Connect with us

Australia

Victoria records 725 cases of coronavirus

Published

on

victoria records 725 cases of coronavirus

Australia

Hodgkin’s lymphoma: Business student Maddie King diagnosed with stage four blood cancer at 19

Published

on

By

hodgkins lymphoma business student maddie king diagnosed with stage four blood cancer at 19

There was no reason for Maddie King to suspect that a mass of tumours had silently spread across one third of her lungs.

The super-fit 19-year-old who rarely drank, exercised religiously and never ate dairy or refined sugars was more concerned with acing her business degree at Sydney University.

So when she felt a ‘large, rubbery lump’ on the back of her neck on June 30, 2019, she could never have imagined that four months later she would be diagnosed with stage four Hodgkin’s lymphoma – the most advanced form of blood cancer.

The now 20-year-old, who swam at state level for New South Wales and trained to become a professional ballerina, is anxiously awaiting the results of gruelling chemotherapy that has robbed her of her fertility.

‘I just wish I had caught it earlier,’ she told Daily Mail Australia.

Scroll down for video

Glamorous business student Maddie King rarely drank, never ate refined sugars and exercised religiously

Glamorous business student Maddie King rarely drank, never ate refined sugars and exercised religiously

Until doctors diagnosed her with stage four Hodgkin's lymphoma in October 2019

Until doctors diagnosed her with stage four Hodgkin's lymphoma in October 2019

Glamorous business student Maddie King rarely drank, never ate refined sugars and exercised religiously until doctors diagnosed her with stage four Hodgkin’s lymphoma in October 2019

To everyone who saw her, the 19-year-old looked the picture of health - so there was no reason to suspect that a mass of tumours had already covered a third of her lungs

To everyone who saw her, the 19-year-old looked the picture of health - so there was no reason to suspect that a mass of tumours had already covered a third of her lungs

To everyone who saw her, the 19-year-old looked the picture of health – so there was no reason to suspect that a mass of tumours had already covered a third of her lungs

After discovering the lump on her neck, Maddie saw a doctor who ‘did all the right things straight away’, ordering x-rays, blood tests and needle biopsies to determine the cause.

When the biopsy showed no signs of cancer, she was given a course of antibiotics for ‘walking pneumonia’ and told to monitor for changes.

Needle biopsies remove just a tiny fragment of cells and are known to return false negatives due to the minuscule size of the sample.

With the lump showing no signs of shrinking, Maddie had an entire lymph node removed for further testing, which immediately revealed the true cause of the growth on October 24, 2019.

It was only with hindsight that she recalled having night sweats and shortness of breath during workouts – both telltale signs of Hodgkin’s lymphoma. 

A raised lump on the left side of Maddie King's neck (pictured) was the only physical clue that the most advanced form of lymphoma was ravaging her body

A raised lump on the left side of Maddie King's neck (pictured) was the only physical clue that the most advanced form of lymphoma was ravaging her body

Gruelling chemotherapy has stolen her fertility and femininity, and Maddie says she wishes she had noticed symptoms sooner

Gruelling chemotherapy has stolen her fertility and femininity, and Maddie says she wishes she had noticed symptoms sooner

A raised lump on the left side of Maddie King’s neck (pictured) was the only physical clue that the most advanced form of lymphoma was ravaging her body

Maddie remembers feeling ‘completely numb’ until her shattered mother broke down in tears, a sight she called ‘the hardest part’ of her diagnosis.

‘I never let her come to any of my chemo sessions because I didn’t want her to see me sick like that,’ she said.

‘It meant I could cry and be a mess without having to worry about being strong for her.’ 

Doctors prescribed a course of gruelling BEACOPP chemotherapy, a potent cocktail of drugs that offers the best chance of destroying advanced lymphoma.

‘It was extremely tough both physically and mentally. I became really sick, tired and weak,’ Maddie said, a bitter pill to swallow for the fitness fanatic who has long used exercise as an escape from anxiety and stress.

A lifelong fitness fanatic, Maddie swam at state level for New South Wales and even trained to become a professional ballerina

A lifelong fitness fanatic, Maddie swam at state level for New South Wales and even trained to become a professional ballerina

A lifelong fitness fanatic, Maddie swam at state level for New South Wales and even trained to become a professional ballerina

Early symptoms of Hodgkin’s lymphoma

Excessive tiredness, fever, night sweats, unexplained weight loss, itchy rashes and painless swelling of lymph nodes in the neck, armpits or groin.

