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What time of lockdown skin do YOU have?

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what time of lockdown skin do you have

Lockdown turned life upside down and completely changed our habits. 

But while your daily routine might slowly start to return to normal, the effects quarantine has had on your skin might be lasting.

Speaking to FEMAIL, two skincare experts explained how four different types of ‘lockdown face’ have emerged, each caused by habits that have developed over the last three months. 

The ‘BBQ face’ for example, is characterised by the sun damage and fine wrinkles caused by days spent under the sun, while ‘kitchen face’, caused by over-indulging, has symptoms including puffiness and ruddy skin.   

Here, FEMAIL reveals how you can work out which type of ‘lockdown face’ you have and the simple steps you can take to reduce the symptoms and reduce further damage…  

Two skincare experts explained how four different types of 'lockdown face' have emerged, each caused by habits that have developed over the last two-and-a-half months. Stock image

Two skincare experts explained how four different types of 'lockdown face' have emerged, each caused by habits that have developed over the last two-and-a-half months. Stock image

Two skincare experts explained how four different types of ‘lockdown face’ have emerged, each caused by habits that have developed over the last two-and-a-half months. Stock image

BBQ FACE

What is it? 

The recent good weather was great for barbecues and getting people outdoors – but it can wreak havoc on skin. Too much time in the sun can lead to tell-tale skin issues. 

‘If you’ve slathered on SPF while sunbathing like me, you might great tiny breakouts or have more noticeable blocked comedonal acne on the forehead,’ explained Ada Ooi, founder of 001 Skincare. ‘You might also see other related issues like blackheads, white heads because you have been layering and layering SPF the pores have been blocked.’

‘Or, if you haven’t been using SPF you might start to feel the skin becoming tight and dry, with pigmentation showing. What’s happening under the skin might also be that collagen and elastin fibres are starting to break down as they can be damaged by the sun rays.’  

How to fix it 

Preventing further damage is simple: wear sunscreen every day, even when it is overcast. Lucy Xu, Skin specialist and Founder of London Premier Laser and Skin Clinics, said: ‘I would suggest always using a high UVA/UVB, preferably factor 50 at all times, and reapply throughout the day especially if you are perspiring.’

Emma added you should reach for a hat when possible.   

FEMAIL reveals how you can work out which type of 'lockdown face' you have and the simple steps you can take to reduce the symptoms and reduce further damage. Stock image

FEMAIL reveals how you can work out which type of 'lockdown face' you have and the simple steps you can take to reduce the symptoms and reduce further damage. Stock image

FEMAIL reveals how you can work out which type of ‘lockdown face’ you have and the simple steps you can take to reduce the symptoms and reduce further damage. Stock image

KITCHEN FACE

What is it? 

‘Kitchen face’ is the result of over-indulging in alcohol, salt and sugary treats during lockdown. Unfortunately while enjoying yourself might be fun at the time, it can have a lasting impact on your skin. 

Emma Coleman, dermatology and aesthetic RGN who has an eponymous skincare range, explained: ‘Eating and drinking substances with a high glycemic index can lead to inflammation in the body, which affects the skin. 

‘Excess sugar can aggravate skin conditions such as rosacea, acne and eczema, and cause dilation of blood vessels on the mid-face and nose giving kitchen face sufferers a ruddy, puffy look.’ 

SLEEPY FACE

What is it?

Anxiety and a disrupted routine means many people are not sleeping as well as they usually do. Not only does this leave you feel sluggish during the day, it affects your face, too. 

Emma said: ‘The facial skin can appear dull, almost grey. and the skin around the eyes may become very inflamed and red if we are sleep deprived. 

‘This is because our skin’s immune system may be weakened by poor sleep patterns bodies, so we are less able to fight off free radical damage. Unrested skin is prone to dehydration and formation of lines and creases as it struggles to create new collagen and sufferers of poor sleep may fall into a cycle of stress/sleeplessness/anxiety. 

How to fix it 

Lucy said: ‘If you are struggling to get proper sleep I would suggest you use brightening products throughout the day which should help to counteract any dulling of complexion. Sleep is important to allow our skin to regenerate so if you can try lavender pillow sprays, sleeping tablets or get an earlier night to try and help you sleep better as this is the only way your skin will properly benefit.’ 

Ada added: ‘My suggestion? Prioritise sleep. Nap in the day if you have to then gradually build the sleeping routine back that suits your work or lifestyle but sleep is just so important for the body to function properly. Enough sleep changes your mood and a lot of the mentioned skin issues will fade away.’ 

