campaign is going to defeat this virus.’

‘Once he gets out of the hospital, he’s ready to get back to the campaign trail,’ Miller told NBC’s Chuck Todd during an interview on ‘Meet the Press’ Sunday morning. ‘He sounded pretty energetic.’

‘But he said something else that I thought that was important too,’ Miller said, ‘and that was to be careful, and that was to remind folks to wash their hands, use hand sanitizer, make sure that if you can’t socially distance, distance to wear a mask. And I thought that was a pretty important message to send and a reminder to the rest of the country.’

Cortes, another senior campaign adviser, reiterated the president’s fitness during an interview with Chris Wallace on ‘Fox News Sunday.’

‘He’s doing well,’ Cortes attested. 

Senior Trump campaign adviser Jason Miller said Sunday that the president is 'ready to get back to the campaign trail'

Senior Trump campaign adviser Jason Miller said Sunday that the president is 'ready to get back to the campaign trail'

Senior Trump campaign adviser Jason Miller said Sunday that the president is ‘ready to get back to the campaign trail’

Fellow senior campaign adviser Steve Cortes (right) told Fox News' Chris Wallace (left): 'He was as upbeat and assertive as he's ever been' and claimed: 'This president is going to recover'

Fellow senior campaign adviser Steve Cortes (right) told Fox News' Chris Wallace (left): 'He was as upbeat and assertive as he's ever been' and claimed: 'This president is going to recover'

Fellow senior campaign adviser Steve Cortes (right) told Fox News’ Chris Wallace (left): ‘He was as upbeat and assertive as he’s ever been’ and claimed: ‘This president is going to recover’

The comments come the morning after White House Physician, Navy Commander  Dr. Sean Conley, said in a briefing Trump is 'not yet out of the woods'

The comments come the morning after White House Physician, Navy Commander  Dr. Sean Conley, said in a briefing Trump is 'not yet out of the woods'

The comments come the morning after White House Physician, Navy Commander  Dr. Sean Conley, said in a briefing Trump is ‘not yet out of the woods’ 

‘We spoke to the president yesterday, we meaning senior campaign staff,’ Cortes said. ‘He was as upbeat and assertive as he’s ever been.’

He added: ‘This president is going to recover, we are highly confident of that.’

Trump announced overnight Thursday via Twitter that he and first lady Melania tested positive for coronavirus as the two took a test following the revelation that Counselor to the President Hope Hicks received a positive diagnosis hours earlier.

Trump’s chief doctor, Navy Commander Sean Conley, along with other doctors gave an update on the president’s condition during a briefing Saturday.

‘While not yet out of the woods, the team remains cautiously optimistic,’ Conley said, adding that Trump moved around his medical suite without difficulty as he conducted business.

The White House physician also said that Trump had been exhibiting ‘clinical indications’ of coronavirus as early as Thursday afternoon.

There are conflicting reports and statements on whether the president has needed supplemental oxygen at any point since arriving at Walter Reed Friday or how high his fever has reached.

Trump provided his own account of his medical condition on Saturday evening, releasing a video of him working from the presidential suite at the hospital in a white button down with no tie and the first button undone.

He said in the video that he is feeling better and will ‘be back soon.’

Trump released a video with him working from the Presidential Suite at Walter Reed Saturday where he said he will 'be back soon'

Trump released a video with him working from the Presidential Suite at Walter Reed Saturday where he said he will 'be back soon'

Trump released a video with him working from the Presidential Suite at Walter Reed Saturday where he said he will ‘be back soon’

‘I spoke with the President yesterday afternoon and he’s in very good spirits,’ Miller said. ‘Both Bill Stepien, the campaign manager, and I spent about a half hour on the phone with the president and going through all the updates on what’s going on with the campaign.’

Miller also said he believes the campaign, White House and medical team are just taking ‘very precautionary’ steps toward ensuring the president’s health.

It appears the two ‘spreader’ events could have been when Trump announced Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination to the Supreme Court at the White House last Saturday and during his rally Wednesday in Minnesota.

Hicks, who traveled with the president to the rally this week, tested positive for coronavirus hours after the event – where she was in close proximity to the president and several of his White House and campaign staffer.

Several individuals who participated in Trump’s debate prep last week, including former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and former White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway, tested positive for coronavirus.

Miller told ABC News’ ‘This Week’ on Sunday morning that he tested negative on Friday – as well as Senior Advisor to the President Stephen Miller and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, who also participated in debate preparations.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Australia

Wife of Dr Yen-Yung Yap wants answers over investigation into husband before his death

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wife of dr yen yung yap wants answers over investigation into husband before his death

The heartbroken wife of an obstetrician who was found dead in a forest wants answers about an investigation into his work conduct before he disappeared.