Source: Cancer Council Australia

<!—->Advertisement

Maddie is one of roughly 600 Australians diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma every year.

It is a rare disease that accounts for just 0.5 percent of all cancers diagnosed in Australia, and one most likely to occur in people aged between 15 and 25 or those over 65 years old.

But Maddie’s story stands as sobering testament that cancer can develop at any time, even in young people at the peak of their physical health.

Hodgkin’s is notoriously difficult to diagnose because symptoms are vague and easily confused with those of less sinister illnesses like bacterial or viral infections – including pneumonia, just as Maddie’s were.

Unlike cervical, breast and colon cancer, there are no screening programmes for Hodgkin’s and it cannot be diagnosed with a generic blood test, leading health organisations to label it a ‘silent killer’.

Warning signs include night sweats and painless lumps in the armpits, groin or neck – both of which Maddie experienced – as well as itchiness, fatigue, inflamed rashes and unexplained weight loss.

Maddie's story stands as sobering testament that cancer can develop at any time, even in young people at the peak of their physical health

Maddie's story stands as sobering testament that cancer can develop at any time, even in young people at the peak of their physical health

Maddie’s story stands as sobering testament that cancer can develop at any time, even in young people at the peak of their physical health

Maddie describes seeing her shattered mother (left) break down in tears as 'the hardest part' of her diagnosis

Maddie describes seeing her shattered mother (left) break down in tears as 'the hardest part' of her diagnosis

Maddie describes seeing her shattered mother (left) break down in tears as ‘the hardest part’ of her diagnosis

In its initial stages, most forms of lymphoma are highly treatable and associated with long-term survival, which means early intervention can be the difference between life and death.

It’s even curable at stage four when tumours have spread to organs outside the lymphatic system, as Maddie’s have.

But she has been warned there is a high risk – 15 to 20 percent – of her cancer recurring, even if she goes into remission after treatment.

While those figures are low compared to other cancers, Maddie says ‘any number higher than zero’ will keep her awake at night, worrying about the worst case scenario. 

And it’s not only imagined fears weighing on her mind – there’s plenty of real ones, too.

Losing her strength and mobility during treatment was a bitter pill to swallow for the fitness fanatic who has long seen exercise as her escape from stress and anxiety

Losing her strength and mobility during treatment was a bitter pill to swallow for the fitness fanatic who has long seen exercise as her escape from stress and anxiety

Hodgkin's lymphoma is known as a 'silent killer' because there are no screening programmes to detect it

Hodgkin's lymphoma is known as a 'silent killer' because there are no screening programmes to detect it

Losing her strength and mobility during treatment was a bitter pill to swallow for the fitness fanatic who has long seen exercise as her escape from stress and anxiety

Chemotherapy has wrought irreversible damage on Maddie’s fertility, leaving her unlikely to conceive without IVF – news she says crushed her more than her diagnosis.

‘I actually didn’t cry until they said I might not be able to have kids naturally,’ she said. 

‘It broke my heart, I always knew I wanted kids. Treatment has taken my fertility and so much of my femininity, I just wish I caught it earlier so that this wasn’t the case.’

For now, Maddie is in what doctors call a ‘grey area’. 

Hodgkin’s lymphoma explained

Hodgkin lymphoma is a rare form of cancer that starts in a type of white blood cells called lymphocytes.

The disease begins in a lymph node, usually in the neck, then spreads through the lymphatic system from one group of lymph nodes to another.

Hodgkin lymphoma represents just 0.5 percent of all cancers diagnosed in Australia. About 11 percent of all lymphomas are types of Hodgkin lymphoma, while the remainder are non-Hodgkin.

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma may arise in lymph nodes anywhere in the body, whereas Hodgkin lymphoma typically begins in the upper body, such as the neck, chest or armpits.

Hodgkin lymphoma is often diagnosed at an early stage and is therefore considered one of the most treatable cancers.

Approximately 600 people in Australia are diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma every year, most commonly younger people aged 15 – 29 and older people over the age of 65. It is more common in men than women. 