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How to fix it

Lucy advised: ‘The best way to remedy this is to use a jade roller and to roll the skin to massage and promote lymphatic drainage which should help to detoxify the skin. I would also suggest drinking plenty of water to flush the sugar from your body and limit the number of snacks you eat.’

Emma added: ‘If you’re prone to inflammation, it’s best to limit the amount of sugar you consume, and avoid alcohol such as wine and Prosecco, opting instead for low sugar, clear spirits such as gin and vodka. Apply a vitamin C serum daily to nourish and protect the face.’   

SCREEN FACE 

What is it? 

Between work and catching up over video calls, for many people lockdown has meant spending more time than ever in front of the screen. 

While it might not seem like a major cause of skin damage, the reality is that all this screen time leaves its mark.  

Lucy explained: ‘Blue light emitted from screens can have a detrimental effect on the skin and can promote premature ageing, skin damage, inflammation and photo ageing.’

Emma added there is also ‘elevated risk of pigmentation, dry, rough skin formation and possibly eczema and psoriasis flare ups. This is partly due to blue light exposure, but actually Zoom calls can be intense and stressful for many people.’ 

Ada said she didn’t think the blue light could cause significant damage on its own but warned there are other risks. 

She said: ‘While I don’t believe in exposure to screen’s blue light actually do damage to the skin, staring at the screen far too long creates a lot of tension to the eyes and all the relative areas. This tension can leave you with blood stagnation dark circles/eye bags.’ 

How to fix it 

Lucy said: ‘I would suggest limiting zoom calls where possible, if you have to do them try using an antioxidant cream or serum to help skin damage, you may also want to wear broad spectrum cream whilst on the calls which should also help protect the skin.’

Emma agreed: ‘Apply some antioxidant moisturiser under your makeup before going on a call and reapply after if you are able to do so. You may also wish to use a face massage tool such as a Gua Sha morning and night to relieve zoom call tensions.’ 

Ada suggested massaging the area around the eye when applying make-up, with the possibility of using a specialist tool to alleviate tension around the eyes and forehead. 

Emma Coleman has her own skincare range at www.emmacolemanskin.com. Lucy Xu is Skin specialist and Founder of London Premier Laser and Skin Clinics (www.londonpremierlaser.co.uk). Ada Ooi is founder of 001 Skincare at https://www.001skincare.com/

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Dan Andrews’ top man Chris Eccles didn’t advise Victorian Premier on covid-19 quarantine

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dan andrews top man chris eccles didnt advise victorian premier on covid 19 quarantine

A countdown to the deadly decision that saw Victoria choose private security over Australian Defence Force personnel to run hotel quarantine has been revealed.

An inquiry into the bungled decision heard Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews announced private security guards would guard returning travellers – without advice from his top bureaucrat.  

On Monday, Department of Premier and Cabinet secretary Chris Eccles told the inquiry he did not advise the premier to use private security. 

Mr Andrews went public with the scheme during a 3.20 pm press conference on March 27 – just hours after Victoria Police’s chief commissioner had been advised by someone from within the Department of Premier and Cabinet that police would play second fiddle to private security guards. 

Department of Premier and Cabinet secretary Chris Eccles has faced the hotel inquiry in Melbourne

Department of Premier and Cabinet secretary Chris Eccles has faced the hotel inquiry in Melbourne

Department of Premier and Cabinet secretary Chris Eccles has faced the hotel inquiry in Melbourne

Private security has been accused of bungling the hotel quarantine operation and causing Victoria's deadly second wave of COVID-19

Private security has been accused of bungling the hotel quarantine operation and causing Victoria's deadly second wave of COVID-19

Private security has been accused of bungling the hotel quarantine operation and causing Victoria’s deadly second wave of COVID-19

Meeting notes from March 27 where Chris Eccles appear to assume a decision has been made to employ private security at hotels. He cannot remember the meeting

Meeting notes from March 27 where Chris Eccles appear to assume a decision has been made to employ private security at hotels. He cannot remember the meeting

Meeting notes from March 27 where Chris Eccles appear to assume a decision has been made to employ private security at hotels. He cannot remember the meeting

It comes as the inquiry revealed Victoria’s Police Minister Lisa Neville questioned the use of Australian Defence Force personnel at Victorian hotels. 

‘The use of the army in hotels? That was not agreed at CCc (crisis cabinet) yesterday but is that what we will be doing? And what will they be doing,’ she asked the state’s Emergency Management Commissioner Andrew Crisp on June 25.

In a day of drama, Mr Eccles, who was appointed secretary of the DPC in December 2014 and leads the Victorian public service in advising the premier and the entire government of Victoria, told the inquiry he had ‘no recollection’ of advising Mr Andrews to use private security at the hotels. 