Dr Yen-Yung Yap, 43, was found by police in the Kuitpo forest around 40km south-east of Adelaide on September 5.

Two days earlier, the father-of-three packed a bag and drove away from his house, leaving behind his three children and wife Mei-Khing Loo, 44.

In March this year, Dr Yap had been banned from delivering vaginal births unsupervised by the Medical Board of Australia, The Advertiser reported.

A year earlier he was told to undertake more training after complaints of misconduct.

Dr Yen-Yung Yap, 43, (pictured with wife Mei-Khing Loo) was found by police in the Kuitpo forest around 40km south-east of Adelaide on September 5

Dr Yen-Yung Yap, 43, (pictured with wife Mei-Khing Loo) was found by police in the Kuitpo forest around 40km south-east of Adelaide on September 5

Dr Yen-Yung Yap, 43, (pictured with wife Mei-Khing Loo) was found by police in the Kuitpo forest around 40km south-east of Adelaide on September 5

The experienced obstetrician and gynaecologist had been banned from performing vaginal births due to a complaint about his alleged use of suctions instead of forceps to remove two babies who were later found to have bleeding on the skull.

Dr Yap was told in March, 2019 he needed more education after the SA Health Practitioners Tribunal was made aware of ‘several complaints’ about his performance.

The 43-year-old argued he had done nothing wrong and was following medical advice, adding the two babies and mothers suffered no long-term effects.

Ms Loo said the first baby was born in 2015 and the mother used Dr Yap to deliver her second child in 2018, before lodging a complaint the following year.

She then wrote to the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) asking them to finalise and release any findings from the investigation into her husband’s conduct.

Before his death, Dr Yap wrote two letters to his wife, detailing his guilt over how much stress the investigation had brought his family.

Before his death, Dr Yap wrote two letters to his wife, detailing his guilt over how much stress the investigation had brought his family

Before his death, Dr Yap wrote two letters to his wife, detailing his guilt over how much stress the investigation had brought his family

Before his death, Dr Yap wrote two letters to his wife, detailing his guilt over how much stress the investigation had brought his family

The letters were dated from June this year but Ms Loo only found them on the day she learnt her husband of 21 years had died. 

‘I don’t know how to express my sorrow and I don’t have (a) solution to stop the stressful problems continuing to affect your life and our kids,’ Dr Yap said in the note. 

‘The ongoing harassment from AHPRA and the Medical Board will make me mentally and emotionally traumatised and professionally unable to care for my patients, and financially unable to care for our kids.’

Four doctors who knew Dr Yap told his legal team he done nothing wrong in the births of the babies, Ms Loo said.

In a statement from AHPRA, they said the investigation would not be continued.

‘Dr Yap appealed to the Tribunal the decision of the Medical Board of Australia to impose conditions in response to a number of notifications of concern about his practice, made by several individuals including patients and doctors,’ the statement said.

‘We are aware of the request from Dr Yap’s widow, Ms Mei-Khing Loo, to complete the investigation and have responded to her in writing, offering to meet with her in person to further discuss our regulatory action.

‘In the circumstances of this case, there is no longer any risk posed and therefore no proper basis for us to continue the investigation.’

Ms Loo said she was ‘heartbroken’ by the decision not to finalise the investigation that ultimately led to her husband’s death.

‘I now need to go through some very tough things, and I’m still in a state of denial, to be honest. Everyday I look at him … and it’s very heartaching, but I have to tell myself I have to be strong, I have three children to look after,’ she said.

Lifeline 13 11 14 

Dr Yap had been married to Ms Loo for 21 years and had three young children together

Dr Yap had been married to Ms Loo for 21 years and had three young children together

Dr Yap had been married to Ms Loo for 21 years and had three young children together

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Model who had no idea she was pregnant when she gave birth celebrates daughter’s first birthday 

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model who had no idea she was pregnant when she gave birth celebrates daughters first birthday

Melbourne model who had no idea she was pregnant until she gave birth to a healthy baby girl on a bathroom floor has celebrated her daughter’s first birthday. 

Erin Langmaid was 23 years old when she suddenly became a mother in October 2019 by unexpectedly welcoming Isla to the world, despite showing no signs of pregnancy.

The size 8 model had been working full time and taking contraceptive injections in the lead up to the birth.

She did not experience typical symptoms of sickness, a baby bump or cravings, and only felt ill on the day Isla was born.