The causes of Hodgkin lymphoma remain largely unclear, but risk factors include family history – with those who have a parent or sibling who has had Hodgkin’s slightly likelier to develop the disease – certain viruses, including glandular fever and HIV, and a generally weakened immune system which can occur because of autoimmune conditions or lengthy periods taking immunosuppressant drugs. 

Source: Lymphoma Australia

<!—->Advertisement

The tumour count in her latest scans returned higher results than expected, leaving her to wait for a follow-up scan in November to assess developments.

While Maddie has largely recovered from the effects of chemo by training her body with yoga, boxing and Pilates, she still feels bitter that cancer has stripped her of the innocence every young woman should enjoy in their early 20s.

‘At times the darkness of it all weighs really heavy on my mind,’ she said.

Being confronted with her own mortality while still in her teens has also taken a toll on her mental health.

‘It’s forced me to grow up so quickly and robbed me of those carefree years in your 20s that I’m watching all of my friends enjoy,’ she said.

‘I’ve outgrown a lot of them and find it difficult to relate to ‘normal’ problems they talk about now, which can feel really isolating.’ 

Since completing chemotherapy, Maddie has regained her strength by training at yoga, boxing and Pilates classes

Since completing chemotherapy, Maddie has regained her strength by training at yoga, boxing and Pilates classes

Since completing chemotherapy, Maddie has regained her strength by training at yoga, boxing and Pilates classes

More driven than ever, Maddie is now juggling her business studies with training to become a Pilates instructor at KX Studios in Sydney

More driven than ever, Maddie is now juggling her business studies with training to become a Pilates instructor at KX Studios in Sydney

More driven than ever, Maddie is now juggling her business studies with training to become a Pilates instructor at KX Studios in Sydney

More driven than ever, Maddie is now juggling her business studies with training to become a Pilates instructor at KX Studios in Sydney. 

Eager to help others avoid what she has been through, she urged young people to educate themselves about early cancer symptoms and to ‘trust your gut’ no matter how embarrassing or insignificant changes in the body may seem.

‘There just isn’t enough awareness among young people about cancer, and alarm bells don’t go off for doctors when they present with symptoms because of their age,’ Maddie said.

‘If you suspect something is off, push the professionals until you get a proper answer because no one is going to care about your health as much as you do.’

For more information on Hodgkin’s lymphoma and other types of blood cancer, please visit  Lymphoma Australia or the Australian Cancer Council. 

Powered by: Daily Mail

Continue Reading

Australia

Anti-lockdown protesters swarm Melbourne park before being chased off by police on horseback

Published

on

By

anti lockdown protesters swarm melbourne park before being chased off by police on horseback

Anti-lockdown protesters swarming a suburban park in Melbourne have been chased off by police on horseback.

Up to 100 people gathering at Elsternwick Park in Brighton dispersed to Elwood when faced with a long line of officers at the site, 11km from Melbourne’s CBD.

Protests were announced by rally organisers about 10.30am on Saturday – half an hour before kicking off at the State Library, and a second closely following at 12pm. 

Law enforcement teams circling Elsternwick Park included officers from Public Order Response, the Mounted Unit and Highway Patrol.

A helicopter also monitored the situation from above.

More than 100 people have gathered at Elsternwick Park (pictured) in Brighton, 11 km south-east of Melbourne's central business district

More than 100 people have gathered at Elsternwick Park (pictured) in Brighton, 11 km south-east of Melbourne's central business district

More than 100 people have gathered at Elsternwick Park (pictured) in Brighton, 11 km south-east of Melbourne’s central business district

The first protest kicked off at the State Library from 11am, with a second shortly after at 12pm. Pictured: A woman being arrested

The first protest kicked off at the State Library from 11am, with a second shortly after at 12pm. Pictured: A woman being arrested

The first protest kicked off at the State Library from 11am, with a second shortly after at 12pm. Pictured: A woman being arrested

Protesters marching along Elwood beach about 1pm were dispersed a third time, and several arrests have been made by officers.

Shouting about Premier Daniel Andrews and coronavirus restrictions was heard throughout the disjointed protests.

The protests were described as ‘chaotic’, with one photographer saying there was ‘a lot of running and not much protesting.’ 