Nor did he believe anyone else from within the DPC had provided any such advice.  

Quarantine breaches involving private security guards seeded 99 per cent of Victoria’s deadly second wave of COVID infections, which in turn has led to more than 700 deaths of the elderly. 

More than 30 security guards ended up catching coronavirus from quarantined returned travellers while working in the hotels. 

After more than three weeks of sitting, the inquiry has heard not a single person can identify who made the decision to hire the private security guards, including Mr Eccles, who claimed on Monday he still doesn’t know.

Mr Eccles came under fire from counsel assisting the inquiry Rachel Ellyard. 

‘You are probably aware in a more general sense of evidence that’s been given before the board from a number of other people who were also not aware of where the decision was made and when and by whom,’ she said. 

‘The decision to engage private security ended up employing thousands of people and costing tens of millions of dollars. Shouldn’t we be able to say who made it, as a matter of proper governance?’

Mr Eccles suggested the decision was likely made by a ‘collective’ of government officials. 

Former Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton takes on oath on the bible to tell the truth at Thursday's inquiry into Victoria's disastrous hotel quarantine program last week

Former Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton takes on oath on the bible to tell the truth at Thursday's inquiry into Victoria's disastrous hotel quarantine program last week

Former Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton takes on oath on the bible to tell the truth at Thursday’s inquiry into Victoria’s disastrous hotel quarantine program last week

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33419192 8754187 image m 14 1600659971664

Former Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton text messages his federal colleague advising that the order to use private security came from the premier's office

Former Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton text messages his federal colleague advising that the order to use private security came from the premier's office

Former Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton text messages his federal colleague advising that the order to use private security came from the premier’s office

At the press conference, Mr Andrews said that police, private security and the government’s health team would be working together at the hotels.

‘We’ve been working on this for quite some time,’ Mr Andrews said. 

He further revealed 500 police working on coronavirus enforcement would be freed up by the private security guard plan.

Mr Eccles claimed he had no knowledge of the plan and could not speculate on what the premier meant during the press conference.

‘It’s really interesting and important question because … it seizes at the issue of individual and collective decision-making,’ Mr Eccles said.

The inquiry heard that a meeting of the National Cabinet was held just hours before Mr Andrews announced the plan to use private security. 

The meeting, which included Prime Minister Scott Morrison and the nation’s premiers, was held to discuss the COVID-19 crisis. 

It concluded about about 1pm where a briefing was held with various department heads within Victoria. 

Victoria Police chief commissioner Graham Ashton texted Mr Eccles about 16 minutes later. 

‘Chris I am getting word from Canberra for a plan whereby arrivals from overseas are to be subjected to enforced isolation from tomorrow,’ Mr Ashton wrote.

‘The suggestion is Victorian arrivals are conveyed to a hotel Somewhere where they are guarded by police for 14 days. Are you aware of anything in this regard?? Graham.’

Mr Eccles said although it was his practice to respond to the chief directly, he could not remember doing so. 

Six minutes after contacting Mr Eccles, Mr Ashton texted Australian Federal Police Reece Kershaw telling him the DPC had advised police would not be running security at Melbourne hotels. 

Mr Ashton told the inquiry last week he can’t recall who it was who told him. 

Under cross examination by a barrister representing Victoria Police, Mr Eccles said it was possible he had delegated an underling to respond to Mr Ashton, but could not be sure. 

Both Mr Ashton and Mr Eccles’ phone records fail to show the pair spoke or texted after Mr Ashton’s initial text message. 

However, Mr Eccles confirmed he had failed to ask if he did in fact ask someone else to pass on information to Mr Ashton.  

The inquiry heard at a meeting held after Mr Andrews’ press conference that day, the decision to use private security firms over police and Australian Defence Force personnel appeared to be well a truly decided. 

In notes of the meeting, which Mr Eccles cannot remember attending, Mr Eccles is noted as stating that he assumes private security had got the job. 

At the same meeting, Mr Ashton is noted asking what role Victoria Police would have. 

‘ADF will be assisting in spot-checking processes from what the PM and the Premier confirmed … we’re trying to keep the ADF presence back of house – to prevent the ADF presence obvious to the community etc,’ he is noted as asking. 

‘Police wont [sic] guard but will be doing the checks?’.

