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Victims’ families demand answers from serial killer nurse who watched veterans die

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victims families demand answers from serial killer nurse who watched veterans die

The families of victims are demanding answers from a serial killer nurse, as it’s revealed she lingered in the room to watch them die after injecting them with fatal doses of insulin. 

Reta Mays, 46, a former nursing assistant at the Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center in Clarksburg, West Virginia, broke down in tears as she confessed to murdering seven elderly veterans in her care between 2017 and 2018.  

Robert Edge Sr., Robert Kozul, Archie Edgell, 84, George Shaw Sr, 81, Felix McDermott, 82, Raymond Golden, and W.A.H. – identified as William Alfred Holloway, 96, by USA Today – all died from severe hypoglycemia.

The veteran she is accused of assaulting has been identified only by initials the R.R.P. 

The West Virginia Army National Guard veteran’s murderous spree came to light when colleagues and victims’ families sounded the alarm over the spate of mysterious deaths. 

Reta Mays, 46, (pictured) a former nursing assistant at the Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center in Clarksburg, West Virginia, broke down in tears as she confessed to murdering seven elderly veterans in her care between 2017 and 2018

Reta Mays, 46, (pictured) a former nursing assistant at the Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center in Clarksburg, West Virginia, broke down in tears as she confessed to murdering seven elderly veterans in her care between 2017 and 2018

Reta Mays, 46, (pictured) a former nursing assistant at the Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center in Clarksburg, West Virginia, broke down in tears as she confessed to murdering seven elderly veterans in her care between 2017 and 2018

Shocking new details have emerged about the serial killer’s murderous rampage including that she watched her victims as some took days to die and tried to murder one twice after her first attempt failed.  

An anonymous investigator told the Washington Post the serial killer would stay in the room and sit by the veterans’ bedsides after she had administered the fatal dose of insulin so she could then watch her victims die. 

Mays then evaded detection by finding a flaw in the hospital systems that enabled the patients’ glucose test results to go undetected, the investigator said. 

They told how Mays would also hang around and watch while medical workers tried desperately to save the veterans. 

One healthcare worker told the Post she lingered in her victims’ rooms when doctors arrived the morning after she injected them to find their blood sugar levels had plummeted.

Mays would watch their futile battle to counteract the drugs and would listen in to their conversations with the victims’ families over their conditions. 

Many of her victims would take several hours to a few weeks for their organs to shut down and die. 

The healthcare worker said they were ‘fooled’ by the killer who came across as eager to please.

‘She absolutely fooled me,’ they said. ‘I looked at her and thought, ‘She wants to be a go-getter.’ She was that helpful and involved.’ 

Robert Kozul

Robert Kozul

John Hallman

John Hallman

The victims: Robert Kozul (left) and John Hallman (right). John Hallman, 87, was cremated, although his daughter said he had an unexplained drop in blood sugar levels before he died

Felix McDermott (pictured) is one of seven victims named. Others include Robert Edge Sr., Robert Kozul, Archie Edgell, George Shaw Sr and Raymond Golden

Felix McDermott (pictured) is one of seven victims named. Others include Robert Edge Sr., Robert Kozul, Archie Edgell, George Shaw Sr and Raymond Golden

Former Army Sgt. Felix Kirk McDermott died in 2018 at the VA facility in Clarksburg after receiving an insulin shot he didn't need

Former Army Sgt. Felix Kirk McDermott died in 2018 at the VA facility in Clarksburg after receiving an insulin shot he didn't need

Felix McDermott (pictured) is one of seven killed victims named. Others include Robert Edge Sr., Robert Kozul, Archie Edgell, George Shaw Sr and Raymond Golden

Mays’ plea agreement also revealed that she tried to kill one of her victims Korean War veteran Archie Edgell twice after her first attempt failed. 

Her first attempt saw her injecting Edgell with enough insulin to cause his glucose levels to plummet while she was working a graveyard shift at the hospital, the plea agreement states.

When Edgell didn’t die the next day, she injected him with another dose the following night. 

Edgell’s autopsy found he had four injection sites on his body.  

His devastated granddaughter has broken her silence over his murders saying she needs to know why Mays went on her killing rampage. 