Some protesters continued to scatter through backstreets, even jumping fences into private property.

One arrested by police was filmed by Nine News telling officers: ‘Wake up, I know you already know this is wrong.’ 

33364798 8749879 image a 37 1600488763573

33364798 8749879 image a 37 1600488763573

33364784 8749879 image a 31 1600488693460

33364784 8749879 image a 31 1600488693460

33364774 8749879 image a 32 1600488750097

33364774 8749879 image a 32 1600488750097

Protesters on Saturday dispersed near the foreshore about 1pm, with police arresting many (pictured)

Protesters on Saturday dispersed near the foreshore about 1pm, with police arresting many (pictured)

Protesters on Saturday dispersed near the foreshore about 1pm, with police arresting many (pictured)

In video captured of the event, protesters can be heard yelling ‘disgraceful’, ‘I’ve done nothing wrong’, ‘no violence’ and ‘peaceful’ as officers stand nearby.

A man can be seen being arrested as he questions: ‘Officers, why are you doing this. I’ve never done anything wrong in my life. Please, this is enough. It’s only  going to get worse. Who is going to fight for you.’ 

Premier Daniel Andrews said the protest was selfish and irresponsible.

He added it was an unlawful act and told protesters: ‘Go home and follow the rules. There is no need to protest about anything. It is not safe’.  

‘It just doesn’t make any sense. You are potentially putting the strategy at risk. No-one should be doing anything to contribute to the spread of this virus, 21 cases today, seriously. This is working. We’re getting there,’ he said, The Age reported. 

Saturday’s events follow concern anti-lockdown protesters in Melbourne are threatening to cause another COVID-19 outbreak as the city teeters on the brink of a third explosion and cases surge in the southeast. 

Police (pictured) are circling the area, including officers from Public Order Response, the Mounted Unit and Highway Patrol

Police (pictured) are circling the area, including officers from Public Order Response, the Mounted Unit and Highway Patrol

Police (pictured) are circling the area, including officers from Public Order Response, the Mounted Unit and Highway Patrol

Public health authorities are racing to stop infections growing in the Casey and Dandenong council areas on the Melbourne’s southeast rim, which now has 90 active cases.

Five households in Clyde, Cranbourne North, Hallam and Narre Warren South are linked to 34 active cases.

Daniel Andrews urged covidiots on Saturday not to gather at planned protests across the city or ‘do anything to undermine’ its progress with tackling COVID-19.

It comes as Victoria recorded 21 new cases of COVID-19, the lowest daily increase since June, and a further seven deaths.  

Metropolitan Melbourne’s 14-day average has plummeted and now sits at 39.3 as the state moves to a COVID normal. In regional Victoria, the 14-day average is at just 1.9. 

33359848 8749879 image a 1 1600487826237

33359848 8749879 image a 1 1600487826237

Daniel Andrews (pictured) urged covidiots on Saturday not to gather at planned protests across the city or ‘do anything to undermine’ its progress with tackling COVID-19

A heavy Police presence is seen in Dandenong following an anti-lockdown protest on August 28

A heavy Police presence is seen in Dandenong following an anti-lockdown protest on August 28

A heavy Police presence is seen in Dandenong following an anti-lockdown protest on August 28

This is the ninth day in a row Victoria has recorded a daily infections increase below 50. 

Metropolitan Melbourne is under strict Stage Four lockdown – limiting Melburnians travelling more than 5km from their homes and enforcing a 9pm to 5am curfew. 

The premier did not comment on where Saturday demonstrations would be, with protesters taking caution when sharing information online.  

Multiple rallies have taken place in Melbourne the past few weekends.  

Victoria Police have responded with a heavy presence – handing out dozens of fines and making arrests. 

‘Let’s not lose sight of the fact that this week we have seen, day after day, not the 725 cases we had five and a half weeks ago – we have made very significant progress,’ Mr Andrews said.

‘We’ve got regional Victoria opening up. People should be positive and optimistic this strategy is working, and therefore, let’s not any of us do anything to undermine that.’  