One year on, Ms Langmaid and partner Dan Carty admitted their lives have changed since becoming parents but say they are enjoying the ride.  

Erin Langmaid was 23 years old when she suddenly became a mother in October 2019 by unexpectedly welcoming Isla to the world. Pictured: The mother and daughter celebrate Isla's first birthday

Erin Langmaid was 23 years old when she suddenly became a mother in October 2019 by unexpectedly welcoming Isla to the world. Pictured: The mother and daughter celebrate Isla's first birthday

Erin Langmaid was 23 years old when she suddenly became a mother in October 2019 by unexpectedly welcoming Isla to the world. Pictured: The mother and daughter celebrate Isla’s first birthday

One year on, Ms Langmaid and partner Dan Carty admitted their lives have changed since becoming parents but say they are enjoying the ride

One year on, Ms Langmaid and partner Dan Carty admitted their lives have changed since becoming parents but say they are enjoying the ride

One year on, Ms Langmaid and partner Dan Carty admitted their lives have changed since becoming parents but say they are enjoying the ride

‘Life’s a lot different now, but I wouldn’t change it at all… it’s been really fun and good,’ the young mum told 7NEWS.

Mr Carty said their one-year-old is a ‘great lot of fun’ with a heap of ‘energy’. 

Ms Langmaid marked her daughter’s first birthday with a video on Instagram. 

‘One year ago today this little angel unexpectedly entered our lives, what a year it’s been of ups and downs but we wouldn’t change a thing,’ she wrote. 

‘Thank you to everyone who has supported us this year, you know who you are. Here’s to another year with little Isla.’

Ms Langmaid could still fit into all of her clothes in the lead up to the birth. 

The size 8 model had been working full time and taking contraceptive injections in the lead up to the birth. Pictured: The young parents with their daughter

The size 8 model had been working full time and taking contraceptive injections in the lead up to the birth. Pictured: The young parents with their daughter

The size 8 model had been working full time and taking contraceptive injections in the lead up to the birth. Pictured: The young parents with their daughter

Ms Langmaid did not experience typical symptoms of sickness, a baby bump or cravings, and only felt ill on the day Isla was born (Pictured: the young family in hospital)

Ms Langmaid did not experience typical symptoms of sickness, a baby bump or cravings, and only felt ill on the day Isla was born (Pictured: the young family in hospital)

Ms Langmaid did not experience typical symptoms of sickness, a baby bump or cravings, and only felt ill on the day Isla was born (Pictured: the young family in hospital)

How does cryptic pregnancy happen? 

Fluctuating hormones can lead to slight bleeding that resembles a period, making a woman think she is not pregnant. 

Low body fat and athletic activity can cause a period to disappear for months at a time.

People who participate in high-impact sports may also have low levels of certain hormones, making it harder to detect a pregnancy. 

Birth control pills and intrauterine devices (IUDs) can make a woman feel confident that a pregnancy just isn’t a possibility.

Source: Healthline  

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She went to the bathroom, and ten minutes later was holding Isla in her arms, who weighed a healthy 3.6 kilograms.

‘It was the biggest shock of my life,’ Ms Langmaid told 7NEWS at the time. 

Mr Carty heard the commotion in the bathroom and was shocked at what he found inside.

‘I heard a big scream and I ran in there and opened the door and I was worried about her, and then I saw the little one and I thought ”hang on, there’s two”,’ Mr Carty said.

The father said he was ‘flabbergasted’.  

Isla was born at 37 weeks, with Ms Langmaid having what is termed a cryptic pregnancy, which is where the mother does not find out they are pregnant until very late. 

One in 500 women do not know they are pregnant until 20 weeks in.

In one in 2,500 cases, women don’t know they are pregnant until they start giving birth. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Halloween blue moon: Where YOU can see it in Australia

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halloween blue moon where you can see it in australia

Many Australians out trick-or-treating for Halloween will be able to catch a glimpse of a super rare blue moon on Saturday night.

A blue moon does not refer to the colour but is rather a quirk of our calendar months. 

Usually there are 12 full moons in a year but every so often there will be 13, meaning that in one month there will be two full moons.

Western Australia will be the only state to see a blue moon tonight which will occur at 10.49pm on October 31. 

In the other states it will fall on November 1 meaning that they will miss out on the blue moon. 

Tonight’s moon will be the smallest of the year, with Halloween coinciding with a ‘minimoon’ – where the moon is at its furthest point of orbit from the sun – also known as an apogee moon. 