Tina Hickman told the Post she was shocked to learn the nurse killed her grandfather Edgell because she had always been friendly and let her walk her dogs on her farm.

‘I kind of didn’t believe it, because I talked to her all the time,’ said Hickman. ‘I would like to know why.’ 

Hickman said she thinks her grandmother, Edgell’s wife of 62 years Frances who died ‘of a broken heart’ months after her husband, had suspicions about the nurse after she rarely left her husband’s side and allowed authorities to exhume his body.   

The devastated granddaughter of one of the victims - Tina Hickman - has broken her silence over the murders as she says she needs to know why Mays went on her killing rampage

The devastated granddaughter of one of the victims - Tina Hickman - has broken her silence over the murders as she says she needs to know why Mays went on her killing rampage

The devastated granddaughter of one of the victims – Tina Hickman – has broken her silence over the murders as she says she needs to know why Mays went on her killing rampage

Hickman told the Washington Post she was shocked to learn the nurse killed her grandfather Korean War veteran Archie Edgell (pictured) because she had always been friendly and let her walk her dogs on her far

Hickman told the Washington Post she was shocked to learn the nurse killed her grandfather Korean War veteran Archie Edgell (pictured) because she had always been friendly and let her walk her dogs on her far

Hickman told the Washington Post she was shocked to learn the nurse killed her grandfather Korean War veteran Archie Edgell (pictured) because she had always been friendly and let her walk her dogs on her far

Mays' plea agreement has revealed that she tried to kill Edgell (pictured with his wife Frances) twice after her first attempt failed

Mays' plea agreement has revealed that she tried to kill Edgell (pictured with his wife Frances) twice after her first attempt failed

Mays’ plea agreement has revealed that she tried to kill Edgell (pictured with his wife Frances) twice after her first attempt failed

As questions are mounting about Mays’ motive, prosecutors believe the 46-year-old will point to post-traumatic stress disorder as a motive for the killings, after her lawyers said she was taking PTSD medication in last week’s plea hearing.

It is not clear what she was taking the PTSD medication for.  

Before joining Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center in 2015 Mays served in Iraq in the West Virginia Army National Guard in 2003. 

She joined the forces about six months after 9/11 and became a chemical equipment repairer in the 109nd Engineer Battalion.

Before joining Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center in 2015 Mays served in Iraq in the West Virginia Army National Guard in 2003. Comrade Mike Greaver (pictured) told the Post there were no signs she could go on to kill

Before joining Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center in 2015 Mays served in Iraq in the West Virginia Army National Guard in 2003. Comrade Mike Greaver (pictured) told the Post there were no signs she could go on to kill

Before joining Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center in 2015 Mays served in Iraq in the West Virginia Army National Guard in 2003. Comrade Mike Greaver (pictured) told the Post there were no signs she could go on to kill

One of her comrades told the Post there were no signs she could go on to kill. 

‘I would have never dreamt she was capable of doing something like this,’ said Mike Greaver, who served in the same unit as Mays in Iraq.

‘This is Jekyll and Hyde if I ever did see it.’  

Mays left the Guard in October 2006 under good terms and began working as a correctional officer at the North Central Regional Jail from 2005 to 2012. 

An inmate filed a lawsuit in 2013 against several correctional officers including Mays.

In the suit, the inmate claimed Mays kicked him and ‘bent over him, spit in his face, and said ‘[h]ow do you like that mother f****’ and ‘you ain’t that tough now are you?’. 

She denied the allegations and the suit was later dismissed.

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center in Clarksburg, West Virginia where the veterans died. Mays pleaded guilty to seven counts of second-degree murder and one count of assault with the intent to commit murder in court last week

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center in Clarksburg, West Virginia where the veterans died. Mays pleaded guilty to seven counts of second-degree murder and one count of assault with the intent to commit murder in court last week

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center in Clarksburg, West Virginia where the veterans died. Mays pleaded guilty to seven counts of second-degree murder and one count of assault with the intent to commit murder in court last week

Mays then worked for ResCare in a home for adults with disabilities in Clarksburg, where she had a flawless record. 

She was also a longtime member of the local Monroe Chapel United Methodist church. 