The premier on Saturday did not comment on where Saturday demonstrations would be, with protesters taking caution when sharing information online. Pictured: Protesters rallying against lockdown regulations on Monday on September 13

The premier on Saturday did not comment on where Saturday demonstrations would be, with protesters taking caution when sharing information online. Pictured: Protesters rallying against lockdown regulations on Monday on September 13

The premier on Saturday did not comment on where Saturday demonstrations would be, with protesters taking caution when sharing information online. Pictured: Protesters rallying against lockdown regulations on Monday on September 13

Mr Andrews’ comments also followed trying to dissuade protesters on Friday by saying their intended actions would be selfish and irresponsible. 

His comments also followed information of a new cluster emerging in the southeast of Melbourne.  

A surge of cases in the Casey and Dandenong area has been linked back to five households in the Afghan community.

There are currently 101 active coronavirus cases in the Casey and Dandenong area with 34 infections linked to five households

There are currently 101 active coronavirus cases in the Casey and Dandenong area with 34 infections linked to five households

There are currently 101 active coronavirus cases in the Casey and Dandenong area with 34 infections linked to five households

Metropolitan Melbourne is under strict Stage Four lockdown - limiting Melburnians travelling more than 5km from their homes and enforcing a 9pm to 5am curfew. Pictured: A person walking through Melbourne's empty city

Metropolitan Melbourne is under strict Stage Four lockdown - limiting Melburnians travelling more than 5km from their homes and enforcing a 9pm to 5am curfew. Pictured: A person walking through Melbourne's empty city

Metropolitan Melbourne is under strict Stage Four lockdown – limiting Melburnians travelling more than 5km from their homes and enforcing a 9pm to 5am curfew. Pictured: A person walking through Melbourne’s empty city

As residents in the city are still under strict Stage Four lockdown, it is thought the infected group may have breached the stay-at-home orders. 

Health authorities are scrambling to track and trace the new surge in cases, and the Victorian government has begun a recruitment drive which sees retired officers re-enlisted to bolster the state’s frontline virus efforts. 

‘Members of those households visiting other households,’ Department of Health and Human Services COVID-19 testing commander Jeroen Weimar said.

‘It is that limited amount of contact, relatively infrequent contact between these five households that has now meant that we have 34 people in five houses experiencing or living with a very real threat of the coronavirus.’

The Victorian government has even began a new recruitment drive that will see retired officers re-enlisted to bolster the state's frontline virus efforts

The Victorian government has even began a new recruitment drive that will see retired officers re-enlisted to bolster the state's frontline virus efforts

The Victorian government has even began a new recruitment drive that will see retired officers re-enlisted to bolster the state’s frontline virus efforts

Police conducting checks on motorists at checkpoints - alongside the Australian Defence Force - to ensure Victorians are following state rules

Police conducting checks on motorists at checkpoints - alongside the Australian Defence Force - to ensure Victorians are following state rules

Police conducting checks on motorists at checkpoints – alongside the Australian Defence Force – to ensure Victorians are following state rules

The cluster – impacting five households in Hallam, Clyde, Narre Warren South and Cranbourne North – first emerged on September 4. 

Cases in the southeast have now spread to Dandenong Police Station and a number of industrial work sites. 

Premier Daniel Andrews on Friday said the actions of the family’s involved in the cluster was ‘disappointing’. 

The cluster which has impacted the five households in Hallam, Clyde, Narre Warren South and Cranbourne North, first emerged on September 4

The cluster which has impacted the five households in Hallam, Clyde, Narre Warren South and Cranbourne North, first emerged on September 4

The cluster which has impacted the five households in Hallam, Clyde, Narre Warren South and Cranbourne North, first emerged on September 4

‘Five kilometres is one thing and visiting others is the real issue here,’ he said. 

‘The rules are in place for a reason and anyone who undermines this, undermines the entire strategy and it means the rules will be on for longer.’ 

The Victorian leader, however, ruled out fines for the group, telling reporters it may discourage others from being completely honest with contact tracers. 

‘I know many Victorians, when you see examples of people not following the rules, that’s disappointing, it makes you angry,’ Mr Andrews said.

‘You need to look at the bigger picture here.

‘We don’t want a situation where people don’t have a sense of confidence and indeed, you know, the sense they’re obliged to tell us the full story as quickly as possible. That’s what we need.’ 