An email from Secretary of the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet Phil Gaetjens offering ADF personnel to Victorian DPC secretary Chris Eccles in April

An email from Secretary of the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet Phil Gaetjens offering ADF personnel to Victorian DPC secretary Chris Eccles in April

An email from Secretary of the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet Phil Gaetjens offering ADF personnel to Victorian DPC secretary Chris Eccles in April

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews will front the hotel inquiry on Wednesday

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews will front the hotel inquiry on Wednesday

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews will front the hotel inquiry on Wednesday

The inquiry has heard repeatedly that ADF personnel would be available to guard Victorian quarantine hotels if required. 

On Monday, the inquiry heard that Mr Eccles was directly offered ADF support, but he cannot recall whether he acted upon the offer or forwarded it up the chain of command. 

Instead, the Victorian Government appeared more interested in obtaining cash from the Commonwealth to support it’s army of bungling rent-a-cops. 

‘In about early April 2020, I contacted (Secretary of the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet Phil Gaetjens) and asked him whether the Commonwealth could provide any financial assistance to Victoria for security in the Hotel Quarantine Program,’ Mr Eccles told the inquiry.

‘Mr Gaetjens responded by email on 8 April 2020 saying, in effect, that the Commonwealth would only provide in-kind assistance of ADF personnel.’

Last week, Mr Andrews continued to stand by his earlier claims that Victoria was not offered ADF assistance with hotel quarantine. 

He is set to be grilled at the inquiry on Wednesday.  

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Council candidate’s racist Facebook posts against Indigenous revealed ahead of election

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council candidates racist facebook posts against indigenous revealed ahead of election

An aspiring councillor has been forced to issue a grovelling apology after for sharing racist memes mocking Indigenous Australians.  

Jane Agirtan, who is a candidate for Kingson Council in Melbourne‘s south-east, said she made the Facebook posts when she was going through a ‘deeply personal time’. 

The old Facebook posts resurfaced after she launched her campaign for the local council election in October. 

Aspiring councillor for Kingston in Melbourne's south-east, Jane Agirtan, was forced to issue an apology after the offensive Facebook posts were made public

Aspiring councillor for Kingston in Melbourne's south-east, Jane Agirtan, was forced to issue an apology after the offensive Facebook posts were made public

Aspiring councillor for Kingston in Melbourne’s south-east, Jane Agirtan, was forced to issue an apology after the offensive Facebook posts were made public

Ms Agirtan shared memes targeting Indigenous Australians, same-sex parents and international students on her personal page between 2014 and 2018

Ms Agirtan shared memes targeting Indigenous Australians, same-sex parents and international students on her personal page between 2014 and 2018

Ms Agirtan shared memes targeting Indigenous Australians, same-sex parents and international students on her personal page between 2014 and 2018

Ms Agirtan shared memes targeting Indigenous Australians, same-sex parents and international students on her personal page between 2014 and 2018. 

In one meme there was a picture of an Indigenous elder with the caption: ‘Spends all his money on petrol, doesn’t own a car’.

Ms Agirtan posted another comment in Russian saying in her ‘ideal world, Aborigines would live the same way minus housing, gasoline, VB and benefits and doctors flying in helicopter reservation’.

She also said same-sex parents were depriving children of their right to know their biological parents.

The would-be councillor issued a desperate apology to the Herald Sun and confirmed that the content had been taken down.

‘I apologise unreservedly for the Facebook posts and memes in question, which I believe have been removed,’ she said. 

Ms Agirtan said the posts are not consistent with her current views and says she was going through a ‘difficult personal situation’ at the time.

The would-be councillor issued a desperate apology and confirmed that the content had been taken down

The would-be councillor issued a desperate apology and confirmed that the content had been taken down

The would-be councillor issued a desperate apology and confirmed that the content had been taken down

The posts resurfaced after she launched her campaign for the local council election in October

The posts resurfaced after she launched her campaign for the local council election in October

The posts resurfaced after she launched her campaign for the local council election in October

‘I deeply apologise to anyone who may have been offended,’ she said.

Kingston Mayor Georgina Oxley said members of the local community had been ‘deeply hurt’ after seeing the posts.

Ms Oxley said the remarks were ‘divisive and upsetting’ and ‘insight hate towards the groups’, with behaviour like that having ‘no place in the Kingston community’.

‘I want to assure those members in our community who may be deeply hurt by these remarks that these are not the views of our community,’ she said.

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McDonald’s worker turned property mogul, 28, reveals he has bought one house a month during COVID-19

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mcdonalds worker turned property mogul 28 reveals he has bought one house a month during covid 19

A property mogul who came from humble beginnings has snapped up a home almost every month since COVID-19 hit – boosting his portfolio to $8million. 