But, according to the Post, she had a troubled family life, with her husband behind bars for failing to register as a sex offender in West Virginia following a 2012 conviction for child pornography.   

Mays is accused of wrongfully injecting her victims with insulin to kill them during graveyard shifts from 2015 to 2018.   

She pleaded guilty to seven counts of second-degree murder and one count of assault with the intent to commit murder in court last week. 

Prosecutors have asked for her to be sentenced to seven consecutive life sentences and an additional 20-year prison term. 

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Donald Trump criticized for saying ‘1917’ Spanish Flu pandemic ended World War Two

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donald trump criticized for saying 1917 spanish flu pandemic ended world war two

The U.S. President has been criticized for claiming the ‘1917’ Spanish Flu pandemic ended World War Two, which did not begin until 1939. 

Donald Trump once again referenced the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic in comparison to the coronavirus crisis during a White House press briefing on Monday. 

He accidentally connected it to World War II which began more than two decades later.

President Trump said the 'great pandemic' of 1917 'probably ended the second World War, all the soldiers were sick'

President Trump said the 'great pandemic' of 1917 'probably ended the second World War, all the soldiers were sick'

President Trump said the ‘great pandemic’ of 1917 ‘probably ended the second World War, all the soldiers were sick’

‘The closest thing is in 1917 they say, right? The great pandemic, certainly as a terrible thing,’ Trump said. 

Then he said it ‘probably ended the Second World War, all the soldiers were sick.’ 

The Spanish flu, also known as the 1918 flu pandemic, lasted from February 1918 to April 1920.

It infected an estimated 500 million people – about a third of the world’s population at the time – in four successive waves. 

The death toll is typically estimated to have been somewhere between 17 million and 50 million. 

New York City celebrating VJ Day at the end of World War Two in Japan 1945. Trump connected the flu pandemic of 1918 to the end of the war

New York City celebrating VJ Day at the end of World War Two in Japan 1945. Trump connected the flu pandemic of 1918 to the end of the war

New York City celebrating VJ Day at the end of World War Two in Japan 1945. Trump connected the flu pandemic of 1918 to the end of the war

A White House official clarified to USA Today that Trump was referring to World War I. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the deployment of troops during WWI could have helped contribute to the spread of the Spanish Flu.

World War I ended after Germany surrendered on November 11, 1918. On June 28, 1919, Germany and the Allied Nations, including Britain, France, Italy and Russia, signed the Treaty of Versailles, formally ending the war.

Some took to Twitter to point out the President’s blunder. Actress and activist Sophia Bush tweeted:  ‘The Second World War ended in … 1945.

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31812216 8614945 image a 3 1597136516897

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31812214 8614945 image a 4 1597136517013

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‘So to recap things we’ve learned since 2016 … 45 hasn’t read the Constitution, hasn’t read the Bible (but likes to hold one upside down), and clearly never took a US History class. Or … math? Cool cool, very cool.’ 

Rep. Eric Swalwell wrote: ‘The Second World War ended in 1945. It’s cruel for @DonaldJTrumpJr and family to let @realDonaldTrump stand out there like this.’ 

Star Trek actor George Takei warned against ‘distorting history’. He wrote: ‘The president thinks the Spanish Flu probably ended World War Two (!) because “all the soldiers were sick.” 

‘The atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki fell 75 years ago yesterday, bringing a long and devastating war to a shattering, violent end. Remember history. Don’t distort it.’ 

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Victoria’s Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton emerges as a ‘sex symbol’ of the coronavirus crisis

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victorias chief health officer brett sutton emerges as a sex symbol of the coronavirus crisis

Victoria’s Chief Medical Officer has emerged as an unexpected sex symbol of the coronavirus pandemic.

Professor Brett Sutton has amassed thousands of female followers since the pandemic took hold, with one photo in particular setting tongues wagging.    

Fans of Prof Sutton, who has fronted near-daily press conferences during the crisis, call themselves ‘Sutttonettes’. 