The success of Melbourne's ongoing lockdown could be at risk with a new cluster in the southeast of the city. Pictured: A coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

The success of Melbourne's ongoing lockdown could be at risk with a new cluster in the southeast of the city. Pictured: A coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

The success of Melbourne’s ongoing lockdown could be at risk with a new cluster in the southeast of the city. Pictured: A coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

The Casey and Dandenong cluster is testing the capacity of COVID-detectives. Pictured: Heath workers are seen at a coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

The Casey and Dandenong cluster is testing the capacity of COVID-detectives. Pictured: Heath workers are seen at a coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

The Casey and Dandenong cluster is testing the capacity of COVID-detectives. Pictured: Heath workers are seen at a coronavirus testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

A health worker is pictured approaching a vehicle at a COVID-19 testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

A health worker is pictured approaching a vehicle at a COVID-19 testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

A health worker is pictured approaching a vehicle at a COVID-19 testing centre in Cranbourne on September 17

Despite the new cluster, Victoria’s overall case numbers are continuing to decline. 

With contact tracers ‘painstakingly’ working around the clock to slow the spread of the virus and bringing the city out of lockdown, the Victorian government is set to introduce a controversial new policy seeing retired cops re-enlisted in the force.

The Department of Justice and Community Safety and the Department of Health and Human Services is behind the push which will see former cops given paid training before being assigned specific COVID-19 roles.

These roles include industry enforcement, testing support, door-knocking and the airport patrol. 

A man with a dog is seen being questioned by two police officers in the Dandenong area

A man with a dog is seen being questioned by two police officers in the Dandenong area

A man with a dog is seen being questioned by two police officers in the Dandenong area

However, not everybody is in favour of the move to bring back veteran police.     

‘Police veterans have a real contribution to make to the ongoing safety of the community but their use to issue infringements, detain people and conduct checks on private property is entirely inappropriate,’ Opposition Police and Community Safety spokesman David Southwick told the Herald Sun.   

Ivan Ray, who served in the Victorian Police Force for more than three decades, said it was a recipe for disaster for the veterans. 

‘It’s effectively a health department police force, and we know the Health Department is no good at enforcement, we saw that in the hotel quarantine operation,’ Mr Ray said.

‘Veterans can play a part and they can support policing, but it has to be by the police department.’

Health authorities are urging anyone in the southeast of Melbourne to diligently monitor their health and immediately get tested if feeling unwell. 

Health authorities are urging anyone in the southeast of Melbourne to diligently monitor their health and immediately get tested if feeling unwell

Health authorities are urging anyone in the southeast of Melbourne to diligently monitor their health and immediately get tested if feeling unwell

Health authorities are urging anyone in the southeast of Melbourne to diligently monitor their health and immediately get tested if feeling unwell

Powered by: Daily Mail

Continue Reading

Australia

How Netflix workers enjoy unlimited holidays but are constructively criticised in group meetings

Published

on

By

how netflix workers enjoy unlimited holidays but are constructively criticised in group meetings

Netflix may be the world’s largest streaming service but it is helmed by a boss who peers have described as ‘blunt’ and ‘not naturally empathetic’.  

Reed Hastings laid down the mantra in the company’s culture deck in 2009 that his workforce was like a ‘pro-team’ rather than a ‘family’.

Workers can be cut from the group and replaced by a more qualified and suitable player if they don’t pull their weight.

But just as the game is competitive, so is it rewarding.

Workers can enjoy a considerate holiday policy where they are able to take as many days off work as they choose.

They are even encouraged to air their concerns and criticisms about projects to their managers.

Reed Hastings (pictured) laid down the mantra in the company's culture deck in 2009 that his workforce was like a 'pro-team' rather than a 'family'

Reed Hastings (pictured) laid down the mantra in the company's culture deck in 2009 that his workforce was like a 'pro-team' rather than a 'family'

Reed Hastings (pictured) laid down the mantra in the company’s culture deck in 2009 that his workforce was like a ‘pro-team’ rather than a ‘family’

Netflix may be the world's largest streaming service but it is helmed by a boss who peers have described as 'blunt' and 'not naturally empathetic'

Netflix may be the world's largest streaming service but it is helmed by a boss who peers have described as 'blunt' and 'not naturally empathetic'

Netflix may be the world’s largest streaming service but it is helmed by a boss who peers have described as ‘blunt’ and ‘not naturally empathetic’

Hastings and co-creator Mark Randolph launched the streaming service in 1997.