Eddie Dilleen, 28, from western Sydney, was working at McDonalds and living in a ‘rough’ neighbourhood when he bought his first property aged 18. 

With property prices plunging amid the pandemic, the real estate guru seized the opportunity to expand his collection – which now stands at 25 investments. 

‘I’ve bought seven properties in total since COVID started. Six properties in Brisbane and one in Sydney,’ he told realestate.com.au.  

Eddie Dilleen, 28, from western Sydney, has bought a home almost every month since COVID-19 hit- bringing his 25-strong investment portfolio to a whooping $8million

Eddie Dilleen, 28, from western Sydney, has bought a home almost every month since COVID-19 hit- bringing his 25-strong investment portfolio to a whooping $8million

Eddie Dilleen, 28, from western Sydney, has bought a home almost every month since COVID-19 hit- bringing his 25-strong investment portfolio to a whooping $8million

Mr Dilleen said his six new properties in Queensland were a mix of houses, duplexes and townhouses as well as one commercial listing.  

‘So, since COVID-19 started I’ve added almost $2.5m to my property portfolio bringing the total value close to $8m in property I own,’ he added.

His latest buys include a $135,000 Logan townhouse bought in March and two Ipswich duplexes for $410,000 in April. 

In May, he paid $133,000 for a two bedroom Ipswich villa, before splashing out $200,000 for a commercial property in Logan in August.  

This month he added a two bedroom unit in Surfers Paradise to his portfolio, on an unconditional contract of $210,000. 

While COVID-19 wrecks havoc on the property market, Mr Dilleen said he was not concerned it would impact his portfolio as he invests using a strategic formula, which ensures his income is always higher than expenses. 

Around $300,000 of his almost $500,000 a year rental earnings are always kept aside for emergencies, while $200,000 are spent on mortgage expenses. 

The real estate guru paid $410,000 for Ipswich duplexes in April (pictured)

The real estate guru paid $410,000 for Ipswich duplexes in April (pictured)

The real estate guru paid $410,000 for Ipswich duplexes in April (pictured)

Mr Dilleen bought an Ipswich two-bedroom villa (pictured)  for $133,000 in May

Mr Dilleen bought an Ipswich two-bedroom villa (pictured)  for $133,000 in May

Mr Dilleen bought an Ipswich two-bedroom villa (pictured)  for $133,000 in May

Mr Dilleen said the three features he looks for in an investment are  ‘good cashflow or high yields, capital growth and buying at a discount price below market value’.

The self-made millionaire became ‘passionate’ about buying property during his teens, to ensure he had a secure future. 

‘I grew up in western Sydney and came from a family where no one actually owned property at all,’ he previously told Daily Mail Australia.

‘From very humble beginnings, a pretty rough neighbourhood, that was my driving factor. I didn’t want to have to struggle and grow up how I did.’ 

Living at home in Mt Druitt, he bought a two-bedroom apartment over an hour away in the Central Coast, north of Sydney. 

He rented out the $130,000 apartment for about $220 a week and made roughly a seven per cent rental return.  

Mr Dilleen’s next investment property was in Adelaide, followed by Brisbane and then the Gold Coast. 

Pictured is the Logan townhouse  (pictured) Mr Dilleen purchased in March for $135,000

Pictured is the Logan townhouse  (pictured) Mr Dilleen purchased in March for $135,000

Pictured is the Logan townhouse  (pictured) Mr Dilleen purchased in March for $135,000

Mr Dilleen added a commercial space (pictured) in Logan to his portfolio in August for $200,000

Mr Dilleen added a commercial space (pictured) in Logan to his portfolio in August for $200,000

Mr Dilleen added a commercial space (pictured) in Logan to his portfolio in August for $200,000

The investor recommends purchasing within metro areas as properties are cheaper.  

His tips for building a portfolio are to start off small, by purchasing something to get a foot in the market and to try not to be emotional about where you buy.

He said to focus on rental return of properties and buy property below market value by looking for those who want to sell fast. 

His fifth tip is to read property investment books and do research to create a strategic buying plan. 

‘I worked out a formula and strategy, it came down to a lot of research and I read a lot of different property investment books even though I hated reading it at the time, I forced myself to learn a lot,’ he said.

‘I built up to it, I started off small, with the small properties and gradually the equity increased. 

‘It’s better to be in the market than on the sidelines waiting or to say it’s too hard and not try at all, that’s not the best attitude to have in life.’ 

MR DILLEEN’S FIVE TIPS

1. Start off small

2. Try not to get emotional about where you buy 

3. Focus on rental return 

4. Buy property below market value

5. Read property investment books  

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