Many Australians out trick-or-treating for Halloween will be able to catch a glimpse of a super rare blue moon on Saturday night (pictured: the full moon over Narrawallee Beach on the south coast of New South Wales on June 6, 2020)

Many Australians out trick-or-treating for Halloween will be able to catch a glimpse of a super rare blue moon on Saturday night (pictured: the full moon over Narrawallee Beach on the south coast of New South Wales on June 6, 2020)

Many Australians out trick-or-treating for Halloween will be able to catch a glimpse of a super rare blue moon on Saturday night (pictured: the full moon over Narrawallee Beach on the south coast of New South Wales on June 6, 2020) 

The full moon phase, which is the lunar orb's position in in orbit, begins on Saturday night for Western Australia but will be early on Sunday morning for the rest of Australia

The full moon phase, which is the lunar orb's position in in orbit, begins on Saturday night for Western Australia but will be early on Sunday morning for the rest of Australia

The full moon phase, which is the lunar orb’s position in in orbit, begins on Saturday night for Western Australia but will be early on Sunday morning for the rest of Australia 

A blue moon is blue in name only - actually referring to the second full moon in one calendar month (pictured: the moon over Sydney in 2016)

A blue moon is blue in name only - actually referring to the second full moon in one calendar month (pictured: the moon over Sydney in 2016)

A blue moon is blue in name only – actually referring to the second full moon in one calendar month (pictured: the moon over Sydney in 2016) 

AUSTRALIA’S FULL MOON ON OCTOBER 31

Western Australia 

10:49pm AWST Oct 31

New South Wales 

01:49am AEDT Nov 1

Australian Capital Territory

 01:49am AEDT Nov 1

Northern Territory

 12:19am ACST Nov 1

Queensland 

12:49am AEST Nov 1

South Australia 

01:19am ACDT Nov 1

Tasmania 

01:49am AEDT Nov 1

Victoria 

01:49am AEDT Nov 1 

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Australian timezones will prevent the eastern states from experiencing the same phenomenon – being roughly one to two hours ahead of WA. 

The moon will reach its fullest early on Sunday morning for the rest of the country, however, they too will be able to see a blue moon when the moon cycle’s to its full point again on November 30. 

Many other parts of the world will also see the blue moon on October 31 with the next one not appearing on this date until 2039. 

The last time the spectacular cosmic display happened on Halloween was in 1944. 

People in North and South America will have a glimpse of the Blue Moon, along with those in India, Europe and Asia. 

The idea of a Blue Moon as the second full moon in a month comes from an article in the March 1946 issue of Sky and Telescope magazine.

This issue published an an article called Once in a Blue Moon by James Hugh Pruett, who referred to the 1937 Maine Farmer’s Almanac, but with a simpler definition.

‘Seven times in 19 years there were – and still are – 13 full moons in a year,’ he wrote.

‘This gives 11 months with one full moon each and one with two.’

‘This second in a month, so I interpret it, was called Blue Moon.’

NASA shares that this is also deemed the Hunter’s Moon, the full moon that follows the Harvest Moon that appeared on October 1. 

A full moon rises above the Sydney Opera House (pictured). A full moon will be visible in the city early on Sunday morning

A full moon rises above the Sydney Opera House (pictured). A full moon will be visible in the city early on Sunday morning

A full moon rises above the Sydney Opera House (pictured). A full moon will be visible in the city early on Sunday morning 

‘According to the Farmer’s Almanac, with the leaves falling and the deer fattened, this was the time to hunt. Since the harvesters had reaped the fields, hunters could easily see the animals that have come out to glean (and the foxes that have come out to prey on them),’ reads NASA’s statement.

‘The earliest use of the term ‘Hunter’s Moon’ cited in the Oxford English Dictionary is from 1710.’ 

On Halloween night, Jupiter will appear in the southwest and Mars will shine brightly in the east-southeast. 

Astronomers have said Mars is particularly good to look at through a telescope from Australia in at the moment – with remnants the polar ice caps visible. 

The planet is currently visible as a bright orange spot just above the eastern horizon in the early evening. 

The idea of a Blue Moon as the second full moon in a month comes from an article in the March 1946 issue of Sky and Telescope magazine (pictured: October's blue moon over Russia)

The idea of a Blue Moon as the second full moon in a month comes from an article in the March 1946 issue of Sky and Telescope magazine (pictured: October's blue moon over Russia)

 The idea of a Blue Moon as the second full moon in a month comes from an article in the March 1946 issue of Sky and Telescope magazine (pictured: October’s blue moon over Russia) 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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