Victoria's Chief Medical Officer Professor Brett Sutton (pictured) has emerged as an unexpected sex symbol of the nation's coronavirus pandemic

Victoria's Chief Medical Officer Professor Brett Sutton (pictured) has emerged as an unexpected sex symbol of the nation's coronavirus pandemic

Victoria’s Chief Medical Officer Professor Brett Sutton (pictured) has emerged as an unexpected sex symbol of the nation’s coronavirus pandemic

Sutton's (pictured left with Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews) as made almost daily appearance in press conferences

Sutton's (pictured left with Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews) as made almost daily appearance in press conferences

Sutton’s (pictured left with Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews) as made almost daily appearance in press conferences

He is known to these women as ‘Sexysutton’, ‘Chief Swoon officer’, ‘Dr Brett McHun’k and ‘CHOttie’.

The past few weeks fans have come together on social media to offer support for the hardworking professor, from Facebook to Twitter and even TikTok. 

One Facebook group, ‘Brett Sutton is Hot’, has more than 9,000 followers, while the less popular ‘Brett Sutton Fan Club’ has 2,000 members and growing.   

Some fans were so besotted with the medical officer they designed a line of kitchenware, linen and t-shirts with his face on them. 

The highly respected Professor is known to his female fans as 'Sexysutton', 'Chief Swoon officer', 'Dr Brett McHun'k and 'CHOttie'

The highly respected Professor is known to his female fans as 'Sexysutton', 'Chief Swoon officer', 'Dr Brett McHun'k and 'CHOttie'

The highly respected Professor is known to his female fans as ‘Sexysutton’, ‘Chief Swoon officer’, ‘Dr Brett McHun’k and ‘CHOttie’

Across the fan pages women are sharing photographs and video clips of Professor Sutton, with one particular photo from his past emerging time and time again

Across the fan pages women are sharing photographs and video clips of Professor Sutton, with one particular photo from his past emerging time and time again

Across the fan pages women are sharing photographs and video clips of Professor Sutton, with one particular photo from his past emerging time and time again

Another photo of him in 2005 wearing an earring is also proving particularly popular

Another photo of him in 2005 wearing an earring is also proving particularly popular

Another photo of him in 2005 wearing an earring is also proving particularly popular

Across the fan pages women share photographs and video clips of Prof Sutton, with one image from his past emerging time and time again.

The photograph features a young Prof Sutton in a sleeveless shirt with flowing shoulder-length hair staring directly into the camera.

Some fans likened the young medical professional to Pearl Jam singer Eddie Vedder or Australian rock legend Michael Hutchence in his heyday.

‘Ok, I’m sold! I was always wondering why I found Prof Brett Sutton alluringly familiar… there’s a bit of Eddie there,’ one woman wrote. 

‘Let’s clone him,’ another swooned. 

‘Take me back to 1991.’

Victoria’s top medical adviser was only 20 at the time, working in Zanzibar in 1991 as part of an overseas stint before returning to Australia. 

Another photo of him in 2005 wearing an earring has proved particularly popular. 

While his good looks are the driving force behind his new cult status, his calm demeanour and handling of the crisis haven’t gone unnoticed. 

One woman described his ‘sultry soothing tones’ while another spoke of his ‘wonderfully calming face’ which made her ‘feel really safe listening to him.’

When false rumours swirled last week Prof Sutton had resigned, fans went into meltdown. 

Dozens of memes have been inspired by the clinician since his raise to fame during the COVID-19 crisis

Dozens of memes have been inspired by the clinician since his raise to fame during the COVID-19 crisis

Dozens of memes have been inspired by the clinician since his raise to fame during the COVID-19 crisis 

While his good looks are the driving force behind his new cult status, his calm demeanour and handling of the crisis haven't gone unnoticed

While his good looks are the driving force behind his new cult status, his calm demeanour and handling of the crisis haven't gone unnoticed

While his good looks are the driving force behind his new cult status, his calm demeanour and handling of the crisis haven’t gone unnoticed

‘There will mayhem on the streets of Victoria if he does.. women will protest… it will be ANARCHY I tell you!’ one woman wrote.

‘Seriously, he can’t leave we depend on him, we need him!’

But fans were pleased to discover Prof Sutton was simply taking a two-day reprieve from his role as the state’s top medical adviser. 