Fast forward almost 25 years and the once modest movie rental company has ballooned into an entertainment powerhouse and moviemaker giant.

The company poured $23 billion into new TV shows and movies in 2020 alone. 

The streaming service is beamed onto computers and television sets in 190 countries and is watched by 193 million subscribers.

More than 13 million Australians are believed to watch the streaming service.

The astronomical growth of Netflix has not just been credited to the thinking-outside-of-the-box approach.

The company is renowned for its holiday scheme that allows its workers to take as much time off as they need.

Netflix does not keep tabs on the number of days taken and the policy has worked well since it was introduced in 2005. 

Hastings explains the policy is about fostering creativity and growth.

‘For me it’s about integrating life and work, where I can take off a day in the middle of the week to attend to some personal stuff, and while on vacation I’ll be thinking about some new title or some new marketing campaign,’ Hastings told Sydney Morning Herald.

Although the sentiment may appear considerate, Hastings response to certain events has led his peers to claim he is ‘not a naturally empathetic guy’.   

Rising expansion costs haemorrhaged the company millions of dollars and Netflix dropped a third of its staff in 2001.

Randolph said Hasting was less fazed about the massive layoff than his co-creator at the time. 

‘He’s not a bad person – he just doesn’t feel what others feel,’ Randolph said.

‘The dominant mode for him is, ‘It would be irrational for us to keep someone on, just to keep us from hurting them.’ 

Hastings’ work philosophy is better summarised in a set of slides he co-wrote with former Netflix chief talent officer Patty McCord.

Hastings and co-creator Mark Randolph launched the streaming service in 1997 (pictured, Hastings at a distribution centre in 2005)

Hastings and co-creator Mark Randolph launched the streaming service in 1997 (pictured, Hastings at a distribution centre in 2005)

Hastings and co-creator Mark Randolph launched the streaming service in 1997 (pictured, Hastings at a distribution centre in 2005)

Fast forward almost 25 years and the once modest movie rental company has ballooned into an entertainment powerhouse and moviemaker giant

Fast forward almost 25 years and the once modest movie rental company has ballooned into an entertainment powerhouse and moviemaker giant

Fast forward almost 25 years and the once modest movie rental company has ballooned into an entertainment powerhouse and moviemaker giant

‘Freedom and Responsibility’ was published online in 2009 and describes the workplace as a ‘team’ rather than a ‘family’.

‘We’re like a pro sports team, not a kid’s recreational team,’ it reads.

‘Netflix leaders hire, develop and cut smartly, so we have stars in every position.’ 

Workers receive constructive criticism in live group sessions with even the bosses given a dressing down.

Hastings came to appreciate the value of openness following an executive decision that could have ruined the company in 2011.

He decided to split Netflix down the middle so the company would only manage streaming while its sibling service Qwikster would handle DVD rentals.  

Though Qwikster came with the added $8 subscription fee and almost a million subscribers left.

Workers quit the streaming service and its stock plummeted by 75 per cent.

Managers later told Hastings they did not believe Qwikster would work, but decided to keep their opinions to themselves.

Hastings has since encouraged workers to actively voice their opinions.

Projects that failed are picked apart to understand why they failed – a process called ‘sunshining’.  

Netflix does not keep tabs on the number of days taken and the policy has worked well since it was introduced in 2005 (pictured, Netflix headquarters at Los Gatos in California)

Netflix does not keep tabs on the number of days taken and the policy has worked well since it was introduced in 2005 (pictured, Netflix headquarters at Los Gatos in California)

Netflix does not keep tabs on the number of days taken and the policy has worked well since it was introduced in 2005 (pictured, Netflix headquarters at Los Gatos in California)

The streaming service is beamed onto computers and television sets in 190 countries and is watched by 193 million subscribers

The streaming service is beamed onto computers and television sets in 190 countries and is watched by 193 million subscribers

The streaming service is beamed onto computers and television sets in 190 countries and is watched by 193 million subscribers

Powered by: Daily Mail

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 DiazHub.