Some fans were so besotted with the medical officer they designed a line of homewares including kitchenware, linen and t-shirts with his face on them

Some fans were so besotted with the medical officer they designed a line of homewares including kitchenware, linen and t-shirts with his face on them

Some fans were so besotted with the medical officer they designed a line of homewares including kitchenware, linen and t-shirts with his face on them

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Ghislaine Maxwell moans about conditions at ‘hell-hole’ Brooklyn jail

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ghislaine maxwell moans about conditions at hell hole brooklyn jail

Ghislaine Maxwell is complaining about conditions inside the ‘hell-hole’ Brooklyn jail where she is being kept ahead of her sex crimes trial. 

The 58-year-old British socialite is being subjected to multiple searches each day and is under constant watch of the guards, her lawyers said, despite recently being taken off suicide watch.

The searches and surveillance should be stopped, her lawyers said, while requesting that she be be taken out of solitary confinement and placed in with other prisoners.

Ghislaine Maxwell is complaining about being kept in solitary confinement and under constant surveillance at a 'hell-hole' Brooklyn jail (seen in a recent court sketch)

Ghislaine Maxwell is complaining about being kept in solitary confinement and under constant surveillance at a 'hell-hole' Brooklyn jail (seen in a recent court sketch)

Ghislaine Maxwell is complaining about being kept in solitary confinement and under constant surveillance at a ‘hell-hole’ Brooklyn jail (seen in a recent court sketch)

Maxwell wants to be moved into general population and allowed more computer time so she can prepare a defense to claims she helped friend Jeffrey Epstein traffick girls for sex (file)

Maxwell wants to be moved into general population and allowed more computer time so she can prepare a defense to claims she helped friend Jeffrey Epstein traffick girls for sex (file)

Maxwell wants to be moved into general population and allowed more computer time so she can prepare a defense to claims she helped friend Jeffrey Epstein traffick girls for sex (file)

Her legal team say she is only being subjected to the ‘onerous’ conditions because friend Jeffrey Epstein died while awaiting trial, in what was ruled a suicide.

They argue that she ‘has never been suicidal and was never diagnosed as exhibiting risk factors for suicide,’ but is still woken up every few hours during the night and forced to wear special clothing.

She has also been forced to undergo body scans, lawyer Chris Everdell wrote in a letter seen by the New York Post, and is observed even while calling her attorneys.

‘Ms. Maxwell is being treated worse than other similarly situated pretrial detainees, which significantly impacts her ability to prepare a defense,’ he said. 

His letter asks that Maxwell ‘be released to the general population and be granted the privileges given to other pretrial detainees’.

Everdell also requested for her to be given more computer time in order to review the reams of documents relating to her case.

Further, his team are asking that she be given the names of three anonymous women who are accusing her of grooming an abusing them.

‘Maxwell cannot prepare for or receive a fair trial without this information,’ her lawyers argued.

Maxwell's lawyers say she is being subjected to 'onerous' conditions at Brooklyn's MDC (pictured) because Epstein died behind bars, and not because of any risk she poses

Maxwell's lawyers say she is being subjected to 'onerous' conditions at Brooklyn's MDC (pictured) because Epstein died behind bars, and not because of any risk she poses

Maxwell’s lawyers say she is being subjected to ‘onerous’ conditions at Brooklyn’s MDC (pictured) because Epstein died behind bars, and not because of any risk she poses

Jeffrey Epstein was initially charged with sex trafficking in Florida in 2006, before being hit with a 53-page FBI indictment the following year.

In 2008, he was offered a controversial plea deal that saw him sentenced to 18 months in prison for soliciting underage prostitutes.

He was then rearrested in July 2019 and charged with sex trafficking, when he was moved to a maximum security jail in Manhattan.

On August 10 he was found unconscious in his cell with injuries to his neck and later died in what was officially ruled a suicide. 

Epstein had been on suicide watch but was taken off just days before his death, on the condition that he be placed with a cellmate and constantly monitored.

But the day before his body was found his cellmate was moved out and not replaced, and guards failed to carry out checks on him.

Maxwell, who is accused of acting as Epstein’s ‘madam’ by finding him young women to abuse and then ‘training’ them to comply with his desires, was arrested on July 2 at a mansion she owned in New Hampshire.

She was transferred to Brooklyn’s Metropolitan Detention Centre on July 6, and has been held in solitary confinement since then. 

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